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AFAC STRATEGY

2019 – 2023


AFAC Limited (ABN 52 060 049 327) Level 1, 340 Albert Street, East Melbourne VIC 3002 P +61 3 9419 2388 E afac@afac.com.au www.afac.com.au


CONTENTS Foreword................................................................................................. 4 How AFAC contributes to the sector’s Strategic Directions.....................6 Our approach.......................................................................................... 7 Future service delivery............................................................................ 7 Significant organisational relationships...................................................10 Our partners and key stakeholders.........................................................12 AFAC’s international connections............................................................14 National fire and emergency capability...................................................16 Glossary of acronyms.............................................................................. 17


FOREWORD

AFAC was created by and exists to support our members. ‘We are here for you’. We are the facilitator and custodian of contemporary fire and emergency service knowledge and practice, for the benefit of our members and through them, the community. We will be recognised and have impact as the National Council for fire and emergency services, through collaboration and influence. The Strategic Directions for Fire and Emergency Services in Australia and New Zealand 2017–2021 which was endorsed by the Australia-New Zealand Emergency Management Committee (ANZEMC) and the then Law, Crime and Community Safety Council (LCCSC) in 2016 provides the overarching priorities and principles for fire and emergency services in Australia and New Zealand. This AFAC Strategy identifies how we are going to achieve these ‘Strategic Directions’. It outlines the approaches, service delivery, partners, stakeholders and national capabilities. The work undertaken by the AFAC National Council and its secretariat, goes to the heart of the overarching principles articulated in the Strategic Directions: ‘primacy of life, trust and confidence, interoperability, and accountability’. We commend it to you.

Paul Baxter, QSO Stuart Ellis, AM President CEO AFAC AFAC

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AFAC STRATEGY 2019 – 2023

OUR VISION Integrated fire and emergency management supporting resilient communities.

OUR VALUES

OUR PURPOSE AFAC is the facilitator and custodian of contemporary fire and emergency service knowledge and practice, for the benefit of our members and through them, the community. We will be recognised and have impact as the National Council for fire and emergency services, through collaboration and influence.

RESPECT COLLABORATION MUTUAL OBLIGATION MUTUAL BENEFIT EVIDENCE-BASED DECISION MAKING

WHO WE ARE AFAC is the Australian and New Zealand National Council for fire and emergency services, creating synergies across the emergency management sector, including fire managers on public land. It is a respected leader, promoting excellence across the emergency management and fire management sectors. By assisting our members, we support them in sustaining Australian and New Zealand communities to be more resilient, through mitigation and response phases of emergency management, fire management on public land and in the transition to recovery. AFAC builds knowledge by bringing together collaborators from across jurisdictions, capabilities, researchers and hazards to discover opportunities, solve problems and promote a community-centered approach. This knowledge is then shared back through the AFAC membership driving innovation and good practice.

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HOW AFAC CONTRIBUTES TO THE SECTOR’S STRATEGIC DIRECTIONS The Strategic Directions for Fire and Emergency Services in Australia and New Zealand 2017–2021 was endorsed by the Australia-New Zealand Emergency Management Committee (ANZEMC) and the then Law, Crime and Community Safety Council (LCCSC) in 2016. The Strategic Directions consist of five priority areas that reflect a shared vision and joint commitment to safe and secure communities in Australia and New Zealand: 1. Supporting resilient communities 2. Providing trusted response 3. Source of credible and timely information 4. Effective governance and resource management 5. Informed by knowledge and research They ensure emergency management agencies and fire managers on public land are positioned to meet challenges presented by changing community needs and expectations. Agencies face an ageing, growing and diverse population, more severe natural disasters occurring over an extended period, national security threats and organisational change. Effective management of fire and emergency services to address these challenges will lead to greater community confidence, trust and improved delivery. The work undertaken by AFAC and its members goes to the heart of the overarching principles articulated in the Strategic Directions: primacy of life, trust and confidence, interoperability, and accountability. AFAC presents an annual Strategic Directions Achievement Report referenced against these five priority areas for Ministers who have responsibility for policing and emergency services. The report provides examples of industry and jurisdictional activities in support of the five strategic priority areas.

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AFAC STRATEGY 2019 – 2023

OUR APPROACH

FUTURE SERVICE DELIVERY

To achieve these strategic directions, five approaches have been identified for AFAC:

GOVERNANCE ARRANGEMENTS

1. collaboration 2. influence and advocacy 3. doctrine and knowledge 4. emergency management practice 5. learning and development. These approaches will be applied to deliver the national Strategic Directions, which inform, clarify intent and identify the actions required by AFAC agencies and the AFAC secretariat. Measures reflecting these outputs have been developed separately for the AFAC Board.

AFAC Limited is owned by its members who are the government fire (including land management) agencies and emergency services in Australia and New Zealand. AFAC National Council sets the strategic directions for the sector and is supported by the AFAC Board. In line with relevant legislation, the AFAC Board, which is elected by and serves the AFAC National Council, is responsible for the formal governance of AFAC business activities supported by five sub-committees: •

Commissioners and Chief Officers Strategic Committee (CCOSC) is responsible for decision making on strategic operational issues, interstate and international deployments and the conduct of the National Resource Sharing Centre(NRSC). CCOSC is jointly chaired by Director-General Emergency Management Australia (EMA) and a jurisdictional representative.

National Aerial Firefighting Centre (NAFC) Strategic Committee oversees NAFC, which is responsible for managing aircraft contracting, aviation management support and the allocation of funds provided by the Commonwealth to support fire and emergency aviation. The NAFC Strategic Committee is comprised of jurisdiction representatives.

Research Committee (RC) provides Council with advice on research priorities, delivery options and outputs and oversees Research Utilisation through AFAC.

Risk and Audit Committee (RAC) is an internal committee of the AFAC Board focused on risk and financial management.

Remuneration and Performance Committee (RPC) the RPC meets as required to review CEO performance and remuneration.

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The AFAC Board has a material interest in the following associated companies: •

AFAC Conference Pty Ltd

Fire Prediction Services Ltd.

AFAC is a significant shareholder and/or member for both companies and is represented on the respective boards. The AFAC secretariat provides a range of shared services and is integral to the operation of both these companies.

AFAC COLLABORATION FRAMEWORK The AFAC Collaboration Framework, reporting to the AFAC Council, will continue to be the vehicle through which the AFAC Members and Affiliates come together to develop and implement the strategic directions set for the sector. The framework supports sharing of knowledge, exchange of insights, exploration of opportunities, and the creation of solutions including doctrine, that shape practice and guide the sector. It is also the established and optimal vehicle for AFAC research utilisation.

AIDR FUTURE SERVICE DELIVERY EMA and AFAC maintain a five-year plan to support and expand the Australian Institute for Disaster Resilience (AIDR) service delivery, and to build its reputation as a trusted source of disaster resilience knowledge, information products and services. AIDR provides leadership and advocacy in disaster resilience, but it requires a strong understanding of existing disaster resilience delivery and identification where the gaps exist.

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AFAC STRATEGY 2019 – 2023

This places AIDR in a unique position to be able to explore and create opportunities not currently provided by others. The sustainability of AIDR requires organisational agility and acknowledgement that AIDR’s engagement extends to local government, Non-Government Organisations (NGOs) and community groups.

EVIDENCE-BASED POLICY AND PRACTICE Policy and practice underpinned by evidence-based research is essential for the sector. AFAC is committed to an ongoing, sector based, research capability. What form this research entity may take and its governance is not decided however, AFAC supports a collaborative research effort, supported by collective funding, matched by the Commonwealth, delivering applied research. It may be in concert with AIDR. AFAC has established a Research Committee to provide Council with advice on research priorities, delivery options and outputs and oversee research utilisation through AFAC.

PREDICTIVE SERVICES The work of Predictive Services within AFAC is expanding. The Predictive Services Company, National Warnings Framework and the National Fire Danger Rating System will involve a significant tranche of further work within AFAC. Predictive services may need to be elevated out of the current collaboration framework and adopt a broader approach beyond fire related predictions, expanding to include other hazards and a broader group of stakeholders.

AFAC SECRETARIAT SERVICE DELIVERY AFAC secretariat service delivery will continue to focus on Member needs and support, with the AFAC secretariat delivering high quality, cost effective services and products to the members of the National Council.

STRATEGIC POSITIONING AFAC recognises state and territory jurisdictional representations will occur through the Australian New Zealand Emergency Management Council (ANZEMC), Senior Officials Group (SOG), the Ministerial Council for Police and Emergency Management (MCPEM) and through bilateral representations. Engagement between ANZEMC and AFAC is maintained through a formal exchange of letters. AFAC will position itself as the national (not jurisdictional) conduit for the Sector to the Commonwealth Government, through EMA and the Department of Home Affairs. The attached diagram depicts ‘significant organisational relationships’ for AFAC in 2021. AIDR is reflected as remaining a business unit of AFAC, noting its current contract ends in June 2020. With the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC (BNHCRC)contract due to expire in 2021, research management is presented as a potential function within AFAC, (depending on future research management considerations), possibly linked to AIDR.

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SIGNIFICANT ORGANISATIONAL RELATIONSHIPS HOME AFFAIRS

EMA

AFAC National Council

AFAC Board

AFAC Conference Ltd.

Professional Development

Risk and Audit

AIDR

Knowledge Management

Research Management ?

Hannover Fairs Australia

NRSC

Interstate

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CCOSC

International

Pacific


AFAC STRATEGY 2019 – 2023

ANZEMC

Collaboration Framework

NAFC Strategic Committee

Research Committee

Predictive Services

EMPS

National Warnings

NFDRS

Hazard Protections

MOU’s including

Standards Australia

ABCB

FFMG

For full list of acronyms please see pg. 17 | 11


OUR PARTNERS AND KEY STAKEHOLDERS

AFAC has established and respected key partnerships with:

EMA EMA is a division within the Department of Home Affairs, the Australian Government lead for disaster response, emergency management, vulnerability from natural disasters and resilience. Working closely with state and territory governments and the international emergency management community, EMA delivers critical programs, policies and services that strengthen and maintain Australia’s national security and emergency management capability.

BNHCRC AFAC partners with the BNHCRC and plans to maintain this partnership with its successor. This partnership collaborates to progress both longer term national research projects and shorter-term support to agencies that directly assists the sector in mitigating, preparing for, responding to and recovery from natural disasters. AIDR AIDR develops, maintains and shares knowledge and learning to support a disaster resilient Australia. AIDR works with government, communities, NGOs, not-for-profits, research organisations, education partners and the private sector to enhance disaster resilience through innovative thought leadership, professional development and knowledge sharing. AIDR is supported by its partners, the Australian Government Department of Home Affairs, AFAC, the Australian Red Cross and the BNHCRC. It is operated as an AFAC business unit and an unincorporated joint venture.

NAFC While the NAFC is a strategic committee of the AFAC Board, it operates as a further business unit of AFAC. It provides a cooperative national arrangement for the coordinated procurement of specialised firefighting services that are readily available for use by state and territory emergency service and land management agencies across Australia, together with specialist aerial firefighting advice.

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BOM The Bureau of Meterology, as Australia’s national weather, climate and water agency, supports the sector in provision of expertise and services when engaging in emergency management activities.

OTHER KEY STAKEHOLDERS AFAC recognises the following key stakeholders:

ANZEMC AFAC maintains an exchange of letters with the ANZEMC. AFAC submits issues for consideration through existing ANZEMC members and meets with ANZEMC representatives annually to review outcomes.

State and territory governments AFAC acknowledges the critical role of state and territory governments who are responsible for fire and emergency services within their jurisdictions. While not actively liaising with state and territory governments (as this is done through member agencies), AFAC seeks to keep them informed through member agencies and ANZEMC.

Memoranda of Understanding AFAC maintains formal MOUs or other partnership agreements with agencies such as: Forest Fire Management Group; Australian Buildings Code Board; Australian Institute for Police Management; Standards Australia, National Bulk Tankers Association; Australian Security Industry; Home Fire Sprinkler Coalition; and the Institution of Fire Engineers Australia.


AFAC STRATEGY 2019 – 2023

INTERNATIONAL LINKAGES AFAC has a broad range of international linkages that together with engagement through EMA, Forest Fire Management Group, the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (AUS) and the Ministry for Foreign Affairs and Trade (NZ) forms an array of international partners listed below.

International •

Global Fire Service Leadership Alliance (GFSLA)

International Search and Rescue (INSARAG)

International Standards Organisation (ISO)

International Fire and Aviation Working Group (IFAWG)

North America

Southern Africa •

Southern African Emergency Service Institute (SAESI)

Asia •

International Fire Chiefs Association – Asia (IFCAA)

Singaporean Civil Defence Force (SCDF)

Hong Kong Fire Service Department (HKFS Dept)

Fire and Rescue Department Malaysia (F&R Dept MAL)

Confederation of Fire Protection Associations – Asia (CFPAA)

Pacific •

Pacific Island Fire and Emergency Service Association (PIFESA)

Pacific Island Emergency Management Alliance (PIEMA)

Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC)

Canadian Association of Fire Chiefs (CAFC)

Canadian Interagency Fire Fighting Centre (CIFFC)

National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)

Metropolitan Fire Chiefs Association (part of NFPA)

India

National Interagency Firefighting Centre (NIFC)

International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC)

United Kingdom •

National Fire Chiefs Council (NFCC)

Institution of Fire Engineers (IFE)

National Association of Fire Officers (NAFO)

Europe •

Federation of European Union Fire Chiefs Association (FEUFCA)

Global Fire Monitoring Centre (GFMC)

For full list of acronyms please see pg. 17 | 13


AFAC’S INTERNATIONAL CONNECTIONS NORTH AMERICA CAFC NFPA MFCA CIFFA NIFC IAFC

Global Fire Service Leadership Alliance (GFSLA)

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UK NFCC IFE

International Search and Rescue (INSARAG)


AFAC STRATEGY 2019 – 2023

EUROPE

ASIA

FEUFCA GFMC

IFCAA SCDF HKFS Dept F&R Dept MAL CFPAA

INDIA NAFO

PACIFIC

SOUTHERN AFRICA

PIFESA PIEMA SPC

SAESI

International Standards Organisation (ISO)

International Fire and Aviation Working Group (IFAWG)

For full list of acronyms please see pg. 17 | 15


NATIONAL FIRE AND EMERGENCY CAPABILITY

The diagram demonstrates the advancement in AFAC capabilities and relationships providing national fire and emergency capacity and capability. It also raises the question, should there be others?

EMA & Dept. of Home Affairs

ANZEMC & MCPEM

AIIMS

AFAC NATIONAL COUNCIL

CCOSC

NRSC & resource deployments

Senior Officer Cohort

Knowledge events & AFAC Conference

AFAC Board

NAFC Strategic Committee

Endorsing EM higher education

Standards representation

Existing MOUs

BNHCRC & research utilisation

National and sector doctrine

AIDR

AFAC collaboration framework

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Predictive Services


AFAC STRATEGY 2019 – 2023

GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS

ABCB.......................... Australian Building Codes Board

IFAWG........................ International Fire and Aviation Working Group

AFAC.......................... Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Authorities Council

IFCAA......................... International Fire Chiefs Association – Asia

AIDR.......................... The Australian Institute for Disaster Resilience ANZEMC.................... Australian and New Zealand Emergency Management Committee BNHCRC..................... Bushfire and Natural Hazards Cooperative Research Centre BOM.......................... Bureau of Meteorology CAFC.......................... Canadian Association of Fire Chiefs CCOSC........................ Commissioners and Chief Officers Strategic Committee CFPAA........................ Confederation of Fire Protection Associations – Asia

IFE.............................. Institution of Fire Engineers INSARAG.................... International Search and Rescue ISO............................. International Standards Organisation MFCA......................... Metropolitan Fire Chiefs Association MOU.......................... Memoranda of Understanding NAFC.......................... National Aerial Firefighting Centre NAFO......................... National Association of Fire Officers NFCC.......................... National Fire Chiefs Council NFDRS........................ National Fire Danger Rating System NFPA.......................... National Fire Protection Association

CIFFC.......................... Canadian Interagency Fire Fighting Centre

NIFC........................... National Interagency Firefighting Centre

EMA........................... Emergency Management Australia

PIEMA........................ Pacific Island Emergency Management Alliance

EMPS......................... Emergency Management Professionalisation Scheme F&R Dept MAL.......... Fire and Rescue Department Malaysia FEUFCA...................... Federation of European Union Fire Chiefs Association

PIFESA....................... Pacific Island Fire and Emergency Service Association RAC............................ Risk and Audit Committee RC.............................. Research Committee

FFMG......................... Forest Fire Management Group

RPC............................ Remuneration and Performance Committee

GFMC......................... Global Fire Monitoring Centre

SAESI......................... Southern African Emergency Service Institute

GFSLA........................ Global Fire Service Leadership Alliance

SCDF.......................... Singaporean Civil Defence Force

HKFS Dept................. Hong Kong Fire Service Department

SPC............................ Secretariat of the Pacific Community

IAFC........................... International Association of Fire Chiefs

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AFAC STRATEGY 2019 – 2023

Copyright Š 2019, Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Authorities Council All rights reserved. Copyright in this publication is subject to the operation of the Copyright Act 1968 and its subsequent amendments. Any material contained in this document can be reproduced, providing the source is acknowledged and is not used for any commercialisation purpose whatsoever without the permission of the copyright owner. | 19


AFAC is the National Council for fire and emergency services Level 1, 340 Albert Street, East Melbourne VIC 3002 P +61 3 9419 2388 E afac@afac.com.au www.afac.com.au

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AFAC Strategy 2019-2023  

The AFAC Strategy identifies how we are going to achieve the five AFAC Strategic Directions outlined in Strategic Directions for Fire and Em...

AFAC Strategy 2019-2023  

The AFAC Strategy identifies how we are going to achieve the five AFAC Strategic Directions outlined in Strategic Directions for Fire and Em...

Profile for afac9
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