Page 1

fold 1

fold 3

fold 2 This is the second year that Alliance Française has collaborated with the Faculty of Art & Design at Monash University in selecting students for this graduate show.

13 May – 2 JUNE 2010 AT EILDON GALLERY ALLIANCE FRANçAISE DE MELBOURNE 51 GREY STREET, ST KILDA t: 9525 3463 | w: www.afmelbourne.asn.au

Opening Hours: Mon-Thu: 9am > 8.30pm, Fri: 9am > 6pm, Sat: 9am > 4.30pm This exhibition has been coordinated by Matthew Perkins and Patrice Pauc.

Luke Tyrrell

Paul Yore

Last Supper study 2009 Graphite on Paper, 4.4m X 1.2m

Kate Winterton ‘Blackness is boundless’, 2009 (Wax on Perspex)

Statement

This work is the final product from an extended process of exploring Leonardo Da Vinci’s The Last Supper. It is part homage to an artist that Tyrrell admires, part role playing, but mostly just to try and get a laugh. At the time the artist felt he was trying to be too serious about his work and trying to please too many people, producing this work allowed him to take a very lighthearted approach.

Biography

Statement

Justine Rouse

Trophy, 2009 Luke Tyrrell is a Graduate of the Bachelor of Fine Arts Elephant in the room, 2009 at Monash University. He Majored in Painting and his Untitled, 2009 work is mostly concerned with exploring the figure in space, and most recently, portraiture. Luke prefers to work from life and has recently been focusing on self Statement portraiture. Recent work explores the relationships we have to our bodies, and the relationship our bodies have to the clothing we wear. The gestures required to ‘make’ leaves a trace of the body in the materials I use, with the intention of suggesting a presence through absence. The use of fabric and garment construction techniques alludes to the clothing that we wear and the restriction and protection it provides, encouraging a dialog about the social constructs surrounding fashion and clothing, and the types of bodies we will accept in certain garments.

Biography

Graduate of Monash University with a degree in Fine Art (Sculpture). Was a finalist in Craft Victoria’s Fresh! 2009 exhibition, and recipient of the Palazzi prize for Sculpture at the Monash University Graduation Exhibition.

Kate Winterton’s photographic and sculptural works draw from cultural iconography and personal memory. This distorts though her humorous desire to recreate fragments of neurotic tension. Blackness is boundless is a disruption of reality and the irrational imaginary. The use of black on black materials is intended as a visual gateway into a realm of seduction and the uncanny. A series of wax rats have been choreographed on a dark surface. They gather to mimic the floral and regal motifs which are often used in the domestic sphere. These familiar patterns of perfectionism and comfort have been shifted by their presence.

Biography

In 2009, Kate was recently awarded the Lab X Photographic Art Prize and Alliance Française Prize for Monash University Graduates. In 2008 she collaborated with the post feminist art collective Vinegar Tom and was awarded for their video installation Cocoon as part of the Re-Mark exhibition at the Alliance Française de Melbourne. Her photographic work from the series Hysterical Bodies was acknowledged in the 2008 Williamstown Contemporary Art Prize and received the 2D art award. Winterton has been invited to show with group exhibitions in Melbourne based galleries such as Testing Ground at Forty-five Downstairs, Shorthand Exposure at Blindside, New Release at Pigment Gallery and most recently Remoteness at Cube 37. Her work was also invited to exhibit in the show Across Regions in Florence Italy. She has recently been appointed a curatorial role for the exhibition Filtering Emotions featuring emerging photomedia artists.

Statement

Paul Yore’s work consists of wacky shrines, which he constructs from a vast diversity of found, pre-loved and cheaply mass-produced materials. The abundance of plastic detritus in the work attempts to articulate the collective psychosis of contemporary consumer culture, which seems hell-bent on a rapacious ingestion of the world’s precious resources. The deliberately ridiculous work deals with such apocalyptical themes in a light-hearted way. The silly constructions are informed by the robust offerings of Dada, Surrealism, psychedelic art, folk art and outsider art as well as various sacred arts and architectures. On a deeper level, the work draws on two male Greek deities, Dionysus and Apollo, who symbolize divergent aspects of the human psyche. The former, associated with drunken pleasure, wild frenzy, sexual urgency and phallic totems is contrasted with the latter, who embodies beauty and aesthetic order. The attempt to reconcile order and chaos is represented in the work as an uneasy tension: a cutesy kind of post-apocalypse Pop that is magical and alluring but also repulsive and sickly sweet. In another way, the work is a celebration of male femininity, of childlike playfulness, of unashamed homoerotic flamboyancy and blatant kitsch. The work is underpinned by the notion that everything in the universe is interconnected and unified in an unsettling but magical way.

COLLAPSING CONDITIONS

>

Biography

Melbourne artist Paul Yore is completing a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Visual Arts at Monash University. His work has been included in several group shows and reviewed in The Age. In 2008, Paul first showed his work for the artist-run initiative O-projects. In 2009, Paul exhibited his artwork in his first solo show within a public art gallery, at the Heide Museum of Modern Art.

back cover

front cover

SARAH DINGWALL SARAH GARRECHT NICKK HERTZOG MICHAEL KOT NIKKI LAM LOUISE MOLESWORTH MIRA OOSTERWEGHEL LUKE TYRRELL JUSTINE ROUSE KATE WINTERTON PAUL YORE


fold 3

fold 2

fold 1

Shared Conditions

>

Monash University seeks to improve the human condition by advancing knowledge and fostering creativity. It does so through research and education and a commitment to social justice, human rights and a sustainable environment. Named after prominent Australian Sir John Monash, Monash University was established by an Act of Parliament in 1958, making it the first university to be established in the State of Victoria for 106 years. Monash has grown into a network of campuses, centres and partnerships around the world with more than 55,000 students from over 130 countries. Monash Art & Design is one of Australia’s leading educators in art and design. The faculty offers courses, for talented students, which are professional, flexible, contemporary and relevant. The faculty produces skilled graduates who shape the future of art and design practice nationally, and on the International stage. In the Department of Fine Arts, we believe that each individual enrolling in our various courses carries within them a unique voice, constituted by their particular histories, experiences and sensibilities. Through critique, study and practice, this voice becomes richer and more voluminous, allowing each student to construct an individual narrative within the wider story of contemporary art. Most important, however, is the relationship between these individual narratives, and the community to which they are addressed. ‘Collapsed Conditions’ point to some of the important shared conditions that we as a global community face today. The students selected for this exhibition represent some of the most remarkable talents of their peer group and consequently their generation: yet this would be meaningless without an audience – the social field within which art is situated. This two-way discourse, between artist and viewer, is what makes an artwork ‘real’. In this second annual exhibition of the Alliance Française Prize for Monash University Graduates, the Faculty of Art & Design is delighted to be able to collaborate with the Alliance Française to make the product of the students’ studies ‘real’: to bring the work of these outstanding graduates to the wider world, an experience of enormous benefit to them emerging artists, but also, we hope, of real value to the community – and conditions – that we all share. Kit Wise Acting Head of Fine Arts Faculty Art & Design, Monash University

Nikki Lam

Silence II, 2009 (3-Channel Video Installation (Duration 48’19”) Dimension Variable)

Sarah Garrecht

Michael Kot

‘Miss Drake and one Gnome’, 2009. (Found objects, photocopies, variable dimensions).

Statement

Sarah Dingwall ‘Yesterday’

Statement

Sarah Dingwall aims to utilize the properties that are unique to glass – its clarity, magnification and permanence. Her approach sees glass used as a means to preserve, document and display. Dingwall’s current body of work is a dialogue on the idea that moments and memories can be counted as evidence of existence – proof can be found in what once housed life. In this, the artist combines simple words, pieces of nature, and other things that once housed life in an attempt to highlight their evidential qualities in an archival style.

Biography

Sarah Dingwall is a graduate of the Bachelor of Fine Arts with a Major in Glass at Monash University. Based on the Mornington Peninsula in Victoria, her current pursuit focuses on combining blown glass with found natural objects. She is interested in ideas about moments that house life and evidence of existence.

There is a kind of fetish with antiquity, an obsession. We love the tacky and the tactile. Can you feel the delicate scratches and scuff makes on the handle of an old spoon? Smell the metal, taste the metallic of the silver when it starts to wear thin? This is about those delicate scratches. They are what charms and fascinates this collector. Her way of magnifying this, to herself and other people, is via the photocopier. The photocopier as a documenter is not the menial and laborious machine it is thought to be. In her view the last thing it does is copy. It creates. And what it produces is singular and independent of it’s prototype. What this collector has done with her prototypes is re-formed them into something fluid and changing. Just as a Rorschach inkblot does to each individual viewer. Not only does the photocopier do this but it also transposes the tactility of the prototype and in some cases, enhances it. A genuine collection requires preciousness and care, that is the way these objects are regarded (perhaps not in the orthodox way of a typical collector). As much as they are all singularly important, they hold more substance as one entity. As one they create a world.

Statement

Nickk Hertzog

‘Stuff that grows and stuff that doesn’t’, 2009 (Plants and Found objects, Dimensions variable).

Statement

Informed in equal parts by Zen Philosophy, Relational Aesthetics and home grown gardening solutions, Stuff That Grows is in exercise into degrees of poetry and interaction. The green creepers that spill over the sides of disused sinks and converted armchairs echo the post apocalyptic but in a peaceful and poetic sense. Stuff That Grows begs the question, if we are doomed to apocalypse, why we shouldn’t we enjoy it? The work is about seeing the beauty that exists beyond the constructions of ‘natural’ and ‘artificial’ and instead, embracing the happy-nihilism of being. As the poet Rumi says: “They say there is no future for us. They are right, which is fine by us.”

Biography

Nickk Hertzog is a recent Graduate of the Bachelor of Fine Art at Monash University and has been involved in numerous student exhibitions. Nickk works in a variety Biography Sarah Garrecht is currently studying a Bachelor of Fine of media, with special focus played to the use of found Arts at Monash University. Her work is devoted to the objects and the differing poetic experiences of instalchildlike reverence of the found object. The trash and lation work. treasure culture, where value is only in the eye of the beholder.

Sh!tface(d)book is a seedy short tale exploring human behaviour and moral shortcomings in the digital age. Tempted by the perilous allure of a night of drunken revelry with his facebook friends, an early 21st century career salaryman abandons the menial chore of cooking dinner for himself and his partner, and opts instead for the gloriously sinful alternative. This film is a satirical view of a man’s personal dilemna that nevertheless does not intend to be a preachy sermon on virtues. It is simply illustrating that our human flaws are never cured by new technology, rather it just offers us a new arena with which to exhibit our own imperfections. The ‘saints and sinners’ vibe of the piece carries on from a long tradition in art and animation of comparing two sides of human behaviour and lifestyle. the devout, obedient yet spiritually mundane ‘good side’, and the delighfully indulgent, pleasurable yet destructive ‘dark side’. Which is the right way to go?

Biography

Michael Kot is an animator, short-filmmaker and recent graduate of Fine Art at Monash University. With a focus on human behaviour in the context of the post-modern digital world, his work is generally as crude and unsettled as the plots and characters he constructs, though always infused with a shady noir humour and an undying love for the cliche. He has not only won prizes, but also lost them by a whisker, and not even gotten within a mile of them. It is fair to say then that in his brief career Michael has experienced all the delirious highs and bruising lows that one might observe an AFL footballer and their “emotional rollercoaster”.

Statement:

Often politically engaged, the ‘otherness’ of being a foreigner questions one’s sense of belongingness and hence the nationalistic attitudes towards the ‘others’. The ethnographic approach of ‘the outsider’ has been generally identified as non-westerners. One could impose a cultural identity according to race, yet such subjective and almost personal conception of the ‘other’ culture could become a statement against those cultures. Exploring the multiculturalism of Melbourne, Nikki Lam transforms her experience as an outsider into a silent language and puts her participants in the ambiguous positions of the‘other’. Roland Barthes once describes that in photography, ‘absolute subjectivity is achieved only in a state, an effort, of silence.’ To achieve subjectivity, the viewer is to be invited to be the outsider of the silent conversation, and to witness the tolerance one has to take to be an outsider. Forcing the participants to abandon their verbal abilities, to an extent is a statement towards everyone who considers himself as an ‘insider’. The power struggle is thus imposed on the viewer. Depending on the viewer’s cultural experience, the struggle could be either a positive or negative one.

Biography:

Nikki Lam is a Graduate of the Bachelor of Visual Arts, Major in Photomedia at Monash University. Being an outsider herself, her works often explore multi-culturalism, westernization and the otherness of cultural identities.

Louise Molesworth Peg Therapy, 2009 (Cardboard installation, video installation).

Statement:

Peg Therapy, an ongoing project - explores cause and effect within the realms of childhood and adulthood. The videos invite the viewer to reminisce about their own childhood experiences by involving video participants in an opportunity to recount their memories through childlike performance and play. This is done by asking the participants to act out an incident from childhood using peg dolls and homemade sets, much like a child would play at home. The focus is on memories that have influenced adulthood and perhaps been distorted over time. The aim of the work is to connect viewers and participants alike through similarities in childhood, whether it be similarity between location, incident or feeling.

Biography:

Louise Molesworth has recently completed a Bachelor of Visual Arts at Monash University, majoring in Photomedia. Her work mainly concentrates on constructed environments and childhood memory, using crude homemade objects she focuses on performance within the medium of digital video and digital stills. She conducts her practice in a joint studio in Trocadero art space in Footscray and has taken part in several joint exhibitions within Monash’s varying student run spaces as well as a joint exhibition at Lab X in StKilda in March of 2010.

Mira Oosterweghel

Fifty Three Kilos, 2009 (Play dough, digital video recording).

Statement:

Fifty Three Kilos is about the limits and different facets of the body. It explores these ideas both through intimate and public expressions. By struggling with a mass of play dough equal to the artists own body weight, she raises issues of self and explores the different aspects of the body, the primal, the sexual and the abject; pleasure, pain, life and death. Tying in with these ideas is the play on absurdity alluded to by the Sisyphean actions of rolling the dead weight.

Biography:

Mira Oosterweghel is a graduate of the Bachelor of visual/arts at Monash University. Her work explores ideas of the body, the self and the abject.


fold 3

fold 2

fold 1

Shared Conditions

>

Monash University seeks to improve the human condition by advancing knowledge and fostering creativity. It does so through research and education and a commitment to social justice, human rights and a sustainable environment. Named after prominent Australian Sir John Monash, Monash University was established by an Act of Parliament in 1958, making it the first university to be established in the State of Victoria for 106 years. Monash has grown into a network of campuses, centres and partnerships around the world with more than 55,000 students from over 130 countries. Monash Art & Design is one of Australia’s leading educators in art and design. The faculty offers courses, for talented students, which are professional, flexible, contemporary and relevant. The faculty produces skilled graduates who shape the future of art and design practice nationally, and on the International stage. In the Department of Fine Arts, we believe that each individual enrolling in our various courses carries within them a unique voice, constituted by their particular histories, experiences and sensibilities. Through critique, study and practice, this voice becomes richer and more voluminous, allowing each student to construct an individual narrative within the wider story of contemporary art. Most important, however, is the relationship between these individual narratives, and the community to which they are addressed. ‘Collapsed Conditions’ point to some of the important shared conditions that we as a global community face today. The students selected for this exhibition represent some of the most remarkable talents of their peer group and consequently their generation: yet this would be meaningless without an audience – the social field within which art is situated. This two-way discourse, between artist and viewer, is what makes an artwork ‘real’. In this second annual exhibition of the Alliance Française Prize for Monash University Graduates, the Faculty of Art & Design is delighted to be able to collaborate with the Alliance Française to make the product of the students’ studies ‘real’: to bring the work of these outstanding graduates to the wider world, an experience of enormous benefit to them emerging artists, but also, we hope, of real value to the community – and conditions – that we all share. Kit Wise Acting Head of Fine Arts Faculty Art & Design, Monash University

Nikki Lam

Silence II, 2009 (3-Channel Video Installation (Duration 48’19”) Dimension Variable)

Sarah Garrecht

Michael Kot

‘Miss Drake and one Gnome’, 2009. (Found objects, photocopies, variable dimensions).

Statement

Sarah Dingwall ‘Yesterday’

Statement

Sarah Dingwall aims to utilize the properties that are unique to glass – its clarity, magnification and permanence. Her approach sees glass used as a means to preserve, document and display. Dingwall’s current body of work is a dialogue on the idea that moments and memories can be counted as evidence of existence – proof can be found in what once housed life. In this, the artist combines simple words, pieces of nature, and other things that once housed life in an attempt to highlight their evidential qualities in an archival style.

Biography

Sarah Dingwall is a graduate of the Bachelor of Fine Arts with a Major in Glass at Monash University. Based on the Mornington Peninsula in Victoria, her current pursuit focuses on combining blown glass with found natural objects. She is interested in ideas about moments that house life and evidence of existence.

There is a kind of fetish with antiquity, an obsession. We love the tacky and the tactile. Can you feel the delicate scratches and scuff makes on the handle of an old spoon? Smell the metal, taste the metallic of the silver when it starts to wear thin? This is about those delicate scratches. They are what charms and fascinates this collector. Her way of magnifying this, to herself and other people, is via the photocopier. The photocopier as a documenter is not the menial and laborious machine it is thought to be. In her view the last thing it does is copy. It creates. And what it produces is singular and independent of it’s prototype. What this collector has done with her prototypes is re-formed them into something fluid and changing. Just as a Rorschach inkblot does to each individual viewer. Not only does the photocopier do this but it also transposes the tactility of the prototype and in some cases, enhances it. A genuine collection requires preciousness and care, that is the way these objects are regarded (perhaps not in the orthodox way of a typical collector). As much as they are all singularly important, they hold more substance as one entity. As one they create a world.

Statement

Nickk Hertzog

‘Stuff that grows and stuff that doesn’t’, 2009 (Plants and Found objects, Dimensions variable).

Statement

Informed in equal parts by Zen Philosophy, Relational Aesthetics and home grown gardening solutions, Stuff That Grows is in exercise into degrees of poetry and interaction. The green creepers that spill over the sides of disused sinks and converted armchairs echo the post apocalyptic but in a peaceful and poetic sense. Stuff That Grows begs the question, if we are doomed to apocalypse, why we shouldn’t we enjoy it? The work is about seeing the beauty that exists beyond the constructions of ‘natural’ and ‘artificial’ and instead, embracing the happy-nihilism of being. As the poet Rumi says: “They say there is no future for us. They are right, which is fine by us.”

Biography

Nickk Hertzog is a recent Graduate of the Bachelor of Fine Art at Monash University and has been involved in numerous student exhibitions. Nickk works in a variety Biography Sarah Garrecht is currently studying a Bachelor of Fine of media, with special focus played to the use of found Arts at Monash University. Her work is devoted to the objects and the differing poetic experiences of instalchildlike reverence of the found object. The trash and lation work. treasure culture, where value is only in the eye of the beholder.

Sh!tface(d)book is a seedy short tale exploring human behaviour and moral shortcomings in the digital age. Tempted by the perilous allure of a night of drunken revelry with his facebook friends, an early 21st century career salaryman abandons the menial chore of cooking dinner for himself and his partner, and opts instead for the gloriously sinful alternative. This film is a satirical view of a man’s personal dilemna that nevertheless does not intend to be a preachy sermon on virtues. It is simply illustrating that our human flaws are never cured by new technology, rather it just offers us a new arena with which to exhibit our own imperfections. The ‘saints and sinners’ vibe of the piece carries on from a long tradition in art and animation of comparing two sides of human behaviour and lifestyle. the devout, obedient yet spiritually mundane ‘good side’, and the delighfully indulgent, pleasurable yet destructive ‘dark side’. Which is the right way to go?

Biography

Michael Kot is an animator, short-filmmaker and recent graduate of Fine Art at Monash University. With a focus on human behaviour in the context of the post-modern digital world, his work is generally as crude and unsettled as the plots and characters he constructs, though always infused with a shady noir humour and an undying love for the cliche. He has not only won prizes, but also lost them by a whisker, and not even gotten within a mile of them. It is fair to say then that in his brief career Michael has experienced all the delirious highs and bruising lows that one might observe an AFL footballer and their “emotional rollercoaster”.

Statement:

Often politically engaged, the ‘otherness’ of being a foreigner questions one’s sense of belongingness and hence the nationalistic attitudes towards the ‘others’. The ethnographic approach of ‘the outsider’ has been generally identified as non-westerners. One could impose a cultural identity according to race, yet such subjective and almost personal conception of the ‘other’ culture could become a statement against those cultures. Exploring the multiculturalism of Melbourne, Nikki Lam transforms her experience as an outsider into a silent language and puts her participants in the ambiguous positions of the‘other’. Roland Barthes once describes that in photography, ‘absolute subjectivity is achieved only in a state, an effort, of silence.’ To achieve subjectivity, the viewer is to be invited to be the outsider of the silent conversation, and to witness the tolerance one has to take to be an outsider. Forcing the participants to abandon their verbal abilities, to an extent is a statement towards everyone who considers himself as an ‘insider’. The power struggle is thus imposed on the viewer. Depending on the viewer’s cultural experience, the struggle could be either a positive or negative one.

Biography:

Nikki Lam is a Graduate of the Bachelor of Visual Arts, Major in Photomedia at Monash University. Being an outsider herself, her works often explore multi-culturalism, westernization and the otherness of cultural identities.

Louise Molesworth Peg Therapy, 2009 (Cardboard installation, video installation).

Statement:

Peg Therapy, an ongoing project - explores cause and effect within the realms of childhood and adulthood. The videos invite the viewer to reminisce about their own childhood experiences by involving video participants in an opportunity to recount their memories through childlike performance and play. This is done by asking the participants to act out an incident from childhood using peg dolls and homemade sets, much like a child would play at home. The focus is on memories that have influenced adulthood and perhaps been distorted over time. The aim of the work is to connect viewers and participants alike through similarities in childhood, whether it be similarity between location, incident or feeling.

Biography:

Louise Molesworth has recently completed a Bachelor of Visual Arts at Monash University, majoring in Photomedia. Her work mainly concentrates on constructed environments and childhood memory, using crude homemade objects she focuses on performance within the medium of digital video and digital stills. She conducts her practice in a joint studio in Trocadero art space in Footscray and has taken part in several joint exhibitions within Monash’s varying student run spaces as well as a joint exhibition at Lab X in StKilda in March of 2010.

Mira Oosterweghel

Fifty Three Kilos, 2009 (Play dough, digital video recording).

Statement:

Fifty Three Kilos is about the limits and different facets of the body. It explores these ideas both through intimate and public expressions. By struggling with a mass of play dough equal to the artists own body weight, she raises issues of self and explores the different aspects of the body, the primal, the sexual and the abject; pleasure, pain, life and death. Tying in with these ideas is the play on absurdity alluded to by the Sisyphean actions of rolling the dead weight.

Biography:

Mira Oosterweghel is a graduate of the Bachelor of visual/arts at Monash University. Her work explores ideas of the body, the self and the abject.


fold 3

fold 2

fold 1

Shared Conditions

>

Monash University seeks to improve the human condition by advancing knowledge and fostering creativity. It does so through research and education and a commitment to social justice, human rights and a sustainable environment. Named after prominent Australian Sir John Monash, Monash University was established by an Act of Parliament in 1958, making it the first university to be established in the State of Victoria for 106 years. Monash has grown into a network of campuses, centres and partnerships around the world with more than 55,000 students from over 130 countries. Monash Art & Design is one of Australia’s leading educators in art and design. The faculty offers courses, for talented students, which are professional, flexible, contemporary and relevant. The faculty produces skilled graduates who shape the future of art and design practice nationally, and on the International stage. In the Department of Fine Arts, we believe that each individual enrolling in our various courses carries within them a unique voice, constituted by their particular histories, experiences and sensibilities. Through critique, study and practice, this voice becomes richer and more voluminous, allowing each student to construct an individual narrative within the wider story of contemporary art. Most important, however, is the relationship between these individual narratives, and the community to which they are addressed. ‘Collapsed Conditions’ point to some of the important shared conditions that we as a global community face today. The students selected for this exhibition represent some of the most remarkable talents of their peer group and consequently their generation: yet this would be meaningless without an audience – the social field within which art is situated. This two-way discourse, between artist and viewer, is what makes an artwork ‘real’. In this second annual exhibition of the Alliance Française Prize for Monash University Graduates, the Faculty of Art & Design is delighted to be able to collaborate with the Alliance Française to make the product of the students’ studies ‘real’: to bring the work of these outstanding graduates to the wider world, an experience of enormous benefit to them emerging artists, but also, we hope, of real value to the community – and conditions – that we all share. Kit Wise Acting Head of Fine Arts Faculty Art & Design, Monash University

Nikki Lam

Silence II, 2009 (3-Channel Video Installation (Duration 48’19”) Dimension Variable)

Sarah Garrecht

Michael Kot

‘Miss Drake and one Gnome’, 2009. (Found objects, photocopies, variable dimensions).

Statement

Sarah Dingwall ‘Yesterday’

Statement

Sarah Dingwall aims to utilize the properties that are unique to glass – its clarity, magnification and permanence. Her approach sees glass used as a means to preserve, document and display. Dingwall’s current body of work is a dialogue on the idea that moments and memories can be counted as evidence of existence – proof can be found in what once housed life. In this, the artist combines simple words, pieces of nature, and other things that once housed life in an attempt to highlight their evidential qualities in an archival style.

Biography

Sarah Dingwall is a graduate of the Bachelor of Fine Arts with a Major in Glass at Monash University. Based on the Mornington Peninsula in Victoria, her current pursuit focuses on combining blown glass with found natural objects. She is interested in ideas about moments that house life and evidence of existence.

There is a kind of fetish with antiquity, an obsession. We love the tacky and the tactile. Can you feel the delicate scratches and scuff makes on the handle of an old spoon? Smell the metal, taste the metallic of the silver when it starts to wear thin? This is about those delicate scratches. They are what charms and fascinates this collector. Her way of magnifying this, to herself and other people, is via the photocopier. The photocopier as a documenter is not the menial and laborious machine it is thought to be. In her view the last thing it does is copy. It creates. And what it produces is singular and independent of it’s prototype. What this collector has done with her prototypes is re-formed them into something fluid and changing. Just as a Rorschach inkblot does to each individual viewer. Not only does the photocopier do this but it also transposes the tactility of the prototype and in some cases, enhances it. A genuine collection requires preciousness and care, that is the way these objects are regarded (perhaps not in the orthodox way of a typical collector). As much as they are all singularly important, they hold more substance as one entity. As one they create a world.

Statement

Nickk Hertzog

‘Stuff that grows and stuff that doesn’t’, 2009 (Plants and Found objects, Dimensions variable).

Statement

Informed in equal parts by Zen Philosophy, Relational Aesthetics and home grown gardening solutions, Stuff That Grows is in exercise into degrees of poetry and interaction. The green creepers that spill over the sides of disused sinks and converted armchairs echo the post apocalyptic but in a peaceful and poetic sense. Stuff That Grows begs the question, if we are doomed to apocalypse, why we shouldn’t we enjoy it? The work is about seeing the beauty that exists beyond the constructions of ‘natural’ and ‘artificial’ and instead, embracing the happy-nihilism of being. As the poet Rumi says: “They say there is no future for us. They are right, which is fine by us.”

Biography

Nickk Hertzog is a recent Graduate of the Bachelor of Fine Art at Monash University and has been involved in numerous student exhibitions. Nickk works in a variety Biography Sarah Garrecht is currently studying a Bachelor of Fine of media, with special focus played to the use of found Arts at Monash University. Her work is devoted to the objects and the differing poetic experiences of instalchildlike reverence of the found object. The trash and lation work. treasure culture, where value is only in the eye of the beholder.

Sh!tface(d)book is a seedy short tale exploring human behaviour and moral shortcomings in the digital age. Tempted by the perilous allure of a night of drunken revelry with his facebook friends, an early 21st century career salaryman abandons the menial chore of cooking dinner for himself and his partner, and opts instead for the gloriously sinful alternative. This film is a satirical view of a man’s personal dilemna that nevertheless does not intend to be a preachy sermon on virtues. It is simply illustrating that our human flaws are never cured by new technology, rather it just offers us a new arena with which to exhibit our own imperfections. The ‘saints and sinners’ vibe of the piece carries on from a long tradition in art and animation of comparing two sides of human behaviour and lifestyle. the devout, obedient yet spiritually mundane ‘good side’, and the delighfully indulgent, pleasurable yet destructive ‘dark side’. Which is the right way to go?

Biography

Michael Kot is an animator, short-filmmaker and recent graduate of Fine Art at Monash University. With a focus on human behaviour in the context of the post-modern digital world, his work is generally as crude and unsettled as the plots and characters he constructs, though always infused with a shady noir humour and an undying love for the cliche. He has not only won prizes, but also lost them by a whisker, and not even gotten within a mile of them. It is fair to say then that in his brief career Michael has experienced all the delirious highs and bruising lows that one might observe an AFL footballer and their “emotional rollercoaster”.

Statement:

Often politically engaged, the ‘otherness’ of being a foreigner questions one’s sense of belongingness and hence the nationalistic attitudes towards the ‘others’. The ethnographic approach of ‘the outsider’ has been generally identified as non-westerners. One could impose a cultural identity according to race, yet such subjective and almost personal conception of the ‘other’ culture could become a statement against those cultures. Exploring the multiculturalism of Melbourne, Nikki Lam transforms her experience as an outsider into a silent language and puts her participants in the ambiguous positions of the‘other’. Roland Barthes once describes that in photography, ‘absolute subjectivity is achieved only in a state, an effort, of silence.’ To achieve subjectivity, the viewer is to be invited to be the outsider of the silent conversation, and to witness the tolerance one has to take to be an outsider. Forcing the participants to abandon their verbal abilities, to an extent is a statement towards everyone who considers himself as an ‘insider’. The power struggle is thus imposed on the viewer. Depending on the viewer’s cultural experience, the struggle could be either a positive or negative one.

Biography:

Nikki Lam is a Graduate of the Bachelor of Visual Arts, Major in Photomedia at Monash University. Being an outsider herself, her works often explore multi-culturalism, westernization and the otherness of cultural identities.

Louise Molesworth Peg Therapy, 2009 (Cardboard installation, video installation).

Statement:

Peg Therapy, an ongoing project - explores cause and effect within the realms of childhood and adulthood. The videos invite the viewer to reminisce about their own childhood experiences by involving video participants in an opportunity to recount their memories through childlike performance and play. This is done by asking the participants to act out an incident from childhood using peg dolls and homemade sets, much like a child would play at home. The focus is on memories that have influenced adulthood and perhaps been distorted over time. The aim of the work is to connect viewers and participants alike through similarities in childhood, whether it be similarity between location, incident or feeling.

Biography:

Louise Molesworth has recently completed a Bachelor of Visual Arts at Monash University, majoring in Photomedia. Her work mainly concentrates on constructed environments and childhood memory, using crude homemade objects she focuses on performance within the medium of digital video and digital stills. She conducts her practice in a joint studio in Trocadero art space in Footscray and has taken part in several joint exhibitions within Monash’s varying student run spaces as well as a joint exhibition at Lab X in StKilda in March of 2010.

Mira Oosterweghel

Fifty Three Kilos, 2009 (Play dough, digital video recording).

Statement:

Fifty Three Kilos is about the limits and different facets of the body. It explores these ideas both through intimate and public expressions. By struggling with a mass of play dough equal to the artists own body weight, she raises issues of self and explores the different aspects of the body, the primal, the sexual and the abject; pleasure, pain, life and death. Tying in with these ideas is the play on absurdity alluded to by the Sisyphean actions of rolling the dead weight.

Biography:

Mira Oosterweghel is a graduate of the Bachelor of visual/arts at Monash University. Her work explores ideas of the body, the self and the abject.


fold 3

fold 2

fold 1

Shared Conditions

>

Monash University seeks to improve the human condition by advancing knowledge and fostering creativity. It does so through research and education and a commitment to social justice, human rights and a sustainable environment. Named after prominent Australian Sir John Monash, Monash University was established by an Act of Parliament in 1958, making it the first university to be established in the State of Victoria for 106 years. Monash has grown into a network of campuses, centres and partnerships around the world with more than 55,000 students from over 130 countries. Monash Art & Design is one of Australia’s leading educators in art and design. The faculty offers courses, for talented students, which are professional, flexible, contemporary and relevant. The faculty produces skilled graduates who shape the future of art and design practice nationally, and on the International stage. In the Department of Fine Arts, we believe that each individual enrolling in our various courses carries within them a unique voice, constituted by their particular histories, experiences and sensibilities. Through critique, study and practice, this voice becomes richer and more voluminous, allowing each student to construct an individual narrative within the wider story of contemporary art. Most important, however, is the relationship between these individual narratives, and the community to which they are addressed. ‘Collapsed Conditions’ point to some of the important shared conditions that we as a global community face today. The students selected for this exhibition represent some of the most remarkable talents of their peer group and consequently their generation: yet this would be meaningless without an audience – the social field within which art is situated. This two-way discourse, between artist and viewer, is what makes an artwork ‘real’. In this second annual exhibition of the Alliance Française Prize for Monash University Graduates, the Faculty of Art & Design is delighted to be able to collaborate with the Alliance Française to make the product of the students’ studies ‘real’: to bring the work of these outstanding graduates to the wider world, an experience of enormous benefit to them emerging artists, but also, we hope, of real value to the community – and conditions – that we all share. Kit Wise Acting Head of Fine Arts Faculty Art & Design, Monash University

Nikki Lam

Silence II, 2009 (3-Channel Video Installation (Duration 48’19”) Dimension Variable)

Sarah Garrecht

Michael Kot

‘Miss Drake and one Gnome’, 2009. (Found objects, photocopies, variable dimensions).

Statement

Sarah Dingwall ‘Yesterday’

Statement

Sarah Dingwall aims to utilize the properties that are unique to glass – its clarity, magnification and permanence. Her approach sees glass used as a means to preserve, document and display. Dingwall’s current body of work is a dialogue on the idea that moments and memories can be counted as evidence of existence – proof can be found in what once housed life. In this, the artist combines simple words, pieces of nature, and other things that once housed life in an attempt to highlight their evidential qualities in an archival style.

Biography

Sarah Dingwall is a graduate of the Bachelor of Fine Arts with a Major in Glass at Monash University. Based on the Mornington Peninsula in Victoria, her current pursuit focuses on combining blown glass with found natural objects. She is interested in ideas about moments that house life and evidence of existence.

There is a kind of fetish with antiquity, an obsession. We love the tacky and the tactile. Can you feel the delicate scratches and scuff makes on the handle of an old spoon? Smell the metal, taste the metallic of the silver when it starts to wear thin? This is about those delicate scratches. They are what charms and fascinates this collector. Her way of magnifying this, to herself and other people, is via the photocopier. The photocopier as a documenter is not the menial and laborious machine it is thought to be. In her view the last thing it does is copy. It creates. And what it produces is singular and independent of it’s prototype. What this collector has done with her prototypes is re-formed them into something fluid and changing. Just as a Rorschach inkblot does to each individual viewer. Not only does the photocopier do this but it also transposes the tactility of the prototype and in some cases, enhances it. A genuine collection requires preciousness and care, that is the way these objects are regarded (perhaps not in the orthodox way of a typical collector). As much as they are all singularly important, they hold more substance as one entity. As one they create a world.

Statement

Nickk Hertzog

‘Stuff that grows and stuff that doesn’t’, 2009 (Plants and Found objects, Dimensions variable).

Statement

Informed in equal parts by Zen Philosophy, Relational Aesthetics and home grown gardening solutions, Stuff That Grows is in exercise into degrees of poetry and interaction. The green creepers that spill over the sides of disused sinks and converted armchairs echo the post apocalyptic but in a peaceful and poetic sense. Stuff That Grows begs the question, if we are doomed to apocalypse, why we shouldn’t we enjoy it? The work is about seeing the beauty that exists beyond the constructions of ‘natural’ and ‘artificial’ and instead, embracing the happy-nihilism of being. As the poet Rumi says: “They say there is no future for us. They are right, which is fine by us.”

Biography

Nickk Hertzog is a recent Graduate of the Bachelor of Fine Art at Monash University and has been involved in numerous student exhibitions. Nickk works in a variety Biography Sarah Garrecht is currently studying a Bachelor of Fine of media, with special focus played to the use of found Arts at Monash University. Her work is devoted to the objects and the differing poetic experiences of instalchildlike reverence of the found object. The trash and lation work. treasure culture, where value is only in the eye of the beholder.

Sh!tface(d)book is a seedy short tale exploring human behaviour and moral shortcomings in the digital age. Tempted by the perilous allure of a night of drunken revelry with his facebook friends, an early 21st century career salaryman abandons the menial chore of cooking dinner for himself and his partner, and opts instead for the gloriously sinful alternative. This film is a satirical view of a man’s personal dilemna that nevertheless does not intend to be a preachy sermon on virtues. It is simply illustrating that our human flaws are never cured by new technology, rather it just offers us a new arena with which to exhibit our own imperfections. The ‘saints and sinners’ vibe of the piece carries on from a long tradition in art and animation of comparing two sides of human behaviour and lifestyle. the devout, obedient yet spiritually mundane ‘good side’, and the delighfully indulgent, pleasurable yet destructive ‘dark side’. Which is the right way to go?

Biography

Michael Kot is an animator, short-filmmaker and recent graduate of Fine Art at Monash University. With a focus on human behaviour in the context of the post-modern digital world, his work is generally as crude and unsettled as the plots and characters he constructs, though always infused with a shady noir humour and an undying love for the cliche. He has not only won prizes, but also lost them by a whisker, and not even gotten within a mile of them. It is fair to say then that in his brief career Michael has experienced all the delirious highs and bruising lows that one might observe an AFL footballer and their “emotional rollercoaster”.

Statement:

Often politically engaged, the ‘otherness’ of being a foreigner questions one’s sense of belongingness and hence the nationalistic attitudes towards the ‘others’. The ethnographic approach of ‘the outsider’ has been generally identified as non-westerners. One could impose a cultural identity according to race, yet such subjective and almost personal conception of the ‘other’ culture could become a statement against those cultures. Exploring the multiculturalism of Melbourne, Nikki Lam transforms her experience as an outsider into a silent language and puts her participants in the ambiguous positions of the‘other’. Roland Barthes once describes that in photography, ‘absolute subjectivity is achieved only in a state, an effort, of silence.’ To achieve subjectivity, the viewer is to be invited to be the outsider of the silent conversation, and to witness the tolerance one has to take to be an outsider. Forcing the participants to abandon their verbal abilities, to an extent is a statement towards everyone who considers himself as an ‘insider’. The power struggle is thus imposed on the viewer. Depending on the viewer’s cultural experience, the struggle could be either a positive or negative one.

Biography:

Nikki Lam is a Graduate of the Bachelor of Visual Arts, Major in Photomedia at Monash University. Being an outsider herself, her works often explore multi-culturalism, westernization and the otherness of cultural identities.

Louise Molesworth Peg Therapy, 2009 (Cardboard installation, video installation).

Statement:

Peg Therapy, an ongoing project - explores cause and effect within the realms of childhood and adulthood. The videos invite the viewer to reminisce about their own childhood experiences by involving video participants in an opportunity to recount their memories through childlike performance and play. This is done by asking the participants to act out an incident from childhood using peg dolls and homemade sets, much like a child would play at home. The focus is on memories that have influenced adulthood and perhaps been distorted over time. The aim of the work is to connect viewers and participants alike through similarities in childhood, whether it be similarity between location, incident or feeling.

Biography:

Louise Molesworth has recently completed a Bachelor of Visual Arts at Monash University, majoring in Photomedia. Her work mainly concentrates on constructed environments and childhood memory, using crude homemade objects she focuses on performance within the medium of digital video and digital stills. She conducts her practice in a joint studio in Trocadero art space in Footscray and has taken part in several joint exhibitions within Monash’s varying student run spaces as well as a joint exhibition at Lab X in StKilda in March of 2010.

Mira Oosterweghel

Fifty Three Kilos, 2009 (Play dough, digital video recording).

Statement:

Fifty Three Kilos is about the limits and different facets of the body. It explores these ideas both through intimate and public expressions. By struggling with a mass of play dough equal to the artists own body weight, she raises issues of self and explores the different aspects of the body, the primal, the sexual and the abject; pleasure, pain, life and death. Tying in with these ideas is the play on absurdity alluded to by the Sisyphean actions of rolling the dead weight.

Biography:

Mira Oosterweghel is a graduate of the Bachelor of visual/arts at Monash University. Her work explores ideas of the body, the self and the abject.


fold 1

fold 3

fold 2 This is the second year that Alliance Française has collaborated with the Faculty of Art & Design at Monash University in selecting students for this graduate show.

13 May – 2 JUNE 2010 AT EILDON GALLERY ALLIANCE FRANçAISE DE MELBOURNE 51 GREY STREET, ST KILDA t: 9525 3463 | w: www.afmelbourne.asn.au

Opening Hours: Mon-Thu: 9am > 8.30pm, Fri: 9am > 6pm, Sat: 9am > 4.30pm This exhibition has been coordinated by Matthew Perkins and Patrice Pauc.

Luke Tyrrell

Justine Rouse

Statement

Statement

‘Last Supper’ study 2009 (Graphite on Paper, 4.4m X 1.2m)

‘Trophy’, 2009 (Tulle, silk lining)

Recent work explores the relationships we have to our bodies, and the relationship our bodies have to the clothing we wear. The gestures required to ‘make’ leaves a trace of the body in the materials I use, with the intention of suggesting a presence through absence. The use of fabric and garment construction techniques alludes to the clothing that we wear and the restriction and protection it provides, encouraging a dialog about the social constructs surrounding fashion and clothing, and the types of bodies we will accept in Biography Luke Tyrrell is a Graduate of the Bachelor of Fine Arts certain garments. at Monash University. He Majored in Painting and his work is mostly concerned with exploring the figure in Biography space, and most recently, portraiture. Luke prefers to Graduate of Monash University with a degree in Fine work from life and has recently been focusing on self Art (Sculpture). Was a finalist in Craft Victoria’s Fresh! portraiture. 2009 exhibition, and recipient of the Palazzi prize for Sculpture at the Monash University Graduation Exhibition. This work is the final product from an extended process of exploring Leonardo Da Vinci’s The Last Supper. It is part homage to an artist that Tyrrell admires, part role playing, but mostly just to try and get a laugh. At the time the artist felt he was trying to be too serious about his work and trying to please too many people, producing this work allowed him to take a very lighthearted approach.

Paul Yore Kate Winterton ‘Blackness is boundless’, 2009 (Wax on Perspex)

Statement

Kate Winterton’s photographic and sculptural works draw from cultural iconography and personal memory. This distorts though her humorous desire to recreate fragments of neurotic tension. Blackness is boundless is a disruption of reality and the irrational imaginary. The use of black on black materials is intended as a visual gateway into a realm of seduction and the uncanny. A series of wax rats have been choreographed on a dark surface. They gather to mimic the floral and regal motifs which are often used in the domestic sphere. These familiar patterns of perfectionism and comfort have been shifted by their presence.

Biography

In 2009, Kate was recently awarded the Lab X Photographic Art Prize and Alliance Française Prize for Monash University Graduates. In 2008 she collaborated with the post feminist art collective Vinegar Tom and was awarded for their video installation Cocoon as part of the Re-Mark exhibition at the Alliance Française de Melbourne. Her photographic work from the series Hysterical Bodies was acknowledged in the 2008 Williamstown Contemporary Art Prize and received the 2D art award. Winterton has been invited to show with group exhibitions in Melbourne based galleries such as Testing Ground at Forty-five Downstairs, Shorthand Exposure at Blindside, New Release at Pigment Gallery and most recently Remoteness at Cube 37. Her work was also invited to exhibit in the show Across Regions in Florence Italy. She has recently been appointed a curatorial role for the exhibition Filtering Emotions featuring emerging photomedia artists.

Statement

Paul Yore’s work consists of wacky shrines, which he constructs from a vast diversity of found, pre-loved and cheaply mass-produced materials. The abundance of plastic detritus in the work attempts to articulate the collective psychosis of contemporary consumer culture, which seems hell-bent on a rapacious ingestion of the world’s precious resources. The deliberately ridiculous work deals with such apocalyptical themes in a light-hearted way. The silly constructions are informed by the robust offerings of Dada, Surrealism, psychedelic art, folk art and outsider art as well as various sacred arts and architectures. On a deeper level, the work draws on two male Greek deities, Dionysus and Apollo, who symbolize divergent aspects of the human psyche. The former, associated with drunken pleasure, wild frenzy, sexual urgency and phallic totems is contrasted with the latter, who embodies beauty and aesthetic order. The attempt to reconcile order and chaos is represented in the work as an uneasy tension: a cutesy kind of post-apocalypse Pop that is magical and alluring but also repulsive and sickly sweet. In another way, the work is a celebration of male femininity, of childlike playfulness, of unashamed homoerotic flamboyancy and blatant kitsch. The work is underpinned by the notion that everything in the universe is interconnected and unified in an unsettling but magical way.

COLLAPSING CONDITIONS

>

Biography

Melbourne artist Paul Yore is completing a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Visual Arts at Monash University. His work has been included in several group shows and reviewed in The Age. In 2008, Paul first showed his work for the artist-run initiative O-projects. In 2009, Paul exhibited his artwork in his first solo show within a public art gallery, at the Heide Museum of Modern Art.

back cover

front cover

SARAH DINGWALL SARAH GARRECHT NICKK HERTZOG MICHAEL KOT NIKKI LAM LOUISE MOLESWORTH MIRA OOSTERWEGHEL LUKE TYRRELL JUSTINE ROUSE KATE WINTERTON PAUL YORE


fold 1

fold 3

fold 2 This is the second year that Alliance Française has collaborated with the Faculty of Art & Design at Monash University in selecting students for this graduate show.

13 May – 2 JUNE 2010 AT EILDON GALLERY ALLIANCE FRANçAISE DE MELBOURNE 51 GREY STREET, ST KILDA t: 9525 3463 | w: www.afmelbourne.asn.au

Opening Hours: Mon-Thu: 9am > 8.30pm, Fri: 9am > 6pm, Sat: 9am > 4.30pm This exhibition has been coordinated by Matthew Perkins and Patrice Pauc.

Luke Tyrrell

Paul Yore

Last Supper study 2009 Graphite on Paper, 4.4m X 1.2m

Kate Winterton ‘Blackness is boundless’, 2009 (Wax on Perspex)

Statement

This work is the final product from an extended process of exploring Leonardo Da Vinci’s The Last Supper. It is part homage to an artist that Tyrrell admires, part role playing, but mostly just to try and get a laugh. At the time the artist felt he was trying to be too serious about his work and trying to please too many people, producing this work allowed him to take a very lighthearted approach.

Biography

Statement

Justine Rouse

Trophy, 2009 Luke Tyrrell is a Graduate of the Bachelor of Fine Arts Elephant in the room, 2009 at Monash University. He Majored in Painting and his Untitled, 2009 work is mostly concerned with exploring the figure in space, and most recently, portraiture. Luke prefers to work from life and has recently been focusing on self Statement portraiture. Recent work explores the relationships we have to our bodies, and the relationship our bodies have to the clothing we wear. The gestures required to ‘make’ leaves a trace of the body in the materials I use, with the intention of suggesting a presence through absence. The use of fabric and garment construction techniques alludes to the clothing that we wear and the restriction and protection it provides, encouraging a dialog about the social constructs surrounding fashion and clothing, and the types of bodies we will accept in certain garments.

Biography

Graduate of Monash University with a degree in Fine Art (Sculpture). Was a finalist in Craft Victoria’s Fresh! 2009 exhibition, and recipient of the Palazzi prize for Sculpture at the Monash University Graduation Exhibition.

Kate Winterton’s photographic and sculptural works draw from cultural iconography and personal memory. This distorts though her humorous desire to recreate fragments of neurotic tension. Blackness is boundless is a disruption of reality and the irrational imaginary. The use of black on black materials is intended as a visual gateway into a realm of seduction and the uncanny. A series of wax rats have been choreographed on a dark surface. They gather to mimic the floral and regal motifs which are often used in the domestic sphere. These familiar patterns of perfectionism and comfort have been shifted by their presence.

Biography

In 2009, Kate was recently awarded the Lab X Photographic Art Prize and Alliance Française Prize for Monash University Graduates. In 2008 she collaborated with the post feminist art collective Vinegar Tom and was awarded for their video installation Cocoon as part of the Re-Mark exhibition at the Alliance Française de Melbourne. Her photographic work from the series Hysterical Bodies was acknowledged in the 2008 Williamstown Contemporary Art Prize and received the 2D art award. Winterton has been invited to show with group exhibitions in Melbourne based galleries such as Testing Ground at Forty-five Downstairs, Shorthand Exposure at Blindside, New Release at Pigment Gallery and most recently Remoteness at Cube 37. Her work was also invited to exhibit in the show Across Regions in Florence Italy. She has recently been appointed a curatorial role for the exhibition Filtering Emotions featuring emerging photomedia artists.

Statement

Paul Yore’s work consists of wacky shrines, which he constructs from a vast diversity of found, pre-loved and cheaply mass-produced materials. The abundance of plastic detritus in the work attempts to articulate the collective psychosis of contemporary consumer culture, which seems hell-bent on a rapacious ingestion of the world’s precious resources. The deliberately ridiculous work deals with such apocalyptical themes in a light-hearted way. The silly constructions are informed by the robust offerings of Dada, Surrealism, psychedelic art, folk art and outsider art as well as various sacred arts and architectures. On a deeper level, the work draws on two male Greek deities, Dionysus and Apollo, who symbolize divergent aspects of the human psyche. The former, associated with drunken pleasure, wild frenzy, sexual urgency and phallic totems is contrasted with the latter, who embodies beauty and aesthetic order. The attempt to reconcile order and chaos is represented in the work as an uneasy tension: a cutesy kind of post-apocalypse Pop that is magical and alluring but also repulsive and sickly sweet. In another way, the work is a celebration of male femininity, of childlike playfulness, of unashamed homoerotic flamboyancy and blatant kitsch. The work is underpinned by the notion that everything in the universe is interconnected and unified in an unsettling but magical way.

COLLAPSING CONDITIONS

>

Biography

Melbourne artist Paul Yore is completing a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Visual Arts at Monash University. His work has been included in several group shows and reviewed in The Age. In 2008, Paul first showed his work for the artist-run initiative O-projects. In 2009, Paul exhibited his artwork in his first solo show within a public art gallery, at the Heide Museum of Modern Art.

back cover

front cover

SARAH DINGWALL SARAH GARRECHT NICKK HERTZOG MICHAEL KOT NIKKI LAM LOUISE MOLESWORTH MIRA OOSTERWEGHEL LUKE TYRRELL JUSTINE ROUSE KATE WINTERTON PAUL YORE


fold 1

fold 3

fold 2 This is the second year that Alliance Française has collaborated with the Faculty of Art & Design at Monash University in selecting students for this graduate show.

13 May – 2 JUNE 2010 AT EILDON GALLERY ALLIANCE FRANçAISE DE MELBOURNE 51 GREY STREET, ST KILDA t: 9525 3463 | w: www.afmelbourne.asn.au

Opening Hours: Mon-Thu: 9am > 8.30pm, Fri: 9am > 6pm, Sat: 9am > 4.30pm This exhibition has been coordinated by Matthew Perkins and Patrice Pauc.

Luke Tyrrell

Paul Yore

Last Supper study 2009 Graphite on Paper, 4.4m X 1.2m

Kate Winterton ‘Blackness is boundless’, 2009 (Wax on Perspex)

Statement

This work is the final product from an extended process of exploring Leonardo Da Vinci’s The Last Supper. It is part homage to an artist that Tyrrell admires, part role playing, but mostly just to try and get a laugh. At the time the artist felt he was trying to be too serious about his work and trying to please too many people, producing this work allowed him to take a very lighthearted approach.

Biography

Statement

Justine Rouse

Trophy, 2009 Luke Tyrrell is a Graduate of the Bachelor of Fine Arts Elephant in the room, 2009 at Monash University. He Majored in Painting and his Untitled, 2009 work is mostly concerned with exploring the figure in space, and most recently, portraiture. Luke prefers to work from life and has recently been focusing on self Statement portraiture. Recent work explores the relationships we have to our bodies, and the relationship our bodies have to the clothing we wear. The gestures required to ‘make’ leaves a trace of the body in the materials I use, with the intention of suggesting a presence through absence. The use of fabric and garment construction techniques alludes to the clothing that we wear and the restriction and protection it provides, encouraging a dialog about the social constructs surrounding fashion and clothing, and the types of bodies we will accept in certain garments.

Biography

Graduate of Monash University with a degree in Fine Art (Sculpture). Was a finalist in Craft Victoria’s Fresh! 2009 exhibition, and recipient of the Palazzi prize for Sculpture at the Monash University Graduation Exhibition.

Kate Winterton’s photographic and sculptural works draw from cultural iconography and personal memory. This distorts though her humorous desire to recreate fragments of neurotic tension. Blackness is boundless is a disruption of reality and the irrational imaginary. The use of black on black materials is intended as a visual gateway into a realm of seduction and the uncanny. A series of wax rats have been choreographed on a dark surface. They gather to mimic the floral and regal motifs which are often used in the domestic sphere. These familiar patterns of perfectionism and comfort have been shifted by their presence.

Biography

In 2009, Kate was recently awarded the Lab X Photographic Art Prize and Alliance Française Prize for Monash University Graduates. In 2008 she collaborated with the post feminist art collective Vinegar Tom and was awarded for their video installation Cocoon as part of the Re-Mark exhibition at the Alliance Française de Melbourne. Her photographic work from the series Hysterical Bodies was acknowledged in the 2008 Williamstown Contemporary Art Prize and received the 2D art award. Winterton has been invited to show with group exhibitions in Melbourne based galleries such as Testing Ground at Forty-five Downstairs, Shorthand Exposure at Blindside, New Release at Pigment Gallery and most recently Remoteness at Cube 37. Her work was also invited to exhibit in the show Across Regions in Florence Italy. She has recently been appointed a curatorial role for the exhibition Filtering Emotions featuring emerging photomedia artists.

Statement

Paul Yore’s work consists of wacky shrines, which he constructs from a vast diversity of found, pre-loved and cheaply mass-produced materials. The abundance of plastic detritus in the work attempts to articulate the collective psychosis of contemporary consumer culture, which seems hell-bent on a rapacious ingestion of the world’s precious resources. The deliberately ridiculous work deals with such apocalyptical themes in a light-hearted way. The silly constructions are informed by the robust offerings of Dada, Surrealism, psychedelic art, folk art and outsider art as well as various sacred arts and architectures. On a deeper level, the work draws on two male Greek deities, Dionysus and Apollo, who symbolize divergent aspects of the human psyche. The former, associated with drunken pleasure, wild frenzy, sexual urgency and phallic totems is contrasted with the latter, who embodies beauty and aesthetic order. The attempt to reconcile order and chaos is represented in the work as an uneasy tension: a cutesy kind of post-apocalypse Pop that is magical and alluring but also repulsive and sickly sweet. In another way, the work is a celebration of male femininity, of childlike playfulness, of unashamed homoerotic flamboyancy and blatant kitsch. The work is underpinned by the notion that everything in the universe is interconnected and unified in an unsettling but magical way.

COLLAPSING CONDITIONS

>

Biography

Melbourne artist Paul Yore is completing a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Visual Arts at Monash University. His work has been included in several group shows and reviewed in The Age. In 2008, Paul first showed his work for the artist-run initiative O-projects. In 2009, Paul exhibited his artwork in his first solo show within a public art gallery, at the Heide Museum of Modern Art.

back cover

front cover

SARAH DINGWALL SARAH GARRECHT NICKK HERTZOG MICHAEL KOT NIKKI LAM LOUISE MOLESWORTH MIRA OOSTERWEGHEL LUKE TYRRELL JUSTINE ROUSE KATE WINTERTON PAUL YORE

Collapsing Conditions Catalogue  

Catalogue of the exhibtion Collapsing Conditions by the graduates students of Monash University, Melbourne