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DISTRICT CENTRE ROHINI, DELHI

AESHVRY RAJAURA

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE|THESIS


ACKNOWLEDGEMENT It gives me immense pleasure to express my gratitude for all those who, knowingly or directly and indirectly helped in my project. The researcher must acknowledge the role of God in their lives, as without his perennial guidance and protection, the task at hand would not been complete. I would like to express my gratitude towards my parents for the support and encouragement which helped me in completion of this project. I respect and thank Ar. Akshat Garg, for providing me an opportunity to do the project on “District Centre“ and giving all support and guidance which made me complete the project duly. I am extremely happy to mention my special thanks to Ar. A. K. Manna, my guide without whom this project work would not be realized and who took keen interest on my project work and guided me all along, till the completion of my project work. I would also like to thanks to Prof. Manoj Jain, Ar. Gaurav Agrawal, Ar. Kanika Agrawal and Ar. Ashu Jain who guided me time to time during my course of duty. I would not forget to remember Ar. Jiyan Pattharwala, Ar. Sachine Kulshrestha and my friends, seniors/juniors......Akshay Verma, Aniruddh Tyagi, Nisha Gahadwal, Hina Kausar, Adil and Mohit for their encouragement and more over for their timely support and guidance till the completion of our project work.

AESHVRY RAJAURA

TEERTHANKER MAHAVEER COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE


CONTENTS Chapter 1 – Introduction 1.1 Project Brief ...................................................................................... 1.2 Thesis Statement............................................................................... 1.3 Program............................................................................................. 1.4 Aim..................................................................................................... 1.5 Need.................................................................................................. 1.6 Scope................................................................................................. Chapter 2 – Research 2.1 Areas of Research............................................................................ 2.2 Case Study : India Habitat Centre, New Delhi.............................. 2.3 Case Study : Select City Walk, Saket Delhi.................................... 2.4 Literature Study : Salt Lake City Centre, Kolkata.......................... 2.5 Hyderabad International Convention Centre, Hyderabad........ 2.6 Comparative Matrix......................................................................... 2.7 Area Comparative Matrix............................................................... Chapter 3 – Project Site 3.1 Introduction...................................................................................... 3.2 Understanding the Context............................................................ 3.3 Site Analysis....................................................................................... 3.4 Site Connectivity.............................................................................. 3.5 Climatic Study.................................................................................. 3.6 Site Documentation........................................................................ Chapter 4 – Programmatic Details 4.1 Components of Program................................................................ 4.2 Area Relationship Matrix................................................................. 4.3 Individual Component Flow........................................................... 4.4 Site Program..................................................................................... 4.5 Area Program.................................................................................. Chapter 5 – Technological Systems 5.1 Sustainability..................................................................................... 5.2 Facade............................................................................................. 5.3 Roof................................................................................................... 5.4 Structure........................................................................................... 5.5 Standards......................................................................................... 5.6 Materials........................................................................................... 5.7 Services.............................................................................................

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Chapter 6 – Design Evolution 6.1 Concept Evolution.......................................................................... 6.2 Concept Development Framework.............................................

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Chapter 7 – Final Design...........................................................................

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LIST OF FIGURES Fig 1.1

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LIST OF IMAGE Img 1.1 Img 1.2 Img 1.3 Img 1.4 Img 1.5 Img 1.6 Img 2.1 Img 2.2 Img 2.3 Img 2.4 Img 2.5 Img 2.6 Img 2.7 Img 2.8 Img 2.9 Img 2.10 Img 2.11 Img 2.12 Img 2.13 Img 2.14 Img 2.15 Img 2.16 Img 2.17 Img 2.18 Img 2.19 Img 2.20 Img 2.21 Img 2.22 Img 2.23 Img 2.24 Img 2.25 Img 2.26 Img 2.27 Img 2.28 Img 2.29 Img 2.30 Img 2.31 Img 2.32 Img 2.33 Img 2.34 Img 2.35 Img 2.36 Img 2.37 Img 3.1 Img 3.2 Img 3.3

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1. INTRODUCTION

According to Delhi Master Plan- 2021, District Centres are defined as “the centres which are meant to serve as the apex of the multi-nodal activities of the community, which should be conceived as major shopping centers, while serving the community with a reasonable variety of other services and facilities and also centres of socio-cultural activity where the community can get together. The emphasis in these centers should be on commerce and their related activities.” In a commercial hierarchy, District Centres meant to serve population of 5 Lakhs. In many places like Kolkata,

they also referred as Sub-City Centre. A District Centre comes second in the commercial hierarchy after City Centre. The term “City Centre” is primarily used in British English. It is a Urban Centre which is concentrated with commercial, cultural and business area of a city or town. A District Centres are the central part and important commercial, cultural and often the historical, political and geographic heart of a city. One such Centre is proposed in Twin District Centre, D2, Rohini by Delhi Development Authority. It covers vast variety of functions such as convention, retail and office.

1.2 THESIS STATEMENT The topic will explore the condition of modern urban situation in which most of the people live spend their time inside the building. Finding ways to provide modern infrastructure for more open places like urban plazas, entertainment zones. Exploring inter-rela-

tionships of the spaces with mixed use technique. Also give focus in evolving contemporary model for traditional Indian Bazars or Indian Markets. Giving them more healthy, comfortable and more functional open spaces.

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PROJECT BRIEF NAME OF THE PROJECT : DISTRICT CENTRE, ROHINI TYPE OF THE PROJECT : COMMERCIAL LOCATION : TWIN DISTRICT CENTRE, ROHINI (DELHI) CLIENT : DELHI DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY AREA : 11 ACRE

1.3 PROGRAM The site is located at a place which is well developed residential area. And population increased rapidly with the arrival of metro station. The space for cultural and refreshment near the site is Swarn Jayanti Park and Adventure Island. A ‘District Centre’ equipped with commercial and cultural activities further

increase peoples activities in open spaces. Location of ‘District Centre’ also proving rapid commercial and entertainment activities because of the metro stations and bus stops are near the site. Various high end malls and hotels in proximity and access Roads on all sides if site allow maximum transition of spaces.

1.4 AIM • To create a space which can form the node for experiencing commercial, cultural and social activities. • The project will be hybrid between a socio-cultural and a Commercial Centre at much reduced scale. • To develop a solution of the project ‘District Centre, Rohini, Delhi’ to create healthy working campus for the users with the best implication of design through climate responsive approach.

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1.5 NEED FOR THE PROJECT Cities are the platform for social, physical, cultural and economic co-existence and conflict. It is an urban space that has its attributes in complexity of interacting social relations. Many old cities of India, which were planned on the basis of existing culture and structure, got transformed into complex patterns and fragments in order to keep up with the population pressure

and evolving trends of urbanization.

IMG 1.1

IMG 1.2

Congested urban areas are beholder of city’s development history. They are chaotic and over populated. They seems to be exhausted in terms of resources and spaces to build or intervene. Finding balance in this situation is what the need of the hour is.

The driving theme for the thesis research has been to find a solution to the above. Also to create a space which can form the node for holding and experiencing commercial, cultural and social activities. The interventions that aren’t eye soar and invite people in. The land utilized should be given back to the people, improved, usable, and developed.

IMG 1.3

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1.6 SCOPE The Proposal Consist of: • Auditorium • Office Space • Conference Room • Supermarket • Function Hall • Exhibition

FIG 1.1

Site is located in ‘TWIN DISTRICT CENTRE’ in Rohini, Delhi. Twin District Centre has two parts namely D1 and D2, separated by Swarn Jyanti Park which stretches 1KM along both sides. It is a major developing commercial district in the region, the site is an opportunity to look into the significant context with an architectural viewpoint. The District

Centre will not only promote social activities, humanities and commerce but also provide employment and improve the economy of the region. Site is surrounded by road from all sides, and there is significant amount of residential areas with mostly MIG housing with surrounds the District Centre.

IMG 1.5

Contemporary

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Conventional Market

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2. RESEARCH

AREAS The idea of the project is to have a center for ‘Socio-Culture’ bringing people together, through performing arts, visual arts, commerce and gathering spaces. The primary issue is to understand and explore ways to create a lively character of a Public Space. To understand the objectives of Transit-Oriented Development in metropolises today. This, fabric comes not just with the functional components sitting together within a boundary but also through the combination of built and open. The idea is to explore such design elements/ideas which have made a successful public interaction and lively space within the city of Delhi. To study the Transition Spaces and understand their role in an institution, other than circulatory spaces. The relationship of building to the site, street and neighboring buildings and to understand and explore the architectural expression of facade (openings and materials) in harmony with Urban Fabric of the surroundings of the District Centre. Other than this the study will include how cultural and commercial strategies create and enhance Sense of Place through Place-making. The research will also be looking into Sustainable Design ideas, with basic requirements of acoustics, structures and lighting for workspaces for designing of spaces like office, auditorium, retail space, etc.

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AREAS OF RESEARCH PUBLIC SPACE Good public spaces are fundamental to sustainable communities and healthy cities. Public spaces have the power to improve city life and strengthen our relationship to community and place. Throughout history, public spaces have embodied public life by being a true shared, democratic space for all. Public spaces are vital ingredient of successful cities. They help build a sense of community, civic identity and culture. Public spaces fa-

cilitate social capital, economic development and community revitalization. Healthy public spaces are the springboard for revitalizing communities, whatever they are and wherever they are. That an attractive, active, well functioning public space can jumpstart economic development in a community – from a small rural town to a big city – is being recognized increasingly around the world.

So, what makes a good public space? • The public space should have some utility to come to the space. • The public space should be diverse in its functions, nature and landscape. • The public space should be dynamic and the public should feel a part of it. The Public Realm The public realm can be seen as the space in which different activities take place and where people share direct and indirect encounters everyday. These spaces include the street, pathways and open spaces. Since the public realm, fundamentally, is based

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on people and what they do, edge conditions need to be tailored to the needs of the users of the public realm, by being designed to a human scale and comfortability as well as being accessible to them.


TRANSIT ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT Halfway through the last century the world acquainted itself with the concept of a transit-centric mode of urban development. Its earliest incidents can be traced back to 1940’s Stockholm and 1960’s Paris where, in an attempt to cope with the increased metropolitan growth and automobile travel, transit-oriented development first began to take shape. It is be-

lieved that localized densities around transit systems could produce positive synergies. According to a Cevero and Zupan (1996), offices attract high number of commuters while housing near transit, both low-cost and highend, offered similar synergies as well. This new model of urban planning was conceptualized to mitigate the adverse effects of urbanization in cities.

“Mixed-use community that encourages people to live near transit services and to decrease their dependence on driving. TODs mix residential, retail, office, open space, and public uses in walkway environment, making it convenient for residents and employees to travel by transit, bicycle, foot or car.” -Calthorpe (1993)

FIG 2.1

Transit Oriented Development (TOD) is a foundational planning concept that integrates the potential of coordinating land use planning, transportation system design and infrastructure in-

vestments, as an integrated process with people and public transit. TOD integrates land use and transport planning and aims to develop planned sustainable urban growth centers, having DC | 20


walkable and livable communes with high density mixed land-use. Citizens have access to open green and public spaces and at the same time transit facilities are efficiently utilized. TOD focuses on creation of high density mixed land use development in the influence zone of transit sta-

tions, i.e. within the walking distance of (500-800 m) transit station or along the corridor in case the station spacing is about 1km TOD advocates pedestrian trips to access various facilities such as shopping, entertainment and work (National Institute of Urban Affairs, 2016).

FIG 2.2

TRANSIT ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT IN INDIA Post the announcement of mission based programs like Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (JNNURM) in 2005, Atal Mission for Rejuvenation, and Urban Transformation (AMRUT) and Smart Cities in 2015, there has been huge emphasis on in-

FIG 2.3

TOD Principles DC | 21

vestments in public transport (Joshi, Joseph, Patel & Darji, 2017). TOD in Indian cities should be looked at as a tool for improving quality of life and financial means to provide infrastructure facilities (Petkar and Hamand 2013).

FIG 2.4

TOD Support Principles Tools


TOD is advocated as the sustainable alternative to sprawl and automobile dependency primarily because it: • Enable Transformation: To assist in transformation of cities from private vehicle dependent city to public transport oriented development, • Accessible Public Transport: To promote the usage of public transport by making it accessible, encourage green mobility by encouraging people to walk and cycle and at the same time curb pollution and other negative impacts of motorization. • Compact Walkable Communities: To create livable and affordable communities, which are compact and walkable. • Promotes Dense Communities: To help defray costs of building and operating mass transit infrastructure. • Avoid Need of Commuting: By introducing job centres, housing and retail within same development. TRANSIT ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT - NCT The National Capital Territory (NCT) is located at the core of the National Capital Region (NCR) in India. NCT Delhi is highly urbanized with 93.18 percent of its population living in urban areas as against the national average of 27.81 percent (Joshi, Joseph, Patel and Darji, 2017). The Delhi Development Authority, responsible for drafting the Master Plan of Delhi 2021. • High-density development, non-motorized transit, pedestrianization and inclusivity can be seen as the common theme for the TOD norms in India. • Since the turn of the century, the new planning principle of Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) is seen as the last lap of achieving sustainable urban transformation after a wave of policies such as the Smart Cities, AMRUT, MMI (Multi-Modal Integration), Last mile connectivity options, Green Mobility Schemes, etc. • The ideas of transit-oriented development has become nearly synonymous with inclusive urban spaces. “Key for low-carbon, compact development with mixed land use that allows for optimized development along transit corridor. TOD increases densities and places high-rises along the transit corridors to accommodate a wide variety of uses. It is an ideal tool for governments to address inclusivity by citing minimum caps for housing for various segments. With the policy capturing the essential elements of mixed-use development, non-motorized transport and pedestrian priority, and encouraging a walk-to-work culture, Delhi in particular is looking at TOD as a solution to its mobility and air quality challenges by developing the areas around metro stations.” -(WRI, 2014) DC | 22


TRANSITION SPACES “Architectural spaces that envelop us like a physical presence, simple and dense, defying description imitation and photography. . . . Universal, yet present. The exterior is simple leading to greater levels of mystery surprise and memory, creating poetic changes of light and shade . . . guiding us through its spaces . . . .” - Alvaro Siza on Mexican Architecture Transition – an in between state, in Architecture, is defined as a link or a connecting space between two confined spaces. Architectural spaces are incomplete without transition spaces. The inclusion of transitional and circulation spaces, in the form of corridors, atrium and stairwells, is unavoidable in the design of most buildings. Definition of a transition spaces, located in between the inner and the outer environment act as a ‘buffer zone’. They act as both a buffer space and a physical link. There is hierarchy in transition spaces in any urban planning like City level, Town level, District level or Local level. The road network itself acts as a transition mode. Integrated in the city scape there are

interaction spaces, gathering spaces, urban corridors, plazas that standstill but act as a transition space in their own way. The one of the most important functions of transition spaces is sustainability in building design. The accurate use of these spaces in a built form may increase its energy efficiency up to great extent. Design elements contributed a lot to transition spaces. There are colonnades, aisles, courtyards, water-bodies, openings like doorways, pathways, patios, gardens, pergolas, foyers, lobbies, etc. If there is no defined space then confinement by some of the above elements itself make the space functional and sensible.

SENSE OF PLACE As both an overarching idea and a hands-on approach for improving a neighborhood, city, or region, Place-making inspires people to collectively re imagine and reinvent public spaces as the heart of every community. Strengthening the connection between people and the places they share, Place-making refers to a collaborative process by which we can shape our public realm in order to maximize share value. More than just promoting better urban design, DC | 23

Place-making facilitates creative patterns of use, paying particular attention to the physical, cultural and social identities that define a place and support its ongoing evolution. With community based participation at its center, an effective Place-making process capitalizes on a local community’s assets, inspiration, and potential, and it results in creation of quality public spaces that contribute to people’s health, happiness, and well being.


2. RESEARCH CASE STUDY INTENT OF STUDY: • To study the environment created inside the complex to through different architectural elements, facade treatment, material landscape and climate-tempered courtyards. • To analyze the offices provided to various institutions/Individual firms. • Finally to analyze the architectural character, circulation-vehicular, and pedestrian, the services provided and the parking of vehicles.

The INDIAN HABITAT CENTRE was conceived to provide a physical environment which would serve as a catalyst for a synergistic relationship between individuals and institutions working in diverse habitat related areas and therefore, maximize their total effectiveness. To facilitate this interaction, the Centre provides a range of facilities. Sharing a common concerns to habitat, various organizations have come together to participate in in-

stitution-building, evolving a synergy within the India Habitat Centre complex. Complex was designed under supervision of architect Joseph Allen Stein. India habitat Centre was Stein’s largest project consisting of six restaurants, four galleries, one auditorium, amphitheater and an atrium. The landscaping, horticulture, fountains, add to the pleasing ambiance of the campus.

IMG 2.1

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NEW DELHI

INDIA HABITAT CENTRE INFORMATION ARCHITECT SITE AREA TOTAL BUILT UP AREA GROUND COVERAGE FIRST AND SECOND BASEMENT

JOSEPH ALLEN STEIN 38400 SQ. M. 53241 SQ. M. 9609 SQ. M. 18819 SQ. M.

IMG 2.2

• 40,000SQ.M. of office accommodation for institutions. • Conference Room with a total capacity of 1000 in 10 locations of different configuration ranging from 30 to 450 seats. • 60 guest rooms, five suits and fire service apartments. • Cafeteria, Restaurants and private dinning room to handle approximately 1500 persons at a time. • A 70 SQ. M. Exhibition area with built in systems and structures for multimedia exhibitions. • A 250 seat amphitheater. • An auditorium with 500 capacity. • A unique library/ resource center with email links to Resource Centres abroad. • Other facilities include an Art gallery, Executive fitness center, Bank, Dish antenna with multi-channel cable TV and piped music.

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LOCATION The India Habitat Centre is located along the Lodhi Road on the fringes of Lutyen’s Delhi designed by Architect Joseph Allen Stein. The L-Shaped site has frontage on the three sides. It is bounded by Max Muller Marg on West, the Vardhman

Marg on south and the Lodhi Road on the north. The fourth side is flanked by Bal Bharthi School. The complex is accessible from three sides, the major pedestrian entrance being from Lodhi road on the north.

INDIAN HABITAT CENTER

FIG 2.5

ZONING • The complex is built on an area of 9acres with a super built area of 97,000 SQ. M. And can be accessed through three sides having Lodhi Road on the northern side segregating vehicular and pedestrian movement. • There are 5 main blocks which are interconnected by mens of aerial walkways serving various functional spaces like office spaces, exhibition spaces, Conference facilities, cafeterias etc. These building blocks being separated manage to create interesting courtyards that are partially open to the elements. • The distribution of various functions is through simplistic but highly functional. There is entry to the site from each road abutting it. Thus it has three entrances. • The two blocks on the Lodhi Road, which is the major road surrounding the site, have offices on the top and reserved for public facilities on the ground floor. • Whereas third block on the south houses common facilities like the conference center, auditorium, library and a guest house are zoned along the Vardhman Marg, which gives it a quite zone, as the road does not support traffic. • The convention block is divided into two built structures, an auditorium and the Convention Centre. This segregation helps in better handling of crowd and there is also separate entry to the Convention Center that avoids other disturbances. • The restaurants and exhibition spaces on the ground floor opens into the courts, these are also used for public exhibitions enhancing interactions. • The two basement parking (933 Cars) houses most of the parking and services extended under the entire bloc, it also had surface parking (60 Cars) and separate parking for buses and private vehicles. DC | 26


FIG 2.6

BLOCK PLACEMENT AND CIRCULATION

COMPONENTS OF BUILDING PROGRAM: AREA NAME AUDITORIUM BLOCK AUDITORIUM AUDI DOME BASEMENT THEATRE (MAHAGONY+ KADAMBA+ RUDRAKSHA+AMALTAS) FUNCTION ROOM BLOCK MAGNOLIA CASUARINAS THE SILVER OAK ROOM (1+2) + FOYER + PATIO SILVER OAK LAWN CHINAR WILLOW GULMOHAR JACARANDA (1+2) +FOYER MAHOGONY THE EXHIBITION HALL THE EXHIBITION COURT HABITAT VISUAL ART GALLERY DC | 27

CAPACITY AREA

537 350 205

558 385 194

100 60 170

128 127 465

25 50 1220 25 150 350

554 28 52 245 338 40 325 191

With 97,000 SQ. M. of super built up area, Habitat Centre provides a variety of related activities and institutions, with a density of approximately 1000-person/acre (total area = 9 acres). 25% of the total area goes into the landscaped courts.

AREA OUTDOOR VENUES THE AMPHITHEATER MARGOSA LAWN SILK COTTON GARDEN EMERALD GARDEN CASCADE COURT PALM COURT THE HUB

CAPACITY AREA

THE PLAZA

450

300 160 85 80

27 468 243 252 1132 1455

650 360


MOVEMENT APPROACH: The center has three entrances abutting its boundaries, one from the Max Muller road and two from the Lodhi road among which one is service road. PEDESTRIAN: The Pedestrian linkages is though paved pathway in different types of stones in different patterns linking the landscape courts. Once inside the complex the blocks are interconnected with the protective sunscreen. Blocks are interconnected to each other with bridges. It has adequate provision for non-ambulatory disabilities, but does not cater to the needs of visual and hearing impairments. VEHICULAR: Remarkable feature of IHC is that it is absolutely traffic free environmental cars and scooters are directed into two levels of basement from peripheral road. Movement is so planned to facilitate left turning into and form the site in entering or leaving the site, all right turning conflicts eliminated. PARKING: Parking is provided in two levels in the basement. The car parking is divided into visually and physically identifiable blocks. Each driveway is provided with proper directional sign-age. The movement are simplified by adopting one way system that generally follows clockwise movement pattern. A separate driveway is provided for HUDCO and seminar hall to allow ways access of vehicles. The entry and exit to the main parking is provided on the ground floor itself. Uniform structural grid of 4.5x6 MTS and 6x6.5 is flowed in the parking area inadequate parking for scooters. Only one entry point for two wheelers to enter. Ramp going to second basement too narrow for linger wheels. Restricted movement of traffic from upper to lower basement.

FIG 2.7

BUILDING SECTION

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FIG 2.8

LOWER GROUND FLOOR PLAN

FIG 2.11

3D ZONING AND MASSING

FIG 2.9

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

FIG 2.10

FIG 2.12

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

SITE PLAN

ORIENTATION • Building is designed with a view to keep minimum expose on the east and west side. • North block with number of openings recessed behind two blocks to shade it from NW sun. • Eastern face conveys a fortress like quality. • Building width have been restricted to 15 MTS enabling the interiors to be lit from both sides. DC | 29

FIG 2.13

MOVEMENT ON SITE


FIG 2.14

LOWER BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN

FIG 2.15

UPPER BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN

OFFICE • General office spaces are located mainly in the blocks adjacent to main streets and are provided as free flowing spaces without internal partitions. • Service core consisting of two lifts, one staircase, A.H.U. room, electrical room and telephone connections (adjustable), duct and toilets for both sex - serve the office space. • All office spaces have flexibility of providing their own wet areas apart from those provided in the central court. • Office spaces measure approximately 14.15m X 14.5m and 33.1m X 14.75m. • The entire building is air conditioned and the basements are mechanically ventilated, ceiling reduces to 3m. • The floor to floor height is 3.75m but with AC ducts running across.

FIG 2.16

DC | 30


THE STEIN AUDITORIUM The Auditorium is equipped with state of the art infrastructure enabling direct telecast, 35mm projection. The hall is ideal for large conferences, seminars, special screenings, presentations, theatre and cultural performances of all kinds. Simultaneous interpretation can be mostly available on request. Main auditorium is also provided with Mahogany room, a hall suited for small gathering with attached kitchenette and washroom apart from control rooms and projector room on the first floor. FIG 2.17

PLOT NO. 9 AUDITORIUM PLAN

IMG 2.3

• Green room lacks the usual requirements of toilets. • The level difference between two seat performs is 1-6 which makes viewing absolutely obstruction free. This auditorium has been provided with balcony seating too. • Double Wall system avoids sounds disturbance from outside. • Area of this auditorium is 575 SQ. M. and it has a capacity of 537 persons.

THEATER HALLS

FIG 2.18

DC | 31

IMG 2.4


ARCHITECTURAL EXPRESSION BUILT TO OPEN • The massing is also articulate according to existing context, the blocks adjacent to the housing area are reduced in volume. • The blocks progressively reduced in volume, office spaces being the highest to the auditorium that is the lowest level building in complex. • The auditorium is set back substantially from the plat line to create a distinct identity. • The built is arranged in the manner that there are multiple courtyard created that flow into each other. • The linear built is directional and helps in movement inside the site. • The built due has both north south and east west orientation, which is though not good in climate of Delhi, but helps to shade the open spaces. The focus has been more on the open space structure. THE BRIDGES • The buildings are grouped around semi-covered courts and linked at 5th and 6th floor level and above bridges to form huge gateways for entrance into various zones/courts. These multi level bridges provide office space as well as links between various building zones. • The bridges from framed views and vistas and complete the character of the enclosed courts. SHADING DEVICES • A system of open sky, shaded canopies over the large paved courts, provide relief from tropic sun with shade casting elements, devised to shade the courtyards in summer, and the lit in the sun in the winter. • A1.2m deep galvanized steel tubular framework stretches edge to edge across the courtyard and is anchored concrete overhangs at the edges. Shade casting leaves of PVC coated nylon fabric, approximately 1.6 X 1.4m are anchored at the predetermined angles within this framework to provide shading element. FINISHES • Exposed brickwork with exposed R.C.C. in cantilevered corridors • Ceramic Tiles-Green, Red and Grey used in extensions to define vertical and also in interiors of lobby used to give an effect to flow.

FIG 2.19

IMG 2.5

DC | 32


IMG 2.6

IMG 2.7

IMG 2.8

IMG 2.9

INFERENCES • The orientation and designing of building is done keeping in mind the comfort of the users and making it Eco-friendly. • The site is very pedestrian friendly with a smooth pedestrian flow but one gets confused about what is where. There is problem of sign-ages. • The core system makes the movement very rigid and makes the connectivity between the blocks very poor. • The beautiful landscaped courts and open spaces are well linked to each other and spaces seen to flow into each other. • Open spaces like amphitheater make the complex lively. • An important consequences of combining the public spaces with offices in the creation of informal activity arrangement as may activity spaces ensures that the campus is alive and populated even after office hours. • All the public activities are located on the ground floor and semi public activities are located in higher floor for smooth functionality. • The complex is well serviced, with major chunk of the service in the lower basement and service are well connected to the building through cores. • The articulation of the open spaces is features that makes the IHC a Distinctive and active public space in the city. • Passive solar techniques like using shading canopies which reflect the unwanted radiation, keeping width of the court is equal to the height of the building , makes the Centre of energy efficient. DC | 33


2. RESEARCH CASE STUDY

INTENT OF STUDY: • To study the environment created for giving street shopping like experience in outdoor area integrating with indoor conditioned shopping area. • To study the designing features of a retail space and various public plazas with lush green sit-outs and landscapes. • Finally to analyze the architectural character, circulation-vehicular, and pedestrian, the services provided and the parking of vehicles.

SAKET DISTRICT CENTRE SAKET DISTRICT CENTRE is a commercial centre located in Saket, Delhi. It spread over 54 Acres (2,20,000 Sq. M.) of area. It has dedicated space of about 1,14,000 Sq. M. to retail with outlets of renowned top Indian and International Brands, two multiplex and

FIG 2.20

SAKET DISTRICT CENTRE ZONING

5 star hotel. It includes 5 Malls :a) Select City Walk Mall b) Dlf Place Mall c) Metropolitan Mall d) Southern Park e) Square 1 Mall

IMG 2.10

SAKET DISTRICT CENTRE

DC | 34


SAKET, DELHI

SELECT CITY WALK INFORMATION CLIENT TYPE COMPLETION YEAR ARCHITECT LOCATION SITE AREA GROUND COVERAGE BUILT UP AREA COMMERCIAL AREA RETAIL AREA (MULTIPLEX AND MALL) LANDSCAPED AREA CLIMATE STRUCTURE

SELECT INFRASTRUCTURE PVT. LTD. MIXED USE COMMERCIAL 2007

TEVATIA CHAUHA SAKET DISTRICT CENTRE, DELHI 15884.5 SQ. M. 9698 SQ. M. 62862.32 SQ. M. 24281 SQ. M. 8498.3 SQ. M. 15782 SQ. M. COMPOSITE R.C.C. FRAMEWORK

IMG 2.11

SELECT CITY WALK is a 1.3 million Sq. ft air-conditioned, vibrant and upscale destination Shopping Centre with retail shopping, amphitheater and an amphitheater. It was open to public from October, 2007. It is located in Saket District Centre.

DC | 35


LOCATION Select City walk is a 62,862 sq. m. of commercial development on Press Enclave road. It is right across the highly dense residential area of khirkee village. The desired catchment of this facility is the southern zone of Delhi, however it has been seen to draw crowds from all parts of Delhi NCR.

Though Press Enclave Marg is not a thoroughfare for most of its visitors, yet the is a success. Select City-walk, Metropolitan mall and DLF Courtyard is built adjacent to each other around a green landscape court.

IMG 2.12

CONNECTIVITY The site is well connected with local city bus network ads the mall has its won bus stand right in front of it. However the nearest metro station is the Malviya Nagar metro station which is approximately 1KM from the mall.

SELECT CITY WALK

FIG 2.21

DC | 36


PROJECT COMPONENT Select CITY WALK houses :

FIG 2.22

PROJECT COMPONENTS

• 3 floors of shopping area. • 2 separate 5-storey blocks containing. 1. Office spaces 2. Serviced Apartments • Outdoor open-air plaza (approx. 1 lakh sq. ft.) • Water bodies & fountains • An amphitheater • Six screen PVR Cinemas

COMPONENTS OF BUILDING PROGRAM: BASEMENTS 41578.5 (3L VLS) + 6075 (3L VLS) GROUND FLOOR 9622.345 + 1756.46 (MULTIPLEX) FIRST FLOOR 10803.323 +2012.72 (MULTIPLEX) SECOND FLOOR THIRD FLOOR FOURTH FLOOR FIFTH FLOOR SIXTH FLOOR SEVENTH FLOOR FOYER AREA IN MULTIPLEX Total area without Basements Total area with Basements Plot Area

FIG 2.23

DC | 37

47653.5 SQ. M. 11378.81 SQ. M. 12816.043 SQ. M. 6568.06 SQ. M. 2921.26 SQ. M. 2776.216 SQ. M. 2467.621 SQ. M. 2268.241 SQ. M. 1948.80 SQ. M. 825.29 SQ. M. 43970.307 SQ. M. 91623.807 SQ. M. 15884.5 SQ. M.


BUILT TO OPEN PLAN It is readily observable that the three adjacent malls form an enclosure around the green court in the middle. This strategy greatly helps in laying down a common ground for proper visibility of all three premises and also offers a great urban realm for social and cultural engagements. The mall is designed in L-shape and

FIG 2.24

this helps in easily accessing the spaces inside from multiple points. Such a built to open orientation gives rise to a more porous edge condition of the built form allowing better visual and physical connections to the outdoor environment; a rarity in mall typology and a welcome change.

FIG 2.25

SITE PLAN SELECT CITY WALK

COURT ACT AS CATCHMENT FOR ACCESS TO SELECT CITY WALK

IMG 2.13

LANDSCAPE COURT IN FRONT OF SELECT CITY WALK

DC | 38


PLANNING AND SERVICES • • • • •

Linear planning with organization on spaces on a single way. L-Shaped planning with plaza at front make which compliment each other. Two entries and five fire exists are provided. 3 level basement parking are provided. The placement of the entrance to the basement is such that it also acts as a drop off without hindering the basement entry. • Three escalators are provided. • Service corridors are also provided at rear side of the select city walk. • A 20m service lane is provided at the back which also serve the purpose of surface parking.

FIG 2.26

FIG 2.27

GROUND FLOOR PLAN SHOWING SERVICES BLOCKS

FIG 2.28

FIG 2.29

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

DC | 39

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

SECOND FLOOR PLAN


VEHICULAR MOVEMENT Vehicular movement on ground level is limited to a linear ramp going down to the basement right from the front of the site. Most of the ground level is occupied by the central green court and other features like water features and amphitheater.

IMG 2.14

PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENT Above illustration shows how the landscaped court of this mall helps in orienting the users according to the building’s movement system. The court almost acts like a collector that does the job of collecting the visitors that enter the premise from various different access points, and channel them all in a controlled movement system under its semi-covered colonnaded walkway along its boundary. This walkway spans across the access points of all three malls and give equal opportunities of access for them all.

FIG 2.30

SPATIAL HIERARCHY AND CONNECTIONS There is a 2.5 M wide passage running on one side of the plaza through which users can enter the mall from any of the four access points. The court facing edge of the mall has been attempted to be made porous, however the mall typology does not allow much interaction with outdoor conditions especially on floors above ground floor. Overall the movement pattern inside the mall falls the linear geometry of the built form hence its is very comfortable even for a first time visitor to orient themselves in the premise and move through it as desired.

FIG 2.31

IMG 2.15

DC | 40


IMG 2.16

IMG 2.17

LACK OF INFORMAL RETAIL OPPORTUNITIES The central court here offers enough space for social interactions and cultural celebrations and events, but the across the entire premise there is no space conducive for informal retail bazaar to be hosted and hence it can be deduced that the design mix for this mall is rigid and possesses no room for formal and informal retail integration.

IMG 2.18

INFERENCES • Being a high end commercial complex the grand plaza in front make it accessible to diverse segment of people. • Hierarchy and strong interrelationship of spaces plaza corridors atrium shops. • Excellent servicing by rear side service lane and service corridors along the back. • No scope for informal shopping, more of contemporary less conventional essences. • Do not provide unbiased opportunity.

IMG 2.19

DC | 41


2. RESEARCH LITERATURE STUDY

INTENT OF STUDY: • To analyze the architectural character, circulation-vehicular, and pedestrian, the services provided and the parking of vehicles.

SALT LAKE CITY Salt Lake City or Bidhannagar as it is popularly called, is a planned satellite town in the Indian state of West Bengal. It was developed between 1958 and 1965 to accommodate the burgeoning population of Kolkata, the state capital. It was supposed to be place for middle income group people fleeing the unbearable conditions and density of inner city. It was planed in a grid iron fashion with entire area geometrically divided into 68 blocks. It was intended to house approximately a population of

1,68,000 belonging to the then middle and high income groups of Kolkata. Its street hierarchy built to open relationship and demographics make it a comparable to Dwarka Sub City of Dwarka. People began to come and settle in Salt Lake in 70s. In 80s, Salt lake came to be know as a distinguished town in Kolkata. Many administrative offices of West Bengal Government were shifted from Kolkata to Salt Lake. Today Salt Lake is a city with mixed character.

FIG 2.32

DC | 42


SALT LAKE CITY, KOLKATA

SALT LAKE CITY CENTRE INFORMATION CLIENT TYPE COMPLETION YEAR ARCHITECT LOCATION SITE AREA BUILT UP AREA PARKING CLIMATE TOPOGRAPHY STRUCTURE

AMBUJA-NEOTIA GROUP MIXED USE COMMERCIAL 2004

CHARLES CORREA DC BLOCK , SECTOR – 1 , SALT LAKE CITY, KOLKATA 6.5 ACRE 50,400 SQ. M. 800 CARS WARM AND HUMID NO CONTOURS RCC FRAMEWORK, CLAY BRICK PARTITION

IMG 2.20

THE KUND (MAIN ENTRY)

DC | 43


DESIGN CONCEPT Charles Correa designed City Centre such that it fits in inherent lifestyle of its catchment area and further enhances it. It was designed to recreate the essence of twas very crucial aspects of its user’s lifestyle, ‘adda’ (a hangout space in local language) and ‘kund’ (Central located sit-out space around

a water body). This was done to seamlessly integrate retail with community and create a rich urban realm that attracts footfall for reasons more that just that of retail. It was conceived as microcosm of the whole metropolis, such that it caters to multiple land uses and diverse income profiles.

IMG 2.22

IMG 2.21

HANGOUT SPACES

AERIAL VIEW OF CITY CENTRE COMPOUND

SITE PLAN AND ITS ORGANIZATION • Clustered organization relies on physical proximity to relate its spaces to one another. • Often consist of repetitive, cellular spaces having similar functions and share common visual trait such as shape or orientation. • The site has a total of 14 access points all varying in size and nature depending upon the mode of transportation a user world choose to reach the site.

IMG 2.23

LOCATION OF CITY CENTRE IN SALT LAKE CITY

FIG 2.33

SITE 3D MASSING

DC | 44


PLANNING AND SERVICES It offers a wide range and nature of spaces ranging from a small ‘dukkan’ to large air conditioned boutique and anchor stores. These varying activities, all arranged in a fine grained mix, are generated by a complex system of spaces, from broad colonnaded public arcades to narrow street “galis” to large terraced plazas culminating in the ‘kund’ in the center of the complex. Coffee shops and restaurants, strategically placed at pivotal locations, provide opportunities to engage in social interactions further reinforcing the concept of integration of retail with community thought formation of ‘addas’. The City Centre has no compound walls. This helps in creating a perme-

FIG 2.35

FIG 2.37

DC | 45

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

THIRD FLOOR PLAN

able edge condition and renders a porous appearance to the compound. Closely placed orthogonal built forms help in creating narrow streets that give rise to interesting movement patterns through the compound.

FIG 2.34

FIG 2.36

FIG 2.38

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

FORTH FLOOR PLAN


PROJECT COMPONENTS • Retail (Small store, kiosk and anchor shops) • Food Court • Specialty Restaurant • Banquets • Residences • Cineplex

FIG 2.39

CIRCULATION PATTERN • Parametric vehicular movement for parking and movement through. • Parking is distributed throughout the site to enhance the all utility area of site. • Pedestrian movement at random natural movement inside project.

N

FIG 2.40

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

FIG 2.41

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

Circulation

Commercial Space

Public Plaza

Services

Vertical Movement Roof Pergola

FIG 2.42

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

DC | 46


NODAL POINTS In a built environment, it is crucial to create distinct nodal points and that is exactly how City Centre has been conceived. Nodal Points here act as hinges that facilitate the interrelations of different types of uses of the same facility and aid in smooth transition from one character of space to other. City Centre clearly highlights the nodal design language of this compound. Distinct nodal Points are created across the site which are then con-

FIG 2.43

nected through a network of covered bazaar street. For ease of access and increased penetration through the built mass there are some internal circulation routes as well. It is interesting to note how these nodal points differ from each other in order to possess distinct identity and render meaning to the spaces around them offering incentive to various user groups to visit all nodes subject to changing times and needs.

SCHEMATIC SECTION SHOWING STREET SYSTEM OF CITY CENTRE

FIG 2.44

SCHEMATIC PLAN SHOWING NODAL POINTS

STREET SYSTEM City Centre is widely regarded as Hybrid Mall. This largely owing to its unusual combination of mall design mix with the convenience of street system replication an Indian Bazaar. It is believed that as per the original design the streets were not meant to be covered, allowing full exposure to the outside climate. However the streets now have been covered with translucent fiber roofing system and punctures are left at only few predefined spots for the plantations in th street below. DC | 47

IMG 2.24

INTERNAL CORRIDOR


FUSING THE ‘BAZAAR’ AND THE MALL The concept of an Indian ‘bazaar’ is that of a highly personalized seller customer interaction in settling of variety of goods and services all placed together mostly along a narrow street. They are mostly characterized by their organic nature and humanized scale. The western concept of malls on the other hands is that of a large than human scape space planned and designed exclusively to cater to a ded-

IMG 2.25

FUSION OF THE MALL AND THE BAZAAR

icated user group. City Centre successfully brings the two together by carefully placing them in conjunction with each other, where the bigger boutique store are placed at the corners of each block and the smaller retailers are given spaces aligned in a series along narrow street cutting through these blocks extending from one edge of the compound to another.

IMG 2.26

IMG 2.27

COURTYARD VIEW

ENTRANCE

IMG 2.28

INTEGRATING INFORMAL BAZAAR

INTEGRATING INFORMAL BAZAAR An informal bazaar is characterized by its temporary nature and ease of access. Such a typology brings opportunities of engagement in an urban realm. The open space along the ‘kund’ is used for informal bazaar to enable users to easily access the

kiosks and ensure increased activity in the primary court. Since the court is opening on the outer edge it also helps in drawing footfall and adds to the urban realm around it. Fusion between organized and unorganized retail is a sure shot crowd puller. DC | 48


FIG 2.45

STUDY OF SHADOW PATTERN

LINKAGE ELEMENTS / SPACES

• The play with light and show is entertained by people at different time and different sense of spaces. • As plaza is interconnecting element the activity performed in this place imparts much leisure. • The shopping with entertainment concept of shoppertainment.

• Connecting corridors specially hidden line between outer streets towards inside. • It Inclusiveness for one. With no boundaries to separate it from the street, it is ope to everyone all income group and age groups. • Material used for pavement of mall resembles the street. • Tree placement in pathways and light arrangement.

IMG 2.29

INFERENCES

VIEW TO THE ‘KUND’

• The activities linked together by means of linking elements, which not only satisfies the function of activity ,but also provides visual connectivity creates harmony. • Concept of conventional Indian marketplace in replicated. • The space, volume and form should be designed considering the types of enclosures and the circulation pattern. • Nature of integration between built and open spaces, with the surrounding environment. • Consideration of Orientation of the building, as it creates shades and shadows on the external surfaces. • Obstructed servicing in staggered blocking planning. • Not much scope for informal activities. DC | 49


2. RESEARCH LITERATURE STUDY

INTENT OF STUDY: • To understand the common facilities provided for information and dissemination. • To study facade treatment, material, landscape and climate tempered courtyards. • To analyze the architecture character, circulation, services provided.

PROJECT Robert Mathew Johnson Marshall was appointed to develop a 6,500 seats capacity convention hall and 5-Star 287 bedrooms hotel for Hyderabad, India. This project is one of the first purpose built conference facilities in the sub-continent. The project is spread over 15 acres and is conveniently located within 45 minutes of the international airport. The main hall

was designed to be pillar free and to be subdivided into a further 6 small halls. Adjacent to the main hall is a pre-function foyer area of over 560 SQ. M. The conference facility was designed and built with a hotel component to cater towards the business traveler. The project was completed in 2005 and is managed by Accor Hotels.

HYDERABAD INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION CENTRE

FIG 2.46

DC | 50


HYDERABAD INTERNATIONAL

CONVENTION CENTRE INFORMATION CLIENT TYPE COMPLETION YEAR ARCHITECT LOCATION SITE AREA SIZE BUILT UP AREA GROUND COVERAGE SURFACE PARKING BASEMENT PARKING

EMAAR PROPERTIES DUBAI HOSPITALITY COMMERCIAL 2005

ROBERT MATHEW JOHNSON MARSHALL HI-TEX GATE, KOTHAGUDA, HYDERABAD 15 ACRE 27,000 SQ. M. 34,038 SQ. M. 15,922 SQ. M. 300 CARS 1000+

IMG 2.30

EXTERIOR OF H.I.C.C.

DC | 51


LOCATION • 18Km (33 min) from Hyderabad Deccan Station. • 35Km (50 min) from Secunderabad Station. • 7.1Km (17 min) from Miyapur Bus Stop NH-9. • 32Km (45 min) from Rajiv Gandhi International Airport. FIG 2.47

The Convention Centre is located in Cyberabad (near to Hi-tech City), Hyderabad. The Convention Centre is in Hyderabad’s IT hub and business district offering state of the art exhibition, meeting and convention services. It is conveniently located within 45 minutes of the international airport.

SITE PLAN

HYDERABAD INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION CENTRE

NOVOTEL CAR PARKING

HICC DOCK AREA

HICC CAR PARKING

STAFF ENTRY / EXIT

ATM

NOVOTEL HYDERABAD CONVENTION CENTRE

Metal Steps

GUEST ENTRY / EXIT

UP

TYPE 1

SWIMMING POOL

BO

UL

DE

RS

N

GA

TE

Novotel Gardens

Novotel Lawns

RS

DE

UL

BO

FIG 2.48

ERS

BOULD

Above site plan showing the Convention Centre and Business Hotel location on site. It also showing surface parking and Entry/Exit for Guest and Staff. DC | 52


FACILITIES AT H.I.C.C. • Custom built to handle versatile events – be it an international conference for 5000 delegates, a cocktail dinner for 4000 guests, a corporate party for 2000 people or even a board meeting for just 15. • 32 breakout rooms, including specialized meeting rooms, speaker preparatory rooms, boardrooms and VIP lounge. 16 – seater registration area. • Pillar-free internal hall of net 6,480 SQ. M that can hold a 5,000 - delegate plenary and can be partitioned into 6 halls. • A spacious pre-function foyer area of over 6,000 SQ. M of lobby space. • In house Event Management and Audio-Visual team. • 24*7 security with the latest surveillance technology. • Cutting edge design features including environmental sustainable practices. • 12.5M free ceiling height with catwalks and truss to withhold heavy suspension and mobile operable walls. • Service pits every 6M, with power, water and internet. • Private workspace for organizers and their guests. • In-built 100% power back-up generation capability. • 1000+ car parking base. • Automated telescopic tiered seating for 2600. • Loading dock for tailor-made capacities. • Separate entry & exit points. • Connected to 287-room Novotel Hyderabad, a 5 – star hotel.

CONVENTION CENTRE

IMG 2.31

DC | 53


FIG 2.49

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

Being the largest Convention Centre of the country, it provides platform for international events which helps in the growth of state as well as country. The most striking feature of the Convention Centre is the column free air conditioned hall with a clear height of 12.2M which provides a very wide option. The hall is flexible in size which can be divided into six parts which can function simultaneously. Aesthetic appeal of the building is highlighted glass facade. The backside of the building is used excellently in providing services and loading/unloading. PROJECT COMPONENT

FIG 2.50

DC | 54


VIEWING ANGLE IN THE CONVENTION HALL VIEW

REQUIREMENT (DEGREES)

PROVIDED (DEGREES)

View without head movement

30

48

With slight head movement

60

73

110

111

Max. Perception

FIG 2.51

FIG 2.52

DC | 55

FIRST FLOOR PLAN


FIG 2.53

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

PARKING It has parking space for 300 car at surface and there is provision 1000+ car park in basement. In addition there is 25 bus parking and 500 two wheelers parking.

VISITOR PARKING The visitor can park the vehicles either in the front or rear depending on the mode of transportation. In case of meetings and conventions, the visitors are dropped near the main entrance approached by a roundabout. Many entrance approached by 8m wide road. Parking for 300 cars at the surface level at the Centre itself for delegates. Secondary parking lot is available at the service zone for the service trucks and staff vehicles. For VVIP drop is from eastern side of the Centre, to provide direct access for the guest at the Centre. DC | 56


FIG 2.54

FIG 2.55

FIRST FLOOR PLAN ZONING

SECOND FLOOR PLAN ZONING

CONVENTION HALL

FIG 2.56

DC | 57

It covers 56% of ground coverage. It has area of 6480 SQ. M. It has the capacity of 500 delegate plenary and it can be partitioned into 6 smaller halls. A spacious pre-function foyer area of total 890 SQ. M. Partitions run with a track concealment system. Projection Screen of 18’x 16’provided.


FIG 2.57

FIG 2.58

FIG 2.59

DC | 58


IMG 2.32

IMG 2.33

ENTRANCE FOYER

IMG 2.34

HALL - ROUND TABLE STYLE SEATING

IMG 2.36

CONFERENCE ROOM

ENTRANCE FOYER

IMG 2.35

IMG 2.37

HALL - THEATER STYLE SEATING

CONFERENCE HALL

INFERENCES • A linear arrangement of Public space, convention hall and service area is seen. • A convention hall should be divisible in multiple parts. • Light brown stone cladding with structural glazing façade give a very recent modern look. Use of Steel canopies add to that feel. • The very recent trend in using stone, glass and steel as aesthetic elements is seen here. Throughout as mass but has five protrusions on a facade,. • Huge manicured garden, large steel canopy on drop off, huge interior spaces, tiled in shades of brown feeling of grandeur. DC | 59


DC | 60

Year of Comple- 1993 tion Architect Joseph Allen Stein

Project Statement Site Area Built Up Area Ground Coverage Number of Access Points Connectivity

Parking

2.2

3 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4

3.6

3.5

2.3

Type

2.2

HYDERABAD INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION CENTRE

Combination of Functioning and layout of a Street like shop- Convention Centre. ping experience in a mall with great public plaza.

SALT LAKE CITY CENTRE

Vehicular, Metro (Distant) and Bus Surface Parking-60 Basement Parking - 993

38,400 SQ. M. 53,241 SQ. M. 9,609 SQ. M. 3

14

26,304 SQ. M. 50,400 SQ. M.

Charles Correa

2004

60702 SQ. M. 34,038 SQ. M. 15,922 SQ. M. 2

Robert Mathew Johnson Marshall

2005

Com- Cultural and Commercial

Vehicular, Metro (Dis- Vehicular and Met- Mostly Vehicular tant) and Bus ro Basement 1 - 370 Cars 800 Cars Surface Parking-300 Basement 2 - 470 Cars Basement Parking- 1000+ Basement 3 - 270 Cars

15,884 SQ. M. 62,862 SQ. M. 9698 SQ. M. 4

Tevatia Chauha

2007

Cultural and Institution- Mixed Use Commercial Mixed Use al mercial

Lodhi Road, New Delhi Saket District Centre, DC Block , Sector HI-TEX Gate, Kothaguda, HyDelhi – 1 , Salt Lake City, derabad Kolkata

Basic Information Location

2 2.1

SELECT CITY WALK

Integration of various Mix of various functions allied facilities with like Retail shops, Food convention Centre courts and Multiplex with lush green landscape.

INDIA HABITAT CENTRE

Selection Criteria

PARAMETERS

1

S. NO.

2.6 COMPARATIVE MATRIX


DC | 61

Shape Vertical Transportation Number of Stories Public Space

Material Pallet

Expression

4.2 4.3

4.6

4.7

4.4 4.5

Architecture Components

4 4.1

The very Recent Trend in using stone, glass and steel as aesthetic elements is seen here. Throughout a cuboid mass but has 5 protrusions on a facade. Huge manicured garden, large steel Canopy on drop off, huge interior spaces, tiled in shades of brown give a feeling of grandeur.

Light Brown Stone Cladding with structural Glazing Facade, Use of steel in Canopies.

G+2 Indoor Only

Rectangular Stair, Escalators and Lifts

Retail Shops, Of- Convention Hall, 21 Meeting fices, Food Court, Rooms, Business Centre Hotel Multiplex, Public Plaza

L-Shape Clustered Stair, Lift and Escalators Stair and Lifts

Retail Shops, Offices Amphitheater, Food Court, Multiplex, Service Apartments

G+5+2B G+6+3B G+3 Well Designed Semi Large Interactive Pub- Lively Public Space covered Public Space lic Space Kund and Shopping Street Exposed Brick Work Granite Stone Facade Colorful Paint Finwith exposed R.C.C. in with Glass Store Glaz- ish on the Elevation Cantilevered Corridors, ing on Ground Floor, with black marble Ceramic Tiles - Green, Combination of Dark flooring in interior Red and Grey used in and light brown stone and combination extensions to define in flooring. of brown and black vertically and also in instone in public plateriors of lobby and lifts. zas. The building are Being a high end Concept of congrouped around semi commercial com- ventional Indian Covered Courts and plex the grand plaza marketplace in linked at 5th and 6th in front make it ac- replicated. Confloor level and above cessible to diverse sideration of Oriby bridges to form segment of people. entation of the huge gateways for Hierarchy and strong building, as it creentrance into various interrelationship of ates shades and zones or courts. The spaces plaza corri- shadows on the vertical long windows, dors atrium shops. external surfaces. red stone and green- Excellent servicing ery complement each by rear side service other. lane and service corridors along the back.

L-Shape Stair and Lifts

Offices, 10 Conference Hall, Exhibition Area ,Auditorium, Cafeteria, Amphitheater, 60 Guest Rooms, 5 Suites


DC | 62

3.

2.

1.

Capacity

Number

Area

Number

Capacity

Area

Exhibition

Conference Hall

Pre-function Area

Capacity

Height

Number

Area

Auditorium

S. NO. PARAMETERS

700 SQ.M.

1 537

150

1

10

25-120

28-128 SQ. M.

575 SQ. M.

INDIA HABITAT SELECT CITY CENTRE WALK

2.7 AREA COMPARATIVE MATRIX SALT LAKE CITY CENTRE

6,807 SQ. M.

6,000 SQ. M.

12.2M

6,480 SQ. M.

5,000

1300 SQ. M.

1700

2

950

2

30

15-120

30-140 SQ. M.

1100 SQ. M.

12M

700 SQ. M.

HYDERABAD INTERNATIONAL DISTRICT CENTRE CONVENTION CENTRE


DC | 63

7.

6.

5.

4.

Number

Area

Capacity

Eatery

Function Hall

Number

Size

Area

Retail Space

8

400 SQ. M. 2

25-170

28-465 SQ. M.

3.75

14.15M X 14.15M & 33.1M X 4.75M

Spaces

Floor to Floor Height

40,000 SQ. M.

Area

Offices 10,080 SQ. M.

6100 SQ. M. 33

7560 SQ. M.

370-600 SQ. M.

24,650 SQ. M. 25,704 SQ. M.

4,840 SQ. M.

2

1000 SQ. M.

1300 SQ. M.

6500 SQ. M.

15

850

2

3.75

7.00M X 34.00M & 7.00M X 40.00M

20,000 SQ. M.


3. PROJECT SITE

FIG 3.1 FIG 3.2

FIG 3.3

FIG 3.4

DC | 64


SITE INFORMATION 3.1 INTRODUCTION CLIENT LOCATION AREA F.A.R. MAXIMUM PERMISSIBLE HEIGHT GROUND COVERAGE SETBACKS PARKING TOPOGRAPHY VEGETATION CLIMATE

FIG 3.5

DC | 65

DELHI DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY SECTOR 10, ROHINI, DELHI 4.49 HECTARES (11 ACRES) 125 26M 30% 9M 3.0 E.C.S. PLAIN SITE SHRUB COVER COMPOSITE


3.2 UNDERSTANDING THE CONTEXT

ROHINI, DELHI

EXISTING POPULATION : 8.5 LAKH PROPOSED POPULATION : 18.7 LAKH

Rohini is the second largest Sub-City in Asia, after Dwarks Sub-City in South West Delhi. It was the first Sub-City Project of Delhi Development Authority (DDA), which was started in 1980s, to provide a composite society for all income groups. It is predominantly a residential project on 2947 Hectare of land within a distance of 15KM from Connaught Place

AREA : 2497 Hac.

in continuation of Shalimar Bagh and Pitampura residential schemes. The area is situated along the Outer Ring Road between the two major traffic corridors- The G.T. road with Railway line to Karnal and Rohtak Road. Neighbour areas are Pitampura, Shalimar Bagh, Mangol Puri, Paschim Vihar, Narela Sub City, Mukarba chowk.

IMG 3.1

STATISTICS LAND USE DISTRIBUTION IN ROHINI: LAND USE RESIDENTIAL GROUP HOUSING COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL PUBLIC, SEMI-PUBLIC FACILITIES CIRCULATION

AREA 1413 Hac. 108 Hac. 482 Hac. 126 Hac. 155 Hac.

POPULATION: ROHINI (PHASE I AND II): AREA: 2015 HA., POPULATION: 8.4 lakhs. ROHINI (PHASE III): AREA: 1010 HA., POPULATION: 1.6 lakhs. ROHINI (PHASE IV & V): AREA: 4533 HA., POPULATION: 2 Lakhs. ECONOMIC STATUS:

2004-2005 CENSUS BY PLANNING COMMISSION

# 29% OF POPULATION LIVES BELOW 25000 Rs/ANNUM (BPL) # 37% OF POPULATION LIVES BELOW 50000 Rs/ANNUM (LOWER MIDDLE CLASS) # 14.3% OF POPULATION LIVES ABOVE 100000 Rs/ANNUM (AFFLUENT FAMILIES) DC | 66


TWIN DISTRICT CENTRE Rohini has emerged as a hub of commerce and entertainment with the Twin District Centre. The Delhi Development Authority is planning to make Rohini into a fully integrated township and hence planned Twin District Centres each spread over 32 Hac. The Twin Districts has well defined zones for retail malls, corporate offices, and cultural and entertainment zones like food courts, multiplex and amphitheater. The District Centre has metro connectivity (Rohini West and Rithala Metro Stations) and is separated by a central green area of about 100 Hactares made up of gardens, amusement parks and leisure areas. In DC-1, a lot of commercial and multiplex spaces has come up like Crown Plaza Hotel, City Centre Mall, Unity One Mall,

FIG 3.6

DC | 67

Ambiance Mall, D-Mall. Between the District Centre is a large park that provides green belt and thereby help in increasing the visual appeal to the project. Also between the District Centres exists “The Metro Walk Mall and Adventure Island� that sprawl over 64 acres of site. The project encompasses a shopping mall, Metro Walk and Adventure Island, a world class amusement park and a water park. There has also been made a provision for multilevel parking. The DMRC created a multilevel parking which can accommodate 550 cars at Rohini West Metro Station. Along with a mall, Unity One Mall that has shopping, multiplex and restaurants.


3.3 SITE ANALYSIS

FIG 3.7

# Located in Twin District Centre a developing hub at center of Rohini for commercial activities. # Access Roads on all sides. # Dense residential area around these site. (Mostly MIG) # Grand public park and adventure land at north west side. # Various high end malls and hotels in proximity.

FIG 3.8

DC | 68


IMG 3.2

IMG 3.3

LEGEND

High tension Electric

Cable

Waste Water Dis-

charge

Fire Service

Trees

FIG 3.9

IMG 3.4

DC | 69

IMG 3.5


3.4 SITE CONNECTIVITY

FIG 3.10

SWARN JYANTI PARK

SWARN JYANTI PARK

FIG 3.11

PEDESTRIAN AND VEHICULAR ZONES

EXISTING NOISE LEVEL

POSSIBLE PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENT

MAXIMUM

POSSIBLE VEHICULAR MOVEMENT

MEDIUM

POSSIBLE SERVICE MOVEMENT

MINIMUM

FIG 3.12

SWARN JYANTI PARK

FIG 3.13

SWARN JYANTI PARK

PEDESTRIAN ZONE

VEHICULAR ZONE

MAJOR PEDESTRIAN FLOW

MAJOR VEHICULAR FLOW

MAJOR PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENT

MAJOR VEHICULAR MOVEMENT

RESIDENTIAL ZONE

RESIDENTIAL ZONE

INSTITUTIONAL ZONE

INSTITUTIONAL ZONE

DC | 70


TRANSIT CONNECTIVITY SITE SITS VERY CLOSE TO CENTRE OF THE METRO CONNECTED ZONES. SITE HAS ALL SIDE ACCESS WITH ROADS. SITE CAN BE ACCESS WITH 36M ROAD FROM 3 SIDES AND 40M ROAD FORM ONE SIDE. SITE IS VERY NEAR TO THE DELHI TRANSPORT AUTHORITY BUS STOP. IT HAS TWO BUS STOP IN ITS PROXIMITY NAMED, ‘E.S.I. BUS STOP’, AND ‘ROHINI DEPOT 2 BUS STOP’. SITE ALSO HAS TWO METRO STATION NEARBY NAMED, ‘ROHINI WEST’ AND ‘RITHALA’.

FIG 3.14

ROAD

FIG 3.15

METRO

KEY POINTS: # ROAD ACCESS FROM ALL SIDES. # 300M FROM NEAREST BUS STAND. # 1.5KM AWAY FROM METRO STATION. # 15.5KM FROM NEW DELHI RAILWAY STATION. # 23.2KM FROM INDIRA GANDHI INTER NATIONAL AIRPORT.

BUS STOP

FIG 3.16

FIG 3.17

DC | 71

FIG 3.18


3.5 CLIMATIC STUDY

FIG 3.19

The geographical location of Delhi is 28o 35’N latitude and 77o 12’E longitude. It is located at an altitude of 216 meter above mean sea level. Delhi is situated on the banks of Yamuna River. The climate of Delhi is extreme. Winter begins in late November or early December. Summer arrives in early April and continues up to late June. Monsoon season starts in the late June or first week of July. Autumn season starts by mid October marked with warm days and pleasant nights. Maximum temperature drops below 30o C and minimum temperature drops below 20o C and there is a gradual fall in average temperature. A particular season does not prevail for more than six months in Delhi and therefore Delhi is placed in a Composite climate. Composite climates are neither consistently hot and dry nor warm and humid. The main consideration for the designer in the composite climate is to create balance between conservation of heat in the winters and exclusion of heat in summer. AVERAGE TEMPERATURE

FIG 3.20

• In summer temperature goes upto 45o C or even more. • Average temperature in summer varies from 25o C to 45o C. • In monsoon temperature drops below 40o C. • In winter, temperature varies from 5o C to 22o C. • By early January, the minimum temperature is close to 0o C and maximum is in single digit. DC | 72


CLIMATE AVERAGE RAINFALL • August is the wettest month. • Mean rainfall is 232.5 mm in the month of August. • The mean annual rainfall is 762mm. • Because of high level of humidity this season is uncomfortable.

FIG 3.21

AVERAGE WINDSPEED • The wind is generally from one or two direction. • Most often the wind is out of the west and north-west. • Sometimes it is out of the east but it is least often out of south and north.

FIG 3.22

FIG 3.23

FIG 3.26

DC | 73

SUMMER JUNE - MAY, 2001

FIG 3.24

WINTER JANUARY - FEBRUARY, 2001

FIG 3.27

FIG 3.25

MONSOON JULY - AUGUST, 2001


3.6 SITE DOCUMENTATION SITE PLAN

FIG 3.28

DC | 74


SITE SECTION

FIG 3.29

DC | 75


SITE VIEW 1 6 1 4

5

2

IMG 3.7

2

3

IMG 3.6

3

IMG 3.9

5

IMG 3.11

IMG 3.8

4

IMG 3.10

6

IMG 3.12

DC | 76


SITE CONTEXT 1

PARK GATE

7

2

3

1 IMG 3.13

8

2

PETROL PUMP

6 4

5 IMG 3.14

ESIC HOSPITAL

IMG 3.15

3

IMG 3.16

CROWN PLAZA

IMG 3.19

DC | 77

AMBIENCE MALL

4

IMG 3.17

6

TRANSPORT AUTHORITY

IMG 3.20

UNITY ONE MALL AND MULTILEVEL PARKING

5

IMG 3.18

7

VEER APARTMENTS

IMG 3.21

8


STRENGTHS • Swarn Jayanti Park next to the site with large green open spaces and lakes. • Easy accessibility by public transport, that is by bus and metro. • Site surrounded by roads on all sides. • Trees line the edges of major roads that can act as noise barrier. • Residential and institutional neighborhood provide opportunity for the site. OPPORTUNITY

• The project will give economic opportunities to people in residential area and generate recreational atmosphere in the region. • Can give views to the park. • No such facility is present in the vicinity, can become good focal point for cultural activities for surrounding communities. • Can cater to a larger public due to good connectivity of site.

DC | 78


WEAKNESS • Large vacant land near to the site which is used as temporary tent for wedding ceremonies or even as dump yard, thus gives unaesthetic views. • Safety issues due to less activity pattern along private edges of the site. • Not enough good views around site except Swarn Jayanti Park along one edge. THREATS

• The success of the project does not depends only on the built environment it might not be able to generate good footfall. • Safety issues on site can become threat for the project.

DC | 79


4. PROGRAMMATIC DETAILS 4.1 COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM

FIG 4.2

Each function will have its separate entry/exit.

FIG 4.1

COMPONENTS OPERATION COMPONENT

FUNCTION

USE TIME

CONVENTION

Occasionally

8-10 Hours at a Stretch

FUNCTIONAL HALL

Occasionally

12-14 Hours at a Stretch

OFFICES

Daily

8 A.M. - 6 P.M.

RETAIL

Daily

10 A.M. - 11 P.M.

Eatery

Daily

10 A.M. - 11 P.M.

SUPPORT

Daily

24x7

Project encompasses creating a Socio-cultural Centre that offers conventional and commercial spaces. Convention Centre includes spaces such as Auditorium, Conference and Exhibition. Retail aspect of the project has been conceived as high street retail in order to bring down the rentals and hence to compensate the office component is designed as high rise.

DC | 80


PROGRAM 4.2 AREA RELATIONSHIP MATRIX

AUDITORIUM CONFERENCE FUNCTION HALL EXHIBITION LOUNGE OFFICE SPACE RETAIL EATERY SUPPORT PARKING FIG 4.3

DC | 81

LOW MEDIUM HIGH


4.3 INDIVIDUAL COMPONENT FLOW

FIG 4.4

AUDITORIUM

FIG 4.5

FUNCTION HALL

FIG 4.6

CONFERENCE

FIG 4.7

EXHIBITION

FIG 4.8

LOUNGE

FIG 4.9

FOOD COURT DC | 82


OFFICE

FIG 4.10

RETAIL

FIG 4.11

4.4 SITE PROGRAM DESIGN PROGRAM S. NO.

PARAMETERS

SITE DETAILS

1

Area of Site

44,977 SQ. M.

2

Permissible F.A.R.

125

3

Permissible Height

26 M

4

Permissible Ground Coverage

25%

5

Setbacks

9M

6

Parking Norms

3 E.C.S.

S. NO.

PARAMETERS

AREAS AS PER DEVELOPMENT CONTROL NORMS

1

Permissible Built Up Area

56,586 SQ. M.

2

Permissible Ground Coverage

11,244 SQ. M.

3

Total Permissible of Car Parking 1697

S. NO.

PARAMETERS

ACHIEVED

1

Built-up Area

45448

2

F.A.R.

101

3

Achieved Ground Coverage

10,890

4

Total Occupancy

14410

FUNCTION PERCENTAGE TYPE

BUILT-UP AREA

PERCENTAGE

CULTURAL

18607

41%

COMMERCIAL

26841

59%

According to Delhi Development Authority’s request for proposal for the Socio-Cultural Centre at Twin District Centre, Rohini, the share in built-up area for commercial should not be more than 60%. DC | 83


DC | 84

3. FUNCTION HALL

2. CONFERENCE

1. AUDITORIUM

S. NO. NAME

SPACE

OCCASIONALLY

30 45 70 20

Conference Room (Triangular Style)

Conference Room (Boat Style)

Conference Room (Classroom Style)

Reception

Storage Facilities

15

200

Reception/Foyer

Kitchen

80

Pre-function Area

850

18

Conference Room (Rectangular Style)

Hall

10

15

Conference Room (Rectangular Style)

50

Reception

3

Canteen

Control Room

O.A.T.

Storage Facilities 300

1145

195

OCCASIONALLY

OCCASIONALLY

30

Pre-function Area

Workshop

20

Rehearsal Room

PEDESTRIAN VEHICULAR

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN VEHICULAR

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN VEHICULAR

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN VEHICULAR

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN

25

Green Room

1993

PEDESTRIAN PEDESTRIAN VEHICULAR PEDESTRIAN

700

ACCESS

Stage

850

Foyer

FREQUENCY

ANALYSIS

OCCUPANCY OCCUPANCY (O) PER SPACE

Main Hall

SPACE

4.5 AREA PROGRAM AREA REQUIREMENTS

PRIVATE

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

PUBLIC

PUBLIC

PUBLIC

SEMI-PUBLIC

SEMI-PUBLIC

SEMI-PUBLIC

SEMI-PUBLIC

SEMI-PUBLIC

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

PRIVATE

PRIVATE

PRIVATE

SEMI-PUBLIC

SEMI-PUBLIC

SEMI-PUBLIC

SEMI-PUBLIC

SEMI-PUBLIC

PUBLIC

PUBLIC

2

2

1.5

2

2

3

3

3

3

2

4

1

7

7

2.75

0.5

0.8

26

100

400

160

1275

40

140

135

90

54

30

30

200

32

300

100

100

210

140

69

290

350

680

2

2

2

2

2

1

4

8

8

8

8

2

2

2

1

2

2

2

2

4

2

2

2

52

200

800

320

2550

40

560

1080

720

432

240

60

400

64

300

200

200

420

280

275

580

700

1360

3922

3072

6199

2290

740

3636

AREA STANDARD NUMBER TOTAL AREA BUA (T) TOTAL PRIVACY (A=S*O) (S) (N) (A*N) SQ. M. SQ. M. OCCUPANCY SQ.M.


DC | 85

10. PARKING

9. SUPPORT

8. EATERY

7. RETAIL

6. OFFICE

5. LOUNGE

4. EXHIBITION

10

Reception

25 950

Retail Space

Supermarket

DAILY

PEDESTRIAN VEHICULAR

PEDESTRIAN

Storage Facilities

Car Parking @ 3ECS/100SQM

PEDESTRIAN

Pantry

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN

IT Room

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN VEHICULAR

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN

Security & Maintenance DAILY

DAILY

PEDESTRIAN VEHICULAR

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN VEHICULAR

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN VEHICULAR

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN VEHICULAR

PEDESTRIAN VEHICULAR

Booking Office

0

365

DAILY

DAILY

DAILY

OCCASIONALLY

PEDESTRIAN

0

10

350

1017

1710

320

1250

PEDESTRIAN

PEDESTRIAN

Administration Office

Storage Facilities

Seating

5

20

Retail Space

Food Counter

7 15

Retail Space

10

Retail Space

Reception

1700

40

Office Plates

20

Gaming Zone

250

Pantry + Bar Counter

Seating Space

Loading/Storage

20

280

Foyer

Reception

950

Gallery

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

PRIVATE

PRIVATE

PRIVATE

PRIVATE

PRIVATE

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

PUBLIC

PUBLIC

PUBLIC

PUBLIC

PUBLIC

PUBLIC

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

SEMI-PUBLIC

SEMI-PUBLIC

SEMI-PUBLIC

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

PUBLIC

SEMI-PUBLIC

32

1.8

4

3.5

3.5

3

2.75

12

2

5

1.6

2

1.3

1.4

0

30

20

60

40

70

70

100

630

30

3800

88

70

45

19

70

20400

20

250

100

400

30

40

364

1330

1

1

1

1

1

2

2

1

1

12

1

4

22

4

26

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

2

0

30

20

60

40

140

140

100

630

360

3800

350

1540

180

500.5

70

20400

20

250

100

400

60

40

364

2660

0

430

1090

6371

20470

770

3124

0

420

1732

1710

320

2200


5. TECHNOLOGICAL SYSTEMS 5.1 SUSTAINABILITY BUILT FORM AND ORIENTATION The main orientation of the building should be within 30° of south. Oriented to east of south will benefit from the morning sun. Those orientated west of south will catch the late afternoon sun – which can help delay the evening heating period. FIG 5.1

SHADE

FIG 5.2

Pushing Glass facade back will reduce direct penetration of sun in summer.

FIG 5.3

DAYLIGHT Orientation #1 is poor, #2 is good and #3 is best.

FIG 5.4

Cutouts in a building’s footprint can provide good daylight.

FIG 5.5

FIG 5.6

DC | 86


TECHNOLOGY JSC "Plantas", www.plantas.lt Pramones str. 6, Klaipeda. Tel.:(+370) 46341339 Motorų str. 6, Vilnius. Tel.:(+370) 52329530

5.2 FACADE

P

L A

VENTILATED FACADE 1

A ventilated facade is a construction method whereby a physical separation is created between the outside of the facade and the interior wall of the building. This separation creates an open cavity allowing the exchange of the air contained between the wall and the outer cladding. The cavity provides a range of thermal, acoustic, aesthetic and functional advantages. Ventilated facades significantly reduce noise levels, cutting them by up to half. JSC "Plantas", www.plantas.lt Pramones str. 6, Klaipeda. Tel.:(+370) 46341339 Motorų str. 6, Vilnius. Tel.:(+370) 52329530

Internal Heat Flow: Laying insulation on the exterior part of the wall prevents thermal bridges across the facade. Heat loss towards the outside in winter is blocked, as is the heat coming from the outside in summer, resulting in energy savings of between 15% and 35%, both in terms of heating and air conditioning. External Heat Flow: Laying insulation on the exterior part of the wall provides the building with greater thermal mass. This increases the building’s thermal inertia and producing a more comfortable ambiance. The wall tile acts as a screen, reflecting a great deal of the solar radiation and preventing it from entering the building.

1

DC | 87

FIG 5.9

L A

N T A S

3

2 6

5

2

7 4

FIG 5.7 1.

1.

8

Anchor

Anchor

5. L/T profile

laying PE 2. Thermal insulation 6. Rivet cladding 3. Bracket KF/KP7.8. Facade Thermal insulation 4. Self drilling screw/rivet

2. Thermal insulation laying PE 3. Bracket KF/KP 4. Self drilling screw/rivet

5. L/T profile 6. Rivet

Detail shoul d be esti mated only as i nstr uc ti on f or installation mater ials f rom JSC "Plantas" supplies . JS C "P lantas" is not r esponsible f or building insulation, sealing or any other solutions, that are not r e l ate d w i th J S C " Pl an tas " i ns ta ll a tio n m at er i al s .

Detail shoul d be esti installation mater ials

JSC "Plantas" is no 7. Facade cladding insulation, sealing or a ® JSC "Plantas" r e l ate d w i th J S C " Pl a 8. Thermal insulation

SECTIONAL DETAIL OF VENTILATED FACADE 1 22

Cladding:

Detail code:

Fiber cement/ HPL siding

FH - 01

Detail name:

Sheet Sheets

Typical vertical section

Detail code:

Cladding:

Fiber cement/ HPL siding

FIG 5.10 FIG 5.8

P

FH - 01

Detail name:

Typical vertical se


DRY WALL CLADDING • Method allow for expansion and contraction of cladding panel/stone/tile in extreme weather conditions. • The dry cladding method creates a gap of around 30-45mm in between back wall and cladding panel/stone/tile, providing a layer of air cushion that acts as a thermal barrier. DOUBLE GLAZED LOW-E GLASS FACADE • Low-E is an additive or very thin layer incorporated to the glass composition. It limit the amount of heat transmitted through glass as well as UV-rays. It allows just the right amount of natural light into a building, while at the same time reduces glare. • Double glazing is two glass panels with a layer of air in between. The concept is the air in between makes minimizes the transfer of heat from the two sides of the glass.

FIG 5.11

5.3 ROOF BROKEN CHINA MOSAIC TERRACING Well-graded broken pieces of glossy glazed tiles provide an inexpensive and conducive cool roofing option. Broken pieces of glazed tiles (preferably white) are embedded in wet mortar to provide a smooth surface that does not undulate. Joints are then grouted using cement mortar with waterproofing material.

IMG 5.1

DC | 88


GREEN ROOF Green roof tops with living vegetation provide green spaces, mitigate urban heat island, energy conservation, improving the air quality and increases biodiversity. It give pleasure to th city dwellers and provide an opportunity for enhancing creativity as well psychological benefits.

FIG 5.12

FIG 5.13

5.4 STRUCTURE COMPONENT

SUB COMPONENT

SPAN

STRUCTURE VERTICAL

HORIZONTAL

AUDITORIUM

Hall Foyer Backstage

30M

Frame System

Truss and Slab

FUNCTION HALL

Hall Pre-function Kitchen

50M

Frame System

Beam and Slab

EXHIBITION

Hall Workshop

50M

Frame System

Beam and Slab

OFFICE

Office-space

100M

Frame System

Beam and Slab

CONFERENCE

Conference Room 100M

Frame System

Beam and Slab

RETAIL

Supermarket

Frame System

Beam and Slab

DC | 89

50M


5.5 STANDARDS

FIG 5.14

FIG 5.15

AUDITORIUM WIDTH

SUPER ELEVATION OF SEATING (GRADIENT)

FIG 5.16

SEAT DIMENSION

FIG 5.17

Division of space using modular desks. Various office spaces in open plan office system: a) manager with small meeting or conference room; b)assistant or departmental head;c) secretary, receptionist; d) senior clerk dealing with public; e)Work Rooms (Working groups).

FIG 5.18 Swivel Chair Work Space

FIG 5.19 Swivel Chair on Caster Work Space

FIG 5.20 Rows with Tables (Staggered Seating)

FIG 5.21 Blocks with In-line Seating

DC | 90


5.6 MATERIALS NEXION SURFACE

SAINT GOBAIN

• It is durable in prolonged exposure to the direct sun. • It has outstanding resistant to chemicals, smog and thermal shocks. • Available in 120x240, 120x120, 80x160, 60x120, 80x80, 60x60, 30x60cm • Available in 9mm thickness.

• Extremely Low Internal Reflection • Advance Solar Protection • Available in 5mm, 6mm and 8mm (10mm and 12mm on request)

HORIZON

ENDLESS CONCRETE

IMG 5.5

CHINA MOSAIC TILES

IMG 5.3

*AVORIO

• Also called cheap tukdi tiles • Available in 6-7mm • It protect form sun heating • Used for roof, wall

IMG 5.4

*BEIGE

IMG 5.2

IMG 5.6

5.7 SERVICES DAILY WATER CONSUMPTION S. No.

AREA COMPONENT

CARPET AREA

PER CAPITA CONSUMPTION OCCUPANCY (LPCD)

TOTAL CONSUMPTION (L/Day)

1Auditorium

6200

15/Seat

1700

25500

2Exhibition

3124

45

2200

99000

3Function Hall

3922

45

2290

103050

20470

45

1710

76950

5Conference

3072

45

740

33300

6Retail

6371

45

1713

77085

Total

414885

4Office

HEAT VENTILATION & AIR CONDITIONING (HVAC) S. No.

AREA COMPONENT

CAPACITY REQUIRED FOR COOLING OF EVERY 9.3 SQ. M. (100 SQ. FT.) IS 1 TR

CAPACITY

1Auditorium

6200

666.667

667

2Exhibition

3124

335.914

336

3Function Hall

3922

421.720

422

4Office

DC | 91

CARPET AREA

20470

2201.075

2201

5Conference

3072

330.323

330

6Retail

6371

685.054

685

Total

4641


6. DESIGN EVOLUTION 6.1 CONCEPT EVOLUTION SITE ZONING To make the site more pedestrian friendly and encouraging more green open space, the concept will include following design decisions. The site is located in the proximity of residential and recreational areas, so there will be a major flow of pedestrians from the existing buildings near the site and from public transit, the built should be pushed back with large open space in front. The office space

are zones along major vehicular access to the site, and the cultural and retail spaces towards the main pedestrian access. This will allow site to have more open and green spaces for the public and also create a sound barrier for the sound coming from the traffic. Having retail space near the cultural will attract more crowd from Cultural Centre, hence both work as catalyst for each other.

CONNECTING PUBLIC PLAZAS • Urban parks and open spaces break up the monotony of concrete, allowing city dwellers the opportunity to connect with nature. • The attraction of a place for public is facilitated through providing multiple green public plazas at different locations which are connected with each other and with other facilities. MOVEMENT THROUGH NODAL POINT Movement loop of precinct is anchored by nodes in a sequence. In built environment, it is crucial to create distinct nodal points. Nodal Points here act as hinges that

facilitate the distinct nature and scale in order to cater to the entire spectrum of varying user groups and aid in smooth transition from one character of space to other.

DC | 92


CONCEPT

FIG 6.1

Defining zones for all three activities on site. Cultural activities and retail activities will located along major pedestrian access. And office will be pushed back along main vehicular access.

FIG 6.2

All three activities rearranged with the creation of open green plazas to facilitate more public appealing. Further the plazas are connected with each other and with other facilities.

Creation of movement pattern on site and pushing activities according to the site movement pattern. PEDESTRIAN VEHICULAR FIG 6.3

DC | 93


EXPLORATION OF BUILD FORM

OPTION 1

FIG 6.4

• Direct access to Culture Centre. • Lack in public walkway along green space. • Office building has very good view on all sides. • Less built-up area for office building. • Street like retail shopping. • Less area for public plaza and open green space.

OPTION 2

FIG 6.5

• Has direct access to Culture Centre. • Potential to create promenade on ground floor. • Building block view on one side of office building. • Significant built-up area for office building. • Significant area for open green space.

VERTICAL SEGREGATION OF FUNCTION • A vertical organization of functions offers greater control over the movement flow on site and it ease the access routes for the functions. • Also, it adds to the security of the Convention, banquet and retail facilities.

FIG 6.6

DC | 94


SERIES OF OPEN SPACES • To develop series of open spaces that are linked through transition spaces. There have to be multiple open, semi covered and covered spaces that promote interactions. These interactive spaces shall be so designed that it attracts people. • Also, provides the public with necessary breather through big green seating spaces and spill out zones.

FIG 6.7

FIG 6.8

MERGE WITH URBAN FABRIC • Urban fabric reflects the morphological composition of physical elements within a certain areas. • Maintaining the urban fabric makes the city a vibrant place to live. • Architects typically give consideration to the urban fabric when designing buildings in towns or cities, sometimes preparing drawings that emphasis the layout of an area and the interrelationships between its elements rather than the buildings themselves. • Exterior plays a major role in retaining the urban fabric of certain area.

IMG 6.1

DC | 95

IMG 6.2


6.2 CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK SOLAR ANALYSIS ANNUAL ISOLATION

FIG 6.10

FIG 6.9

GROUND ANNUAL ISOLATION

FIG 6.11

AVERAGE SUMMER ISOLATION

FIG 6.13

FIG 6.12

GROUND ANNUAL ISOLATION

FIG 6.14

AVERAGE WINTER ISOLATION

FIG 6.16

FIG 6.15

GROUND ANNUAL ISOLATION

FIG 6.17

DC | 96


SHADOW PATTERN ON SITE SUMMER (09AM - 07PM) @2HOUR INTERVAL

FIG 6.18

FIG 6.19

FIG 6.20

FIG 6.21

FIG 6.22

FIG 6.23

WINTER (08AM - 07PM) @2HOUR INTERVAL

FIG 6.24

FIG 6.25

FIG 6.26

FIG 6.27

FIG 6.28

FIG 6.29

SHADE ON SOUTH FACADE DECEMBER 21 AT 1 PM

JUNE 6 AT 1 PM

FIG 6.30

FIG 6.31

WIND TUNNEL SIMULATION

FIG 6.32

DC | 97

FIG 6.33


DAYLIGHT ILLUMINANCE Daylight illuminance analyzed at date June 6th, 2019 (Summer Solstice) and December 21st, 2019 (Winter Solstice)between time 09 AM and 01 PM & 01 PM and 05 PM. It shows daylight visualization on interior floors.

FIG 6.34

FIG 6.36

FIG 6.38

June 6th, at LVL - 3750

June 6th, at LVL + 00

June 6th, at LVL +3900

FIG 6.35

FIG 6.37

FIG 6.39

Dec 21st, at LVL - 3750

Dec 21, at LVL + 00

Dec 21st, at LVL +3900

DC | 98


DAYLIGHT LUMINANCE RENDER VIEW Daylight render of interior is analyzed at 1 PM on June 6th. It show luminance view in interiors.

FIG 6.40

FIG 6.42

FIG 6.44

Conference Room

Meeting Room

Meeting Room

FIG 6.41

FIG 6.43

FIG 6.45

Conference Room

Workspace

Workspace

To control the daylighting, Saint Gobain Horizon Low-E Glass with 25% of visual light transmission and SGHC value of 0.34 is used. DC | 99


7. FINAL DESIGN

DC | 100


PORTFOLIO

DC | 101


CONCEPT SITE ZONING

CONNECTING PUBLIC PLAZAS

The site is located in the proximity of residential and recreational areas, so there will be a major flow of pedestrians from the existing buildings near the site and from public transit, the built should be pushed back with large open space in front. The office space are zones along major vehicular access to the site, and the cultural and retail spaces towards the main pedestrian access. This will allow site to have more open and green spaces for the public and also create a sound barrier for the sound coming from the traffic. Having retail space near the cultural will attract more crowd from Cultural Centre, hence both work as catalyst for each other.

• Urban parks and open spaces break up the mo allowing city dwellers the opportunity to conne

VERTICAL SEGREGATION OF FUNCTION

SOLAR ANALYSIS ON FACADE

• The attraction of a place for public is facilitate multiple green public plazas at different locat nected with each other and with other facilitie

All three activities rearranged with the creation o to facilitate more public appealing. Further the ed with each other and with other facilities.

• A vertical organization of functions offers greater control over the movement flow on site and it ease the access routes for the functions. • Also, it adds to the security of the Convention, banquet and retail facilities.

AVERAGE SUMMER

AVERAGE WINTER


onotony of concrete, ect with nature.

ed through providing tions which are cones.

of open green plazas plazas are connect-

MOVEMENT THROUGH NODAL POINT Movement loop of precinct is anchored by nodes in a sequence. In built environment, it is crucial to create distinct nodal points. Nodal Points here act as hinges that facilitate the distinct nature and scale in order to cater to the entire spectrum of varying user groups and aid in smooth transition from one character of space to other. Creation of movement pattern on site and pushing activities according to the site movement pattern. PEDESTRIAN

VEHICULAR

SHADE

Pushing Glass facade back will reduce direct penetration of sun in summer.

SHADE ON SOUTH FACADE DECEMBER 21 AT 1 PM

JUNE 6 AT 1 PM


SITE PLAN (1:500)


SITE PLAN (1:500)

SITE SECTION XX’ (1:500)


1 BASEMENT (1B) FLOOR PLAN (1:500)


2 BASEMENT (2B) FLOOR PLAN (1:500)


1 BASEMENT (1B) FLOOR PLAN (1:250)

GROUN


ND FLOOR (GF) FLOOR PLAN (1:250)


FIRST FLOOR (1F) FLOOR PLAN (1:250)

SECON


ND FLOOR (2F) FLOOR PLAN (1:250)


THIRD FLOOR (3F) FLOOR PLAN (1:250)

FOURTH


H FLOOR (4F) FLOOR PLAN (1:250)


FRONT ELEVATION (1:250)

SIDE ELEVATION (1:250)

SECTION BB’ (1:250)

SECTION


N AA’ (1:250)


GRID PLAN (1:250)


STRUCTURE VIEW


1 BASEMENT FLOOR (1B) PLAN (1:250)

FRONT ELEVATION (1:250)

S


SECTION DD’ (1:250)

CONFERENCE ROOM AREA SCHEDULE S.NO. STYLE 1 BOAT STYLE 2RECTANGULAR 3RECTANGULAR 4TRIANGULAR

CAPACITY 45 14 18 20

AREA 90 SQ. M. 25 SQ. M. 35 SQ. M. 85 SQ. M.

5CLASSROOM

65

155 SQ. M.


GROUND FLOOR (GF) FLOOR PLAN (1:250)

SIDE ELEVATION (1:250)


FIRST FLOOR (1F) FLOOR PLAN (1:250)

SECTION CC’ (1:250)


GRID PLAN (1:250)


STRUCTURE VIEW


2

LANDSCAPE PLAN (1:500) BOTANICAL NAME

COMMON NAME

1

Eugenia Jambolana

Jamun

10.2-11.7

9.1-10.7

2

Swietenia Mahagoni

Indian Mahogany

9.0-12.0

6.0-9.0

4

Delonix Regia

Gulmohar

5.0-12.0

12.0-15.0

S. No.

IMAGE

HEIGHT (M) SPREAD (M)

ON SITE

LANDSCAPE VIEW 1


1 3

LANDSCAPE VIEW 2

LANDSCAPE VIEW 3


BIBLOGRAPHY Delhi Development Authority https://dda.org.in/ National Building Code, 2016 Neufert Standard,2013 Smart City Proposal New Delhi, 2015 https://www.ndmc.gov.in/smart-city-ltd-website/pdf/ Smart%20City%20Ppt.pdf http://mohua.gov.in/upload/whatsnew/59a4070e85256Transit_Oriented_Developoment_Policy.pdf https://cept.ac.in/UserFiles/File/CUE/Working%20Papers/Revised%20New/36CUEWP-36_TOD%20Lessons%20from%20Indian%20Experiences.pdf https://www.modelical.com/en/gdocs/electrical-systems-lighting-analysis/ https://www.meteoblue.com/en/weather/week/new-delhi_india_1261481 http://www.greenspec.co.uk/building-design/designing-for-passive-solar/

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