Page 1

Statistical Report


Contents 4 6 8

Generation Park Installed Capacity Electric Power Transmission

Energy Balance

AES Values

10 Profile of the Group 10 Power Generation Units 12 Fuel Reception Facilities 14 New Line of Business 16 Energy Balance 17 Capacity Balance 18 Non-Regulated Users 19 Fuel Inventory and Consumptions 20 Fuel Imports 21 Operative Indexes 22 Relevant Events 23

Brief History of the Dominican Electric Sector

Electricity Distribution

Letter from the President

AES Dominicana Background

24

Capacity Balance Maximum Demand Energy Supply by Fuel Type International Fuel Prices

AES Dominicana

Energy Spot Price Capacity Spot Price and Connection Right Frequency Regulation Service Non-Regulated Users Market

Wholesale Electric Market

26 27 31 31 32 33 34 34 35 36 36 37 38

40

Installed Capacity Energy Balance Maximum Demand Energy Spot Price International Fuel Price Power Outages

Annual Statistics

42 42 43 43 44 45

46

Anexos


Letter from the President de AES Dominicana

AES Dominicana is pleased to present its 2009 Statistical Report, which includes: operations performance, business model by line of business and electric market composition.

using mineral coal, both fuels have become the most competitive and resourceful of all those used in the local market.

The name of AES Dominicana encompasses the companies of Dominican Power Partners (DPP), AES ANDRES, both 100% owned by AES Corporation, and ITABO S.A., of which AES owns 50% of its equity.

As you may realize, AES Dominicana has been able to convert opportunities into success stories, exercising a leadership role in the electric power sector and becoming an engine for development of the Dominican Republic.

Year 2009 can be defined as a year of continued excellence for AES Dominicana as new lines of business were created and further improvements were obtained. During 2009, AES Dominicana maintained a leadership position in the national electricity industry with an average contribution of 33% of all energy that was demanded in the National Interconnected Electric System (SENI). AES Dominicana has been a key component to the diversification of fuel type composition of electric sector in the Dominican Republic, after introducing natural gas for the generation of electricity and reestablishing, in an efficient manner, the production of electricity

Marco De la Rosa President of AES Dominicana

Marco De la Rosa


AES Values La Gente AES • Put Safety First • Act with Integrity • Honor Commitments • Strive for Excellence • Have Fun through Work

What does this mean? Put Safety First: We will always put safety first for our people, contractors and communities. Act with Integrity: We are honest, trustworthy and dependable. Integrity is at the core of all we do, how we conduct ourselves and how we interact with one another and all of our stakeholders. Honor Commitments: We honor our commitments to our customers, teammates, communities, owners, suppliers and partners, and we want our businesses on the whole, to make a positive contribution to society. Strive for Excellence: We strive to be the best in all that we do and to perform at world-class levels. Have Fun through Work: We work because work can be fun, fulfilling and exciting. We enjoy our work and appreciate the fun of being part of a team that is making a difference.


2009 Statistical Report

AES Dominicana

2009 AES Dominicana 8

9


2009 Statistical Report

AES Dominicana

AES Dominicana Background AES invested for the first time in the Dominican Republic in 1997 when, within the context of a merger that involved the Destec companies and NGC, AES decided to acquire from NGC international assets owned by Destec, which included DPP and other related companies. DPP is the owner of the generation units of Los Mina V and Los Mina VI, two open cycle gas turbines of 118 MW each, which are described below in this report. From May of 1996 until August of 2001, DPP operated under the Independent Private Producer scheme, selling all of its production to La Corporación Dominicana de Electricidad (CDE). Then, after an agreement between DPP and CDE, the contract between both parties was cancelled and a new electricity sale arrangement was established between DPP and EDEESTE, which included a back-up contract with the CDE. In the year 2000 AES confirmed its commitment to the long term development of the Dominican Republic by constructing AES ANDRES. The project included a combined cycle with 319 MW, a liquefied natural gas terminal and a gas pipeline towards the DPP power station. In December of 2000, AES takes another important step, when it acquires the assets of GENER, obtaining a participation of 25% in the ITABO power plant. Since May 1st, 2003, Dominican Power Partners operates to supply its electricity sale contract with EDEESTE, selling its excess generation and buying what it needs on the spot market. In the year 2003, AES ANDRES began its operations becoming the most efficient power station of Latin America and representing a jump towards sustainable development for the country using clean energy. At this time, it improved the strategic position of the country that formarly depended 90% on petroleum derivatives to supply its electricity needs. In the year 2006, AES Dominicana acquires another 25% of the ITABO equity, which were property of El Paso. Then AES becomes the owner of the 50% of ITABO’s equity and therefore takes the control of the operative and administrative areas.

AES Dominicana supports the growth of its business by standing upon a strong foundation composed of its code of conduct, corporate social responsibility, environmental care and its people, which are the most valuable resources.

Profile of the Group AES began operations in the Dominican Republic with the intent to provide value to the national energy market and contribute to the development of the communities where it serves. Today, AES Dominicana is positioned as the principal investment group in the Dominican electric sector, with modern facilities for energy production and with the most competitive fuels for power generation in the national electric sector. AES Dominicana has two deep-sea port infrastructures; Itabo’s International Pier, to download the coal used for electricity production and AES Andres’ International Pier, to download the liquefied natural gas used for electricity production. It also has, in its AES Andres’ facilities, the first terminal intended for the distribution of liquefied natural gas in specialized trucks. As a business group, AES Dominicana combines a global perspective with deep local knowledge and a relentless commitment to operational excellence. There has been a consistent pattern of improvement year after year in generation and efficiency. AES serves as a model to the rest of the players in the electric sector, by displaying the best practices of corporate governance within the electric industry in the Dominican Republic.

10

11


2009 Statistical Report

AES Dominicana

Power Generations Units

ITABO 1

Technical details of AES Dominicana power generation units.

AES ANDRES Installed Capacity: 319 MW Technology: Combined Cycle Primary Fuel: Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) Commercial Operation Date: December 2nd, 2003 Gas Turbine Manufacturer: Mitsubishi Gas Turbine Capacity: 198 MW Gas Turnibe Speed: 3,600 rpm Inlet Heat Recovery Steam Generator Temperature: 610 ºC Gas Turbine Generator Manufacturer: Mitsubishi Gas Turbine Generator Nominal Capacity: 218.5 MVA Gas Turbine Generator Nominal Voltage: 18 kV Gas Turbine Generator Cooling System: Air Steam Turbine Manufacturer: Hitachi Steam Turbine Capacity: 121 MW Steam Turbine Speed: 3,600 rpm Steam Pressure: 124 kg/cm² Steam Temperature: 568 ºC Steam Turbine Generator Manufacturer: Siemens Steam Turbine Generator Nominal Capacity: 134 MVA Steam Turbine Generator Nominal Voltage: 13.8 kV Steam Turbine Generator Cooling System: Air Advantages: Low Environmental Impact and More Energetic Efficiency

DPP Installed Capacity: 2 x 118 MW Technology: Gas Turbine Primary Fuel: Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) Commercial Operation Date: 19 de mayo del 1996 Manufacturer: Westinghouse Turbine Speed: 3,600 rpm Turbine Stages: Four (4) Compressor Stages: Fourteen (14) Outlet Gas Temperature: 630 ºC Generator Nominal Capacity: 2 x 142 MVA Generator Nominal Voltage: 13.8 kV Generator Speed: 3,600 rpm Generator Cooling System: Air Advantages: Fast Manufacture and Installation and Low Environmental Impact

12

Installed Capacity: 128 MW Technology: Steam Turbine Primary Fuel: Mineral Coal Secundary Fuel: Fuel Oil 6 Tertiary Fuel: Fuel Oil 2 Commercial Operation Date: July 17th, 1984 Turbine Manufacturer: Brown Bovery Company Turbine Speed: 3,600 rpm Steam Pressure: 141 kg/cm² Steam Temperature: 535 ºC Generator Manufacturer: Foster Wheeler Generator Nominal Capacity: 150.6 MVA Generator Nominal Voltage: 13.8 kV Generator Cooling System: Hydrogen Advantages: Provides Economic Base Electricity Generation

ITABO 2 Installed Capacity: 132 MW Technology: Steam Turbine Primary Fuel: Mineral Coal Secundary Fuel: Fuel Oil 6 Tertiary Fuel: Fuel Oil 2 Commercial Operation Date: Mayo 10th, 1988 Turbine Manufacturer: General Electric Turbine Speed: 3,600 rpm Steam Pressure: 146 kg/cm² Steam Temperature: 540 ºC Generator Manufacturer: General Electric Generator Nominal Capacity: 155.3 MVA Generator Nominal Voltage: 13.8 kV Generator Cooling System: Hydrogen Advantages: Provides Economic Base Electricity Generation

13


2009 Statistical Report

AES Dominicana

Fuel Reception Facilities

AES ITABO International Pier

AES ANDRES’s International Pier AES ANDRES Power Station is located at the Boca Chica community, just fifteen (15) minutes from Santo Domingo. The power station has a pier and a terminal for liquid natural gas unloading and it also has the capacity to receive other liquid fuels. Inside the facility, the terminal has an unloading ship system that consists of three (3) arms with an unloading capacity of 10,000 m3 per hour. It also has a double wall cryogenic tank with the capacity to store 160,000 m3. In addition the terminal has a regasification system with the capacity to convert 250,000 MMBTU per day. Finally, it has a boiloff security system to handle the gases of the cryogenic tank in order to keep the atmospheric pressure During 2009, the terminal was handed 943,024 m3 of liquid natural gas at -161 ºC, from seven (7) ships.

The AES ITABO International Pier is located at the power station’s coastal area. It is an open sea port with the capacity to receive autodischarging vessels with the intention to open the scope for the coal supply agreements. The pier has a length of 535 meters, providing the facility to load and to unload any other solid products. In addition, it has a mooring system with six (6) dukes, as well as a signal system for the approaching vessels. Principal Characteristics: Fourteen (14) meters depth: Allows vessels like Handymax (45,000 mt) and Panamax (65,000 mt). Auto-discharging vessels required. Discharge Capacity of 1,200 metric tones per hour. During 2009, the AES ITABO International Pier unloaded 678,633 metric tones of mineral coal from fourteen (14) ships vessels.

AES ANDRES – DPP Natural Gas Pipeline In addition to the LNG Terminal, a natural gas pipeline was built in order to supply natural gas to the DPP power units, improving its efficiency and competitiveness. Technical Details: Length: 34 km Pipe Diameter: 12 inches Max Pressure: 100 bar Average Pressure: 50 bar Control Valves Station: Eight (8)

14

15


2009 Statistical Report

AES Dominicana

New Lines of Business

Energy Balance

Regasified Natural Gas Sale Business

The following table shows the energy balance of the AES Dominicana generation companies during 2009.

In the year 2005, AES ANDRES signed its first natural gas supply agreement with LINEA CLAVE. This local distribution company is responsible for distributing regasified natural gas by trucks. The natural gas supply to LINEA CLAVE initiated in 2007.

2009 AES ENERGY BALANCE [GWh]

AES ANDRES

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

2009

CONTRACT SALES

LINEA CLAVE has its station next to AES ANDRES power station. There, the natural gas is compressed to high pressures and stored in special containers. Then, it is transported by trucks to its final destination. In October of 2008, AES ANDRES signed another natural gas supply agreement with SOLUCIONES EN GAS NATURAL (SGN). This local distribution company will be responsible for distrubuting compressed natural gas to the industrial market and transportation market. The agreement will allow more clients to benefit from the advantages of natural gas.

Liquid Natural Gas Sale Business

-

13.44

14.88

14.40

14.88

14.40

14.88

14.88

14.40

22.32

21.60

22.32

182

EDEESTE

EDENORTE

25.63

22.78

25.28

25.65

26.57

28.16

29.14

28.04

26.71

28.19

25.81

28.43

320

DPP

41.88

38.15

45.27

36.69

76.97

85.65

89.72

78.85

109.80

93.43

84.63

68.99

850

-

-

-

-

0.71

17.73

9.34

22.97

1.72

8.40

4.16

2.64

68

17.95

17.18

18.87

17.99

18.95

21.17

23.84

23.53

32.22

34.15

32.06

29.02

287

3.70

18.52

0.57

1.47

0.69

1.52

3.58

5.86

3.14

39

0.07 (67.46)

10.29

15.88

22.84

(3.24)

4.85

9.60

22.95

62

176.84

181.34

190.42

180.09

187.76

172.00

171.22

1,730

ITABO UNR CONTRACT PURCHASES

-

-

-

SPOT SALES/(SPOT PURCHASES)

ITABO

(5.75)

13.77

37.79

ANDRES PRODUCTION

79.72

105.32

142.10

91.09

52.11

AES ITABO CONTRACT SALES

AES Dominicana continues developing the natural gas market. In 2009 it introduced the first station for liquid natural gas distribution, contemplating the importance of extending the technological options necessary to be able to expand the natural gas market and to improve the industries, commerce and transport competitiveness. The loading station is located inside the AES ANDRES LNG terminal at Punta Caucedo and includes two areas for the reception of trucks, each with a filling valve. In this way the station is available to fill two trucks simultaneously. In addition, the space is designed for the construction of two additional reception areas in the future. AES Dominicana successfuly signed contracts with various fuel distribution companies. These companies will be responsible for the natural gas distribution throughout the country: SOLUCIONES DE GAS NATURAL, PLATER GAS, PROPAGAS and TROPIGAS.

EDESUR

58.83

52.24

56.24

57.56

59.34

61.17

64.20

64.53

62.50

65.70

60.11

63.39

726

EDENORTE

41.76

36.55

39.64

41.48

42.29

43.79

47.57

47.32

45.29

48.46

43.30

45.58

523

EDEESTE

24.59

21.64

24.00

24.44

25.31

26.92

27.83

28.04

26.71

28.19

25.81

28.43

312

CDEEE

35.14

41.76

43.10

41.18

42.60

39.79

13.74

5.52

38.49

38.49

35.81

40.32

416

ANDRES UNR

-

-

-

3.70

18.52

0.57

1.47

0.69

1.52

3.58

5.86

3.14

39

0.21

0.23

0.32

0.31

0.25

0.25

0.25

0.27

0.20

0.25

0.19

0.17

3 68

CONTRACT PURCHASES ANDRES

-

-

-

-

0.71

17.73

9.34

22.97

1.72

8.40

4.16

2.64

MONTERIO

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4.31

3.04

1.80

1.59

11

FALCONDO

35.14

41.76

43.10

41.18

42.60

39.79

13.74

5.52

38.49

38.49

35.81

40.32

416

SPOT SALES/(SPOT PURCHASES) ITABO PRODUCTION

(6.34)

(2.21)

(2.31)

7.34

11.85

11.68

(38)

143.84

18.44 (25.33) (28.90) 85.33

91.30

126.64

(0.86)

141.90

(3.10) (18.60) 96.36

125.63

115.66

127.88

142.07

141.15

148.17

1,486

103.27

90.88

100.81

102.65

106.30

113.05

116.89

117.74

112.18

118.38

108.39

119.42

1,310

41.88

38.15

45.27

36.69

76.97

85.65

89.72

78.85

109.80

93.43

84.63

68.99

850

1.28

0.37

(0.00)

0.92

0.85

0.02

0.00

(0.00)

0.01

0.05

(0.00)

(0.00)

3

62.67

53.10

55.54

66.88

30.18

27.42

27.16

38.89

2.40

25.00

23.76

50.43

463

DPP CONTRACT SALES EDEESTE CONTRACT PURCHASES ANDRES SPOT SALES/(SPOT PURCHASES) DPP PRODUCTION

In the previous table we highlighted some important lines: contract sales, contract purchases, spot sales, spot purchases and energy supply. The next lines will focus on the contract market between AES Dominicana and some agents of the Wholesale Electricity Market:

16

17


AES Andres

Non-Regulated Users

Since February, a new short term contract sale with EDENORTE was signed, where the energy is sold in two hourly blocks. Also since April, a backup contract with AES ITABO took effect in order to reduce the exposure in the spot market.

AES ANDRES continues strengthening its position in the Non-Regulated Users Market, with the support of a strategy based on competitive prices and quality services as aggregate value to the offering. AES Andres’s portfolio of energy distribution has been further diversified and collections of this segment has met target.

AES ITABO

During 2009, four new contracts were signed with non-regulated users; INCA KM 22, INCA LA ISABELA, SAN ISIDRO FREE ZONE and LATIN AMERICA FREE ZONE (PIISA), which represent a monthly consumption of approximately 13 GWh. In addition, there were renewed contract sales with BARCELO CAPELLA, TERMO ENVASES, MOLINOS DEL OZAMA, JARAGUA and AERODOM.

During 2009, the contract sale with CDEEE continued in order to increase the energy supply of the country’s north zone through FALCONDO’s units, whose injections and retirements are administrated by AES ITABO in the market. Also, as indicated before, since April, a backup contract with AES ANDRES took effect in order to reduce the exposure in the spot market. Lastly, in September a contract purchase with MONTERIO was signed.

The following table shows AES ANDRES’s and AES ITABO’s non-regulated users’s consumption during 2009.

DPP

2009 AES NON-REGULATED USERS DEMAND (GWh)

During 2009, the contract sale with EDEESTE continued along with a back up contract purchase with AES ANDRES. JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

AES ANDRES AERODOM

2.30

2.16

2.37

2.59

2.75

2.84

3.10

3.12

3.04

3.15

2.82

Capacity Balance

ALDOM

0.47

0.36

0.58

0.47

0.43

0.43

0.55

0.44

0.46

0.50

0.35

0.37

CARREFOUR

0.69

0.60

0.64

0.68

0.73

0.72

0.79

0.78

0.77

0.80

0.74

0.79

HAMACA

0.67

0.62

0.62

0.67

0.73

0.79

0.93

0.87

0.77

0.83

0.82

0.76

The following table shows the capacity balance of AES Dominicana’s power stations during 2009.

CAPELLA

0.53

0.46

0.49

0.54

0.60

0.62

0.68

0.69

0.67

0.69

0.61

0.67

COSTA CARIBE

0.54

0.48

0.48

0.50

0.51

0.56

0.63

0.66

0.53

0.61

0.57

0.54

LISTIN DIARIO

0.53

0.50

0.56

0.51

0.57

0.59

0.63

0.62

0.56

0.61

0.57

0.58

MALLA

1.06

1.04

1.17

1.02

1.25

1.04

0.96

1.08

0.85

1.09

1.16

0.98

2009 AES CAPACITY BALANCE [MW]

2009

MOLINOS

1.07

1.06

1.10

1.01

1.03

1.17

1.02

0.91

0.71

1.05

1.05

0.79

MC CHARLES

0.73

0.64

0.68

0.73

0.75

0.78

0.80

0.73

0.76

0.77

0.75

0.78

1.35

1.42

1.46

1.56

1.46

1.47

1.55

1.51

1.45

0.86

0.86

0.91

0.96

0.97

0.96

1.04

0.98

0.93

1.26

1.30

1.34

1.36

1.38

1.61

1.41

1.30

1.75

1.88

1.81

1.71

1.49

1.41

1.54

1.37

0.50

0.40

0.49

0.45

0.53

0.56

0.54

0.50 0.25

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

PLASTIFAR

1.25

1.33

1.52

Contract Capacity Sales

269.38

269.98

269.01

269.88

270.78

275.11

276.33

277.75

289.15

289.13

288.77

290.04

278

JARAGUA

0.89

0.76

0.86

Firm Capacity

209.98

202.70

214.78

204.03

201.73

207.01

220.61

201.72

204.74

204.99

209.38

193.20

206

TERMO ENVASES

1.22

1.33

1.31

1.10

ZF CAUCEDO

2.07

1.65

1.85

1.75

LADOM

0.45

0.46

0.51

0.51

AES ANDRES

Contract Capacity Purchase

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Spot Sale / (Spot Purchase)

(59.40)

(67.28)

(54.23)

(65.85)

(69.05)

(68.10)

(55.72)

(76.03)

(84.41)

(84.15)

(79.40)

(96.84)

(72)

AES ITABO Contract Capacity Sales

250.00

250.00

250.00

250.00

250.00

250.00

250.00

250.00

250.00

250.00

250.00

250.00

250

Firm Capacity

225.82

225.64

225.03

225.82

225.82

225.82

225.81

225.82

225.82

225.82

225.82

223.02

226

Contract Capacity Purchase

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Spot Sale / (Spot Purchase)

(24.18)

(24.36)

(24.97)

(24.18)

(24.18)

(24.18)

(24.19)

(24.18)

(24.18)

(24.18)

(24.18)

(26.98)

(24)

Contract Capacity Sales

210.00

210.00

210.00

210.00

210.00

210.00

210.00

210.00

210.00

210.00

210.00

210.00

210

16.75

16.16

17.12

16.25

15.35

15.71

16.77

15.35

15.59

15.61

15.97

14.70

16

Contract Capacity Purchase

(193.25)

(193.84)

(192.88)

(193.75)

(194.65)

(194.29)

(193.23)

(194.65)

(194.41)

(194.39)

(194.03)

(195.30)

(194)

Spot Sale / (Spot Purchase)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Firm Capacity

MULTIFORM

0.19

0.26

0.30

0.26

0.27

0.29

0.30

0.28

0.30

0.38

0.40

ZF LAS AMERICAS

3.29

3.46

3.82

3.42

3.52

3.80

4.19

4.09

4.19

4.32

4.07

3.55

1.57

1.55

1.77

2.02

2.44

2.39

2.09

1.55

1.53

INCA kM 22 INCA LA ISABELA ZF SAN ISIDRO PIISA TOTAL

DPP

2.90

17.95

17.18

18.87

17.99

18.95

21.17

23.84

23.53

1.38

1.53

1.33

1.20

2.86

2.98

2.70

2.25

6.52

6.24

5.75

4.97

32.22

34.15

32.06

29.02

AES ITABO QUITPE

0.19

0.18

0.23

0.30

0.25

0.24

0.15

0.14

0.23

0.24

0.21

0.23

TOTAL

0.19

0.18

0.23

0.30

0.25

0.24

0.15

0.14

0.23

0.24

0.21

0.23

The next chart shows the average demand of AES’s non-regulated users during 2009.


2009 Statistical Report

AES Dominicana

Coal

AVERAGE DEMAND 2009 AES NRU QUITPE MULTIFORM ALDOM LADOM

0.22 0.29

The following table shows the inventory evolution details during 2009.

0.45 0.49

2009 COAL INVENTORY AND CONSUMPTIONS

COSTA CARIBE

0.55

LISTIN DIARIO

0.57

CAPELLA

During 2009, AES ITABO, with two steam units, had a total consumption of 640,390 metric tones of coal and 19,160 metric tones of petcoke. Also, through different providers, 678,633 metric tones of coal were purchaced.

[metric ton]

0.61

AES ITABO

JAN

FEB

APR

MAY

JUN

Beginning Inventory

49,784

20,419

3,747

76,481

82,215

81,315

Purchases

40,376

22,426

116,359

60,608

55,830

Consumptions

67,514

36,471

43,625

53,861

56,730

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2,227

2,627

-

1,014

-

2,547

-

CARREFOUR

0.73

MC CHARLES

0.74

Third Partie Sales

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

39,069

JUL

32,421

30,507

93,061

89,559

84,176

Total

-

47,295

52,103

117,950

56,499

56,487

52,700

39,699

53,943

51,130

53,549

60,001

60,530

63,337 640,390

-

-

-

-

-

-

2,888

1,847

-

1,339

-

14,489

HAMACA

0.76

Losses

JARAGUA

0.91

Final Inventory

20,419

3,747

76,481

82,215

81,315

39,069

32,421

30,507

93,061

89,559

84,176

73,538

67,514

36,471

43,625

53,861

56,730

39,699

53,943

51,130

53,549

60,001

60,530

63,337

MOLINOS

1.00

Subtotal Consumption

2009 PETCOKE INVENTORY AND CONSUMPTIONS

1.33

TERMO ENVASES INCA LA ISABELA PLASTIFAR

[metric ton]

1.42

AES ITABO

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

1.44

Beginning Inventory

32,204

32,204

32,204

32,204

62,503

54,984

51,677

50,308

49,763

46,290

46,046

46,046

Purchases

-

-

-

33,002

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

33,002

Consumptions

-

-

-

2,702

7,519

3,307

1,369

545

3,473

244

-

-

19,160

Third Partie Sales

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.70

Losses

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.76

Final Inventory

32,204

32,204

32,204

62,503

54,984

51,677

50,308

49,763

46,290

46,046

46,046

46,046

-

-

-

2,702

7,519

3,307

1,369

545

3,473

244

-

-

67,514

36,471

43,625

56,563

64,249

43,006

55,312

51,674

57,022

60,245

60,530

ZF CAUCEDO

1.69

INCA kM 22

1.98

ZF SAN ISIDRO AERODOM

3.81

ZF LAS AMERICAS

Subtotal Consumption

5.87

Total Consumption

PIISA

0.00

1.00

GWh

2.00

3.00

4.00

5.00

Fuel Imports

Natural Gas

Natural Gas

During 2009, AES ANDRES and DPP had a total natural gas consumption of 19,236,618 MMBTU and 20,935,129 MMBTU were purchaced through a long term supply agreement.

[MMBTU]

Beginning Inventory

676,550

Purchases

MAR

APR

2,166,000

564,588

1,755,012

MAY

JUN

3,232,785

JUL

AUG

2,362,153

591,025

1,799,763

SEP

OCT

2,809,690

1,336,402

NOV

DEC

2,465,715

759,874

Total

2,973,408

-

3,010,798

3,030,396

-

-

2,990,750

2,998,381

-

2,942,221

-

ANDRES Consumptions

673,013

906,764

1,104,538

702,236

426,456

1,368,510

1,410,286

1,477,654

1,395,741

1,464,078

1,364,424

1,322,181

13,615,881

DPP Consumptions

764,507

640,165

660,982

798,629

400,585

349,904

325,975

462,492

29,790

298,133

285,877

603,699

5,620,737

BOG Consumptions

7,435

16,202

18,941

17,322

9,440

23,189

14,814

16,238

13,170

13,266

18,080

15,959

184,054 422,878

Third Partie Sales Final Inventory

63,337 659,549

2009 AES ANDRES NATURAL GAS IMPORTS

2009 NATURAL GAS INVENTORY AND CONSUMPTIONS FEB

19,160

During 2009, the AES ANDRES LNG Terminal received seven vessels with 20,935,129 MMBTU equivalents to 943,024 m3. The next table shows the details.

The next table shows the inventory evolution details during 2009.

JAN

Total

6.00

Fuel Inventory and Consumptions

AES ANDRES Y DPP

678,633

640,390

1.06

MALLA

20

MAR

2,989,175 20,935,129

39,003

38,282

35,913

34,437

34,151

29,525

30,937

32,069

34,587

37,431

37,461

39,082

2,166,000

564,588

1,755,012

3,232,785

2,362,153

591,025

1,799,763

2,809,690

1,336,402

2,465,715

759,874

1,768,128

#

Date

Supplier

Vessel

1

January 5, 2009

BPGM

BRITISH RUBY

MMBTU 2,973,408

M3 133,937

2

March 3, 2009

BPGM

BRITISH MERCHANT

3,010,798

135,622 136,504

3

April 27, 2009

BPGM

BRITISH DIAMOND

3,030,396

4

July 6, 2009

BPGM

BRITISH MERCHANT

2,990,750

134,718

5

August 18, 2009

BPGM

BRITISH DIAMOND

2,998,381

135,062

6

October 10, 2009

BPGM

BRITISH TRADER

2,942,221

132,532

7

December 9, 2009

BPGM

BRITISH INNOVATOR

2,989,175

134,648

20,935,129

943,024

21


2009 Statistical Report

AES Dominicana

Coal

During 2009, the International Port of AES ITABO received fourteen (14) vessels with 678,633 metric tones of coal. The next table shows the details.

As can be seen above, 2009 was a year full of challenges for the operating area due to some externalities such as AES ANDRES transformer failure, affecting the power plant operations during the first five months of the year, as well as the quality of coal received at AES ITABO in the first half of the year, while negotiating the supply contract with Glencore.

2009 AES ITABO COAL IMPORTS #

Date

Supplier

Vessel

Loading Port

1

January 17, 2009

CARBONES DEL CARIBE

BALLANGEN

ITABO

Metric Ton 40,376

MMBTU 1,069,975

2

February 2, 2009

OXBOW

UBC SALVADOR

ITABO

22,426

594,292

3

March 1, 2009

CARBONES DEL CARIBE

BALDER

ITABO

47,262

1,252,433

4

March 4, 2009

MG TRADING

HERON

ITABO

28,553

756,654

5

March 20, 2009

COAL MARKETING COMPANY

BALLANGEN

ITABO

40,544

1,074,416

6

April 22, 2009

COAL MARKETING COMPANY

CSL ARGOSY

ITABO

60,608

1,606,112

7

May 14, 2009

COAL MARKETING COMPANY

CSL METIS

ITABO

55,830

1,479,495

GLENCORE INTERNATIONAL

ALICE OLDENDORF

ITABO

47,295

1,253,322

SHELTON TRADING

CSL SPIRIT

ITABO

52,103

1,380,736

ITABO

60,683

1,608,092

8

July 2, 2009

9

August 12, 2009

10

September 12, 2009

BULKTRADING

BERNHARD OLDENDORFF

11

September 29, 2009

GLENCORE INTERNATIONAL

JOHANNA OLDENDORFF

ITABO

57,268

1,517,592

12

October 7, 2009

EDF TRADING

CSL ATLAS

ITABO

56,499

1,497,222

13

November 15, 2009

EDF TRADING

CSL METIS

ITABO

56,487

1,496,897

14

December 31, 2009

GLENCORE INTERNATIONAL

SHEILA ANN

ITABO

52,700

1,396,537

678,633

17,983,774

Relevant Events During 2009, two black outs have occurred on the Interconected National Electric System: the first one was on Wednesday 15th of July at 11:34 and the second one was on Wednesday 2nd of September at 18:03. The following table shows the programmed major maintenances applied to AES Dominicana power units during 2009. 2009 AES RELEVANT EVENTS Description

From

To

Itabo 1

Unit

Programmed Maintenance

15-Feb-2009 00:43

14-Mar-2009 14:20

Hours

Andres

Programmed Maintenance

21-Apr-2009 00:37

19-May-2009 06:34

678

Los Mina 5

Programmed Maintenance

01-Sep-2009 00:00

01-Jan-2010 00:00

2,928

Itabo 2

Programmed Maintenance

20-Jun-2009 01:58

30-Jun-2009 19:14

257

662

2009 AES ITABO PETCOKE IMPORTS #

Date

Supplier

Vessel

Loading Port

1

April 19, 2009

KOMSA

MUSKETEER

HAINA

Metric Ton

MMBTU

33,002

874,540

Operative Indexes The following table shows the operative indexes and operation rates of power units applied to AES ANDRES, AES ITABO and DPP. 2009 AES OPERATIVE INDEXES JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

2009

EAF [%] ANDRES

41.3%

56.7%

66.5%

45.5%

34.7%

99.1%

94.9%

99.1%

99.2%

99.7%

93.7%

95.6%

77.2%

ITABO 1

93.5%

37.3%

37.2%

90.2%

90.7%

86.1%

82.6%

72.6%

82.8%

91.2%

94.6%

97.3%

79.7%

ITABO 2

93.8%

92.6%

96.8%

84.6%

87.4%

45.3%

89.3%

77.1%

84.4%

80.8%

85.4%

87.2%

83.7%

LOS MINA 5

83.2%

91.9%

100.0%

90.3%

88.5%

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

62.8%

LOS MINA 6

99.9%

94.8%

95.1%

97.7%

98.9%

100.0%

93.0%

100.0%

100.0%

99.8%

98.4%

93.5%

97.6%

EFOR [%] ANDRES

58.7%

34.8%

33.5%

31.9%

3.5%

0.9%

1.1%

0.9%

0.0%

0.3%

3.2%

0.1%

14.1%

ITABO 1

5.1%

14.7%

1.0%

9.8%

8.8%

6.4%

14.3%

11.6%

12.1%

4.0%

0.8%

1.8%

7.5%

ITABO 2

0.8%

0.6%

3.2%

8.7%

12.6%

24.1%

9.4%

8.0%

10.5%

7.2%

5.3%

4.3%

7.9%

LOS MINA 5

27.7%

16.1%

0.0%

18.7%

21.3%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

7.0%

LOS MINA 6

0.1%

1.8%

0.0%

0.0%

2.8%

0.0%

8.8%

0.0%

0.0%

0.6%

3.9%

0.0%

1.5%

HEAT RATE [BTU/kWh] ANDRES

8,369

8,603

7,773

7,684

8,135

7,738

7,773

7,760

7,750

7,778

7,932

7,718

7,918

ITABO 1

10,809

11,502

11,683

11,048

11,373

11,056

11,287

10,839

10,516

10,638

10,703

11,210

11,055

12,398

12,546

11,541

11,435

11,526

11,391

11,218

11,237

ITABO 2

11,135

11,549

LOS MINA 5

14,490

14,175

LOS MINA 6

11,694

11,831

22

11,894

11,874

11,630

14,095

14,297

11,738

11,921

11,623 14,264

12,446

11,985

11,524

12,038

11,839

12,072

12,064

11,920

23


Wholesale Electrical Market


2009 Statistical Report

AES Dominicana

The following table shows the installed capacity by company and technology.

Brief History of the Dominican Electric Sector

INSTALLED CAPACITY BY FUEL TYPE December 2009

In 1997 the capitalization process began. This process was instituted due to serious problems in the electrical sector caused by a deficit of the generation, poor quality service and a lack of capital investment for the electrical sector expansion.

Water 17.5%

The capitalization process was formalized on June 24, 1997, with the publication of the State Companies Reform Law. Before this process, generation, transmission and distribution assets in the Dominican Republic were owned by CDE, who by law was the only entity authorized to operate in the electricity sector.

Natural Gas 18.5%

In the mid 90s, CDE subscribed several power purchased agreements with independent power producers; increasing the systems installed capacity with private capital. During this period, the sector was regulated by a series of administrative resolutions issued by the Industry and Commerce Ministry. Through the different stages of the capitalization process, the assets held by CDE were divided into eight state-owned companies: CDEEE, a parent holding company, three distribution companies: EDENORTE, EDESUR and EDEESTE, three generation companies: HAINA, ITABO and HIDRO and the power transmission company.

Fuel Oil 2 14.4%

In 1999, the three distribution companies and the two thermal generation companies were capitalized through the sale of 50% of the stocks to private investors. The Dominican State remained with 49% of the stocks and the last 1% was sold to the employees of these companies. In July 2001, the Electricity General Law was issued, establishing the institutions of the sector and the rules under which it will operate. In July 2002, the Electricity General Law Rulebook was issued, completing the electrical sector new legislation. During 2007, the Electricity General Law and its Rulebook were modified by the law number 186-07. The new law has as a goal to criminalize the electrical fraud and establish other measures to obtain the electrical sector’s financial viability.

Fuel Oil 6 39.1%

Coal 10.5%

2009 SYSTEM INSTALLED CAPACITY TOTAL GENERATION COMPANY

STEAM TURBINE

GAS TURBINE

AES ANDRES AES ITABO

Generation Park Installed Capacity

The following chart shows the installed capacity by technology and fuel type. INSTALLED CAPACITY BY TECHNOLOGY December 2009

HAINA

DIESEL ENGINE

HYDRO

319.00 236.00 346.16

100.00

[MW] 319.00

260.00

DPP

The generation park of the system is mainly componed of 82.5% thermoelectric units while the other 17.5% is componed by hydroelectric units.

COMBINED CYCLE

102.00

HYDRO

523.10

[%] 10.8%

260.00

8.8%

236.00

8.0%

548.16

18.5%

523.10

17.6%

METALDOM

42.00

42.00

1.4%

SEABOARD

116.30

116.30

3.9%

GPLV

194.50

194.50

6.6%

MONTERIO

100.10

100.10

3.4%

CEPP

76.86

76.86

2.6%

LAESA

31.60

31.60

1.1%

INDEPENDENT POWER PRODUCERS [IPP'S]

Hydro Turbine 17.5%

Steam Turbine 20.3%

SAN FELIPE

185.00

185.00

6.2%

CESPM

300.00

300.00

10.1%

30.00

30.00

1.0%

1.90

1.90

0.1%

MAXON CDEEE TOTAL [MW]

606.16

336.00

804.00

695.26

523.10

2,964.52

100.0%

TOTAL [MW]

866.2

572.0

1123.0

723.2

523.1

2,992.50

100.0%

Gas Turbine 11.2%

Combined Cycle 26.9%

Diesel Engine 24.2% 26

27


2009 Statistical Report

AES Dominicana

SYSTEM INSTALLED CAPACITY

HYDROELECTRIC UNITS

THERMOELECTRIC UNITS COMPANIES

FUEL

RESERVOIR HYDRO TECHNOLOGY

CAPACITY [MW]

AES DOMINICANA

FUEL

TECHNOLOGY

TAVERA I

WATER

Hydro Turbine

CAPACITY [MW] 48.0

TAVERA II

WATER

Hydro Turbine

48.0

JIGUEY I

WATER

Hydro Turbine

49.0

ANDRES

NATURAL GAS

Combined Cycle

319.0

JIGUEY II

WATER

Hydro Turbine

49.0

ITABO I

COAL

Steam Turbine

128.0

AGUACATE I

WATER

Hydro Turbine

26.0

ITABO II

COAL

Steam Turbine

132.0

AGUACATE II

WATER

Hydro Turbine

26.0

NATURAL GAS

Gas Turbine

118.0

VALDESIA I

WATER

Hydro Turbine

27.0

NATURAL GAS

Gas Turbine

118.0

VALDESIA II

WATER

Hydro Turbine

27.0 12.5

LOS MINA VI SubTotal

815.0

HAINA HAINA I

FUEL 6

Steam Turbine

54.0

HAINA II

FUEL 6

Steam Turbine

54.0

HAINA IV

FUEL 6

Steam Turbine

84.9

SAN PEDRO VAPOR

FUEL 6

Steam Turbine

33.0

PUERTO PLATA I

FUEL 6

Steam Turbine

27.6

PUERTO PLATA II

FUEL 6

Steam Turbine

39.0

HAINA TG

FUEL 2

Gas Turbine

100.0

BARAHONA CARBON

COAL

Steam Turbine

53.6

SULTANA DEL ESTE

FUEL 6

Diesel Engine

102.0

SubTotal

548.2

RIO BLANCO I

WATER

Hydro Turbine

RIO BLANCO II

WATER

Hydro Turbine

12.5

MONCION I

WATER

Hydro Turbine

26.0 26.0

MONCION II

WATER

Hydro Turbine

RINCON

WATER

Hydro Turbine

10.1

PINALITO I

WATER

Hydro Turbine

25.0

WATER

Hydro Turbine

SubTotal

25.0 437.1

NON-RESERVOIR HYDRO LOPEZ ANGOSTURA

WATER

Hydro Turbine

CONTRA EMBALSE MONCION I

WATER

Hydro Turbine

18.4 1.6

CONTRA EMBALSE MONCION II

WATER

Hydro Turbine

1.6 0.6

BAIGUAQUE I

WATER

Hydro Turbine

PALAMARA

FUEL 6

Diesel Engine

107.0

BAIGUAQUE II

WATER

Hydro Turbine

0.6

LA VEGA

FUEL 6

Diesel Engine

87.5

HATILLO

WATER

Hydro Turbine

8.0 8.4

GENERADORA PALAMARA - LA VEGA

JIMENOA

WATER

Hydro Turbine

EL SALTO

WATER

Hydro Turbine

0.7

ANIANA VARGAS I

WATER

Hydro Turbine

0.3

ANIANA VARGAS II

WATER

Hydro Turbine

0.3

DOMINGO RODRIGUEZ I

WATER

Hydro Turbine

2.0

DOMINGO RODRIGUEZ II

WATER

Hydro Turbine

2.0

ROSA JULIA DE LA CRUZ

WATER

Hydro Turbine

0.9

NIZAO NAJAYO

WATER

Hydro Turbine

0.3

LOS ANONES

WATER

Hydro Turbine

0.1

SABANA YEGUA

WATER

Hydro Turbine

12.8

SEABOARD

LAS DAMAS

WATER

Hydro Turbine

7.5

ESTRELLA DEL NORTE

FUEL 6

Diesel Engine

43.0

SABANETA

WATER

Hydro Turbine

6.3

ESTRELLA DEL MAR

FUEL 6

Diesel Engine

73.3

LOS TOROS I

WATER

Hydro Turbine

4.9

116.3

LOS TOROS II

WATER

Hydro Turbine

4.9

MAGUEYAL I

WATER

Hydro Turbine

1.5

MAGUEYAL II

WATER

Hydro Turbine

1.5

18.7

LAS BARIAS

WATER

Hydro Turbine

58.1

SubTotal

SubTotal

194.5

CDEEE SAN FELIPE

FUEL 6

Combined Cycle

185.0

CESPM I

FUEL 2

Combined Cycle

100.0

CESPM II

FUEL 2

Combined Cycle

100.0

CESPM III

FUEL 2

Combined Cycle

100.0

MAXON

FUEL 2

Diesel Engine

30.0

RIO SAN JUAN

FUEL 2

Diesel Engine

1.9

SubTotal

516.9

SubTotal CEPP CEPP I

FUEL 6

CEPP II

FUEL 6

Diesel Engine

SubTotal

76.8

MONTE RIO POWER MONTE RIO

0.8 86.0

FUEL 6

Diesel Engine

SubTotal

100.1 100.1

TOTAL HYDRO

523.13

GRAND TOTAL

2,964.5

METALDOM METALDOM

FUEL 6

42.0

SubTotal

42.0

LAESA PIMENTEL SubTotal TOTAL THERMO

28

FUEL 6

Diesel Engine

31.6 59.6 2,441.36

29


2009 Statistical Report

Electric Power Transmission Electric power transmission or “high voltage electric transmission” is the bulk transfer of electrical energy, from generating power plants to substations located near the population centers. This is distinct from the local wiring between high voltage substations and customers, which is typically referred to as electricity distribution. Transmission lines, when interconnected with each other, become high voltage transmission networks. Electricity is transmitted at high voltages (69 kV or above) to reduce the energy lost in long distance transmission. A key limitation in the distribution of electricity is that, with minor exceptions, electrical energy cannot be stored, and therefore it must be generated as it is needed. A sophisticated system of control is therefore required to ensure electric generation very closely matches the demand. If supply and demand are not in balance, generation plants and transmission equipment can shut down which, in the worst cases, can lead to a major regional blackout. To reduce the risk of such failures, electric transmission networks are interconnected into regional, national or continental wide networks thereby providing multiple redundant alternate routes for power to flow should failures occur. Much analysis is done by transmission companies to determine the maximum reliable capacity of each line which is mostly less than its physical or thermal limit, to ensure spare capacity is available should there be any such failure in another part of the network. The Dominican Electricity Transmission Company is a state enterprise whose main objective is to build, operate and maintain self-sustaining networks and substations of the National Interconnected Electric System to provide quality electric services at reasonable prices.

AES Dominicana

Within these networks there may be a mix of overhead line construction utilizing traditional utility poles and wires, as well as, underground construction with cables and indoor or cabinet substations. However, underground distribution is significantly more expensive than overhead construction. In part to reduce this cost, underground power lines are sometimes co-located with other utility lines in what are called Common Utility Ducts. Distribution feeders emanating from a substation are generally controlled by a circuit breaker which will open when a fault is detected. Automatic Circuit Reclosers may be installed to further segregate the feeder, thus, minimizing the impact of faults. The Dominican Electricity Distribution has three companies: Edesur Dominicana, S. A. Edenorte Dominicana, S. A. Empresa Distribuidora de Electricidad del Este, S. A.

Energy Balance The following table shows the monthly energy balance in 2009. 2009 SYSTEM ENERGY BALANCE [GWh]

JAN AES ANDRES AES ITABO

The Dominican system has four mayor zones: Santo Domingo Zone, Southern Zone, Northern Zone and Eastern Zone. The main substations of these mayor zones are: Palamara and Hainamosa for Santo Domingo Zone, Pizarrete for Southern Zone, Bonao II and Canabacoa for Northern Zone and finally San Pedro II for Eastern Zone. The Dominican Electricity Transmission Company continues progressing in its construction of a new transmission line of 345 kV. This proyect includes four interconnected substations located at Julio Sauri, Bonao, El Naranjo and Navarrete.

DPP HIDRO

Electricity distribution is the final stage in the delivery of electricity to end users. A distribution system’s network carries electricity from the transmission system and delivers it to consumers. Typically, the network would include medium-voltage (less than 69 kV) power lines, electrical substations and pole-mounted transformers, low-voltage distribution wiring and sometimes electricity meters. The actual distribution system begins as the primary circuit leaves the sub-station and ends as the secondary service enters the customer’s meter socket. A variety of methods, materials, and equipments are used among the various utility companies, but the end result is similar.

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

2009

105.3

142.1

91.1

52.1

176.8

181.3

190.4

180.1

187.8

172.0

171.2

1,730

143.8

85.3

91.3

126.6

141.9

96.4

125.6

115.7

127.9

142.1

141.2

148.2

1,486

62.9

53.3

55.7

67.1

30.4

27.6

27.4

39.1

2.5

25.2

23.9

50.6

466

127.7

135.4

114.7

114.8

169.1

150.2

110.1

132.6

118.4

104.8

81.8

82.9

1,442

IPPs

91.3

60.6

60.5

89.2

115.9

101.0

156.5

127.1

104.0

118.8

91.9

136.3

1,253

HAINA

90.7

79.2

90.3

85.6

87.3

70.9

93.2

90.1

106.3

114.0

103.6

94.8

1,106

GPLV

87.4

75.3

91.5

92.8

82.6

98.1

99.4

106.2

102.5

103.3

95.6

84.1

1,119

SEABOARD

70.1

62.7

64.2

66.2

66.9

68.8

68.8

70.3

69.3

69.0

69.1

59.3

805

CEPP

22.7

25.7

29.9

22.7

23.5

21.7

27.1

27.7

24.2

16.9

27.1

26.4

296

MONTERIO

40.6

38.2

46.1

46.2

48.1

46.3

49.0

41.9

41.3

45.1

42.7

38.5

524

METALDOM

14.8

10.1

11.5

11.4

12.1

11.7

12.8

17.4

14.5

14.0

9.0

11.1

150

LAESA

18.6

14.3

26.1

26.4

32.5

34.3

37.8

39.2

38.2

39.5

38.3

37.3

383

FALCONDO

Electricity Distribution

FEB

79.7

35.2

41.9

43.2

41.2

42.6

39.9

13.8

5.7

38.5

38.5

35.8

40.3

417

GENERATION

885.4

787.5

867.2

881.3

904.9

943.8

1,002.9

1,003.3

967.7

1,018.9

932.0

981.0

11,176 3,785

EDESUR

307.8

272.6

293.0

300.2

305.4

318.7

335.2

335.2

327.3

343.7

313.9

331.9

EDENORTE

249.8

218.7

237.1

248.1

253.0

261.9

284.6

283.1

270.9

289.9

259.0

272.7

3,129

EDEESTE

240.4

211.6

234.7

239.0

247.5

263.2

272.1

274.2

261.2

275.6

252.4

278.0

3,050

70.6

68.7

81.9

74.2

82.9

79.7

89.6

88.8

81.1

86.1

83.7

77.6

965

2.9

2.4

2.7

3.0

0.4

0.2

0.2

0.5

2.4

2.2

2.3

2.5

22

871.6

773.9

849.4

864.4

889.2

923.7

981.7

981.7

942.9

997.5

911.2

962.7

10,950

LOSS

13.8

13.6

17.7

16.8

15.7

20.1

21.2

21.6

24.8

21.4

20.8

18.3

226

PERDIDAS

13.8

13.6

17.7

16.8

15.7

20.1

21.2

21.6

24.8

21.4

20.8

18.3

226

UNR's OTHERS DEMAND

During 2009, the total net generation was 11,176 GWh. The companies with mayor contribution to the system were AES ANDRES with 16%, AES ITABO with 13%, HIDRO with 13%, IPP’s with 11%, HAINA with 10% and GPLV with 10%.

Distribution networks are typically of two types, radial or interconnected. A radial network leaves the station and passes through the network area with no normal connection to any other supply. This is typical of long rural lines with isolated load areas. An interconnected network is generally found in more urban areas and will have multiple connections to other points of supply. These points of connection are normally open but allow various configurations by the operating utility by closing and opening switches. Operation of these switches may be by remote control from a control center or by a lineman. The benefit of the interconnected model is that in the event of a fault or required maintenance a small area of the network can be isolated and the remainder kept on supply. 30

31


2009 Statistical Report

AES Dominicana

The next chart shows the energy contribution of all the system companies.

2009 SYSTEM ENERGY BALANCE

2009 SYSTEM ENERGY BALANCE METALDOM 1% MONTERIO 5% CEPP 3%

MONTERIO 5.2%

FALCONDO 4%

LAESA 3%

AES ANDRES 16%

HIDRO 16.3%

SEABOARD 5.9% GPLV 10.2%

AES ITABO 13%

ITABO 12.7%

DPP 0.9%

DPP 4%

GPLV 10%

HAINA 10%

HAINA 17.3%

HIDRO 13%

IPPs 11%

As shown above, AES Dominicana is the group with the highest contribution to the electrical market, reaching on 2009 a 33% of participation through the contributions of AES ANDRES, AES ITABO and DPP.

Capacity Balance

The system’s maximum demand is the highest power consumed by the distribution companies in a specific moment of the year. Generally it happens during the system peak hours. Maximum demand is data used on the capacity recalculation, because the system remunerates only the maximum capacity effectively recorded as demanded during the year.

DEMANDA MAXIMA MENSUAL 2009

[MW]

APR

MAY

[MW]

JAN

FEB

JUN

JUL

SEP

OCT

AES ANDRES

210.0

202.7

214.8

204.0

201.7

207.0

220.6

201.7

204.7

205.0

209.4

193.2

206.2

12.2%

Day / Hour

AES ITABO

225.8

225.6

225.0

225.8

225.8

225.8

225.8

225.8

225.8

225.8

225.8

223.0

225.5

13.4%

GENERATION

16.8

16.2

17.1

16.3

15.4

15.7

16.8

15.4

15.6

15.6

16.0

14.7

15.9

0.9%

Total AES Dominicana

452.6

444.5

456.9

446.1

442.9

448.5

463.2

442.9

446.1

446.4

451.2

430.9

447.7

26.6%

HYDRO

321.4

337.9

300.0

321.1

323.1

319.5

287.7

316.5

309.4

308.7

308.9

344.5

316.6

18.8%

NET GENERATION transmission high-voltage

IPPs*

141.8

136.9

145.2

137.7

134.4

137.7

147.1

134.6

136.6

136.8

139.7

128.9

138.1

8.2%

HAINA

236.5

233.3

238.6

233.8

231.4

219.5

227.1

231.4

232.9

233.0

225.3

221.7

230.4

13.7%

GPLV

189.9

189.9

189.9

189.9

189.9

189.9

189.9

189.9

189.9

189.9

189.9

189.9

189.9

11.3%

SEABOARD

108.9

108.9

108.9

108.9

108.9

108.9

108.9

108.9

108.9

108.9

108.9

108.9

108.9

6.5%

AUG

NOV

DEC

MW

%

EDESUR

CEPP

65.0

64.7

64.8

65.1

64.9

64.9

65.0

64.8

65.1

65.1

65.1

64.1

64.9

3.9%

MONTERIO

96.4

96.4

96.4

96.4

96.4

96.4

96.4

96.4

96.4

96.4

96.4

96.4

96.4

5.7%

METALDOM

40.5

40.5

40.5

40.5

40.5

40.5

40.5

40.5

40.5

40.5

40.5

40.5

40.5

2.4%

LAESA

30.7

30.7

42.7

44.4

51.3

58.0

58.0

58.0

57.9

58.1

58.1

58.1

50.5

3.0%

1,683.7 1,683.8 1,683.8 1,683.8 1,683.8 1,683.8

1,683.7

1,683.7

1,683.7 1,683.9 1,683.9 1,684.0 1,683.8 100.0%

* SAN FELIPE and CESPM

The companies that contributed the most capacity to the system during 2009 was HIDRO with 19%, HAINA with 14%, AES ITABO with 13%, AES ANDRES with 12%, and finally GPLV with 11%.

32

IPPs* 8.2%

Maximum Demand

2009 FIRM CAPACITY BALANCE MAR

ANDRES 12.9%

The following table shows the power production and power consumptions during the monthly maximum demand hour.

The following table shows the final capacity values by power generation companies in 2009.

Total

METALDOM 2.2%

CEPP 3.9%

SEABOARD 7%

DPP

LAESA 1.7%

Month

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

D07 H20

D03 H21

D02 H20

D22 H20

D29 H21

D05 H21

D30 H21

D26 H21

D30 H22

D12 H20

D13 H20

D03 H20

GROSS GENERATION

1,575

1,604

1,564

1,652

1,683

1,645

1,674

1,726

1,743

1,712

1,698

1,702

NET GENERATION sub-transmission voltage

1,524

1,553

1,521

1,599

1,629

1,593

1,620

1,667

1,689

1,656

1,643

1,644

1,520

1,546

1,512

1,595

1,624

1,588

1,614

1,661

1,685

1,652

1,639

1,640

EDEESTE

453

450

397

432

459

463

450

456

461

493

467

455

EDENORTE

456

421

423

430

429

429

426

473

477

468

462

484

498

524

509

579

556

539

558

581

588

545

546

531

99

119

120

125

114

115

125

122

100

113

118

124

7

9

7

11

6

8

9

10

7

9

9

10

DISTRIBUTION DEMAND

OTHER DEMAND NRU GENERATION UNITS Pérdidas [MW] Pérdidas [%]

8

24

56

18

62

33

45

19

51

23

36

37

0.52%

1.55%

3.67%

1.15%

3.80%

2.08%

2.78%

1.16%

3.02%

1.41%

2.20%

2.23%

In 2009, the maximum demand occurred on September 30th at 22:00 hours. The total gross power production was 1,743 MW and the total power consumption was 1,634 MW. 93% was consumed by the distribution companies and 6% was consumed by the non-regulated users. 33


2009 Statistical Report

AES Dominicana

The following chart shows the evolution of fuel price in the International market during 2009.

Energy Supply by Fuel Type

2009 INTERNATIONAL FUEL PRICES

The fuels that supplied the most energy to the system in 2009 were Fuel Oil 6, supplying 46%, Natural Gas supplying 20% and finally Coal supplying 16%.

16

COAL

LNG

FUEL OIL 6

FUEL OIL 2

14

ENERGY SUPPLY BY FUEL TYPE 2009 US$/MMBTU

12

Water 13% Natural Gas 19%

10 8 6 4 2

Fuel Oil 6 47%

0 JAN

Coal 16%

Fuel Oil 2 5%

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

Energy Spot Price The energy spot price is the variable cost needed to produce an additional unit of energy, considering the system demand and the available installed capacity. The following chart shows the evolution of the average energy spot price and the maximum energy spot price during 2009. AVG

2009 ENERGY SPOT PRICE

International Fuel Prices

MAX

200 150

US$/MWh

The prices of Fuel Oil 6 and Fuel Oil 2 correspond to the Platts reference prices in the US Gulf Coast Port. For Mineral Coal, the price is FOB Puerto BolĂ­var, for a heat rate of 11,300 Btu/pound. The Natural Gas prices are referred to the monthly average of the front month future NYMEX (Henry Hub) contract.

100 50

The following table shows the monthly average price for each fuel, expressed in US$/MMBtu.

0

2009 INTERNATIONAL FUEL PRICES

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

(US$/MMBTU)

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

COAL

2.91

2.62

2.14

2.21

2.08

2.13

2.16

2.15

1.98

2.09

2.06

2.16

LNG

5.90

5.20

4.41

4.04

3.60

3.88

3.94

3.57

3.37

3.28

4.76

4.60

FO6

6.14

6.45

5.97

6.80

8.29

9.55

9.50

10.51

10.17

10.65

11.32

10.96

FO2

10.09

8.87

8.87

9.59

10.52

12.57

11.68

13.38

12.43

13.84

14.21

14.06

The next table shows the monthly average energy spot price and the maximum energy spot price during 2009.

2009 ENERGY SPOT PRICE [US$/MWh]

JAN

34

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

AVERAGE

AVG

80

87

86

89

99

110

132

131

146

145

150

139

116

MAX

86

101

105

100

110

128

143

143

155

151

157

165

129

35


2009 Statistical Report

AES Dominicana

Capacity Spot Price and Connection Right The capacity spot price is defined by a formula with the cost to install an open cycle gas turbine with 50 MW and the O&M costs. The next chart shows the evolution of the capacity spot price and the connection right during 2009.

AES Dominicana, through AES ANDRES, AES ITABO including FALCONDO and DPP, was the Group who had more contributions to the Primary Frequency Regulation, with an important 46% of the reserve margins, maintaining the quality and reliability of the electric supply. During 2009 AES ANDRES and DPP contributed 51% and 9% respectively to the Secondary Frequency Regulation Service. The hydroelectric power generators contributed 39% of the margin. As we can see in some months the 3% established in the regulation was not reached, as the minimum that the system should have in order to operate with security, facing the planned demand variations.

2009 CAPACITY SPOT PRICE AND CONNECTION RIGHT [US/kW-mes]

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

FREQUENCY SECONDARY REGULATION SERVICE 2009 CONTRIBUTION RESERVE

Promedio

Capacity Spot Price

7.77

7.78

7.83

7.83

7.86

7.92

7.96

7.95

7.97

7.97

7.98

7.99

7.90

Connection Right

3.14

2.74

3.14

3.26

3.34

3.53

3.43

3.31

3.56

3.13

2.91

3.23

3.23

[GWh]

35

The annual average capacity spot price was 7.9 US$/ kW-month. The following table shows the monthly values.

30 25 20

CAPACITY SPOT PRICE

2009 CAPACITY SPOT PRICE AND CONNECTION RIGHT

15

CONNECTION RIGHT

12

10 5

US$/kW-mes

10

0

8

JAN

FEB

MAR

6

APR

MAY

AES ANDRES

JUN

HIDRO

JUL

AUG

DPP

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

3% DEMAND

4 2 0 JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

Non-Regulated Users Market A non-regulated user (NRU) is a public service user that, before having the non- regulated user status, could have the electricity service through free contracts, with any electric supplier.

Frequency Regulation Service The AES power generation units play an important role in the frequency regulation service of the system. The following chart shows the margins contributed by each company that participates in this market.

Article 108 of the General Electricity Law states that companies must apply to the Superintendency of Electricity to be authorized the non-regulated user status. Also, to obtain this status the public service users must meet the following power consumption:

FREQUENCY PRIMARY REGULATION SERVICE 2009 CONTRIBUTION RESERVE [GWh]

40 35 30

2007 ≥ 1.4 MW 2008 ≥ 1.3 MW 2009 ≥ 1.2 MW 2010 ≥ 1.1 MW 2011 hereafter ≥ 1 MW

25 20

From 2000 to 2009, the Superintendency of Electricity has issued 107 authorizations to have the non-regulated user status. However, currently only 63 non-regulated users are using their authorizations in the wholesale electric market.

15 10 5 0

JAN

36

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

AES ANDRES

DPP

HIDRO

SAN FELIPE

FALCON

GPLV

SEABOARD

METALDOM

MONTERIO

3% Demanda

OCT

NOV

DEC

HAINA

37


2009 Statistical Report

AES Dominicana

2009 NON-REGULATED USERS MARKET EVOLUTION 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% JAN

FEB

MAR

AES ANDRES

APR

HAINA

MAY

AES ITABO

JUN

MONTE RIO

JUL

SEABOARD

AUG

EDESUR

SEP

EDENORTE

OCT

NOV

DEC

EDEESTE

The next table shows the monthly energy supplied by each power generation company to their non-regulated users during 2009. 2009 NON-REGULATED USERS MARKET EVOLUTION (GWh)

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAR

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

GWh

%

AES ANDRES

17.95

17.18

18.87

17.99

18.95

21.17

23.84

23.53

32.22

34.15

32.06

29.02

HAINA

2.36

2.11

2.24

2.23

2.35

2.44

-

-

-

-

-

-

286.94 29.9% 13.72

1.4%

AES ITABO

0.21

0.23

0.32

0.31

0.25

0.25

0.25

0.27

0.20

0.25

0.19

0.17

2.90

0.3%

MONTERIO

12.36

12.42

14.04

12.92

16.65

14.72

12.94

12.94

3.81

4.06

0.70

0.69

118.25 12.3%

SEABOARD

23.72

22.92

30.54

25.18

25.03

22.14

25.80

26.09

21.46

17.99

6.94

6.55

254.35 26.5%

EDESUR

7.99

7.79

8.86

8.74

9.72

9.62

9.44

9.31

8.10

8.89

8.67

8.35

105.49 11.0%

EDENORTE

5.45

5.39

6.31

6.10

6.36

6.55

6.81

6.60

6.16

6.80

6.32

5.47

74.32

7.7%

EDEESTE

1.04

1.14

1.28

1.20

1.26

1.25

6.04

5.67

4.78

8.31

18.88

18.93

69.79

7.3% 3.7%

HIDRO

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.54

2.58

4.81

6.22

10.37

8.92

35.44

TOTAL (GWh)

71.07

69.19

82.45

74.67

80.57

78.14

87.66

86.98

81.55

86.67

84.14

78.10

961.20 100.0%

As we can see the distribution companies had an important role in the non-regulated users market, remaining participation of the power generation companies. The following chart shows the evolution of the non-regulated users market in 2009.

38

39


2009 Statistical Report

AES Dominicana

Annual Statistics 40

41


2009 Statistical Report

AES Dominicana

Installed Capacity

Maximum Demand

The next table shows the installed capacity evolution of the Dominican electric system between 2000 and 2009.

The next table shows the maximum demand between 2001 and 2009. YEARLY MAXIMUM DEMAND [MW]

SYSTEM INSTALLED CAPACITY MW

COMPANY

2000

CAYMAN POWER

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

YEAR MONTH

2009

50.0

Day / Hour

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

DECEMBER

DECEMBER

SEPTEMBER

MAY

JUNE

MAY

JULY

MAY

SEPTEMBER

D11 H21

D20 H20

D11 H21

D04 H21

D02 H22

D17 H21

D05 H21

D13 H21

D30 H22

ENERGYCORP

103.5

103.5

103.5

103.5

AES ITABO

586.0

586.0

432.5

432.5

432.5

432.5

432.5

432.5

294.5

260.0

GROSS GENERATION

1,601

1,634

1,737

1,690

1,691

1,766

1,772

1,925

1,743

HAINA

456.7

663.3

665.1

665.1

665.1

663.4

663.4

663.4

548.2

548.2

NET GENERATION sub-transmission voltage

1,553

1,578

1,691

1,643

1,639

1,708

1,724

1,861

1,689

HIDRO

402.0

411.8

463.8

463.8

463.8

463.8

469.3

469.3

472.3

523.1

NET GENERATION transmission high-voltage

1,551

1,575

1,688

1,639

1,634

1,703

1,719

1,855

1,685

DPP

236.0

236.0

236.0

236.0

236.0

236.0

236.0

236.0

236.0

236.0

GPLV

194.5

194.5

194.5

194.5

194.5

194.5

194.5

194.5

194.5

194.5

DEMAND

SAN FELIPE

175.0

175.0

185.0

185.0

185.0

185.0

185.0

185.0

185.0

185.0

EDEESTE

465

473

519

481

463

466

454

502

461

METALDOM

42.0

42.0

42.0

42.0

42.0

42.0

42.0

42.0

42.0

42.0

EDENORTE

478

499

545

522

491

521

502

591

477

SEABOARD

115.0

115.0

115.0

115.0

115.0

116.3

116.3

116.3

116.3

116.3

EDESUR

524

535

539

538

546

580

602

604

588

GENERATION

CEPP

76.9

76.9

76.9

76.9

76.9

76.9

76.9

76.9

76.9

76.9

NON-REGULATED USERS

MAXON

30.0

30.0

30.0

30.0

30.0

30.0

30.0

30.0

30.0

30.0

OTHERS

LAESA

79.9

79.9

83.9

87.7

87.7

31.6

31.6

31.6

59.6

200.0

300.0

CESPM

300.0

300.0

300.0

300.0

300.0

300.0

300.0

AES ANDRES

319.0

319.0

319.0

319.0

319.0

319.0

319.0

MONTERIO

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1.9

1.9

2,948.2

2,992.5

RIO SAN JUAN TOTAL [MW]

2,547.5

2,913.9

2,928.2

3,351.0

3,247.5

3,159.4

3,196.5

3,196.5

TOTAL RETIROS Losses [MW] Losses [%]

7

8

18

35

49

77

101

93

100

12

17

13

13

39

12

31

10

7

1,487

1,532

1,634

1,589

1,586

1,656

1,690

1,799

1,634

64

43

54

50

48

47

29

56

51

4.11%

2.71%

3.23%

3.06%

2.93%

2.74%

1.66%

3.02%

3.02%

Energy Spot Price

Energy Balance

The following table shows the energy spot price evolution between 2001 and 2009.

The following table shows the electric market agents annual energy balance between 2000 and 2009.

ENERGY SPOT PRICE

SYSTEM ENERGY BALANCE

[US$/MWh]

[GWh]

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

AES ITABO

2,214.2

1,867.3

1,271.1

1,509.4

955.3

1,048.2

1,574.8

1,630.3

1,735.5

1,903

2001

47.79

53.22

50.71

51.67

53.41

65.76

72.07

74.52

79.83

60.37

51.35

HIDRO

915.8

736.3

876.5

1,189.5

1,571.6

1,883.0

1,745.4

1,465.5

1,369.4

1,442

2002

44.72

42.28

47.28

59.29

60.60

63.99

58.65

65.72

65.28

63.64

66.62

62.76

69.89

73.08

69.41

61.49

58.90

60.82

77.46

70.63

77.90

73.71

59.01

68.07

45.58

IPPs

3,316.3

2,085.2

2,377.9

1,515.6

1,767.2

1,396.2

1,228.1

1,100.0

1,431.3

1,253

2003

HAINA

1,973.8

2,241.2

2,985.0

2,196.1

1,331.2

1,774.4

1,757.1

1,662.6

1,334.8

1,106

2004

57.60

67.20

62.24

63.93

56.55

76.92

72.86

74.24

73.18

68.57

79.58

58.74

GPLV

213.2

1,422.5

1,428.4

1,329.5

814.9

814.4

765.7

888.3

1,084.8

1,119

2005

55.76

66.89

59.77

70.43

70.58

72.05

75.88

85.91

87.08

92.54

95.24

77.25

SEABOARD

415.9

885.0

890.3

864.5

699.0

792.8

777.6

777.3

796.3

805

2006

79.57

92.79

103.30

79.95

91.13

95.93

87.92

91.33

107.09

96.58

89.42

72.81

CEPP

473.2

385.6

401.8

266.5

242.0

283.8

339.4

361.8

262.6

296

2007

71.01

76.72

81.93

83.19

97.55

99.02

111.59

114.39

107.12

116.65

120.19

115.32

345.5

691.9

984.2

1,582.2

1,900.2

2,040.9

1,730

2008

134.21

141.28

144.31

157.78

163.76

184.58

204.88

216.24

186.00

179.44

134.27

84.52

2009

79.51

86.56

86.48

88.88

99.15

110.05

132.04

131.23

146.33

144.58

150.03

138.79

AES ANDRES DPP

537.7

18.1

18.2

94.0

364.2

338.2

466

MONTERIO

594.9

461.3

555.6

495.7

448.2

526.1

524

138.5

160.7

184.4

193.1

188.7

150

48.8

237.9

230.3

383

METALDOM LAESA GENERATION

9,522.4

9,623.1

10,231.0

10,349.2

8,691.0

9,711.5

10,593.2

11,029.4

11,338.9

11,176.3

EDESUR

3,420.0

3,445.0

3,709.4

3,608.2

2,968.6

3,266.5

3,488.2

3,655.8

3,826.0

3,785

EDENORTE

2,863.8

2,788.8

3,022.9

3,087.3

2,497.2

2,725.4

2,967.4

3,098.6

3,240.2

3,129

EDEESTE

2,991.1

2,926.1

3,101.5

3,216.7

2,706.3

2,960.6

3,053.0

3,033.9

3,042.6

3,050

NRU

5.0

73.3

68.4

163.3

314.9

461.5

767.7

878.7

975.7

965

OTHERS

1.8

1.3

30.4

18.8

12.3

62.5

72.8

122.3

60.7

22

DEMAND

9,281.7

9,234.5

9,932.6

10,094.3

8,499.3

9,476.5

10,349.1

10,789.3

11,145.2

10,950

LOSS

240.7

388.6

298.4

254.9

191.7

235.0

244.1

240.1

193.7

226.3

42

43


2009 Statistical Report

AES Dominicana

ENERGY SPOT PRICE EVOLUTION

Power Outages or Black Outs

250

A power outage (also known as a power cut, power failure, power loss, or blackout) is a short- or long-term loss of the electric power to an area.

US$/MWh

200

There are many causes of power failures in an electricity network. Examples of these causes include: faults at power stations, damage to power lines, substations or other parts of the distribution system, a short circuit, or the overloading of electricity mains.

150 100

The following table presents a list of the power outages that have occurred between 2000 and 2009. 50

INTERRUPCIONES TOTALES SENI 2000 - 2009

-

DATE

HOUR

Wednesday

9-Feb-2000

16:47

Shortcircuit to 138 kV Itabo - Los Prados power line

Saturday

25-Mar-2000

19:19

Strain insulator failure to 138 kV Itabo - Palamara II power line

Sunday

13-Aug-2000

11:55

Low Frequency

Sunday

13-Aug-2000

19:22

Low Frequency

Friday

25-Aug-2000

13:35

High-voltage breakers trip to 138 kV Villa Duarte - Hainamosa II power line

Saturday

2-Sep-2000

15:50

Low Frequency

Monday

9-Oct-2000

7:01

Autotransformer trip at Villa Duarte Substation

Friday

8-Dec-2000

8:33

A conductor landing to 138 kV Itabo - Haina I power line

Saturday

2-Jun-2001

14:27

Low Frequency

Monday

4-Jun-2001

15:51

Failure at Palamara substation

Thursday

28-Jun-2001

15:53

Low Voltage

25

Thursday

28-Jun-2001

18:06

Low Frequency

20

Tuesday

6-Nov-2001

6:49

Low Frequency

15

Sunday

18-Nov-2001

16:37

Low Voltage

Thursday

22-Nov-2001

12:40

Low Frequency

Tuesday

27-Nov-2001

3:16

Low Frequency

5

Saturday

9-Mar-2002

20:06

Low Frequency

-

Tuesday

19-Mar-2002

11:49

Shortcircuit to 138 kV Los Mina - Hainamosa power line

Sunday

24-Mar-2002

1:46

Low Frequency

Friday

26-Jul-2002

12:38

Low Voltage

Saturday

4-Jan-2003

0:55

Distribution transformer failure at Villa Duarte substation

Wednesday

6-Aug-2003

3:20

Unknown

Saturday

27-Sep-2003

13:04

A damage to 138 kV Embajador - Los Prados power line

Saturday

11-Oct-2003

3:03

Low Frequency

Sunday

22-Feb-2004

3:40

A trip of 138 kV Villa Duarte - Timbeque II power line

Thursday

25-Mar-2004

14:05

Failure at Bonao II substation

Sunday

8-Aug-2004

14:40

High Frequency. Failure of the 69 kV San Francisco - Pimentel power line and 69 kV Hatillo - Pimentel power line

Monday

9-Aug-2004

14:11

Low Frequency

Tuesday

10-Aug-2004

15:47

High Frequency

Monday

23-Aug-2004

14:52

Unknown

Monday

23-Aug-2004

18:29

Unknown

Tuesday

7-Sep-2004

13:56

Failure of the 138 kV Hainamosa - AES Andres power line

Monday

13-Sep-2004

16:13

Low Frequency

Tuesday

21-Sep-2004

3:33

Failure of the 138 kV Palamara - Hainamosa power line

Wednesday

3-Aug-2005

13:15

High-voltage breakers trip of the 138 kV Jig端ey/Aguacate - Pizarrete power line

Thursday

18-Aug-2005

8:27

Failure of the 138 kV Haina - Itabo power line

Friday

19-Aug-2005

10:56

Low Frequency

Jan-01 J

an-02 J

an-03

Jan-04

Jan-05 J

an-06

Jan-07 J

an-08

Jan-09

International Fuel Prices The next chart shows the evolution of international fuel prices between 2004 and 2009. INTERNATIONAL FUEL PRICE EVOLUTION EVOLUCION PRECIOS INTERNACIONALES COMBUSTIBLES

FO2

FO6

LNG

Jan-09

Jan-08

Jan-07

Jan-05

Jan-06

10

Jan-04

USD/MMBtu

30

COAL

The following charts show the evolution of fuel prices by fuel type. FO6 3% Sulfur, Gulf Coast, Residual Fuel

180

180

160

160

140

140

120

120

US$/BBL

US$/BBL

FO2 Gulf Coast, Destillates and Blendstocks, Waterborne

100 80 60

100 80 60

40

40

20

20

-

Jan-04

Jan-05

Jan-06

Jan-07

Jan-08

Jan-09

Jan-04

Jan-05

LNG NYMEX Henry Hub 12

US$/TM

US$/MMBTU

14 10 8 6 4 2

44

Jan-04

Jan-05 J

an-06

Jan-07 J

an-08

Jan-07

Jan-08

Jan-09

COAL FOB Bolivar

16

-

Jan-06

Jan-09

180 160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 Jan-04

Jan-05 J

an-06

Jan-07 J

an-08

Jan-09

DAY

CAUSE

Saturday

20-Aug-2005

11:05

Low Frequency

Wednesday

7-Sep-2005

13:11

Low Frequency

Wednesday

21-Sep-2005

22:51

High Frequency. Failure of the 138 kV Bonao II - Canabacoa power line

Monday

29-Oct-2007

0:52

Low Frequency

Wednesday

15-Jul-2009

11:34

Low Frequency

Wednesday

2-Sep-2009

18:03

Low Frequency. AES Andres Trip caused by 138 kV power line interconection wron open

45


2009 Statistical Report

AES Dominicana

Attachments 46

47


2009 Statistical Report

Glossary

FACTOR OF A CENTRAL GENERATING UNIT: The quotient between the energy that the Available A AVAILABILITY power of the plant could generate in the period considered, which is normally one year, and the energy corresponding to its maximum power during the same.

B

BAR: That point of the electrical system prepared to deliver and withdraw electricity.

AES Dominicana

GAS (NG): A mixture of gases that is frequently found in fossil beds, alone or accompanied by oil. It is N NATURAL composed mainly of methane in quantities greater than 90 to 95%, and in addition , usually contains other gases such

as nitrogen, ethane, CO2, and traces of butane or propane , as well as small proportions of inert gases such as carbon dioxide and nitrogen.

BTU: British Thermal Unit of measurement. It is a unit of heat in the English European System. Its equivalence in the International System (IS) is the Calorie. The prices of Natural Gas are usually expressed in US$/MMBtu. 1 BTU is equivalent to 252 Calories (Cal).

C

CONTRACTS MARKET: The market for transactions of sale and purchase of electricity based on freely negotiated contracts for supply.

COMBINED CYCLE: a machine composed of two phases: one phase of gas and the other phase of steam. Typically the whole entity consists of a gas turbine, a heat recuperation boiler, a steam turbine, and one or several electrical generators.

COST OF LACK OF SUPPLY OR ENERGY NOT SERVED: The cost incurred by users, by not having energy available and having to obtain it from alternative sources; or the economic loss derived from the lack of production and sale of goods and services, and the loss of well-being due to the decrease of quality of living in the case of the residential sector. This cost is established annually by means of resolution of the Superintendency of Electricity.

O PEAK POWER: Maximum power on the annual load curve. P PRIMARY FREQUENCY REGULATION (RPF): Power that a generator units can vary by automatic action of its system OWN CONSUMPTION: The energy consumed by the auxiliary systems of a central unit or Substation.

in the face of changes in the system’s frequency.

R

RIGHT OF CONNECTION: The difference between the total annual cost of the transmission system and the right of use estimated for the year. The procedure to determine the right of use is established in the Regulation of the General Electricity Law.

the system. The OC establishes the regulation parameters, and the generator companies are responsible for providing service through their control Centers.

FREQUENCY REGULATION (RSF): Power which a generator unit can vary, or modify by automatic or S SECONDARY manual action of its system of regulation in a sustained manner.

FUEL OIL: A petroleum derivative obtained as a residue after the distilling process. Being a fuel, which is heavier than those which can be distilled at atmospheric pressure, Fuel Oil is used as a fuel for electrical energy plants, boilers, and ovens.

SELF PRODUCERS: Those enterprises or entities , who have available their own generation for consumption of electricity, independently of their productive process, and who eventually sell their surplus power or electrical energy to third parties.

SPOT MARKET: The market for transactions of short-term sale and purchase of electricity not based on term contracts was economic transactions are performed at Marginal Short Term Energy Cost and at Marginal Our Cost.

STEAM TURBINE: A machine that transforms thermal energy from fuel into mechanical energy. Through a process of generation of steam produced in a boiler, from which come conditions of high temperature and pressure. The kinetic energy of the steam is used by the turbine mechanically and through this by a generator to produce electricity.

V

VARIABLE PRODUCTION COST OF A THERMAL ELECTRICAL MACHINE: This corresponds to the cost of fuel placed in the plants, and used in the production of electrical energy, multiplied by the average specific consumption of the machine plus the variable non-fuel cost.

FIRM POWER: The power that can be supplied by each generating units during peak hours, with high security/safety. F FREQUENCY REGULATION: Actions necessary to maintain frequency within the permissible tolerances defined for

GAS TURBINE: A machine composed of a compressed air compressor (sic), a turbine especially designed for this G purposes, and an electrical generator. The turbine converts thermal energy from fuel which is produced as a result

of the expansion of hot gases from the explosion of the mixutre of compressed air, fuel, and flame, into mechanical energy that is used by the electrical generator to produce electricity.

TURBINE: A machine that uses kinetic energy and power from water to produce a rotation movement H HYDRAULIC which , transferred through an axis, directly moves a machine or generator that transforms mechanical energy into electrical energy.

NON REGULATED USER (UNR): That user of the electrical service will his monthly demand exceeds the limits established by the Superintendency in order to classified as a public user, and which fulfill the requirements established in the Regulation of the General Electricity Law.

MAXIMUM ANNUAL DEMAND: The maximum gross half our demand, during a calendar year, of the total of the generator units of the system, occurring within the system´s peak hours.

NATURAL GAS (LNG): Natural Gas processed to be transported in liquid form. It is the best alternative for L LIQUID transporting and storage because when transformed into liquid as atmospheric pressure and –163oC , the liquefaction process reduces the volume of gas by 600 times.

MARGINAL CENTRAL UNIT: This refers to the generating unit or units, which at optimum load dispatch increase M their generation when we demand is marginally increased.

48

MARGINAL SHORT-TERM COST: The variable costs necessary to produce one additional unit of energy, considering the demand and the generation infrastructure available.

49


2009 Statistical Report

AES Dominicana

Economic Indexes CONSUMER PRICE INDEX

ENERGY’S UNITS

Year

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

2000

168.80

169.80

171.20

171.30

171.50

172.40

172.80

172.80

173.70

174.00

174.10

174.00

2001

175.10

175.80

176.20

176.90

177.70

178.00

177.50

177.50

178.30

177.70

177.40

176.70

2002

177.10

177.80

178.80

179.80

179.80

179.90

180.10

180.70

181.00

181.30

181.30

180.90

2003

181.70

183.10

184.20

183.80

183.50

183.70

183.90

184.60

185.20

185.00

184.50

184.30

2004

185.20

186.20

187.40

188.00

189.10

189.70

189.40

189.50

189.90

190.90

191.00

190.30

2005

190.70

191.80

193.30

194.60

194.40

194.50

195.40

196.40

198.80

199.20

197.60

196.80

2006

198.30

198.70

199.80

201.50

202.50

202.90

203.50

203.90

202.90

201.80

201.50

201.80

2007

202.42

203.50

205.35

206.69

207.95

208.35

208.30

207.92

208.49

208.94

210.18

210.04

2008

211.08

211.69

213.53

214.82

216.63

218.82

219.96

219.09

218.78

216.57

212.43

210.23

2009

211.14

212.19

212.71

213.24

213.86

215.69

215.35

215.83

215.97

216.18

216.33

215.95

J

Cal

Btu

KVh

J

1

0.2388

0.009478

0.000000277

Calories

Cal

4.1869

1

0.0039683

0.000001163

Term Unit British

Btu

1055.06

252

1

0.00029307

Kilowatt / Hours

KVh

3600000

8598000

3412.14

1

Joulie

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

DENSITY’S UNITS MONTHLY AVERAGE EXCHANGE RATE [RD/USD]

Year 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

AVERAGE

BUY

15.98

16.05

16.05

16.05

16.05

16.05

16.05

16.05

16.38

16.45

16.49

16.53

16.18

SALE

15.98

16.05

16.05

16.05

16.05

16.05

16.05

16.05

16.38

16.45

16.49

16.53

16.18

BUY

16.62

16.66

16.66

16.66

16.66

16.66

16.66

16.66

16.66

16.66

16.76

16.97

16.69

SALE BUY SALE BUY SALE BUY SALE BUY SALE BUY SALE BUY SALE BUY SALE BUY 2009

16.62 17.05 17.05 17.56 17.76 46.09 46.64 29.84 30.40 34.56 34.84 33.70 33.90 33.76 33.89 35.37 SALE

16.66 17.15 17.15 18.17 18.37 49.23 50.44 28.85 29.22 34.17 34.44 33.36 33.51 33.83 33.96 35.56 35.49

16.66 17.15 17.15 22.72 22.92 46.52 47.18 28.30 28.60 32.56 32.85 32.79 32.96 33.92 34.04 35.67 35.65

16.66 17.56 17.70 23.78 23.98 44.35 44.81 28.25 28.54 32.11 32.33 32.23 32.40 34.03 34.14 35.83 35.77

16.66 17.56 17.76 25.60 25.80 46.92 47.69 28.70 28.91 32.49 32.73 32.14 32.29 34.01 34.13 35.95 35.92

16.66 17.56 17.76 28.89 29.09 48.12 48.67 28.90 29.08 32.77 32.94 32.42 32.57 34.16 34.27 35.92 36.04

16.66 17.56 17.76 34.45 34.85 44.84 45.56 28.93 29.06 32.75 32.91 32.99 33.14 34.27 34.39 35.98 36.00

16.66 17.56 17.76 33.72 34.13 41.25 42.11 29.00 29.13 32.63 32.80 32.90 33.05 34.68 34.80 36.03 36.07

16.66 17.56 17.76 31.70 32.25 36.95 37.62 30.42 30.82 32.95 33.12 33.31 33.46 34.83 34.95 36.06 36.10

16.66 17.56 17.76 34.91 35.23 32.27 32.98 32.41 32.70 33.47 33.66 33.46 33.59 34.99 35.09 36.09 36.13

16.76 17.56 17.76 39.74 40.24 29.56 30.13 33.25 33.54 33.56 33.69 33.41 33.53 35.19 35.32 36.09 36.16

16.97 17.56 17.76 37.44 37.82 28.86 29.33 33.12 33.39 33.09 33.30 33.52 33.66 35.26 35.39 36.09 36.17

16.69 17.45 17.59 29.06 29.37 41.25 41.93 30.00 30.28 33.09 33.30 33.02 33.17 34.41 34.53 35.89 36.16

Kg / m3

Lb / Pie 3

Lb / Gl (UK)

Lb / Gl (US)

Kg / m3

1

0.062428

0.010022

0.008345

Pound / Cubic Feet

Lb / Pie 3

16.0185

1

0.160544

0.133681

Pound / Gallon UK

Lb / Gl (UK)

99.7764

6.22884

1

0.83268

Pound / Gallon USA

Lb / Gl (US)

119.826

7.48047

1.20094

1

Kilograms / Cubic Meters

MASS’S UNITS Kg

Ton.

Large Ton

Short Ton

Pound (Lb

Kg

1

0.001

0.000984

0.001102

2.2046

Ton

T

1000

1

0.984207

1.10231

2204.62

Large Ton

TL

1016

1.016

1

1.12

2240

Short Ton

TC

907

0.907

0.892857

1

2000

Pound

Lb

0.4535

0.0004535

0.000446429

0.0005

1

Kilogramo

Source: Web Page of the DR Central Bank

PODERES CALORÍFICOS SUPERIORES E INFERIORES DE ALGUNOS COMBUSTIBLES PCS

PCI

PCS

PCI

PCS

PCI

Kcal/Kg

Kcal/Kg

Kcal/L

Kcal/L

Kj/L

Kj/L

10,800

10,008

9,374

8,686

39,250

36,371

Combustibles Líquidos Petróleo

VOLUME’S UNITS cm3

M3

Feet 3

Inch 3

Gal (UK)

Gal (USA)

BBL

Liters (Lt)

Cubic Centimeters

cm3

1

0.000001

0.0000353

0.06102

0.00021997

0.00026417

6.2899E-06

0.006102

M3

1000000

1

35.3147

61000

219.969

264.17

6.28976

1000.028

Oleo Diesel

10,750

10,000

9,159

8,680

38,350

36,343

Cubic Meters

Oleo Combustible

10,090

9,583

10,217

8,318

42,780

34,827

Cubic Feet

Gas Licuado de Petróleo

11,750

11,000

6,486

9,548

27,160

39,977

Feet 3

28320.589

0.028317

1

1727.556

6.2288

7.4805

0.178107

28.321

Cubic Inch

Inch 3

16.387

0.00001639

0.00057863

1

0.00360465

0.00432898

0.0001031

0.0163866

PCS

PCI

PCS

PCI

Gallon

Gal (UK)

4546.09

0.004546

0.160544

277.42

1

1.20094

0.028594

4.54596

Kcal/m3

Kcal/m3

Kcal/m3

Kcal/m3

Gallon

Gal (US)

3785.41

0.003785

0.133681

231

0.83268

1

0.02381

3.78533

Barrels

BBL

158984

0.158988

5.6146

9698.024

34.9726

42

1

158.984

Liters (Lt)

1000.028

0.001

0.03531

61.0255

0.219976

0.264178

0.0063

1

Combustibles Gaseosos Gas Natural Húmedo Gas Natural Seco

10,454 9,256

8,240 8,500

43,770 38,750

34,500 35,584

PCS

PCI

PCS

PCI

Kcal/Kg

Kcal/Kg

Kj/Kg

Kj/Kg

Carbón Vegetal

7,500

6,500

30,560

27,213

Coque de Carbón Mineral

7,300

6,998

30,560

29,299

Liters

Combustibles Sólidos

50

51


2009 Statistical Report

52

Statistical Report 2009  

Statistical Report 2009

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