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May 6, 1996 1.0

INTRODUCTION

Page 2

2.0

HISTORY / BACKGROUND

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3.0

SITUATION ANALYSIS 3.1 SYSTEM PROFILE AND PERFORMANCE 3.2 MARKET TRENDS AND USER ATTITUDES 3.3 CRITICAL ISSUES 3.4 OPPORTUNITIES

Page 4 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7

4.0

GOALS

Page 9

5.0

RECOMMENDED STRATEGIES 5.1 SERVICE STRUCTURE 5.1.1 BASE NETWORK 5.1.2 COMMUNITY NETWORK 5.1.3 ALTERNATIVE STRATEGIES CONSTRAINED UNCONSTRAINED BALANCED 5.1.4 LONG TERM POLICY DIRECTIONS 5.2 FARE STRUCTURE 5.3 INFRASTRUCTURE REQUIREMENTS 5.3.1 FLEET REQUIREMENTS 5.3.2 FACILITY REQUIREMENTS 5.4 MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS 5.4.1 MARKETING 5.4.2 COMMUNICATIONS 5.4.3 PUBLIC OUTREACH PROCESS 5.5 DATS

Page 10 Page 10 Page 10 Page 13 Page 14

Page 15 Page 17 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 30 Page 30 Page 33 Page 35 Page 37

IMPLEMENTATION 6.1 BUSINESS PLAN BUDGET FORECASTS 6.2 6.2.1 INITIAL IMPLEMENTATION COSTS 6.2.2 OPERATING BUDGET 6.2.3 FIVE YEAR CAPITAL FORECAST

Page 39 Page 39 Page 40 Page 40 Page 40 Page 43

6.0

Planning and

Development


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1.0 INTRODUCTION This report documents a new service strategy - Horizon 2000 - for the Edmonton Transit System which when implemented will deliver improved perfaullance. Transit users will get more reliable and consistent service, communities will get better access to important local destinations and attractions, and taxpayers and City Council can expect greater cost efficiency and accountability. Horizon 2000 is customer responsive and fiscally responsible. As transit is a package of various product and service elements when viewed from the customer's perspective, it is important to design them carefully in order to accomplish the organization's objectives. Such elements include service structure, fare structure, vehicles and infrastructure, as well as marketing and communications. To ensure customer's needs and preferences are met, all of these elements must be properly planned and integrated. Horizon 2000 is based on this important foundation. The following report describes the proposed service strategy in detail, including implementation plans for both immediate and short term components of this process.


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2.0 HISTORY/BACKGROUND A review of the existing transit system and the current market trends and conditions was conducted as part of the Transportation Master Plan process by the IBI Group of Consultants. IBI assessed input from surveys and stakeholder outreach activities and developed an outline for a strategy for the transit system. Their recommendations include: •

reorienting transit routes to better match the service with the travel needs of Edmontonians

improving the consistency and reliability of transit service on a city-wide and year-round basis

offering more community and neighborhood focused services

simplifying the fare system to make it more equitable for all customers

improving financial performance

These recommendations were subjected to a peer review process involving several key transit authorities and consultants from across Canada (Appendix 1). The recommendations from IBI and the peer review process were used by Edmonton Transit System to develop a new service strategy for the provision of public transportation in Edmonton. The individuals participating in the peer review agreed, in principle, with the concept of a new transit strategy, particularly with the notion of a system of base and community networks. Concerns expressed included the need for revisions to the fare structure, and the requirement for faster implementation of the new plan. The proposed new service strategy, Horizon 2000, was presented to a number of major stakeholder groups throughout February and March of 1996, as well as being widely distributed to post-secondary institutions and Area Councils. Presentations were provided to the Advisory Board on Services for Persons with Disabilities, the Edmonton Public School Board, One Voice, the Edmonton Student's Alliance, the Edmonton Federation of Community Leagues, the Edmonton Transit System Advisory Board, the Citizen's Advisory Group, and the DATS Working Group. Information has also been provided to the Chamber of Commerce, and ongoing discussions have been held with the Public and Catholic School Boards. The purpose of these presentations was to obtain preliminary feedback on the new concept, and to identify specific concerns prior to forwarding the proposed new strategy to City Council for approval (Appendix 5).

Section Highlights


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3.0 SITUATION ANALYSIS The following is a review of Edmonton Transit System's current profile and performance, market trends, user attitudes, critical issues and opportunities. Together they define the need and urgency for changing the way public transit is delivered in Edmonton. 3.1 SYSTEM PROFILE AND PERFORMANCE The Edmonton Transit System serves 628,000 people living in the City of Edmonton, and provides 38 million trips annually (9% of all trips within Edmonton) on 129 routes, 365 days of the year. ETS provides a family of public transit services, including light rail transit, conventional and community bus routes, transportation for the disabled, and a variety of special services. Twenty transit centres serve as transfer points permitting travel anywhere in the city. The transit network emphasizes service to the traditional concentrations of employment and activity in the Downtown and University of Alberta areas. Service is focused into these areas from the suburban residential areas. The current fleet is comprised of: 614 diesel buses (59 low floor buses, 19 conventional 35' GMC New Look, 536 conventional 40' GMC New Look) • 60 trolley buses (plus 38 surplus trolleys, which ETS is presently attempting to sell, based on 1994 directions from City Council) • 10 small buses • 37 LRT vehicles •

The present weekday fleet requirement is: • • • •

482 diesel buses 45 trolley buses 5 small buses 27 LRT vehicles

In accordance with the standard practices of transit properties, the remainder of the fleet is required for maintenance programs, vehicle breakdowns, and backup. Since 1986, annual revenue hours per capita have decreased by 23% and net operating costs have increased 37%. Ridership declined 5.2% between 1986 and 1987, then remained relatively stable until 1991. Since 1991, there has been an 11% decrease in ridership, with a trend of approximately 3% per year. Annual costs and revenues for the operation of Edmonton Transit System, excluding DATS, in the 1996 Budget are: 0 0 0 0

Net Operating Expenses Farebox Revenues Other Revenues Municipal Tax Levy

$94,597,000 $38,812,000 $ 2,513,000 $53,272,000


5

Section Highlights

MARKET TRENDS AND USER ATTITUDES 3.2 Market Trends Edmonton has experienced significant socio-economic changes over the past ten years which has had an adverse effect on the performance of ETS. Suburbanization The employment base is shifting to the suburbs where it is more cost-effective to operate a business. The net result is less traffic to the downtown core, which traditionally has been one of ETS's major service destinations. In addition, population growth has occurred in the suburban areas. From 1986 to 1995, the population within the City of Edmonton has grown from 572,000 to 628,000, which represents a 10% increase. The majority of this growth has occurred in outlying neighborhoods. Employment The recession, and the resultant job losses, particularly in the provincial and federal sectors, have had a profound effect on the local economy and the downtown core. The traditional workforce is changing as more people are working out of their homes and more people are employed part-time. Many women, who are the largest segment of transit riders, are earning more money and choosing private automobile ownership over public transit. Changes in employment have resulted in a decrease in demand for the current transit service structure. Demographics Currently, Edmonton Transit System's largest market group are persons under 25 years of age. With the overall aging of our population, this market group will shrink in size for the foreseeable future. In contrast adults aged 25-64, who are least likely to use public transit, are a growing segment and represent the second largest market group. The smallest group is seniors, and as the population ages, expansion of this rider group will place more demands on more specialized accessible services and DATS, which are typically costly to provide. Car Friendly City Another important factor affecting the use of public transit within Edmonton is the prolific use of private automobiles. Edmonton has one of the highest rates of private automobile ownership in all of Canada. Recently, an Edmonton Journal article reported that Edmonton was the least expensive city in the country to own and operate a vehicle. In addition, the high number of parking stalls in the downtown area far exceeds the demand. Public parking is priced comparable to or lower than transit fares, makes it difficult for ETS to provide an attractive alternative to private automobile use. User Attitudes In order to gauge customer needs and attitudes regarding the public transit system in Edmonton, a public outreach program was conducted in 1994 and 1995 utilizing stakeholder sessions, citizen


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groups (including the Edmonton Transit System Advisory Board, and the Citizen's Advisory Group for the Transportation Master Plan), and the 1994 Attitude and Awareness Survey. While indicating a general overall satisfaction with the transit system, a marked need for improvement in where and how public transit service is provided in Edmonton was demonstrated. Concerns noted included the perception of empty buses running through neighborhoods, routes being too centralized, poor evening and weekend service, unclean and deteriorating transit vehicles and facilities, passenger behaviour, and safety concerns. One issue raised repeatedly was that of convenience. Suggestions included more direct routes to reduce transfers, improved transfer connections, and better feeder services to main transit terminals. Travel Patterns A review of origin-destination patterns obtained from the 1994 Household Travel Survey shows that the current distribution of transit trips does not match overall travel patterns in the city. This information indicates that ETS service has to be better reoriented to reflect travel patterns.

Section Highlights

3.3 CRITICAL ISSUES ETS is facing increasing operating and capital costs, and aging infrastructure, and decreased capital funding. The current transit system is stretched to the limit. Annual requirements to hold costs have resulted in a tightening of schedules and reduced frequencies, and the effort to maintain service on some routes has negatively impacted transfer connections. A number of additional factors are contributing to the problems currently faced by the Edmonton Transit System.

Declining Ridership Similar to most other North American transit properties, the primary problem facing ETS today is declining ridership. The market trends identified in Section 3.2 are major contributing factors. Increasing Operating and Capital Costs The decrease in provincial cost sharing has resulted in a 67% reduction in capital grants and the elimination of the basic transit operating grant ($5 million) to Edmonton and Calgary. Operating and capital costs, however, continue to increase particularly with respect to labour, overhead, purchases of new buses, and infrastructure maintenance. Condition of Vehicles and Infrastructure The average age of the diesel fleet is over 18 years, with 54 vehicles purchased prior to 1970; the average age of the trolley fleet is 14 years. The majority of fleet operators in North America plan replacement schedules on a 15-year life cycle. However, given the extensive replacement requirements for ETS, no bus under the age of 25


7

years will be retired in the current schedule. As a result, due to the age of the fleet, there is an opportunity to reduce annual maintenance costs through replacement with new vehicles. The current program of refurbishment of old buses with spare parts, at an estimated annual cost of $100,000, cannot continue indefinitely, as the bus superstructure itself has a finite lifespan, and the parts are becoming increasingly difficult to obtain. Additionally, the Duncan fareboxes used on all buses are now obsolete and require replacement. The age of Edmonton Transit System's fleet has had a negative impact on the image of ETS. ETS facilities and infrastructure will also require significant funds for maintenance and upgrades within the next five to ten years. For example, significant costs for rehabilitation of the LRT system and stations are beginning to appear as the system reaches 20 years in age, and a number of transit center facilities require upgrading to enhance customer comfort and improve security perceptions. Operating Conditions ETS experiences significant difficulties in maintaining trolley operations during spring and summer months due to construction related interruptions, and during winter months due to operating difficulties. This has resulted in a requirement to maintain a 100% diesel backup fleet for trolley service. Use of additional power packs for the trolley buses will address some of these construction-related problems. Fleet Mix To meet some of the increasing demands in those areas where the use of large buses are not suitable, the increased use of small buses is occuring. This will require additional service equipment and may require additional garage space for storage if the City expands its small bus fleet. Fiscal Requirements The City's fiscal policy, with an emphasis on the payment of the City's long term debt and minimal annual tax increases, requires Edmonton Transit System to meet fiscal targets. With increasing operating and capital costs, annual service reductions have become an issue. Efforts by ETS to minimize the impacts of service reductions has resulted in a tightening of schedules, reduced frequencies and unreliable transfer connections. By adopting a new service strategy, the continued deterioration of service performance and passenger dissatisfaction will be halted. The new system will have the reliable connections and achievable schedules necessary to attract and hold ridership. Section Highlights

3.4 OPPORTUNITIES Several opportunities for improving ridership exist with the adoption of a new service strategy for the Edmonton Transit System.


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Realignment of Services Services need to be re-aligned to be able to meet and adapt to changing customer demands. Main routes need to operate in a straight line on roads connecting key transit centres in a grid fashion. Suburban routes need to be concentrated on a few key transit centres or activities, and be designed to maintain the coverage presently provided, but with better circulation to and from local activities. Where feasible, small buses need to be used within neighborhoods to feed major routes at the key transit centres. Consistency and Reliability of Service Delivery To reduce passenger waiting and transfer connection times, schedules need to be re-designed to ensure consistency through pulsed schedules at transit centres, timed transfers at transfer points, and clockfaced schedules. Fare Structure At the present time, over 40 pieces of fare media (26 ETS products and 14 regional fare products) are valid on Edmonton Transit System. The method of fare payment needs to be simplified. This means reducing the number of fare categories, reviewing concession fares, and establishing a consistent method for determining the fare structure from year to year. Target Markets and Image Our approach to the marketplace must be more focused on community level services. Major travel patterns of existing transit users as identified through the Household Travel Survey will be given priority in service design. Service will be prioritized according to demand and service quality will reflect the expectations held by users of the transit system. Community Involvement in Transit Planning In order to ensure that transit service remains responsive to customer needs, Edmontonians and their communities need to participate in the design of transit services on an on-going basis. Formal market research and other public consultation measures with respect to community, stakeholder, and interest groups must be enhanced and an ongoing process. Section Highlights


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4.0 GOALS As noted in Section 3.3, not all factors affecting ridership are within Edmonton Transit System's ability to influence (e.g. changing demographics and employment). Similarly, not all factors can be influenced at the municipal level. The City's Transportation Master Plan will establish priorities for the fimding of all major transportation programs in Edmonton for the next 20 years. The long term role of the Edmonton Transit System within the overall transportation strategy will be defined when this process is completed in 1997. In developing a new service strategy, Edmonton Transit System's goals for the next three to five years are: • Increased ridership • Improved quality of transit services, especially in the area of consistency and reliability • Increased customer satisfaction • Increased opportunities for persons with disabilities to access the public transit system • Improved financial performance In meeting these goals, ridership on ETS will stabilize and/or improve. It is not possible however to quantify ridership expectations since Edmonton Transit System's current ridership model is based on the existing system, which would change substantially. To address this, a new predictive model based on consumer choice analysis is being developed in 1996. Mississauga Transit in Ontario, and Orange County Transit (OCTA) in California, implemented similar transit service strategies in 1995, both of which were successful. OCTA experienced a moderate growth in ridership in the first year of their new operations, although it cannot be confirmed that this improvement is attributable solely to the new service strategy.

Section Highlights


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5.0 RECOMMENDED STRATEGIES To achieve our goals and address the critical issues, ETS recommends the following strategies: Service Structure • reorient transit routes in order to better match the service with the travel needs of Edmontonians Fare Structure • simplified, more equitable fare system and establish a consistent method for determining the fare structure from year to year Infrastructure Requirements • develop one new transit centre and replace and upgrade existing fleet and facilities Marketing • offer more community and neighborhood focused services; increase opportunities for people to provide input to transit services in their communities DATS • support demand management strategies to complement DATS in meeting the increasing demand for accessible transit service from persons with disabilities.

5.1 SERVICE STRUCTURE By restructuring transit service, the service will be more flexible and responsive to changing conditions both in the short and long term. In the short term, transit service will be better aligned with actual travel patterns. Over the longer term, a properly aligned transit service will be in a much better position to meet long term objectives. The revised transit service will have two main components: • City-wide transit routes that operate on a consistent and reliable basis every day of the year • Community transit services that provide service to local community amenities as well as connect with the city-wide routes for travel across town or to the downtown area.

5.1.1 THE BASE NETWORK The Base Network is designed to connect the communities within Edmonton with a reliable, consistent and simple to understand grid transit system. The Base Network is to be the foundation of the Edmonton Transit System, joining communities and major destinations such as the downtown and University of Alberta. The Base Network will: • be concentrated on arterial corridors •

meet minimum perfounance standards of 50 passenger boardings per hour during peak service hours and 30 passenger boardings per hour in the off peak periods

be operated seven days a week, 365 days a year with consistent frequencies of 30 minutes or better.


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include the existing LRT line

utilize low floor buses as they become available to provide an accessible, city-wide network for persons with mobility difficulties who can travel independently

incorporate trolleys where feasible to maximize the use of the existing trolley fleet (trolleys could be alternated with low floor buses) to ensure Base Network accessibility

The Base Network will be comprised of a Core and Connector Network (seee map on following page). • The Core Network Routes provide a basic crosstown, radial network focusing on the University and Downtown. The Core Network is concentrated on high demand corridors that can support the minimum performance standards at least sixteen hours a day •

The Connector Network Routes provide a more extensive grid system that both expands the coverage of the Base Network into more areas of the City, and acts as a feeder to the Core Network. Connector Routes are designed to operate during hours when minimum Base Network performance standards can be maintained

Base Network schedules will be designed to ensure consistent and reliable connections at key transit centres. This will result in more workable schedules along all routes, allowing sufficient time for connections to be made. Current practice is to design tight schedules to maximize operating efficiencies to meet current service standards within existing fiscal limitations. Tight schedules have led to a less reliable service and greater difficulties in meeting connections. Additional demand requirements not satisfied by Base Network frequencies will be accommodated by supplemental services designed to serve specific needs around the City. Examples of supplemental service options could include school specials and peak hour service extras and express services. Supplemental services will be operated as required and not be included formally as part of the Base. These services will be more flexible to seasonal variations, and demand variations along specific route sections, or from specific neighborhoods. This will result in a more targeted and efficient use of demand driven services. Supplemental services will be part of the Community Network level of service. The Base Network will not be subject to annual budget or seasonal changes. Changes to the Base Network will be considered on a three year cycle or when there are significant changes in demand. Future Base Network extensions into residential areas will be subject to population growth and operational feasibility. When implemented in June, 1997, the Base Network will require approximately 613,000 service hours, or 41% percent of the hours currently approved for 1996. Within current budget levels this would leave approximately 876,000 service hours available for assignment to the Community Network.


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5.1.2 COMMUNITY NETWORK The Community Network will have a much more localized, neighborhood focus. Over a dozen specific areas have been identified for the planning and operation of individual Community Networks. Each Community Network will reflect the more customized travel priorities of the local communities served. Community Networks will evolve from a grass roots public participation program that will focus on the definition of neighborhood specific needs and priorities, and reflect a community sense of involvement through an ongoing evaluation of the community based services. The participation process is outlined in Section 5.4.3 of this report. The general performance standards for the Community Network are: •

30 passenger boardings per hour during weekday peak and midday periods

15 passenger boardings per hour during night and weekend periods

50 passenger boardings per hour for express routes

60 passenger boardings per hour for special purpose routes such as school extras

Examples of Community Network service options could include: •

commuter express service to the downtown or university area (possibly starting as local feeders within residential neighborhoods prior to connecting with other feeders at key transit centres)

industrial park shuttles

neighborhood collectors and circulators with connections to the Base Network and service hours concentrated during time periods that are relevant to neighborhood activities

school services

peak hour supplemental service to the Base Network in response to demand

community bus routes Planning and Development

cross-town service to major destinations

a feeder role for DATS to low floor bus routes

L:BRARY The City of Edmonton

Given the customized nature of some of these services, a premium fare policy for higher service levels will be considered. It is possible that not all Community Network service needs identified in the ongoing public participation process will be feasible within approved funding levels. However, any innovative


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initiatives for provision of service at the Community level will be considered. Service priorities will be established and reviewed in light of service performance. If service standards are not met, Community Network services may be cancelled in consultation with the community, and service hours reassigned to accommodate other service requests within the community following a 6-8 month trial period and evaluation. Community Network services will be affected by funding levels approved annually in the municipal budget process. If required, service cuts will be made to Community Network services so that the integrity of the Base Network would be maintained. 5.1.3 ALTERNATIVES STRATEGIES Three alternative strategies for Edmonton Transit System were identified and reviewed by IBI Group. These three strategies, summarized from their report, illustrate the relationship between service, revenue and market response. The first strategy is a "constrained" approach and emphasizes fiscal responsibility at the expense of customer responsiveness. The second strategy is an "unconstrained" approach and emphasizes customer responsiveness at the expense of fiscal responsibility. The third approach is a "balanced" approach and represents a compromise between fiscal responsibility and customer responsiveness. Constrained Program Strategy This describes the existing strategy for Edmonton Transit System, which is essentially cost driven. The objective of this strategy is to maintain the level of service without increasing the cost of the service provided. No increased revenue from tax or user sources are sought, and no additional sources of funding (provincial grants) are anticipated. Characteristic of this strategy is that it 'tries to be everything to everybody', and results in unproductive services or providing too much service for the demand. This strategy usually means less money is available (since all is going to maintain service) to address or even research changing market conditions. Typically, services are reduced during periods of fiscal restraint to cut costs. Fluctuations in the level of transit service force greater dependence on the automobile, and prospects after future service cuts are for greater ridership losses. IBI estimated that continuing to follow this strategy could result in a transit modal split of 7%, a decrease from the current 9%. Unconstrained Program Strategy This program strategy requires the City to allocate increased funding in order to boost levels of transit service, making transit the priority. In addition, this strategy requires travel demand management measures and more encouragement for transit supportive land use development. The objective is to improve services for all citizens and to achieve modal splits in the 10-15% range as compared to the current 9%. Routes would need to be more community oriented, capturing local trips as well as trips destined for major work or education centres. Service levels would have to increase dramatically, simultaneous with the costs for running the service. This means that the transit system will be carrying a mix of captive and choice riders. Past research by the Transportation Department has indicated that objectives of increasing ridership levels can only be achieved by significantly increasing costs to automobile users in conjunction with service increases.


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Balanced Program Strategy This strategy involves a coordinated and carefully targeted approach to the planning, budgeting and delivery of transit services, with an eye to both cost and customer needs. The objective is to tailor service closely to demand and to have an equitable distribution of costs, resulting in a better cost/revenue ratio between users and taxpayers. This strategy is based on a dual level approach to service, incorporating a Base Network and a Community Network. The Base Network guarantees service for all citizens and meets transit's essential service role for captive and choice users, oriented to educational and employment destinations along major arterial routes. The Community Network is comprised primarily of neighborhood and premium services which are customer driven and adhere to strict performance criteria. This would mean a gradual upgrading of services in the suburban areas of the city to lessen dependence upon the automobile. This strategy allows for reduction of service in the Community Network during times of restraint, or removing service if the performance criteria for ridership or revenue are not reached. Under these conditions, the Base Network would remain in place. This strategy will result in the cutting of unproductive Community Network services in order to maintain costs. By fixing a Base Network in place with guaranteed schedules, ridership will stop shrinking and begin to improve. Meeting customer needs for specific trips within each community will also result in improved ridership while maintaining costs at a constant level. In the long run, the balanced strategy approach also allows the Edmonton Transit System to respond to the roles and long term goals defined for ETS in the Transportation Master Plan. The balanced strategy, adapted to Edmonton conditions, is the recommended approach. 5.1.4 LONG TERM POLICY DIRECTIONS In the long term, the type of service provided by ETS will be determined by the functions defined for us in the Transportation Master Plan. These functions may range from a basic essential service to a priority function. Irrespective of this, the proposed strategy will allow us the flexibility to meet the expectations developed in the Transportation Master Plan. Horizon 2000 is intended to reposition ETS services and fares so as to better address short to medium term markets and economic conditions in Edmonton. By placing ETS service on a more market responsive footing and course over the next ten years, Horizon 2000 will enable ETS and the City of Edmonton to pursue and take advantage of a variety of initiatives and issues which are under consideration in the Transportation Master Plan. These include: • • • • • • •

A wider, more comprehensive role for public transit Transit supportive Transportation Demand Management Measures Transit supportive land use policies Existing and future environmental commitments Future LRT extensions Policy directions emerging from the "Full Cost" assessment of transportation costs Transportation for persons with disabilities

Through the examination of Edmonton's longer term transportation needs, the Transportation Master Plan may identify a role or roles for public transit that may go well beyond the shorter


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term scope of Horizon 2000. This strategy simply provides a solid foundation upon which any future directions can be pursued. As part of the Transportation Master Plan, the city is investigating the applicability and suitability of Transportation Demand Management measures in Edmonton. By their very nature, TDM measures are aimed at making better use of transportation infrastructure, in part by encouraging alternative travel modes such as transit. Recommendations emerging from the TDM Study will need to be considered in concert with Horizon 2000 via-a-vis the City's long term transportation objectives. The Transportation Master Plan is considering a number of growth and land use scenarios. In particular, the Citizen Advisory Group has, through a visioning exercise completed in the Spring of 1995, developed three separate visions of Edmonton for the year 2020. In addition, the Transportation Department is considering a "Base" scenario as well as a City Council directed "Intensification" scenario. Horizon 2000 is flexible enough to adapt to the full range of scenarios under consideration. In fact, with its greater community orientation it is particularly well suited to the higher "density/mixed use scenarios being reviewed in the Transportation Master Plan. Existing and Future Environmental Commitments The City of Edmonton has, through a 'resolution of City Council, committed itself to reducing greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by the year 2000. Horizon 2000 is entirely consistent and supportive of this commitment. With its objective of arresting and reversing ridership declines, Horizon 2000 will complement any other initiatives the City may choose to pursue further in its environmental and quality of life objectives, both short term and long term. LRT Extensions The Transportation Master Plan process is, through its review of several long term scenarios, considering the merits of further LRT extensions, either city-wide, or to specific city sectors. While Horizon 2000 is not predicated upon further LRT extensions, it does recognize the existing LRT line as an integral component of the Base Network. Any future LRT extensions which may be identified through the Transportation Master Plan process would be integrated and absorbed into the Base Network of services. Policy Directions from "Full Cost" Study As part of the Transportation Master Plan, the City is conducting a "full cost" assessment of transportation costs in Edmonton. The study is intended to identify the full range of costs, direct and indirect, by travel mode, as well as who is paying these costs. The results and recommendations of this study may influence the transportation (and transit) investment priorities recommended in the Transportation Master Plan. Again, Horizon 2000 will complement any transit-supportive recommendations which may flow from the "full cost" assessment currently underway. Transportation for Persons with Disabilities Horizon 2000 assumes continuation and support for the current DATS service, although it does recognize the increasing demand being placed on the service and the City's increasing difficulty in keeping up with this demand. The implementation of Horizon 2000 will result in a more diverse mix of vehicles in ETS's fleet. The existing bus fleet is slowly being replaced exclusively by low floor buses. The same


17

commitment to accessible vehicles will continue to govern the City of Edmonton's future transit vehicle purchases. The transit system restructuring and related fleet replacement policies recognizes the changing needs of our aging population by reducing travel barriers on a broad basis for both able-bodied and disabled citizens.

Section Highlights

5.2 FARE STRUCTURE The current fare structure needs to be changed if the proposed goals of Horizon 2000 are to be reached. The financial goal is to achieve a more equitable distribution of costs by having transit users and taxpayers share the cost of operating the transit system; recovering at least 43-45% of transit operating costs from farebox revenues. There is a significant inequity between the fare paid by adult cash and ticket users and passengers using other fare types. The major focus of this strategy is to establish a discount structure for all ETS fare media based on the existing adult cash fare. The main objective is to rationalize the fare structure, rather than substantially increasing revenues. A number of goals have been established: • a structure for implementing fare discounts, using the Adult Cash Fare as the base guideline, is proposed. • simplify the fare structure • develop a framework for setting fares in the annual budget process. This is reflective of City Council's direction of November 24, 1994, where the administration was requested to propose fare policy options for 1996 and beyond including an implementation plan for senior citizen bus passes that might be pegged at a ten percent rate of an equivalent adult monthly pass over twelve months.


18

To address the first goal, a discount structure for all Edmonton Transit System fare media based on the Adult Cash fare is proposed. In its review of the ETS fare structure, IBI Group suggested that passes are underpriced in comparison to adult cash fares. In general, the fares charged by Edmonton Transit are in the low to mid-range in comparison with larger Canadian transit systems. The existing adult cash fare of $1.60 would be used as a base level with the price of other fare media adjusted over a three year period until the recommended discount levels were reached. Using $1.60 is recommended as opposed to establishing a lower base rate since it is expected that reducing cash fares would result in a decrease in revenues (ie. additional revenues generated from new transit riders would not offset reduced revenues from existing passengers). Based on ETS estimates and comments from IBI Group, it is anticipated that increases to fares for passes would have less impact on ridership than if Adult Cash and Ticket fares were increased. Following this, the fare structure would be changed through approval of the Adult Cash rate by City Council, with all other fare categories being adjusted proportionally. While some increase in revenue would occur with the implementation of this fare structure, the main objective is to rationalize the structure as opposed to substantially increasing revenues. The increased revenue would initially fund additional service and infrastructure enhancements. This proposal recognizes that, within the existing fare structure, there is a significant inequity between the fare paid by Adult Cash and Ticket users and passengers using other fare types. This proposal would reduce the level of inequity while reducing the number of fare types. With respect to the second goal, there are over 40 pieces of fare media (25 ETS fare products, and 14 regional fare products) that are valid on Edmonton Transit System. This leads to difficulties for transit operators in recognizing the different forms of fare media, leading to fare evasion, as well as increased production and administrative costs. The initial step proposed for simplifying the fare structure is to consolidate the four pass categories for elementary, junior high and senior high school students into one category in September 1996. Further actions will be considered in conjunction with the renewal of regional service contracts and review of promotional fare media. To minimize the impacts of the recommended changes, the fare changes would be phased in over a three year period. The following changes should be noted: •

Child/Senior Citizens Cash and Tickets These categories are presently priced at 50% or less than the Adult Cash fare. This proposal would increase the price to $1.00 or approximately 60% of the Adult Cash fare. Initially, this would reduce the amount of change required for the customers. With the proposed implementation plan, the increase to $1.00 would be effective in January 1997.

•

Adult Monthly Pass The monthly pass rate would be increased in value from approximately 66% of Adult Cash to 75% of Adult Cash (based on an average utilization of 43.4 trips per month with the monthly pass). Since a $6.00 increase would be required, the increased rate would be phased in over a three year period.


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•

Post Secondary Discounted Monthly Pass With this proposal, the 10% discount for the monthly pass presently provided to post secondary students would continue to be provided. Presently, students of any accredited post secondary institution can obtain a discounted pass with the restriction that the student must be attending full-time for a minimum six month term and possess picture identification from the institute. Appendix 2 provides a current list of schools whose students are eligible for the post-secondary discounted pass. The criteria for determining eligibility is being reviewed.

•

School Monthly Passes Edmonton Transit has accepted the recommendations from the IBI review that a single unrestricted student pass be offered to school age students. The position regarding offering a single pass is supported by the Edmonton Public and Edmonton Catholic school districts. However, the school districts maintain that if a single pass is to be offered to students, it should be one that is restricted to school days to correspond with their responsibility to provide transportation services to and from school. The two districts sell bus passes in their schools and are utilizing a provincial grant to support their respective students. Based on concerns raised by the school districts, ETS will support the consolidation of school passes to a single, restricted pass at this time, with implementation of the single school pass category recommended for September 1996. With respect to the price of the pass, the school boards believe that the monthly price of a restricted pass should not exceed $31.00. The school boards contend that this year's transit revenues from the two school districts will be significantly higher than the revenues accrued to transit in previous years and will exceed projected revenues. ETS is recommending a rate of $31.90 for this pass. At this price, it is estimated that there would be no change in revenue compared to the revenues collected with the present school pass categories. The increased revenues being generated from school passes in the 1995/96 school year are due to service initiatives and enhancements undertaken by ETS (with some operatingcost increases) and from a reduction in the price of the restricted school passes as charged by the school boards. Over the following three years, the price of the restricted school passes would be increased to a level where the "per trip" fare is 60% of the Adult Cash fare. With this implementation plan, the school pass rate would be increased to $37.00 by September 1999.

•

Senior Citizens Annual Pass The rate charged for this pass is the lowest for major Canadian cities. For other larger Canadian transit systems, senior citizens pay between $120 to $612 per year. Users of this pass presently pay approximately $0.18 per trip. This proposal would increase the rate to approximately $0.38 per trip or 25% of the Adult Cash fare and would continue to be low compared to the rates charged by other Canadian transit systems. Prior to 1998, ETS will examine options for providing a reduced rate for seniors with lower incomes (i.e. those receiving Guaranteed Income Supplement). Any recommendations for changes to the senior's pass price must be completed by the Fall to provide sufficient time to prepare for the pass sales program. For comparative purposes, a summary of transit fares charged by other Canadian transit properties is provided in Appendix 7. The proposed fare structure is outlined below.


20 Proposed Fare Strategy

FARE CATEGORY

Fare

EXISTING STRUCTURE Single Rate as % Average Revenue Per Trip of Adult Cash

Fare

PROPOSED STRUCTURE Single Rate as % Average Revenue Per Trip of Adult Cash

CASH Adult

$ 1.60

$1.60

100.0%

$

1.60

$1.60

100.0%

Child/Senior Citizen

$ 0.80

$0.80

50.0%

$

1.00

$1.00

60.0%

$ 16.00

$1.60

100.0%

$ 16.00

$1.60

100.0%

$ 7.50

$0.75

46.9%

$ 10.00

$1.00

60.0%

Adult

$ 46.00

$1.06

66.2%

$ 52.00

$1.20

75.0%

Post Secondary

$ 42.00

$0.97

60.5%

$ 47.00

$1.08

67.0%

$ 37.00

$0.96

60.0%

TICKET (Book of 10) Adult Child/Senior Citizen

MONTHLY PASS

SCHOOL MONTHLY PASS* Restricted Elementary/Junior High

$ 28.50

$0.74

46.4%

Senior High

$ 34.50

$0.90

56.2%

Elementary/Junior High

$ 32.00

$0.74

46.1%

Senior High

$ 38.00

$0.88

54.7%

$ 25.00

$0.18

11.0%

$ 55.00

$0.39

25.0%

Adult

$ 4.75

$1.19

74.2%

$

4.75

$1.19

75.0%

Child

$ 2.00

$0.50

31.3%

$

3.75

$0.94

60.0%

Unrestricted

SENIOR CITIZEN ANNUAL PASS

DAY PASS

" Indicates prices charged to the school boards. School boards provide additional subsidies to the students (Existing Rates - $13.00 for Restricted Passes; $30.00 for Unrestricted Passes).


21

The recommended fare strategy received support from the Peer Review Group that was reviewing the Ten Year Transit Service and Fare Strategy Plan report from IBI Group. At the December 14, 1995 meeting of City Council, the Transportation Department was directed to review the rationale used by the Parks and Recreation Department to develop a differential facilities fee schedule for various age groups and determine whether it can be used for the establishment of transit fares. The pricing guidelines used by the Parks and Recreation Department are included in Appendix 3. Two concerns arose from the comparison, the first of which addressed the issue of a cost recovery factor. ETS requires a minimum cost recovery in the provision of its services, which is the principle issue in determining fares. Parks and Recreation's services are not as severely confined by minimum cost recovery requirements. Additionally, one of the price categories offered by Parks and Recreation is that of the Family Rate, defined as "no more than two persons of the same household 18 years and over and all other members of that household under 18 years of age". Use of this category by ETS would present a number of problems, most notably that of inequity in use between the two services. It is likely that most users of the Parks and Recreation Family admission generally use the facilities or services once or twice weekly, at most. However, a similar program by ETS could potentially result in everyday use by families, which would have a greater impact on cost recovery abilities. Initial changes would occur in September 1996 with consolidation of school passes. This change would be revenue neutral, with adjustment to the 60% level phased in during the subsequent three years. The Adult Monthly Pass and Senior Citizens Annual Pass rates would also be increased over a three year period. The rates charged for children (cash, tickets and daypass) would be adjusted to the proposed level in January 1997. Historically, with changes in fares, ridership and revenues would have been impacted. However, with changes in service structure and delivery, these impacts will be offset, with the exception of 1997 as service restructuring will not occur until June. The recommended implementation plan is outlined on the following page.


22

Recommdended Implementation Plan FARE CATEGORY

Existing Rate

1999

1998

1997

CASH Adult

$

1.60

$

1.60

$

1.60

$

1.60

Child/Senior Citizen

$

0.80

$

1.00

$

1.00

$

1.00

Adult

$

16.00

$

16.00

$

16.00

$

16.00

Child/Senior Citizen

$

7.50

$

10.00

$

10.00

$

10.00

Adult

$

46.00

$

48.00

$

50.00

$

52.00

Post Secondary

$

42.00

$

43.00

$

45.00

$

47.00

34.00

$

35.50

$37.00

(effective Sept. 98)

(effective Sept. 99)

TICKET (Book of 10)

MONTHLY PASS

(Passes consolidated 09/96)

SCHOOL MONTHLY PASS* Restricted

$

31.90

$

Elementary/Junior High

$

28.50

(effective Sept. 97)

Senior High

$

34.50

Unrestricted Elementary/Junior High

32.00

Senior High

38.00 (Passes eliminated Sept. 96)

SENIOR CITIZEN ANNUAL PASS Senior Citizen

$

25.00

$

35.00

$

45.00

$

55.00

Adult

$

4.75

$

4.75

$

4.75

$

4.75

Child

$

2.00

$

3.75

$

3.75

$

3.75

DAY PASS

* Indicates prices charged to the school boards. School boards provide additional subsidies to the students (Existing Rates -$13.00 for Restricted Passes; $30.00 for Unrestricted Passes).


23

Edmonton Transit System is also reviewing methods of reducing fare evasion on the system. Actions being taken include: • • • • •

the recommendation to install electronic fareboxes on buses. This would resolve the majority of fare evasion issues between operators and passengers adjusting policies and procedures to provide consistent enforcement for fare evasion problems increase the fine for fare evasion from $35 to $75 simplify the fare structure which will allow operators to more easily recognize valid fare media review the design of fare media. Existing trials with picture ID cards at two high schools is underway

Longer term objectives regarding fare structure are to: • • •

Establish a fairer structure within the Edmonton region Establish "premium" fares for "premium or specialized" services Develop a "Flex Fare", taking advantage of new farebox technologies

Regional Fare Structure Edmonton Transit System has agreements with St. Albert and the County of Strathcona which permit the outlying municipalities to operate transit service into Edmonton and provide for usage of fare media on the systems. The existing agreements, which expire at the end of 1997, allow use of fare media for the outlying systems on Edmonton Transit System (except for LRT). However, Edmonton residents must pay a surcharge when traveling from Edmonton to the outlying areas. Further, ETS fare media is not valid for travel within St. Albert or Sherwood Park. With the negotiations for new agreements, ETS will develop new guidelines to ensure equity for all transit users in the region when traveling between the different municipalities. Flexfare System With the development of new fare collection technologies, Edmonton Transit System will have the opportunity to promote increased ridership through fare incentives. The flexfare system would provide for progressive discounts based on usage during a fixed time period. In addition, new types of fare media, such as weekly passes, could be introduced. The use of stored-value smart cards and debit cards could also be considered. Initiatives of this type are dependent on the acquisition of electronic farebox technologies for the entire transit system. Service-based Fares The concept of charging a higher fare for premium services has been suggested. Examples of this would include levying a surcharge on community-tier express services or community bus routes, which provide a more specialized "door-to-door" type of service. With the existing Westmount Community Bus service, although ridership levels are higher than on similar community bus services provided in other Canadian cities, they are well below those experienced throughout the system. In addition, the route was designed to serve senior citizens in the Westmount area, who generally pay a lower fare with the Senior Citizen Annual Pass. As a result, the cost recovery on this type of service is low. Edmonton Transit System will be


'74

investigating options to increase the revenue received on these types of services so that the return is comparable with the remainder of the transit system.

Section Highlights

5.3 INFRASTRUCTURE REQUIREMENTS In order to operate the transit system and address customer convenience and perception concerns, ETS operates and maintains a substantial inventory of vehicles, facilities, equipment and amenities. Maintaining the ETS infrastructure in safe operating condition is essential to the provision of service. The quality and appearance of the fleet and facilities also has a bearing on the customer's perceptions and acceptance of ETS as a transportation alternative. The perception of inadequate or unsafe facilities will discourage customers from using or trying the transit system, which impacts on ridership levels. If the equipment is unreliable, the objectives of restructuring of the transit system can be undermined. Facilities and equipment which offer accessible features are important to the viability of the system. A number of upgrades, including pararamps, automatic door openers, and an LRT test project involving vehicle ramps have been introduced throughout the system to assist customers with mobility difficulties. A continued program of accessibility improvements is required to encourage customer use of Edmonton Transit System's services. The following sections document the infrastructure requirements needed to maintain ETS '5 ability to operate a safe and reliable service. In addition, facility changes which could enhance comfort for passengers (such as shelters), therefore encouraging continued or new usage of the system, are also noted.


25

5.3.1 Fleet Requirements 40 foot Diesel Buses To meet the anticipated peak service capacity requirements of the new service structure, the current fleet mix of large diesel buses will be required. There is potential for small bus application during some off-peak periods and Sundays and holidays. However, it is important that the replacement schedule for full-sized buses proceeds as planned. The replacement schedule calls for the purchase of 232 40-foot buses in the 1997-2001 time frame, at an estimated cost of $76.1M. This will provide a total of 291 newer vehicles in the large bus fleet (48% of current diesel fleet). The purchase of new buses will also help to address reliability and image perceptions. To improve accessibility to the transit system for persons with mobility difficulties the new buses will continue to be wheelchair accessible without the requirement for lift equipment (i.e. low floor vehicle design). ETS has evaluated a variety of options for bus fuels, and the most viable are Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) and Clean Diesel. Based on this evaluation, the most cost effective of these two options is the Clean Diesel fuel, which is recommended for all current vehicle purchases. A summary of the fuel evaluation is included in Appendix 4.

Small Buses Small buses are used in applications where roadway structure and geometrics are not adequate for 40 foot diesel buses (e.g. SouthPark Service Plus, Westmount Community Bus, and service to Lewis Estates) or where ridership levels are extremely low (e.g. Gold Bar/Ottewell night and Sunday service, and off-peak service to Evergreen Mobile Home Park). Eight small buses are presently required. All future small bus purchases will be for accessible vehicles. Direct operating costs for fuel and maintenance for small buses are approximately the same as for the regular 40 foot diesel buses, however, ETS realizes some savings through the use of "Paratransit" operators, who receive lower wage and benefits packages compared to regular operators. Paratransit operators have a different licensing classification (Class 4) and are limited to carrying 24 seated passengers. An on-going replacement program for the small bus fleet is required. Due to the different characteristics of areas being served, the small bus services need to be assessed to determine if they encompass "light" or "medium" duty applications. High acceleration, heavy braking, high maneuverability and heavy loads require medium duty buses to provide reliability and access to an area (i.e. Southpark run), with a 30 foot low floor bus recommended at estimated cost of $275K .(Note: one replacement unit will be ordered in 1996 for SouthPark). Light duty service applications (e.g. Westmount Community Bus) can be accommodated with a low floor unit, such as the ELF 125. Community buses can be purchased for $130K with an 8 to 12 month delivery time, or leased at rates of $3,600 per month for a 36-month lease. Replacement small units, with a life expectancy of 5 years (as compared to 18 years for 40 foot diesel buses), are required in 1998, 2000 and 2001 at a total estimated cost of $630K. This does not include the number of small buses which might be required to serve the Community Network. As the Community Network evolves, the requirement for small buses may increase. However, the small bus fleet should not exceed 5% of the total fleet complement.


26

In the short term, ETS will modify its purchase schedule to obtain 4 small buses in 1997, and 2 small buses in each of 1998 and 1999. The replacement schedule for 40 foot buses will be reduced by 4 over the 1997-1999 period. Following a review of expanded small bus operations, the fleet replacement schedule, beyond 1999, will be adjusted. Fleet Replacement Schedule YEAR

40-FOOT BUS

SMALL BUS

1997

34

4

1998

49

2

1999

49

2

2000*

50

2001*

50 *fleet mix st_bject to review of extended small bus operations in 1997- 1999.

Trolley Buses Trolley buses will continue to be utilized in the restructured route network, with the total number required to be determined following the community network planning. Increased utilization of trolley buses in the base could be accomplished with extensions of present lines. However, a large capital investment would be required. For example, Edmonton Power has estimated that the cost of the extension to West Jasper Place Transit Centre would be approximately $5.5 million. Any extensions to trolley routes will be subject to funding availability and will involve community consultation. Significant difficulties in maintaining trolley operations during spring and summer months occur because of construction. A 100% diesel backup fleet for trolley service is therefore required. To reduce the impact of minor construction interruptions, wire breaks, and emergency disruptions, Edmonton Transit System has initiated testing of Auxiliary Power Supply Units (APU's) which provide limited off wire capability. The cost to retrofit 30 trolley buses with APU's would be approximately $1.5 million. The issue of accessibility remains a concern with trolley buses, and a full cost benefits analysis will be undertaken in 1996 to evaluate potential options. In the meantime, ETS will be coordinating trolley buses interspersed with low floor buses to improve accessibility. 5.3.2 Facility Requirements In upcoming years, ETS facilities and infrastructure will require significant funds for maintenance and upgrades. New infrastructure is also required to enhance customer convenience and security, and to support the new service structure. The requirements identified are based on a number of security reviews conducted by ETS between 1993 and 1995, applying the safety and security principles identified by the city's Safer Cities Initiatives. ETS participated in the


27

development of the design guidelines, currently used as the standard for planning and development of urban communities. In most instances, ETS already meets the established criteria; those areas which currently do not fit these standards are being upgraded. For newly constructed sites, ETS is ensuring that these new concepts are incorporated. ETS has also entered programs that can reduce risk and potential damage to vehicles and faciltities without increasing capital budget requirements. Although it was not mandated for ETS to involve front-line staff in these initiatives, we have taken the initiative in training all bylaw enforcement and maintenance staff in the Safer Cities program components. Eventually, all transit planning staff will also receive program training, which will facilitate feedback for design improvements throughout the transit system. ETS also has a strong involvement in both the D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) and Crimestoppers programs as part of ongoing efforts to reduce crime throughout the transit system and in the community. These programs are funded within the current budget. ETS currently has the following safety and security programs funded in the capital budget: improved lighting in transit terminals and LRT stations • increased lighting in parking areas • installation of additional help phones and security cameras at bus terminals o

Plans for introduction of additional camera buses and live camera hook-up to ETS Control are in the capital budget as well, although these programs are currently unfunded. ETS will be expanding the successful Stop Request program in the Fall of 1996, operating it from 7:00 p.m. This will accommodate shorter daylight hours. This program provides customers with the opportunity to disembark from buses at locations other than transit stops, along regular routes, after 9 p.m. This allows customers to leave their bus at locations closer to their destinations. The expanded program will be offered during fall and winter months, and will provide for early evening stop request hours. Express portions of bus routes and the LRT are not included in this program. LRT Facilities Repairs and modifications to LRT stations, track, and equipment are required to maintain the integrity of the system and to ensure a safe operations. Significant costs for rehabilitation of the LRT system are beginning to appear as the system reaches 20 years in age. Main areas to be addressed include:

• •

leakage repairs at the underground LRT stations improvements to Belvedere and Clareview LRT Station, bus terminals and park and ride facilities. (A facility planning study is presently underway to determine the cost and feasibility of options for these stations.) replacement of the system for monitoring and control of LRT stations and tunnels


28

Transit Centres A number of transit centre facilities and upgrades are required to support the restructured transit network and to enhance customers' comfort and perceptions of the system. These include:

• •

• •

construction of a new transit centre near Mill Woods Town Centre. (A facility planning study is scheduled for the second half of 1996 to determine potential locations and costs.) heated shelter facilities at Kaskitayo, Kingsway, Castle Downs, Capilano and Abbottsfield Transit Centres. ( A program for construction of heated shelter facilities has been identified in the CPP throughout the 1990's; however, these projects have received a low priority and have not been funded.) enhanced security equipment for buses and transit centres (including video cameras and recording devices, communication links and monitoring facility upgrades) a shelter upgrade for the Jasper Place Transit Centre.

A list of these upgrades and their associated costs are shown on the following page. Excepting portions of the security camera installations, these improvements are not funded in the current approved CPP. This list does not include the ongoing composite facility programs.


29

Facility and Infrastructure Requirements CAPITAL COST

ANNUAL OPERATING COST

YEAR

a. LRT Belvedere Station upgrade 1999-2000 * $30k $3.2-5.6M - Platform & entrance 1999 * $3.0M - Parking facilities 1998 * $1.0M Clareview Station Park 'n Ride upgrade Stations & Tunnel 2000-2001 ** Facilities Control $600k System b. Bus Facilities 1997-1998 * $7-10k Mill Woods Town $1.8M Centre Transit Centre Heated Transit Centres 1997-1998 * $7k - Kingsway $250k 1998-1999 * $7k - Castledowns $460k 1998-1999 * $460k $7k - Kaskitayo 1998-1999 * $285k $7k - Abbottsfield 1999-2000 * $7k - Capilano $285k 1997-1998 * $100k $3k Jasper Place Transit Centre Upgrade Improved Security at Transit Centres 1996-1997 ** $3.9-6.5k $145k - current program 1998-1999 * $6.5k $100k - 3 remaining TC's 1997-1999 * $7-9k $885k Central Security Monitoring 1997-1999 * $9k Bus Security Cameras $336k 1997-2001 * $7k/20 shelters Additional Bus Shelters $500k - 20 per year starting 1997 $190k Twice weekly bus shelter cleanings Notes: 1. Engineering study for Belvedere Station upgrade is funded in CPP; upgrade is not funded. Study also covers the Clareview Transit Centre (west side of the CN tracks). $500k was approved by Council from their contingency fund for design of facilities at Belvedere. 2. "*" means not funded in current CPP 3. "*" means funded in current CPP

Trolley System Upgrades A extensive program to upgrade existing trolley overhead to ensure the safe and reliable operation of the trolley network and correct safety deficiencies is presently underway. The four year program, approved by City Council in 1994, has ETS investing an additional $6.7 million in improvements to trolley overhead, feeder systems, and substations within the existing network. Funds for these improvements were generated from deferring the bus replacement schedule. Additional Bus Shelters ETS presently has over 600 locations where bus shelters have been requested. From 1993 to 1995, approximately 15 shelters per year were installed using funds from reserve funding. An on-going program for the installation of 20 shelters per year would have a capital cost of


30

approximately $100,000 annually. In addition, operating costs would require increases of $7,000 ' annually for maintenance. Fare Collection Equipment All of Edmonton Transit System's buses are equipped with Duncan fareboxes which are now obsolete. ETS has retained a consultant to review the feasibility and costs of obtaining and installing electronic farebox equipment. This equipment will provide the following benefits: • improved cash handling security • less confrontation between operators and passengers • with additional equipment, the ability to implement a "Flexfare" system and the ability to use "smart card", "debit card", or similar technologies for fare payments; this provides customers with more flexibility in payment • improved data for planning and forecasting

The estimated cost for electronically registering fareboxes is $8K per unit, with an additional $4K per unit required for smart card technology. Facility modifications would also be required in all 3 garages to dump collected fares at a cost of $300K. There are 2 options for implementing this program: • install fleetwide on an immediate basis • phase in with purchase of new vehicles at a cost of $12K per vehicle • install on a division by division basis The total estimated cost for fleet retrofit is $9 million for equipment and installation labour. LRT ticket machines and ticket validators would also require replacement and upgrading to be compatible with the new system, with an estimated cost of $1.5M in 1998. Changes for on-going maintenance costs are being considered by the consultant. Final recommendations are expected in mid-1996. Consideration will also be given to the potential for DATS to use electronic fare equipment. Section Highlights


31

5.4 MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS STRATEGY Exhibiting a market orientation means focusing on customer needs through planning and researching, and monitoring performance in terms of satisfying those needs. 5.4.1 MARKETING Participation of Edmontonians and their communities in making improvements to local transit service particularly with respect to Community Networks is critical to the success of the new service strategy. Formal market research and other public consultation measures are required. The following activities will be undertaken: • Trip Diary Surveys Trip diaries such as those conducted for the Transportation Master Plan will be used to monitor changes in community travel patterns (origin/destination information) that may be impacting routes, ensuring transit service is reflective of local travel needs. • Customer Satisfaction Surveys Customer satisfaction surveys were initiated in 1995. They are an effective way of identifying areas of service which can be improved and the effects of service improvements. These surveys will be conducted quarterly on a city-wide basis to measure customer satisfaction with respect to fourteen different aspects of transit performance (e.g. reliability, convenience, comfort, accessibility, safety, security etc.). DATS customers will be included in these surveys. • Analysis of Customer Complaints Commendations and concerns from customers are a valuable source of information that can be used for making suggested improvements to service. ETS is currently in the process of computerizing the Customer Concerns database as part of a comprehensive, integrated management information system program. • Consumer Choice Model ETS has historically estimated ridership impacts using fare and service elasticities. With the evolution of a new transit system for June 1997, this existing model used to predict ridership will no longer be effective. Therefore a new model needs to be developed. The new model will be based on consumer choice analysis of several market and system variables and could be queried an alternate scenario basis. Furthermore, the model will be used to estimate the impacts on various market groups (e.g. students, seniors, residents from a particular geographic area, etc.). In effect, a Consumer Choice Model will allow the Edmonton Transit System to test in advance a wide range of actions without incurring the expensive lesson of trial and error in the marketplace. Less quantitative methods are also required to gather the opinions and suggestions from the various groups. This information will be collected in cooperation with the ETSAB and Area Councils. A proposal for involving these two groups in an annual program for improving community transit service is provided on the following page. In this process, ETSAB and Area Council representatives would serve as channels for community input for transit planning at the local level. Edmonton Transit System would support


32

their efforts in terms of providing resources and assistance in developing specific outreach activities to meet their needs. The involvement of Edmontonians and their communities means that transit services will reflect local preferences and that transit services within a community will change as local needs change. In other words, ETS will be, in effect, a series of interlocking community-oriented transit systems as opposed to a single, comprehensive network of routes. Consequently, transit will need to be more focused at a community and route level rather than at a "system" or city-wide level. This requires unique communication packages to be developed and targeted at different audiences. Transit Route Improvement Program

Route Performance Statistics

Trip Diary Survey for Under Performing Routes

Customer Satisfaction Surveys

Analysis of Customer Complaints

ETSAB Stakeholder Outreach Results

Recommended Changes by Transit (Consumer Choice Analysis Model) Presentation to ETSAB

Presentation to Area Council(s)

Written Submissions from ETSAB & Area Council(s) I

Final Recommendations by Transit to Council


'3 3

5.4.2 COMMUNICATIONS

The objectives for communicating the new service strategy are to: -Ensure customers are informed and prepared for the changes to the system -Promote ridership at the community level on a route by route basis Some of the communication strategies which are envisioned for the new plan are given below. It is important to note however, that a final communication plan cannot be developed until the Community Networks are designed. The involvement of communities in the design of their own services will also serve to identify appropriate communication strategies. Informing Customers • On-Board Ambassadors Sufficient notice must be provided to all transit users prior to the change. Other properties which have undergone major changes to their service have been successful with the use of on-board bus ambassadors. On-board staff can communicate directly with passengers about upcoming changes to the transit system over a month-long period just prior to implementation of the new service strategy. This will allow for the opportunity to respond to individual customer concerns well in advance of the changes. Newspaper and radio advertisements will advise customers that staff from Edmonton Transit System will be on-board to provide them with information and answers to any questions they may have. •

Info Bus Another option which is also being considered is the conversion of an existing fullsized bus into an "Info Bus". This bus would function as a mobile information centre and could be available at community meetings, transit centers, and elsewhere as a drop in center. After introduction of the new service strategy, the bus would continue to be used as part of Edmonton Transit System's community outreach program and Horizon 2000.

Customer Information Additional staff and extended hours of operation must also be considered for the telephone information services areas to address increased customer calls. This includes the Customer Information area at Churchill Station, and the Commendations and Concerns area at Mitchell Division. Increased call activity on the Buslink system should be anticipated, and extra capacity planned for. The strategy to interface Control and Customer Information with Buslink should be accelerated to enhance the reliability and consistency of information being provided to the customer. Similarly, computerization of the Commendations and Concerns database will facilitate improved customer service and should also be completed prior to implementation of the new plan.

Operator Handbook Operators must also be prepared to answer an increasing number of inquiries. They must be given appropriate tools to be able to address customer inquiries, which can include a new operator handbook containing new route maps, transfer points, and other pertinent information. This process has already been initiated as a result of an operator suggestion, and will be developed with assistance by Operator Focus Group members.

Route Numbering System One of the concerns expressed by transit customers is the difficulty frequently experienced in locating and identifying routes. A new system for


34

designating route numbers and names will assist to better identify routes as part of the community level of services or as part of the base. This will help to reinforce the notion that transit is a series of individual community systems and will simplify the process for customers. •

Printed Material Edmonton Transit System's printed and on-street infoimation will be reviewed and revised to reflect the needs of key market groups. This may mean changes in distribution strategies, incorporation of languages other than English, and other alternative strategies for presenting information (e.g. large print for seniors).

Communication of Service Changes A major communications effort will be required to announce the new system to Edmontonians in June 1997. The use of high impact advertising (i.e. television, radio, newsprint, and outdoor mediums) will be required to achieve effective reach and frequency levels. A new corporate identity package will be considered for vehicles, bus stops, transit shelters, benches, and uniforms.

Promoting Ridership • Local Focus Promotions Each route within the community will be promoted on the basis of • the trip purpose for which it was designed. If, for example, a route is intended to serve a local mall then it will be promoted as such to residents. Users then would not suffer from false expectations based on other trip purposes. •

Transfer Promotions In order to build confidence in the system, promotional programs to support a guaranteed transfer ("or your next ride is free") program will be implemented and widely promoted.

Fare Media Sales Edmonton Transit System's new fare options also need to be widely promoted. Sale outlets need to be provided with new point-of-sale material and their locations publicized.

On Board Advertising Bus interiors will be redesigned to make passengers feel welcome. This could be accomplished through more effective signing. Currently, most on-board signage warns customers about what they should and should not do (e.g. no food or drink, move to the back of the bus, exact change only). Signage will thank customers for their patronage.

• Partnerships Cross-promotional opportunities with local destinations and attractions will be pursued to build ridership and revenues. Such partnerships demonstrate private sector endorsement for public transit and helps to offset costs in service delivery and promotion. Successful past examples include the Royal Bank SouthPark and Westmount buses and the 1995 KFC monthly pass promotion. • Operator Involvement Operator Focus Groups at each facility have already been established to assist in this regard. Operators will also be encouraged to take "ownership" of their route and the service provided to their customers through voluntary participation in route specific promotions. These promotions will be developed in cooperation with Operator Focus Group members.


35

5.4.3 PUBLIC OUTREACH PROCESS A two-phase public outreach program has been designed to assist in the development and implementation of the new service strategy. The first phase included presentations of the strategy concept to a variety of special interest groups representing students, seniors, the disabled, and the business community. Participants include the Edmonton Federation of Community Leagues, the Edmonton Public School Board, One Voice, the Advisory Board on Services for Persons with Disabilities, and the DATS Working Group. Feedback received on the new service strategy has been positive, and is summarized in Appendix 5. The second phase of the outreach program begins mid-May and lasts until the end of June. It consists of a series of public open house information meetings and feedback or workshop sessions. Fourteen public meetings and feedback sessions each have been scheduled throughout the various communities of Edmonton (Appendix 6). The objective for the public meetings is to give citizens the opportunity to learn about Horizon 2000. The objective of the feedback sessions is to identify and prioritize local issues regarding transit and to give interested citizens the opportunity to become involved in the design of services. An extensive public awareness campaign consisting of newspaper, bus interior and exterior advertisements, direct mail, onboard brochures, and portable road signs has been designed to encourage citizens to become involved. In addition, a video has been produced to facilitate the public meetings and any other presentations that might be requested from interested groups. A series of public open house information sessions will be conducted - one for each of these areas. While these open house sessions are primarily intended for the general public, letters of invitation will also be sent to stakeholder groups. The primary purpose of the open houses will be to provide citizens with information to make informed choices about services in their area. A video describing the new service strategy has been produced to complement the infoimation presented at these open house sessions. Participants will be given the opportunity to register their suggestions for local service during feedback sessions scheduled at specific times for their convenience. The suggestions collected at these sessions will be used in conjunction with data from the household travel survey conducted for the Transportation Master Plan and customer satisfaction data recently collected by Intelligent Marketing Systems Inc. on behalf of ETS to design transit services in each of the fourteen areas. Edmonton Transit System will also make separate presentations to the Edmonton Federation of Community Leagues Area Councils. This public participation program is scheduled to be completed by the end of June 1996. Edmonton Transit System will then use this information to finalize designs for the community network. The final stage of the public participation program will be formal assessment of the community network on a city wide basis. The new transit service structure and the results of the formal market research assessment will then be provided to the Edmonton Transit System Advisory Board and the Citizen's Advisory Group for review and comment.


36

Public Participation Program for the Design of Community Networks

Analysis of Household Travel Data and Transit Performance Data

v Area Council, ETSAB, CAG Information Sessions

Open House Information Sessions

Feedback Sessions

Customer Satisfaction Survey

Develop Community Network

Formal Market Research Assessment

Report-Back Sessions for Open House Groups, ETSAB, and CAG

Final Community Network Design

Community Network services will be affected by funding levels approved annually in the municipal budget process. If required, service adjustments would be made to Community Network services so that the integrity of the Base Network would be maintained. Following development and initial implementation of the new service strategy, ETS will introduce a process by which continuous evaluations of the community networks will be conducted.


37

Section Highlights

5.5

DATS The DATS Strategic Plan, approved by City Council on September 13, 1994, identified 5 goals: • • • • •

commitment to a fully integrated family of public transit services ensure public transit users are matched to the services that best meet their needs develop and coordinate new accessible transit service initiatives commitment to providing high quality services through cost effective management develop contingency plans to address short- and long-term funding restraints.

Strategic planning actions completed include: development of a communication plan to promote the ETS family of accessible transit services and encourage a voluntary reduction in DATS trips; development of the "Mobility Choices" travel training program; revised registration process and introduction of a re-registration program; investigation of perceived eligibility abuse; market assessment of contractor rates; and introduction of a penalty for users who frequently "no trip" or "no cancel". Planning actions underway are: development of a computerized scheduling program; feasibility study of a taxi-saver coupon program; and identification of potential fund raising opportunities. A pilot project will be designed in 1997 for the introduction of an integrated service transfer from DATS to ETS's accessible services. Public consultations were held in November, 1994, and participants agreed on the essential nature of DATS door-to-door service, and affirmed the need to maintain high service standards. Most were opposed to the introduction of changes likely to reduce the quality of service. The Horizon 2000 public outreach program, which will develop the community network, provides an opportunity to identify specific travel demands that could be met by accessible ETS services initiated in each community. The Strategic Plan recognizes that until ETS' family of accessible services are in place at adequate levels, consideration must be given to the growing number of transit users unable to use regular transit, and recommends additional financial resources for DATS. The DATS Strategic Plan estimated that DATS will need to provide in excess of 801,600 trips in 1996 (as compared to the budgeted 745,600 trips) and upwards of 939,000 trips in the year 2000


38

to meet the conservatively estimated increased demand of over 4 percent per year for specialized public transportation service. Over 15,000 DATS users are registered to use the service as of March, 1996. Approximately 60 percent of registrants are ambulatory and the other 40 percent use a wheelchair or scooter, and respectively take approximately 66 and 33 percent of DATS trips. Ten percent of registrants have a cognitive disability and take roughly 29 percent of all DATS trips. The Strategic Plan recognizes that to alleviate the growing demand for public transportation services by persons with disabilities will require increased and enhanced accessible regular transit system. The target groups for these alternate accessible public transit services are senior citizens, DATS users with a mild cognitive disability, and persons with physical disabilities who have a high level of independent mobility. To support integration of DATS with other public transit services and accessibility, Edmonton Transit System will: • Ensure all new facilities include, where possible, design features that support accessibility • Upgrade existing facilities, where possible, to incorporate design guidelines such as the "Design Guidelines for Accessible Bus Stops" developed in 1994, and the "Guidelines for Design of Safe, Accessible Pedestrian Environments" currently under development by Alberta Transportation • Purchase low floor, accessible buses for regular and community services • Seek approval to retrofit all LRT cars with wheelchair ramps through the CPP budget process The Base Network will receive priority with respect to assignment of accessible buses and upgrades to facilities. This will facilitate better integration of DATS services, but will not compel those passengers onto regular services who cannot use them comfortably and effectively. However, it will take several years to ensure a fully accessible service based on the bus purchase program and limited funding available to upgrade existing infrastructure in the current Capital Priorities Program. Special scheduling of low floor buses on trolley bus routes will also be required as these are generally part of the Base Network.

Section Highlights


39

6.0 IMPLEMENTATION As noted in the previous sections of this report, there is a need to change the structure of ETS in order to remain a viable transportation option for the City of Edmonton. In June of 1997, Edmonton Transit System will restructure its entire service framework and establish a new foundation for transit services in the city. ETS is proposing extensive changes which will result in a more equitable fare structure, consistent and reliable service, and dependable transfer connections. Horizon 2000 will be developed using existing survey data and extensive community input, particularly in the design of the Community Network. Throughout the remainder of 1996 and early 1997, ETS will conduct a program to gather input from Edmonton residents and stakeholders to permit the design of a more community focused transit system. Following the initial changes, ETS will initiate an ongoing interactive process with the various communities to ensure continuing feedback on services provided and monitoring of these changes. Other supporting aspects of ETS must also change to enhance the viability of the transit service, including a new business approach, which will ensure that ETS can be responsive to Edmonton's changing conditions. The following sections summarize the actions proposed, and the financial implications of these actions. 6.1 BUSINESS PLAN 1996-2001 In 1995, Edmonton Transit System completed a comprehensive planning exercise to develop a business plan which will guide the organization over the next five years. The need for business and strategic planning was initiated in response to a number of significant issues, including changing economic conditions, the development of the Transportation Master Plan and service delivery strategy, declining ridership, aging infrastructure and fleet, and changing customer needs and expectations. ETS chose a specific business planning model and used an external resource to facilitate and guide the management team through the process of developing their business plan. The first phase of the planning process, developed in 1995, allowed the management team to: * confirm and validate commitment to the existing mission, values and principles * create a vision and purpose statement * scan the environment for trends * identify critical issues Planning and Development * set goals and strategies UBRARY * develop performance measures, standards and objectives City of Edmonton Additional outcomes were: * the development and installation of an information and monitoring system that will collect key infoimation and monitor the progress of performance measures * the establishment of role and responsibility statements for senior management staff * the development of Section goals, strategies, measures and standards


40

During 1996, ETS will begin to implement the plan by installing the monitoring/information system, evaluating the progress of the performance measures and developing annual operational work plans and budget allocations for the branch and sections. As well, continued work will be done on establishing role and responsibility statements for middle managers, identifying new performance measures, and faunalizing a method for environmental scanning and forecasting. The goals and strategies recommended in Horizon 2000 are consistent with those developed in the ETS Business Plan. Section Highlights

6.2 BUDGET FORECASTS 6.2.1 INITIAL IMPLEMENTATION COSTS Prior to implementation of the restructured transit system, a comprehensive public outreach and communication program will be undertaken, with three sets of public meetings. Almost all of the costs associated with the marketing and communication of Horizon 2000 will be accommodated within current budget guidelines. The exception will be $300,000 for a comprehensive promotional campaign which will be used when the new system is unveiled in June of 1997. 6.2.2 OPERATING BUDGET Edmonton Transit System is proposing a package of operating strategies for the 1997-1999 period which includes transit service restructuring, rationalization of the fare structure and the provision of additional service to accommodate growth in the city. The operating assumptions used to develop this plan include: • • •

Wages and salaries would remain at existing levels Inflation on other items would be between 2% to 3% each year Some contingency hours have been included on an annual basis to allow ETS to react to unexpected changes in operating conditions. These changes typically occur as a result of schedule adherance problems due to growth and increasing traffic congestion or shifts in student transportation movements. Approximately $100,000 per year is allocated

The elements of this strategy are: • • • • •

Undertake an extensive and on-going public outreach program which will assist in the design of the transit system. Undertake marketing and communications activities to raise awareness of the transit system changes and their benefits. Restructuring of the transit system in June 1997 using the service structure concept described in Section 5.1. Implementation of the fare structure plan described in Section 5.2. Expansion of transit service to neighbourhoods and areas that currently do not have service, funded through revenues generated from implementation of the proposed fare structure. Additional buses to serve new areas will be required after 1999.


41

As a result of an increase in overall ridership and revenue levels occuring in 1996, ETS will be able to offset the loss of the one-time tax levy increase of $676,000 which was approved by City Council in March 1996. Through implementation of these strategies, ETS will: •

• • • •

increase ridership as a result of the service restructuring. It is anticipated that the annual ridership increases of 2% in 1997 and 3% in 1998 and 1999 will be realized from the service restructuring improve financial performance (increased cost recovery) maintain the existing tax levy requirement at $52,596,000, with the one-time tax levy increase provided by City Council in 1996 removed absorb inflationary cost increases with revenues generated by increased ridership with additional revenues generated through implementation of the fare strategy, service will be provided to developing neighbourhoods and other areas currently without transit service

Expected performance trends for the 1997-1999 period are shown on the following page.


42

Three Year Performance Trends Service Hours Hours 700,000 650,000 —

Base Network

600,000 — 550,000 — 500,000 1996

1997

1998

1999

1998

1999

1998

1999

Year

Hours 1,000,000 950,000 —

Community Network

900,000 —

850,000 — 800,000 1996

1997

Year

Hours 1,600,000 1,550,000 -r

Total Hours

1,500,0004

1,450,000 + 1,400,000 1996

1997

Year

Financial Performance $ (000's) 55,000

Tax Levy

• 52,500 -

50,000 1996

1997

1998

1999

1998

1999

1998

1999

Year

Percentage 46.0

Cost Recovery

43.5 41.0 1996

1997

Year

Ridership

Riders (000's) 40,000

Ridership

39,000 38,000 37,000 1996

1997

Year


43

6.2.3 FIVE YEAR CAPITAL FORECAST As noted in Section 5.3, ETS has infrastructure requirements (fleet and facilities) necessary to support the operation of the transit system. These requirements include fleet replacements required to maintain the existing level of service and security measures and improved facilities (shelters, transit centres, accessibility improvements) which improve customer convenience, comfort and perception of the transit system. Between 1996 and 2001, a limited number of projects have been funded in the CPP, totalling $82.6 million. The majority of these funds ($76.1 million) are for vehicle replacements of buses which are over 25 years in age. However, the majority of projects which have been identified are considered as enhancements or infrastructure required to serve growth. The projects identified would require $41 million in capital funding over the next five years. In addition, the ETS operating budget would require an additional $964,000 by 2001 to maintain the capital enhancements. These categories of projects are given a lower priority within the CPP. With the budgetary limitations on capital funding, these projects would not be funded. Some of these projects, such as construction of a new transit centre near Mill Woods Town Centre and providing new heated shelter facilities are required to support the restructured transit system and focus of the transit network on major community attractors. Projects which are most essential to support the restructuring will be given a higher departmental priority. Section Highlights


1

APPENDIX ONE


45

PEER REVIEW PROCESS Purpose of Peer Review It has been recognized that a comprehensive review of transit service in Edmonton could lead to proposals that could drastically alter tthe way in which transit service might be provided and that such changes could have significant impact on existing transit patrons. In order to minimize the risks of embarking on changes to Edmonton's transit service, the City has decided to subject the findings and recommendations of theTransit System Review to a peer review process. The main objectives of the peer review process are: • To ensure that current system deficiencies have been correctly identified from the available market and travel demand data. • To ensure that the consultant's recommended response to Edmonton's situation is appropraite given circumstances, and that it meets generally accepted practice and thinking in the Canadian transit industry for medium sized Canadian cities. • To ensure that the fare strategies recommended by the City's consultant are reasonable and consistent with the latest industry directions. • To outline in broad terms, the upside and downside risks asssociated with embarking on the consultant's recommendations and to offer advise on risk reduction strategies, particularly with respect to implementation of the IBI Group proposals. Proposed Approach It is proposed that the peer review process involve 3-4 Canadian transit experts who would act as individuals, rather than serve on a panel. The desired mix of expertise would include persons with an understanding of the broader strategic issues facing transit properties in Canada and persons with experience in planning and operating transit services in mid-sized Canadian cities. The peer review process is intended to result in constructive contributions to the efforts of the City's consultant, IBI Group. The contributions of the peer group will be used to develop the best possible recommendations to City Council. Peer Review Group Mr. R. Wayne Bowes, P. Eng. Vice President DELCAN Corporation Ottawa, Ontario

Mr. Kerry O'Leary Director, Service Planning OC Transpo Ottawa, Ontario

Mr. Ed. J. Dowling General Manager Mississauga Transit Mississauga, Ontario

Mr. Al Cormier Executive Vice President Canadian Urban Transit Association Toronto, Ontario


46

Each of the reviewers submitted detailed comments on the proposed strategy. The following is a summary of the highlights of these comments.

1.0

Kerry O'Leary, Director of Service Planning, OC Transpo Mr. O'Leary has indicated that the concept of a Base and Community Network provides some flexibility that is not currently existant in the transit system. The reviewer recommended against issuance of free passes. He suggested that a simplification of the fare structure is warranted, as is introduction of electronic farebox and smart card technology. Mr. O'Leary suggested that introduction of a community-based service could potentially result in increased service efficiencies, more ridership, increased revenues, and more community support, with a downside being longer travel times and more frequent transfers.

2.0

A. Cormier, Executive Vice President, CUTA Mr. Cormier suggested that this report must be considered in conjunction with the direction developed within the Transportation Master Plan. He indicated that "if the master plan assumes a diminishing role for transit and an increasing role for the automobile, then I find the draft report's conclusions and recommendations appropriate. If.. .it looks to transit to serve a larger market share, then I have concerns with the draft report". He suggested that the Transportation Master Plan should restrict continued development of road and parking networks to better align it with the restructuring of ETS. This reviewer inquired as to the role of ETSAB in the development of the Transportation Master Plan. He further indicated that the Transportation Master Plan should compliment the objectives held by the ETSAB. Mr. Cormier indicated that IBI's suggestion of a 9% modal share is lower than in other Canadian properties. He further stated that IBI's recommendations to downsize transit services would effectively destroy ETS. Mr. Cormier noted concerns with IBI's placement of transit commuters at the bottom of the priority list for service. He disagreed with IBI's suggestion of giving up on "choice" riders. He indicated that the senior's pass prices should be increased annually to attain a reasonable level, as this demographic group is increasing in market size. Mr. Cormier indicated that the recommended implementation timefi-ame of up to 5 years was unacceptable; further, it should not be staged in phases, but rather introduced all at once. Mr. Cormier praised the "innovative and valuable recommendations" in this report.

3.0

Ed Dowling, Mississauga Transit Mr. Dowling's review was prepared from an operational perspective, emphasizing both the delivery of service and the plan's effect on ETS employees. The concept of Core, Connector, and Community services is seen as a method of providing transit services


47

which remain flexible to meet changing travel needs without severely impacting on various components of the system. Mr. Dowling recommended a detailed marketing plan for each segment of the route network. A strong component of the marketing plan should involve on-board customer service representatives to provide information to customers and to promote the new system plan. Mr. Dowling recommended that further revisions to the fare structure proposal were required, specifically increases to cash fares, and that consideration be given to the introduction of a weekly pass. The reviewer suggested that this report did not give sufficient consideration to the impact that information technology could make, particularly with respect to homebased businesses and employees. One of Mr. Dowling's primary concerns was that the IBI timeline provided for implementation of the plan to occur over a five year period, which he suggests is unacceptable. His recommended strategy would be for implementation of the new strategy as soon as it has been developed, and not follow a schedule of phased in services. Mr. Dowling supports the plan in principle. 4.0

R. W. Bowes, Delcan Corporation Mr. Bowes indicated some concern with the use of a consultation strategy as he felt it might be too complex and "may not lead to meaningful involvement because such a large percentage of users are not captive riders". The reviewer recommended that a reduction of fare categories is warranted, and supports the concept of using the adult cash fare as the basis for other fares. He also supported the introduction of electronic fare technology. He suggested that discounts on fares be reduced. Mr. Bowes supported the concept of a two-tier service network.


2

APPENDIX TWO


49

Post Secondary Institutions Eligible for Discounted Adult Monthly Pass (Current) Alberta College Alberta Vocational College Athabasca University Campbell and Associates Career College Chapale Career Centre Ltd. Concordia College Continuing Education Est-elle Academy of Hair Design Excel Resources Grant MacEwan Community College Jack Bredin Community Institute John Howard Society King's College Martech College Marvel College Mennonite Centre for Newcomers N.A.I.T. New Home Immigration and Relocation Centre Newman Theological College North America Baptist College Northwest Bible College University of Alberta


3

APPENDIX THREE


-i1996 Price Schedule with GST

PRICING GUIDELINES The general guidelines listed below are In most cases applicable to the setting of the Department's fees and charges. However, because of the diversity of products and amenities provided, some exceptions occur.

TH-facility Pass: A 10% reduction Is applied to the annual family pass fees for Fort Edmonton Park, Muttart Conservatory and Volley Zoo to arrive at the Tr-facility Pass rate.

1.

Group Rates: A 25% discount Is applied to the Individual rate by age categor for advance booked groups of 10 or more persons, or as otherwise stated In the Schedule.

Pricing Categories/Definitions

Child: 2 to 12 years; approximately 50% of the adult admission price. Youth: 13 to 17 years; approximately 75% of the adult admission price.

3.

Specific Product or Service Guidelines

Adult: 18 to 64 years.

3.1

Arenas

Union 65 years and over; approximately 75% of the adult admission price.

Children under two years of age will be admitted free when accompanied by a, admission paying adult.

Family: No more than two persons of the some household 18 years and over and oil other members of that household under 18 years of age. Group: Comprises 10 or more individuals with a common purpose seeking admission to a facility. Minor Sports Group: Any non-profit group affiliated with a nationally or provincially recognized organization whose majority of participants ore 17 years of age and under and are Edmonton residents.

Any minor group ice time booked In addition to the hours specified In the min( group contract or agreement with the City will be at regular ice rote for the Um period, unless otherwise negotiated with the Department. All commercial and Junior winter use of arenas must be negotiated through the Branch Manager and a formal agreement entered Into with the City of Edmonton. 3.2

2.

Price Reductions

Leisure Centre Pools

Children under two years of age will be admitted free when accompanied by a admission paying adult.

10 Admission Pass: Approximately 10% reduction Is applied to the single admission price. 20 Admission Pass: Approximately 15% reduction is applied to the single admission price. 30 Admission Pass: Approximately 20% reduction Is applied to the single admission price.

Disabled persons will be admitted to the AG Pool upon presentation of their ACT Membership Card. The fees for a swim meet rental shall be the approved rate or 15% of gross receipts, whichever is greater. School groups not Included In the Joint Use Agreement will pay the approved rote, minus the group reduction, plus the cost of instruction.

Edmonton Parks and Recreation


4

APPENDIX FOUR


52

FUEL STRATEGY

The most viable options for the type of fuel for new buses are Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) and Clean Diesel. This is based on the availability and stable supply of fuel resources, infrastructure available to supply and support use of the fuel, availability of bus engines and coach bodies from suppliers, and equivalent costs of maintaining the equipment. Reductions in exhaust emissions (nitrogen oxides, hydrocarbons, particulate, carbon monoxide) and greenhouse gas emissions (methane, carbon dioxide) can be achieved with the use of either fuel and the latest engine technology over the amounts emitted by older diesel engines currently used by Transit. If the current diesel bus fleet was totally converted to Clean diesel technology, an estimated 72% reduction in exhaust emissions and a 17.7% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions would be achieved. If the total fleet was converted to CNG engines, an estimated reduction in exhaust emissions of 81.5% and 33.6% for greenhouse gases would be achieved. These amounts are substantial for the fleet in isolation, but almost insignificant when considering the overall emissions related to transportation activities. Transportation related activities account for approximately 67% of all exhaust emissions, and 25% of all greenhouse gas emissions. Transit currently accounts for approximately 1.4% of exhaust emissions and 2% of greenhouse gas emissions of the percentages related to transportation activities. With a fleet changeover to Clean Diesel technology, Transit would account for approximately 0.4% of exhaust emissions and 1.6% of greenhouse gases related to transportation activity. CNG fueled engines would result in 0.3% of exhaust emissions and 1.3% of greenhouse gases related to transportation. The largest transportation contributor in producing harmful exhaust emissions and greenhouse gas is the automobile. Substantial pollution reductions can be achieved with policies promoting the use of Transit as opposed to automobiles for personal transportation within the City. These are economic impacts associated with conversion to Natural Gas that are not experienced with using Clean diesel technology. In order to provide a safe indoor NG fueling and storage facility, each of the three operating garages would be required to be retrofitted with methane and carbon monoxide detectors and improved ventilation at an estimated cost of $500k per facility. To obtain the necessary maximum 5 minute bus refueling time, large NG compressors would be required at each garage at an estimated cost of $2.75M each. If the fleet was converted to CNG, one facility at a time would be converted. In addition to building modifications, there is an additional capital cost of $65k for each CNG equipped bus. Additional training and certification of maintenance staff would be required to service the CNG systems on the bus. Until all garages are converted, new buses will be allocated to one garage which will restrict the ability to expand low floor service on a proportional basis to all areas of the City. With the use of Clean Diesel technology, no modifications are required to the existing facilities and no premium is required for the purchase of a bus. Staff will require limited upgrading to be able to maintain the new coaches. New low floor buses can be equitably distributed to all garages to expand low floor service in all areas of the City.


53

Northwestern Utilities Limited submitted a proposal to the City offering to underwrite the capital costs of the compressors and building modifications. This cost would be recovered by charging a premium on the price of natural gas supplied to the garage. The diesel equivalent price per litre would be $0.244. The additional capital cost of a CNG bus was assumed to be funded 75% Provincial Grant and 25% City Tax Levy. Cost of diesel fuel was assumed to be $0.38/1. The price of natural gas was assumed to be $1.75/GJ. A discount rate of 7% was used with 0% inflation to calculate the NPV of converting one garage to CNG buses over a twenty year span. The NPV was calculated at +$4.76M for this scenario. When the full capital cost of the bus is tax levy and no Provincial Grant, the NPV was calculated at -$4.472M. The Transportation Department Finance Section evaluated the NWU proposal. Because of the shortage of capital funds and the large number of other projects qualifying for Provincial Grant money, the full 75% grant is not available to offset the CNG bus premium. In the 1996-2000 CPP, grant funding levels for funding replacement buses amounted to 37-39% of the CNG cost premium. The Transportation analysis calculated the NPV with 7% discount rate and 0% and 3% inflation with no grant money used. The NPV ranged from -$3.082M to -$4.578M. One major factor influencing the NPV is the capital cost premium for a CNG bus. The break-even CNG bus premium is $39.6K - $49.7K (depending on whether 0% or 3% inflation factor is used). If this amount per bus can be achieved by a lower price, or with assistance of provincial grant funding, for the 220 buses required to equip each garage, CNG becomes more viable as an alternative fuel option. Other critical factors are the price of diesel fuel and the price of natural gas. A lower price for diesel, and/or higher price for natural gas will result in a more unfavorable NPV. The analysis also indicated that the most favorable option is for the city to pay for the capital cost of the compressor and building modifications instead of paying a compression charge to NWU over the twenty year period. Based on the economic value, the shortage of capital funds, the fact that the CNG fuel alternative is still a developing technology, and that substantial reductions in Transit's emissions can be achieved, it is recommended that Transit obtain Clean Diesel engines with the next order of 136 low floor buses. CNG bus prices and industry experience with CNG fleets will be monitored and evaluated for the purchase of additional units for the year 2000 and any subsequent years. Note that the replacement bus funds, currently approved in the CPP, are for Clean Diesel units. Additional funds would have to be approved to purchase CNG buses. One of the most promising new alternative fuel systems is the development of hydrogen fuel cell technology, which may be available at a cost comparable to that of the CNG bus in the next 7-10 years. This technology is currently in the R & D stage. Fuel cells utilize hydrogen fuel and oxygen (from air) with a catalyst to chemically react to produce water vapor, heat, and electrical energy. The electrical energy is used to power the bus. Fuel cells produce no harmful exhaust of greenhouse gas emissions that are produced by internal combustion engines. The fuel cell technology will allow the advantages of electric drive (no emissions, quiet, excellent performance characteristics) with the route flexibility of diesel or CNG buses (no fixed overhead trolley lines). Facilities require modification to safely fuel and store buses comparable to a CNG equipped facility. Hydrogen fuel can be formulated from natural gas or methanol feedstock. Maintenance costs may be lower due to the fact that the fuel cell is not an internal combustion engine. Full evaluation of this technology will be done prior to ordering buses beyond the year 2001.


5

APPENDIX FIVE


55

OUTREACH SUMMARY Presentation Summaries, February 1 - March 30, 1996

1.1 Edmonton Transit System Advisory Board (ETSAB) The Advisory Board has participated in the development of Horizon 2000 since the Fall of 1995. Presentations and updates have been given regularly at monthly Advisory Board meetings, and members have provided input and feedback throughout all stages of the process. Members have had the opportunity to review both the IBI Group report and the Horizon 2000 strategy proposal, and have provided valuable contributions in the ongoing evolution of the plan. ETSAB voted unanimously at the April 29, 1996 regular meeting that they support Horizon 2000 and the recommendations to be implemented.

1.2 DATS Working Group (February 20, 1996) The presentation was well received by this steering committee, which expressed an interest in continued involvement in the development of the new system, particularly with respect to the potential roles of DATS services in the new Community Network. The chair of the DATS Working Group is also a member of the ETSAB (Edmonton Transit System Advisory Board), and has indicated that both organizations are supportive of the new service strategy.

1.3 Amalgamated Transit Union Local 569 (February 20, 1996) Union representatives were generally positive in their comments about the proposals outlined in the presentation, although some concerns were expressed regarding the issue of paratransit operators and an initial perception that the strategy would result in service hour reductions. The first issue has been referred to contractual discussions, and the second has been resolved, with the Union supporting Horizon 2000.

1.4 Edmonton Student's Alliance (February 28, 1996) Five student participants attended the presentation (provided during an ESA Executive meeting), representing Grant MacEwan Community College, Concordia College, and King's College. Participants indicated that public transit service for students is an essential service, and stated that few other civic services affect as many people as transit does.


56

Specific concerns from King's College students were discussed, who feel that this institution is under-serviced. Although previous transit and travel surveys have been conducted in this area to determine travel requirements, low ridership levels persist. It was indicated that development of the Community Network will provide an opportunity to address student concerns for travel to this institution, and others throughout the city. As this presentation was delivered prior to Council deliberation on reinstatement of 40,000 service hours, considerable time was given to discussion on whether student involvement could influence City Council's decision; discussion also included how service reductions are determined and implemented. Service cuts have a major impact on student riders, who travel during non-peak operating periods, early and late evenings, and weekends, when service reductions are more likely to occur. A recommendation was made to introduce a tax on car sales. The presenter indicated that a series of expectations and recommendations will be made through the Transportation Master Plan which will include proposals for introduction of auto-disincentive programs, including a gasoline tax, a tax on local vehicle sales, and increased parking rates. Participants indicated a concern with the pricing of the senior's pass, and recommended that the price of the annual pass be doubled, or a monthly pass be introduced.

1.5 One Voice (March 4, 1996) Fourteen participants, representing a number of senior's groups, attended the presentation, provided during a regular One Voice executive meeting. Participants recommended that ETS meet with the various senior's groups in Edmonton to address the issue of senior's fares to establish a consensus agreement, whether in terms of increasing fares or establishing a monthly pass. Generally, members supported a marginal increase in the senior's annual pass prices, however they recommend consideration be given to subsidization for low income seniors. Concerns were raised about the potential for increases in walking distances in the new strategy, and the likely increase in transfers. Participants recommended that there should be a greater emphasis on the importance of public transit as a community service, and a de-emphasis of private transportation. Participants recommended that transit services should be subsidized by the municipality.


57

1.6 Edmonton Federation of Community Leagues (March 25, 1996) Approximately 20 individuals attended the presentation, representing a good crosssection of community leagues throughout the city. Representatives indicated interest in assisting ETS in the development of the new community network services through Area Councils and community meetings. Concerns were expressed over the concept of premium fares, increases to fares for seniors, and increased walking distances. The community leagues expressed interest in the Community Outreach program, and will be actively supporting the involvement of the community leagues in this process.

1.7 Edmonton Public and Separate School Boards (March 1996) School board representatives support the concept of a single school pass, but have expressed concerns about fraudulent use of such passes, and about the possibility that they could be subsidizing post secondary student use. The school boards indicated that they would like to work with ETS on planning start and finish times to make more efficient use of peak hour services. They are also interested in working with DATS more closely on the issue of special needs school trips to determine if DATS can address some of these trip needs.

1.8 Transit Facilities (February 12-29, 1996) Presentations were made to transit staff at all facilities throughout the month of February. Staff suggestions for incorporation into the new strategy included: * more park and ride facilities * fare reductions offered as passenger incentives for frequent riders * improve infrastructure, make it more attractive, improve perception of security for passengers, improve cleanliness of system and facilities, repair decaying or inadequate infrastructure, need permanent shelters at Lakewood and Kaskitayo * changes in overall image, including uniforni, corporate colors needed * more consistent sign-ups required * regional service considerations, service to the International Airport * follow traffic patterns more, more east-west routes, particularly in south * more "real" express routes, less interlines * introduction of electronic fareboxes, debit cards and smart cards * zonal fare system Staff concerns and questions raised during the presentations included: *total platform hour changes * job security (esp. with small buses), job loss potential; job classification changes with increased use of paratransit operators * transfer connections * overabundance of parking, inexpensive parking makes it difficult for transit to be competitive, particularly in the downtown


58

* long-term future of the LRT, consideration for surface stations * future of trolleys, use of intermittent trolley/low floor bus service * inequities between DATS service and conventional transit service, particularly in terms of cost to the customer * role of all staff in developing and promoting new strategy * fleet mix proposals, increase of small buses, problems with continued deferment of bus purchases There has been a generally positive reaction to and feedback from staff on this new strategy, who see it as an impressive and potentially effective plan for transit's future. To ensure that all staff have a good understanding of the new strategy, Operator Focus Group members will providde further staff presentations in all facilities throughout May and June. 1.9 University Campus Planning Coordination Committee (March 11, 1996) A presentation of the proposed transit strategy was made to approximately 10 representatives of campus area agencies. The overall reaction to the transit proposals was supportive and positive. One concern expressed by some members of the committee was related to the potential for University transit centre to become a hub, or focus of the Community Service network in the campus area; University officials are not supportive of the University transit centre gaining such a wide role or function in future.

1.10 South-Central area communities (February 28, 1996) Approximately 20 people representing south -central area communities attended this meeting to hear about the transit plan proposals. A number of issues and questions were raised and discussed with Transportation Dept. staff. The bulk of the issues raised related to how the new plan would make transit service more competitive and how the plan would affect users of the current system. There was alot of interest and enthusiasm expressed about the community focus of the transit plan and the opportunities for community involvement in its design. Meeting participants were also interested in the linkage between the new transit plan and the other aspects of the Transportation Master Plan.

1.11 Chamber of Commerce (April 1996) Following provision of information, and initial discussions with the Chamber of Commerce, a "Brown Bag" session has been scheduled for May 25, 1996 to provide further information on Horizon 2000. Members of the Chamber of Commerce are encouraged to attend. The initial response by the Chamber of Commerce to the proposed strategy has been positive.


59

1.12 Transportation Master Plan Citizen Advisory Group (CAG) The Citizen Advisory Group has reviewed and commented on the transit plan proposals on a number of occasions since May of 1995. The Transit Strategy was formally presented to the CAG in November 1995. Comments and feedback provided by the CAG have contributed to a clearer definition of the short and long term issues and requirements of public transit in Edmonton. Their input has contributed to a clearer understanding of the actions that are needed in the short term to enable consideration of longer term possibilities such as: • • • • • • •

A wider, more comprehensive role for public transit Transit-supportive Transportation Demand Management Measures Transit supportive Land-use policies Existing and Future Environmental Commitments Future LRT Extensions Policy directions emerging from the "Full Cost" assessment of transportation costs Broad integration of of Persons with Disabilities.

The CAG have reviewed and provided comments on the Horizon 2000 report which have contributed to a clearer, more consistent and positive presentation of the proposed Transit Plan. Their comments and contributions reflect a largely positive view of the proposals being forwarded for City Council's approval. The CAG generally view the Transit Strategy proposals as a necessary first step to improving transit in Edmonton over the longer term.

1.13 Other A number of community and business organizations were advised of the transit plan proposals and offered the opportunity to receive a presentation. The following organizations were contacted: Downtown Business Association West Edmonton Business Association South Edmonton Business Association Council of Business Revitalization Zones Area Council 1 Area Council 2 Area Council 3 Area Council 4 Area Council 17 Area Council 20 Clareview Area Council Southwest Area Council Millwoods Presidents Council Southeast Planning Coalition

Planra;g and Development

LIBRARY -r H*;

Cy of Edmonton


6

APPENDIX 6


61

**NOTE: All meetings scheduled for 7 pm to 9 pm (Halls booked from 6 pm to 10 pm)

1

Clareview/Lake District (14) Homesteader, South Clareview, Bannerman, Hairsine, Fraser, Evergreen Clareview Arena 3804 - 139 Avenue May 14, 1996 May 21, 1996

2

1st session Feedback session

Calder/Castledowns/Canora (11) Palisades, Henry Singer Park, Moose Lodge, Edmonton Soccer Association, Wellington Park, Athlone, Dunvegan, Calder, Kensington, Carlisle, Caernarvon, Lauderdale, Rosslyn, CFB Edmonton, Lorelei/Beaumaris, Baturyn, Elsinor, Castle Downs, Dunluce Kensington Community League 12130 - 134 A Avenue May 15, 1996 May 22, 1996

3

1st session Feedback session

Balwin/Lake District (13) Killarney, Glengarry, Northmount, Evansdale, Lake District (north and south), Lago Lindo, Kilkenny, Londonderry, Delwood, Balwin, Belvedere, Steele Heights, McLeod, Matt Berry, Pilot Sound West Steele Heights Community Hall 5825 - 140 Avenue May 22, 1996 May 29, 1996

4

1st session Feedback session

Beverly (12) Cromdale, Bellevue, Montrose, Newton, Highlands, Beacon Heights, Beverly Heights Bellevue Community League 7308 - 112 Avenue May 23, 1996 May 30, 1996

1st session Feedback session

'


62

5

Scona/ Capilano/ Hazeldean (2) Strathcona, Ritchie, Hazeldean, Argyll, Avonmore, King Edward Park, Idyliwylde, Kenilworth, Ottewell, Holyrood, Stratheam, Cloverdale, Forest Heights, Fulton Place, Capilano, Gold Bar Bonnie Doon Community League 9246 - 93 Street May 27, 1996 June 3, 1996

6

1st session Feedback session

Mill Woods (3) North Millboume, Leefield, Lakewood, Knottwood, Woodvale, Millhurst, Southwood, Ridgewood, Bumewood, Fountain Lakes, Meadowbrook, Twin Parks, Ellerslie Grant MacEwan Community College - Millwoods Campus May 30, 1996 June 6, 1996

7.

1st session Feedback session

Central (1) Westmount, Downtown, Queen Mary Park, Central McDougall, McCauley, Boyle Street, Rossdale, Oliver, Riverdale Heritage Room, City Hall 1 Sir Winston Churchill Square June 4, 1996 June 17, 1996

8

1st session Feedback session

Dovercourt/Parkdale/Delton (10) Dovercourt, Woodcroft, Sherbrooke, Prince Charles, Inglewood, Prince Ruptert, Spruce Avenue, Westwood, Delton, Elmwood Park, Eastwood, Parkdale, Cromdale, Alberta Avenue Inglewood Community League 12535 - 116 Avenue June 10, 1996 June 19, 1996

1st session Feedback session


63

9

Duggan/Kaskitayo (5) Aspen Gardens, Royal Gardens, Greenfield, Blue Quill, Duggan, Ermineskin, Skyrattler, Yellowbird East, Twin Brooks, Blackburn Greenfield Community Hall 3803 - 114 Street June 6, 1996 June 12, 1996

10.

1st session Feedback session

Garneau/Lansdowne (4) Windsor Park, Garneau, Queen Alexandra, McKernan, Belgravia, Parkallen, Allendale, Lendrum, Pleasantview, Empire Park, Malmo, Lansdowne, Grandview Heights Lendrum Community Hall 11335-57 Ave June 11, 1996 June 18, 1996

11

1st Session Feedback session

Riverbend/Terwillegar (6) Brookview,Riverbend/Brookside, Terwillegar Riverbend Community Hall 258 Rhatigan Road June 13, 1996 June 20, 1996

12.

1st Session Feedback session

Jasper Place (8) Mayfield, High Park, McQueen, Grosvenor, North Glenora, Glenora, Crestwood, Parkview, Laurier Heights, Rio Terrace, Elmwood, Glenwood, Jasper Park, West Jasper Place, West Meadowlark, Meadowlark, Sherwood, Brittania/Youngstown, Canora West Jasper/Sherwood Community Hall 9620 - 152 Street June 18, 1996 June 25, 1996

1st Session Feedback session


64

13

West End (7)

La Perle, Belmead, Summerlea, Aldergrove, Thorncliffe, Westridge, Lymburn, Wolf Willow, Country Club, Lessard, Willowby, Callingwood, Westview Village/Lewis Estates Callingwood/Lynwood Community Hall 17740 - 69 Ave June 19, 1996 June 26, 1996

14

1st Session Feedback session

Northwest Industrial (9) Mitchell Transit Garage 11904 - 154 Street June 20, 1996 June 27, 1996

1st Session (This meeting scheduled from 11.30 am - 1.30 pm) Feedback session (Meeting time to be decided)


7

APPENDIX 7


66

1995 REVENUE AND RIDERSHIP FARE CATEGORY

REVENUE

RIDERSHIP

CASH $12,318,598

7,699,124

$1,000,969

1,251,211

$3,030,294

1,893,926

$354,435

472,580

$10,143,092

9,576,403

$4,713,492

4,873,975

Elementary/Junior High

$2,244,746

3,024,500

Senior High

$2,824,722

3,144,039

$424,416

576,014

$1,164,320

1,330,696

$597,362

3,261,230

Adult

$20,620

17,364

Child

$4,104

8,208

OTHER

$45,243

28,275

$38,886,413

37,157,545

Adult Child/Senior Citizen

TICKET (Book of 10) Adult Child/Senior Citizen

MONTHLY PASS Adult Post Secondary

SCHOOL MONTHLY PASS* Restricted

Unrestricted Elementary/Junior High Senior High

ANNUAL PASS Senior Citizen

DAY PASS

TOTAL


67

COMPARATIVE FARE STRUCTURES - SELECTED CANADIAN TRANSIT PROPERTIES FARE TYPE

EDMONTON

CALGARY

TORONTO

MISSISAUGA

OTTAWA

HAMILTON

$1.85 (1) $2.70 (2)

LONDON

WINNIPEG

Adult Cash (Off Peak)

$1.60

$1.50

$2.00

$2.00

Adult Cash (Peak)

$1.60

$1.50

$2.00

$2.00

Student/Senior Cash Fare

$0.80

$1.00

$2.00

Child Cash (Peak)

$0.80

$0.90

$0.50

$2.00

$1.00

$0.95

$1.00

$0.80

Child Cash (Off-Peak)

$0.80

$0.90

$0.50

$2.00

$1.00

$0.95

$1.00

$0.75

Adult Tickets (10/Book) Adult Tickets (50/Book)

$16.00

$12.50

$15.00 $75.00

$15.00

$0.80 @

Adult Tickets (5/Book) Adult Tickets - 2 Fare Ticket Child Tickets (10/Book)

N/A

$6.75

$7.50

$8.50

Student/Senior Tickets (10/Book) Adult Monthly Pass

$7.50 $3.50 $3.75 $7.50

$46.00

$48.00

$1.85 (1) $2.70 (2)

$1.70

$2.00

$1.40

$1.70

$2.00

$1.40

VICTORIA

$1.50 $1.50 $1.50 $2.25 $3.00

$1.50 $2.25

$0.85

$13.50

$6.75

$7.00

$8.50

$0.80 @

$0.95@

$0.80 @

$7.50

$13.50 $8.50

$0.80 @

$0.95@

$1.10 @ $1.05@ $56.00 +$3 Photo

$8.00

$57.00 (1) $72.50 (2)

$78.00

VANCOUVER

$55.00

WeekDay Pass (Consecutive Mon - Ed)

$52.00

$1.00 $1.50 $1.00 $1.50

$0.75 $1.10 $1.50 $0.75 $13.75 $20.50 $28.00 N/A $7.50

.

$13.50 1 ZONE 2 ZONES 3 ZONES

$9.00 $9.00

$54.00 $82.00 $106.00

$47.00 1 ZONE 2 ZONES 3 ZONES

$11.70

7 Day Pass (Consecutive Mon - Sun) ADULT 7 Day Pass (Consecutive Mon - Sun)

$16.00 $14.50

$13.50 $8.00

STOT/Sn

Post Secondary Monthly Pass

$42.00

$41.00

Senior High Pass

$34.50

$34.00

Senior High Pass (Unrestricted)

$38.00

Child Monthly Pass

N/A

Elementary/Junior High Pass

$28.50

Elementary/Junior High Pass (Unrestricted) Senior Citizens Annual Pass

$32.00 $25.00

$46.75 $56.75 $46.75 $56.75

$58.50

(1) (2) (1) (2)

$50.00

N/A

N/A

$30.80

$33.00

$30.80

$33.00

$28.00

$33.00

$30.80/M0

$39.00

$40.00 $34.00

$40.00 $46.75 (1) $56.75 (2)

.*

$51.00/M0

$120.00

$28.00/M0

$135.00

$42.00/M0

$30.00

$33.00/M0

$30.00/M0

Adult Day Pass

$4.75

$4.50

$6.00

$4.50

$5.00

Child Day Pass

$2.00

$2.50

$6.00

$2.50

$4.00

NOTES:*

Vancouver Winnipeg Ottawa

Concession Fares - Child 5-13 years, Students 14-19 years, Seniors 65+ years Peak Hours = Service start - 9:30 a.m. / 3:00-6:30 p.m. One category for Child, Seniors and High School Students (1)=Mainline Service (2)=Express Service (premium) hild under 6 years=free with adult Child 6-14 years=adult fares for cash and ticket Multiple tickets required for mainline and express service

1 ZONE 2 ZONES 1 ZONE 2 ZONES 3 ZONES 1 ZONE 2 ZONES 1 ZONE * 2 ZONES 3 ZONES ALL ZONES *


Edmonton (Alta.) - 1996 - Horizon 2000_planning for a better future