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CITY OF EDMONTON LIBRARY/RESOURCE CENTRE PLANNING DEPARTMENT

T070 7833 1979

A.C. 2938


Riverdale Shared-Ride Taxi Study

Jointly Prepared by: Operations and Development Branch Edmonton Transit Transportation Planning Branch Planning Department City of Edmonton August, 1979


Table of Contents page Table of Contents List of Exhibits List of Tables

iii iii

PART I - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY CHAPTER 1 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 CHAPTER 2 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4

Summary Introduction Study Objectives Study Methodology Overview of Current Shared-Ride Taxi Systems The Community of Riverdale Development of Alternatives Economic Analysis Evaluation Process

1 1 1 2 2 2 3 5

RECOMMENDATIONS Recommendations Service Characteristics Implementation Program Monitoring Program

6 6 7 7

PART II - THE REPORT CHAPTER 3 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 CHAPTER 4 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 CHAPTER 5 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5

INTRODUCTION Background Study Organization Study Objectives Study Methodology

9 10 10 11

OVERVIEW OF CURRENT SHARED-RIDE TAXI SYSTEMS Introduction Service Characteristics Population and Ridership Statistics Operating Results Potential Benefits and Problems

14 15 15 18 18

THE COMMUNITY OF RIVERDALE Introduction Study Area Population Statistics Current Transit Service Current Demand of Transit Service

21 21 21 21 24


page CHAPTER 6 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 6.10 CHAPTER 7 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 CHAPTER 8 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 CHAPTER 9 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 CHAPTER 10

DEVELOPMENT OF SHARED-RIDE TAXI ALTERNATIVES Introduction Basic Shared-Ride Taxi Alternatives Generation of Sub-Alternatives Taxi Fares Types and Level of Services Hours of Operations Service Coverage Dispatch Function Transfer Location Short Listing ECONOMIC ANALYSIS Introduction Costing Methodology Definitions of Economic Terms Costing Criteria and Assumptions Estimates of Hours and Mileages of Operations Comparison of Annual Operating Costs Comparison of Unit Operating Costs

33 33 33 34 36 36 36

EVALUATING THE ALTERNATIVES Introduction The Evaluation Factors Results of the Evaluation Process The Selected Alternative

41 41 42 42

RECOMMENDED PLAN Recommendations Service Coverage Hours of Operations Method of Operations Fare and Method of Payment

45 45 46 46 46

IMPLEMENTAION AND MONITORING PROGRAMS

Introduction 10.1 10.2 Approval Process 10.3 Fine-Tuning of System Design 10.4 Legal Aspects 10.5 Contract Preparation and Tendering Process 10.6 Insurance and Licensing Requirements 10.7 Liaison with the Selected Taxicab Company 10.8 Scheduling Advertising/Promotion Campaign 10.9 10.10 Monitoring Program

APPENDIX

27 27 27 28 30 30 30 30 31 31

REVIEW OF THE EDMONTON TAXICAB INDUSTRY

47 47 47 47 49 49 49 49 49 49

51


page List of Exhibits 3.1

Study Methodology

12

5.1

Study Area

22

5.2

Half-Hourly Transit Ridership Profile to/from Riverdale

26

6.1

Generation of Shared-Ride Taxi Sub-Alternatives

29

8.1

Results of Evaluation Process

43

10.1

Implementation Program

48 List of Tables

1.1

Summary of Economic Analysis Comparison of Unit Operating Costs

4

4.1

Comparison of North American Shared-Ride Taxi Systems Service Characteristics

16

4.2

Comparison of North American Shared-Ride Taxi Systems Population and Ridership Statistics

17

4.3

Comparison of North American Shared-Ride Taxi Systems Operating Results

19

5.1

The Community of Riverdale Population Statistics by Sex, Age Group and Occupation

23

5.2

Half-Hourly Transit Ridership Profile - to/from Riverdale

25

7.1

Summary of Hours and Mileage of Operations

37

7.2

Summary of Economic Analysis Comparison of Annual Operating Costs

38

7.3

Summary of Economic Analysis Comparison of Unit Operating Costs

39


PART I EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


-1CHAPTER 1 SUMMARY 1.1

Introduction This report presents the findings and recommendations of a study which

examined the operational and economic feasibilities of utilizing taxicab vehicles in providing public transit service to the residents of Riverdale in off-peak periods (including nights, Sundays and Holidays). The study was initiated by Edmonton Transit in response to the following directive from the City Utilities and Engineering Committee: "That the Committee direct the Administration to bring back a proposal for providing a subsidized taxi service on a trial basis to ensure that all residents of Riverdale have access to public transit." The Riverdale Shared-Ride Taxi Feasibility Study was jointly conducted by Edmonton Transit (Operations and Development Branch) and the Planning Department (Transportation Planning Branch). The Edmonton taxicab industry, Edmonton Transit Drivers' Union and a number of current operators of shared-ride services were contacted to seek input to the study. 1.2

Study Objectives The main objectives of this study have been to conduct economic analysis

of a number of alternative shared-ride taxi services and to identify the operational constraints that would be expected. The study also aimed at developing a detailed program for the implementation and monitoring of a trial subsidized taxi system in Riverdale. 1.3

Study Methodology The study was carried out in seven phases as follows: (i)

PHASE 1: Start-Up

(ii) PHASE 2: Review of Current Situations (iii) PHASE 3: Identification of Operational Constraints (iv) PHASE 4: Economic Analysis (v)

PHASE 5: Recommendations


-2(vi) PHASE 6: Implementation Program (vii) PHASE 7: Monitoring Program 1.4

Overview of Current Shared-Ride Taxi Systems A review of current shared-ride taxi operations in North America was con-

ducted. In total, eleven such systems were examined including: North Battleford, Saskatchewan; Peterborough, Ontario; El Cajon, California; Hicksville, New York; Davenport, Iowa; Little Rock, Arkansas; Madison, Wisconsin; Benecia, California; Los Gatos, California; La Mesia, California; and Arabi, Louisiana. The sizes of these operations range from 12 vehicles serving a population of 14,000 in North Battleford, Saskatchewan to a fleet of over 70 vehicles providing service to over 300,000 residents in Little Rock, Arkansas. The average daily patronages in these centres vary from 21 passengers in Arabi, Louisiana to 3,200 patrons in Little Rock, Arkansas. 1.5

The Community of Riverdale The community of Riverdale has a population of 921 residents (1978 Census)

of which about 30% are under 15 and over 65 years of age. The community is currently provided with a 30-minute transit service from about 6:00 A.M. to midnight, seven days a week. From results of surveys conducted over a three month period (November, 1978 to February, 1979), the total transit patronage was estimated at 36 trips to/from the community on weekday nights (6:30 P.M. to midnight) and 56 passengers on Sundays and Holidays (8:00 A.M. to midnight). 1.6

Development of Alternatives The study developed and examined a number of shared-ride taxi options.

The following operating parameters were considered in identifying the various taxi alternatives: rate of compensation to the taxicab company in providing the service; type and level of services; hours of operations; service coverage; dispatch function; and transfer location. A preliminary analysis was conducted and the number of alternatives were shortlisted to the following five for detailed examination: (i)

Rate of compensation to the taxicab company to be based on existing tariffs, i.e. $1.20 for the first 1/8 mile and $0.10 for each additional mile.


-3(ii)

Rate of compensation to the taxicab company to be based on a flat hourly rate of $14.00/hour.

(iii) Service to be provided by Edmonton Transit using modified van vehicles with a capacity of 8 passengers. (iv)

Similar to (iii) except 5-passenger leased cars are to be used.

(v)

Regular fixed route service (for comparison purposes).

In examining the above alternatives, a number of service variations in terms of schedulings and routings were also considered. (i)

fixed schedule and fixed route.

(ii)

fixed schedule and variable route.

(iii) fully demand-responsive service, i.e. variable schedule and variable route. Under a fixed schedule type of operation, service would be provided at 30-minute intervals from the community and from a transfer location; for connections to the regular bus system with a variable schedule operation, service would be provided when there is a demand for it. Fixed route refers to the type of service whereby the current bus routing in the neighborhood is followed and regular transit zones are used for passenger pick-ups and drop-offs; door-step service is provided under a variable route system. 1.7

Economic Analysis Results of the economic analysis are summarized in Table 1.1 The

findings are discussed as follows: (i)

The current regular bus route costs annually $56,155 to operate or an hourly rate of $19.66; the cost/passenger is $3.90.

(ii)

The two taxi options are expected to cost between $30,000 to about $38.000 per annum; the unit passenger costs are estimated at $2.13 to about $2.60.

(iii)

The alternatives of utilizing 5-passenger leased cars and modified vans would cost from $42,000 to more than $65,000 over a 12-month period; on a per passenger basis, these options would cost between $2.14 to almost $4.00.


-4 TABLE 1.1 SUMMARY OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS - COMPARISON OF UNIT OPERATING COSTS (1979 dollars)

Unit Costs By Type Of Service Provided Alternative

Unit Cost

Fixed Schedule/ Fixed Route

Fixed Schedule/ Variable Route

Variable Schedule/ Variable Route

1: (current taxi tariffs)

annual costs total costs/pass deficit/passenger* costs/veh-mile costs/veh-hour

$ 30,603 $2.13 1.73 2.59 /

$ 40,414 $1.89 1.49 1.81 /

$ 50,199 2.34 1.94 1.73 /

2: (fixed hourly rate)

annual costs total costs/pass deficit/passenger* costs/veh-ndle costs/veh-hour

$ 37,452 $2.60 2.20 / 15.82

$ 39,177 1.83 1.43 / 15.80

$ 50,588 $2.36 1.96 / 15.71

3: (vans operated by Transit)

annual costs total costs/pass deficit/passenger* costs/veh-nile costs/veh-hour **

$ 57,081 $3.96 3.54 4.04 24.77

$ 61,658 $2.88 2.48 2.64 26.76

$ 65,470 $3.05 2.65 2.08 28.42

4: (leased cars operat2d by Transit)

annual costs total costs/pass deficit/passenger* costs/veh-nile costs/veh-hour **

$ 41,886 $2.91 2.51 2.91 18.18

$ 45,832 $2.14 1.74 1.84 19.89

$ 48,428 $2.26 1.86 1.54 21.02

5: (regular - bus route)

annual costs total costs/pass deficit/passenger* costs/veh-mile costs/veh-hour

$ 56,155 $3.90 3.50 1.36 19.66

* Assumed a 40% and 60% split between Children and adult fares. ** Not including "deadhead" travel time.

/ / / / /

/ / / / /


-51.8

Evaluation Process The various alternatives were evaluated based on these criteria: (i)

Lowering the total costs of service.

(ii)

Lowering the costs/passenger ratio.

(iii) Simplicty of operation. (iv)

Meeting demand of community.

(v)

Ease of monitoring service quality.

(vi)

Ease of accounting/audit control.

Applying the above evaluation factors, the alternative of a flat hourly rate of payment was selected. The recommended operating strategy is to provide a fixed schedule/fixed route type of service.


-6CHAPTER 2 RECOMMENDATIONS 2.1

Recommendations Based on the findings of this study, the following recommendations are

made: (i)

That the current regular bus service at nights, Sundays and Holidays in the Community of Riverdale be replaced by a fixed schedule/fixed route type of subsidized taxicab service; and that the service be provided, through normal City tendering process, by one of the taxicab companies in the City of Edmonton at a rate of payment of not exceeding $15.00/hour.

(ii) That the proposed subsidized taxicab service be implemented on a trial basis for a period of one year; and that the service be monitored and evaluated over the course of the test period. The recommended subsidized taxicab program represents a less costly alternative of providing transit service to the residents of Riverdale compared to the existing regular bus route at nights, Sundays and Holidays. However, it is noted if the current regular bus service is discontinued and an alternative fond of public transportation is not substituted, an annual operating cost savings of over $56,000 could be realized. Under the "donothing" option, bus service at nights, Sundays and Holidays would still be available at Rowland Road/89 Street and about half of the population (500 people) of the community would be beyond 1300 feet (current City walking distance policy) of a transit zone. It is further noted that the above recommendations are made specifically for the Riverdale case. The general applicability of shared-ride taxi on a city-wide basis has not been determined. 2.2

Service Characteristics It is further recommended that the following service characteristics be

adopted: (i)

The service be available to all the residents of or patrons destined to the community within the boundary of 95 Street, Rowland Road and the North Saskatchewan River.


-7(ii)

The service be provided for these periods: Monday to Saturday - 6:30 P.M. to 11:00 P.M.; Sundays and Holidays 8:00 A.M. to 11:00 P.M.

(iii)

The regular transit routings be followed and the current transit zones be used for passenger pick-ups and drop-offs.

(iv)

A basic 30-minute service frequency be provided; and additional service be provided in o, ierload situations.

(v)

Transfer connections to the regular bus route system be made at the intersection of Jasper Avenue/95 Street (transit patrons will be picked up at regular transit zones in the Riverdale area and driven to the intersection of Jasper Avenue/95 Street for transfer connections to the regular bus system; in the homebound direction of travel, patrons will be picked up at Jasper Avenue/95 Street and dropped off at the nearest transit zone to their residence).

(vi)

No cash or transfers be exchanged between the patrons and taxicab operator for the "taxi" portion of the trip; current Edmonton Transit fares be charged on the regular bus route system.

2.3

Implementation Program The implementation of the 6-month test will involve the following activities: (i)

Approval process.

(ii)

Fine-tuning of system design.

(iii) Investigation of legal aspects. (iv)

Contract preparation and tendering process.

(v)

Identification of insurance and licensing requirements.

(vi)

Liaison with the successful tender.

(vii) Scheduling. (viii) Advertising/Promotion campaign. 2.4

Monitoring Program The proposed Riverdale subsidized taxi service wi31 be closely

monitored durirg the 6-month trial period. The following aspects regarding the service will be examined: (i)

Service reliability.

(ii)

Ridership.

(iii)

Comments from users.


-8(iv)

Comments from taxicab operator.

(v)

Quality of service (i.e. wait time, travel time, etc.)

(vi)

Efficiency of service (i.e. occupancy rate; passengers per vehicle mile and per vehicle hour, etc.)

(vii) Revenue (viii) Costs of service. (ix)

Connectivity to the regular bus route system.


PART II THE REPORT


-9CHAPTER 3 INTRODUCTION 3.1

Background On 1978 07 02 transit service in the community of Riverdale, which is

situated in the river valley south of Rowland Road, was discontinued at night (6:30 P.M. to midnight) and on Sundays and Holidays. Data collected had shown that riderships in the community during these time periods were very low. It is noted that the removal of service was part of Edmonton Transit's overall effort to optimize the utilization of existing resources and to reduce transit operating costs. Prior to the 1978 07 02 cut-back, residents of Riverdale were provided with 30-minute all-day service. On 1978 08 15 a petition from the Riverdale Community League was submitted to City Council demanding that the evening and holiday bus service through Riverdale be reinstated. This item was dealt with at the regular meeting of City Council on 1978 10 10 at which time Edmonton Transit was directed to prepare a report and recommendation for an alternative bus route to be implemented on a three-month trial basis. In a report dated 1978 10 18 Edmonton Transit recommended that the night, Sunday and Holiday service to Riverdale remain discontinued. This recommendation was overruled by City Council on 1978 10 24. At the same Council meeting the motion "That the Riverdale bus service be reinstated as previously existed" was carried. Subsequent to this directive, a special bus service which operated between Downtown and Riverdale was implemented on 1978 11 19. During the 3month trial period, this special route was closely monitored. Results of ridership surveys revealed that this service was used by an average of 4.6 passengers per hour at a cost of $3.69 for each passenger carried. On 1979 02 11 the test route was replaced by a regular bus service. The operating results of the Riverdale special bus service were documented and submitted to the Utilities and Engineering Committee. At the Committee's meeting on 1979 04 17 the following motion was concurred in: "That the Committee direct the Administration to bring back a proposal for providing a subsidized taxi service on a trial basis to ensure that all residents of Riverdale have access to public transit."


-10Edmonton Transit, in response to the above directive, then initiated a study to examine the economic and operational feasibilities of replacing the current regular bus route in Riverdale by taxi service and to develop an implementation/monitoring program for a trial operation. This report documents the findings and recommendations of the Riverdale Shared-Ride Taxi Study. 3.2

Study Organization The study was conducted by a study group consisted of representatives

from Edmonton Transit (Operations and Development Branch) and the Planning Department (Transportation Planning Branch). Over the course of the study, various private and public transportation agencies were consulted in an attempt to seek suggestions and/or input to the study. These agencies included the following: (i)

Transportation Development Agency, Ministry of Transport

(ii) Border Transit Limited (operator of the Peterborough TRANSCAB service), Peterborough, Ontario (iii) Edmonton Transit Operators' Union, Local 569 (iv) Edmonton taxi industry 3.3

Study Objectives The primary objectives of this study are two-fold: firstly, to investi-

gate the economic and operational feasibilities of replacing the regular bus service in Riverdale at nights, Sundays and holidays by a shared-ride taxi system and to formulate an implementation/monitoring program for a three to six-month trial operation. Specifically, the study objectives are: (1)

to identify the demographic and travel characteristics of the residents of Riverdale.

(ii) to undertake an overview of current shared-ride taxi systems in North America and to document their operating results. (iii) to develop alternative shared-ride taxi options taking into account all relevant variables such as: type of service; hours of operations; service coverage; dispatch procedures; transfer locations; methods of payment to the taxi operators; etc.


-11(iv)

to conduct economic analysis and evaluation of the operating strategies identified.

(v)

to undertake a review of the taxicab industry in the City of Edmonton ; and to identify the level of interests of the Edmonton taxi industry towards the implementation of a shared-ride taxi experiment in Riverdale.

(vi) to submit a recommended plan of action to the Utilities and Engineering and City Council pertaining to the provision of transportation service to the residents of Riverdale. (vii) to develop a detailed implementation/monitoring program for a trial shared-taxi ride experiment in Riverdale. 3.4

Study Methodology The overall study approach is outlined in Exhibit 3.1. The study was

carried out according to the following procedure: (i)

PHASE 1: START-UP (documentation of study background; review of operating experience in other North American cities and establishing study objectives).

(ii) PHASE 2: REVIEW OF CURRENT SITUATIONS (review of current transit policies; identifying the demographic/traval characteristics of the residents of Riverdale; analysis of supply/ demand of transit service; and review of the Edmonton taxi industry). (iii) PHASE 3: IDENTIFICATION OF OPERATIONAL CONSTRAINTS (contacts with the transit drivers' union; discussions with the taxi industry; and identification of various operating strategies). (iv) PHASE 4: ECONOMIC ANALYSIS (costing of regular bus service and various taxi options). (v)

PHASE 5: RECOMMENDATIONS (selection of the most operationally feasible alternative and submission to City Council).

A comprehensive review of the Edmonton taxicab industry is documented in the Appendix. The review included these aspects of the taxicab industry: the industry structure; supply of service; tariffs; special services; regulations and licensing.


-12— Exhibit 3.1 Study Methodology

PHASE I START UP

INPUT

• BACKGROUND

• CURRENT LITERATURE

• REVIEW OF OPERATING EXPERIENCE

• PREVIOUS SUBMISSIONS TO COUNCIL

• STUDY OBJECTIVES

PHASE 2 CURRENT SITUATION,

INPUT

• TRANSIT POLICIES

• TRANSPORTATION PLAN PART 1 • 1979 CENSUS

• COMMUNITY OF RIVERDALE • SUPPLY AND DEMAND OF

TRANSIT SERVICE

• RIDERSHIP SURVEYS

• EDMONTON TAXI INDUSTRY

• CONTACTS WITH THE TAXI INDUSTRY

PHASE 3 OPERATIONAL CONSTRAINTS

IN PUT

• BUS DRIVER UNION

• CONTACTS WITH LOCAL 569

• LIABILITY

• CONTACTS WITH CURRENT OPERATORS

OPERATING STRATEGIES

PHASE 4 • COST • COST •

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

OF REGULAR OF

TAXI

SERVICE

OPTIONS

SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS

PHASE 5 : RECOMMENDATIONS

PHASE 6 IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAM

PHASE

7: MONITORING PROGRAM

OF SHARED RIDE SYSTEM

INPUT • TAXI

COST ESTIMATES

• 1979 EDMONTON TRANSIT OPERATING COST PROJECTIONS


-13(vi) PHASE 6: IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAM (development of operating policies such as level and hours of service, etc.; development of operating procedure such as dispatch and accounting; tendering; and advertising/promotion campaign). (vii) PHASE 7: MONITORING PROGRAM (ridership surveys; response from taxi companies and residents; and analysis of operating results).


-14CHAPTER 4 OVERVIEW OF CURRENT SHARED-RIDE TAXI SYSTEMS 4.1

Introduction In an attempt to minimize the costs of providing public transportation

services and/or increase service levels, several shared-ride taxi systems have been implemented in a number of North American cities. For example, in El Cajon, California, there is a shared-ride taxicab operation providing city-wide dial-a-ride services. In Peterborough, Ontario and North Battleford, Saskatchewan, shared-ride taxicab services provide a feeder link to line-haul transit. In Los Gatos, California a subsidized taxicab program serves the elderly. In addition, San Diego, California has recently rewritten its taxicab bylaw to allow taxicab participation in sharedride, group ride, jitney and fixed route/fixed schedule services. Other centres with subsidized taxicab programs include Hicksville, New York; Davenport, Iowa; Little Rock, Arkansas; Madison, Wisconsin; Benecia, California; and Arabi, Louisiana. The service characteristics and operating results of these systems are presented in this chapter of the report. The following aspects of the above subsidized taxicab programs are reviewed: (i)

Service characteristics (type of service; ownership; fleet size; vehicle capacity; hours of operations; and average wait time and travel time).

(ii) Population and ridership statistics (population served; area size; population density; daily and annual riderships; and average trip length). (iii) Operating results (daily vehicle-hours and vehicle-miles; travel speed; occupancy rate; vehicle productivity; costs and revenue of operations; and fare structure).

Sources of information: 1."Shared-Ride Taxi Feasibility and Design Study in Bathurst, New Brunswick, A Working Paper", N. D. Lea & Associates Ltd. and Beauchemin-BeatonLapointe Inc., March, 1977. 2."Transit in Battlefords - An Innovative System", Transportation Agency of Saskatchewan, September, 1979.


-154.2

Service Characteristics The service characteristics of most shared-ride taxi operations are that

service is provided on a demand-responsive basis and the taxicab operator is permitted to carry two or more passengers with different origins and/or destinations. Table 4.1 compares the service characteristics of eleven such systems that are currently operating in the United States and Canada. The following is a summary of the comparison:

(1)

Immediate service is provided in most of the centres reviewed with the exception of Peterborough and North Battleford where requests for service must be made one hour in advance of the scheduled departure time of the connecting bus route.

(ii) The shared-ride program in Peterborough, Ontario is the only publicly-owned service in North America. (iii) The number of taxicabs used in providing this type of service is in the range of 5 to 75; about 12 to 20 taxi vehicles are utilized in the Peterborough and North Battleford cases. (iv) Most of the systems provide service in all time periods with the exception of Peterborough and North Battleford which operate respectively from 6:15 A.M. to midnight and from 6:00 A.M. to 7:00 P.M. (v)

Among the systems that release this information, the average wait time for service is 20 minutes or less except Peterborough (30 minutes).

4.3 Population and Ridership Statistics The comparison of population and ridership statistics is contained in Table 4.2. The comparison is briefly discussed as follows: (i)

The range of population served by the eleven systems is between 3,400 (Peterborough) and over 300,000 (Little Rock, Arkansas); in terms of population density, Hicksville and La Mesia have the highest figures of 7,070 and 6,430 residents/sq. mi. among the centres reviewed.

(ii) The shared-ride taxi services in Davenport, Little Rock and Madison attract over 1,400 daily riders; in smaller centres


-16TABLE 4.1 COMPARISON OF NORTH AMERICAN SHARED-RIDE TAXI SYSTEMS - Service Characteristics -

Transit Property

Type of Service SpaceTimeResponsive Responsive

OwnerShip

System Characteristics Hours of Vehicles/ No. of Size of Vehicles 1,000 people Service Vehicles

North Battleford, Saskatchewan

deferred

area wide

private

12

5-pass.

El Cajon, Calif.

illmlediate

area wide

private

14

5-pass.

0.23

Peterborough, Ont.

deferred

limited

public

15-20

5-pass.

Hicksville, N.Y.

immediate

area wide

private

20-40

Davenport, Iowa

immediate

area wide

private

23

Little Rock, Ark.

immediate

area wide

private

Madison, Wis.

immediate

area wide

Benecia, Calif.

immediate

Los Gatos, Calif.

Quality of Service Avg. Travel Avg. Wait Time (Min.) Time (Min.)

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

20

12

5.88

615-2415

30

10

n.a.

0.83

n.a.

9

10

5-pass.

0.23

n.a.

20

11

55-75

5-pass.

0.24

n.a.

8

15

private

30

5-pass.

0.15

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

area wide

private

n.a.

5-pass.

0.21

n.a.

21

n.a.

immediate

area wide

private

n.a.

5-pass.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

La Mesia, Calif.

immediate

area wide

private

5

5-pass.

n.a.

10

n.a.

Arabi, La.

immediate

area wide

private

n.a.

5-pass.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a. 0.11 n.a.

600-1900


-17TABLE 4.2 COMPARISON OF NORTH AMERICAN SHARED-RIDE TAXI SYSTEMS - Population and Ridership Statistics -

Transit Property

Service Area Characteristics Density Area Population (Sq. Mi.) (Pop./Sq. Mi.) Served

North Battleford, Saskatchewan

14,000

n.a.

El Cajon, Calif.

60,500

12.1

3,400

Hicksville, N.Y. Davenport, Iowa

n.a.

Utility of Service Annual Daily Ridership Rides/ Capita

Rides Sq. Mi./ Day

n.a.

Avg. Trip Length (Mi.)

180

n.a.

5,000

600

3.0

49.6

3.6

4.6

740

200

17.7

43.5

2.6

48,100

6.8

7,070

900

5.6

132.4

n.a.

98,500

19.7

5,000

1,430

4.4

72.6

n.a.

Little Rock, Ark.

315,400

150.3

2,090

3,200

3.0

21.2

n.a.

Madison, Wis.

200,000

48.5

4,120

2,500

3.9

51.6

n.a.

8,800

9.0

980

80

2.7

8.9

n.a.

Los Gatos, Calif.

23,740

9.0

2,640

35

0.4

3.9

n.a.

La Mesia, Calif.

45,000

7.0

6,430

200

1.3

28.6

n.a.

Arabi, La.

20,500

4.0

5,130

21

0.3

5.8

n.a.

Peterborough, Ont.

Benecia, Calif.

n.a.


-18such as Benecia and Peterborough, the daily patronage is less than 200. (iii) On a per capita basis, Peterborough is the most successful system with 17.7 annual rides; the other systems generate fewer than 6 annual rides per capita. 4.4

Operating Results Table 4.3 identifies the operating results of the various shared-ride

taxi services. A summary of the comparison is presented as follows: (i)

In terms of productivity, the El Cajon, Davenport and Madison systems carry over 4 passengers for each vehicle-hour operated; in comparison, the service in Peterborough attracts less than 1 patron per vehicle-hour.

(ii) From available data, the costs of providing a shared-ride taxi service are in the range of $3.65 per vehicle-hour in Little Rock to $7.30 per vehicle-hour in Peterborough; the costs per passenger are between $0.99 in Peterborough and $1.35 in Little Rock and Madison. (iii) Most systems charge a base fare of $0.35 to $1.00 plus an incremental fare dependent on the distance travelled. 4.5

Potential Benefits and Problems From the literature review and discussions with operators of existing

shared-ride taxi systems, a number of potential benefits and problems associated with this type of service have been identified. Included as potential benefits are: (i)

greater vehicle efficiency and labor productivity.

(ii) reduced or deferred capital budget requirements. (iii) low operating costs. (iv) higher levels of service to transit patrons. There are a variety of factors that could restrict the implementation of a shared-ride taxi service. The factors include: (i)

bylaw regulations restricting taxicab services to specific operational criteria.


-19TABLE 4.3 COMPARISON OF NORTH AMERICAN SHARED-RIDE TAXI SYSTEMS - Operating Results -

Transit Property

Efficiency of Service Hr./Day Mi./Day /Veh. /Veh.

Avg. Speed (mph)

Pass/ Veh-Hr.

Costs of Service Costs/ Costs/ Veh-Hr. Veh-Mi.

Costs/ Pass.

Revenue/ Pass.

Deficit/ Pass.

Base Fare

Cot Revenue Ratio

1.8

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

$1.21

$0.75

$0.47

$0.75

1.6

$0.90 -0.61 •

$0.50

3.4

0.35

3.1

Avg. Occupancy

North Battleford, Saskatchewan

n.a.

n.a.

El Cajon, Calif.

115

8.7

13.1

2.0

4.9

$6.28

$0.48

$1.28

$0.38

Peterborough, Ont.

186

18.6

10.0

2.1

0.7

7.30

0.73

0.90

0.29

Hicksville, N.Y.

153

13.9

11.0

n.a.

3.0

3.70

0.34

1.23

1.79

0.56

Davenport, Iowa

195

18.7

10.4

n.a.

4.5

4.97

0.48

0.99

1.03

0.04

Little Rock, Ark.

150

16.0

9.4

2.2

2.7

3.65

0.39

1.35

n.a.

Madison, Wis.

192

19.2

10.0

n.a.

4.3

5.59

0.56

1.35

Benecia, Calif.

n.a.

14

n.a.

n.a.

2.9

n.a.

n.a.

Los Gatos, Calif.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

La Mesia, Calif.

n.a.

16

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

Arabi, La.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

1.00 + 0.7 .50/mi. 0.75 + .25/zone

1.0

n.a.

0.65 + .35/zone

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

0.65 + .15/zone

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

0.50 n.a.

n.a. n.a.


-20-

(ii) the potential resistance of transit labour to integrated taxi-transit services. (iii) a resistance by the taxi industry to participation in group or shared-ride services. (iv) a diversion of a substantial number of passengers from exclusive ride service, resulting in reduced overall revenues for the taxicab operator. (v)

the ability of taxicab operators to satisfy service supply requirements and to handle the more complex dispatch functions of many-to-many shared-ride services.

(vi) potential problems related to fare collection, revenue/cost accountability, contract administration and the monitoring of service quality.


-21CHAPTER 5 THE COMMUNITY OF RIVERDALE 5.1

Introduction The community of Riverdale is situated in the city river valley south of

Rowland Road. According to the 1978 Census, Riverdale has a population of 921 people residing in approximately 400 dwelling units. At present, the community is provided with a 30-minute bus service from 6:00 A.M. to midnight seven days a week. The current daily ridership before 6:00 P.M. is about 320 trips to/from Riverdale. After 6:00 P.M. the community generates about 4 transit patrons per hour. The centre of the comauunity is about 1 mile to a major crosstown bus route and 2 to 2.5 miles to the City Centre. The study area, population statistics, and supply/demand of transit services are further discussed in the following sections. 5.2

Study Area The study area is bounded by Rowland Road to the north, 95 Street to the

west, and the North Saskatchewan River to the south and east. Exhibit 5.1 identifies the exact boundary of the study area. 5.3

Population Statistics Population statistics were extracted from the 1978 Census to identify the

demographic distribution of the community. This information provided an indication as to the degree of transit dependency of the residents of Riverdale. In 1978, the community had a population of 921 of which 427 were female residents. The population break down by age group was: 18% were 15 and under; 71% were between 16 and 65; 11% were 66 and over. In terms of occupation, the 1978 Census revealed that about half of the residents were employed either on a full-time or part-time basis and the rest of the population consisted of pre-schoolers, students, homemakers, unemployed and retired residents. Table 5.1 presents in more detail the above information. 5.4

Current Transit Service Riverdale is served by a 30-minute bus service in all time periods. The

current service is provided by the following bus routes:


To Forrest Heights Bonnie Doon University

Exhibit 5.1

Study Area

STUDY AREA

TRANSIT ZONES


-23TABLE 5.1 THE COMMUNITY OF RIVERDALE POPULATION STATISTICS BY SEX, AGE GROUP AND OCCUPATION

Population Break Down By Age Group 15 and under

16 to 65

No. of Residents

% of Total

No. of Residents

Male

83

17%

Female

82

Total

165

Sex

66 and over

Total

% of Total

No. of Residents

% of Total

No. of Residents

% of Total

362

73%

49

10%

494

100%

19%

293

69%

52

12%

427

100%

18%

655

71%

101

11%

921

100%

Population Break Down By Occupation PartFull-Time Time Em- Employees ployees

Unem loyed

Retired

Total

Sex

PreSchoolers

Students

HomeMakers

Male

38

69

2

3

295

35

52

494

Female

36

83

125

19

126

14

24

427

Total

74

152

127

22

421

49

76

921


-24(i)

Route 56 - 6:30 A.M. to 6:30 P.M., Monday to Saturday.

(ii) Route 63 - 6:30 P.M. to midnight, Monday to Saturday; and 6:30 A.M. to midnight, Sundays and Holidays. 5.5

Current Demand of Transit Service As discussed in Chapter 3 of this report, a special shuttle bus route

connecting Downtown and Riverdale was implemented on 1978 11 19. During the three months of operation of this service, extensive ridership counts were conducted. The counts indicated that the average weekday (Monday to Saturday) ridership from 6:30 P.M. to midnight was 36 trips to and from the community; and on Sundays and holidays, the service was used by an average of 56 transit patrons. Table 5.2 presents the half-hourly ridership profiles for weekday nights, and Sundays/Holidays. The same information is presented graphically in Exhibit 5.2.


-25TABLE 5.2 HALF-HOURLY TRANSIT RIDERSHIP PROFILE TO/FROM RIVERDALE

Half Hour Beginning

8 - 830 830 - 9 9 - 930 930 - 10 10- 1030 1030 - 11 11 - 1130 1130 - 12 12 - 1230 1230 - 13 13 - 1330 1330 - 14 14 - 1430 1430 - 15 15 - 1530 1530 - 16 16 - 1630 1630 - 17 17 - 1730 1730 - 18 18- 1830 1830 - 19 19 - 1930 1930 - 20 20 - 2030 2030 - 21 21 - 2130 2130 - 22 22 - 2230 2230 - 23 23 - 2330 2330 - 24 24 - 2430

Total

Monday to Saturday

Sundays and Holidays

to from River- Riverdale dale

to from River- Riverdale dale

total

2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 0

3 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 0

5 5 4 4 4 4 2 2 2 2 2 0

0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0

17

19

36

27

total

0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0

0 0 1 2 2 2 0 2 3 2 3 3 2 2 3 3 2 3 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 3 2 1 0

29

56


-

-

-

-


Exhibit

5.2

Half -Hourly Transit Ridership Profile To /From Riverdale

10 —

I'

MONDAY TO SATURDAY

I

1

I

`, / 1

1

'5, ••

1/

LU

•-

5

AVERAGE PASSENGER VOLUME --•

• 1

/ I

1 1

I / I / II

KEY :

I

1

It

I I /

1 1

1 i---1\ I 1 \\ 11 1

'4

-• MAXIMUM OBSERVED PASSENGER VOLUME

I / I / 1/ I/ •

A

x

/ 1 ‘/

U—

111111I

9

8

10

11

II

12

II

13

II

14

II

II

16

15

II

17

18

I

til

19

20

II

21

II

22

23

SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS i i

/

A

/ /\ / / \ / \ / / I /

/

• /

/

. .

I I

x I

\ lks

/'

\

X 1 I 1 / \I

/

11. I • / .4.

II X

/

/ ‘,

A II

x

I /

fl, / \

N

/ )k

/

• \

/ \ ,

/ik s / ,

\

/

i

s• \

• /

\

; )111 / I / I

\ •

,,./ ••

11 .,

\

/

I

/

I

I Ts / •

I t

'S.,

\ / .‘ /

/ •

24

\

/

X

4 1 1 1 1

x

I

\

/ 16,

\

I , I , •

1 X

fr— — 4

, . / v

_

I 8

10

11

12

I

1 13

I

I 14

I

I

I

15

16

'

I 17

TIME OF DAY

I

I

I

I

I

18

19

20

21

22

23

24


-27CHAPTER 6 DEVELOPMENT OF SHARED-RIDE TAXI ALTERNATIVES 6.1

Introduction As indicated in Chapter 3 of this report, the main objective of this

study is to investigate the feasibility of utilizing the taxi industry in low demand periods as a measure to decrease transit operating costs. To examine the economic implications of introducing some form of subsidized shared-ride taxi service (as applied to the case of Riverdale), four basic operating alternatives were identified. The basic alternatives reflected different rates of compensations to the taxicab operator for providing the service. Under each principle alternative, a set of sub-alternatives were generated. The sub-alternatives represented variations in the following operating parameters: type and level of service; hours of operations; service coverage; dispatch function; and transfer location. A preliminary analysis of the subalternatives were carried out. Based on the findings of the initial examination, several more feasible alternatives were selected for detailed evaluation. 6.2

Basic Shared-Ride Taxi Alternatives Through discussions among the study group members, four basic alter-

natives of taxi rates were identified. (i)

Current taxi tariff ($1.20 for the first 1/8 mile and $0.10 for each additional 1/8 mile).

(ii) Fixed hourly rate ($14.00/hour ). (iii) Fixed hourly rate plus fixed fare per passenger ($6.00/hour + $1.00/passenger). (iv) Fixed fare per passenger ($1.50 - $2.50/passenger). 6.3

Generation of Sub-Alternatives In the case of Riverdale, a shared-ride taxi service would function as a

feeder service to connect residents of the community to the regular bus route

A survey was conducted in an attempt to determine what would be an acceptable hourly rate of revenue to the taxicab operator. The lowest estimate received was $14.00/hour.


-28system or directly to Downtown. The exact mechanism of such an operation would depend on a number of operating variables such as: (i)

Type of service (fixed route service; or variable routings).

(ii) Level of service (fixed schedule; or fully demand-responsive service). (iii) Hours of operations (current hours of service, i.e. up to midnight; or service terminated at 11:00 P.M. to further reduce operating deficits). (iv) Service coverage (service provided to all residents of the community; or only to those outside of the City's walking distance policy of 1,300 feet). (v)

Dispatch function (handled by transit staff; or by taxicab dispatchers).

(vi) Transfer locations (transfers to the regular bus route to take place at Rowland Road/89 Street; Jasper Avenue/95 Street; or Downtown. Considering the above parameters, a number of sub-alternatives were then specified for each of the four basic taxi fare alternatives. Under each basic alternative, 32 sub-alternatives were generated. In total, 128 sub-alternatives were examined. Exhibit 6.1 identifies the various combinations of parameters. A preliminary analysis was then carried out to estimate the costs of providing the various shared-ride taxi alternatives. In addition to this analysis, the general applicabilities of the system parameters outlined above were also assessed. The conclusions of the preliminary analysis are discussed in the following sections. 6.4

Taxi Fares In evaluating the four basic taxi fare alternatives, the options of com-

pensating the taxicab operator based on the current taxicab tariffs and based on a flat hourly rate were favoured because of lower total and unit operating costs. The other two alternatives (i.e. fixed hourly rate plus per passenger costs and per passenger rate only) were eliminated from further examination because of the complexities of the accounting procedures involved and the potential for fraud.


-29EXHIBIT 6.1 GENERATION OF SHARED-RIDE TAXI SUB-ALTERNATIVES *

SubAlternative

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32

Type of Service Fixed Route

Schedule

Van. Route

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

Fixed

Van.

To Mid- To Night 11 PM

X X X X

X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X

Limited

Dispatch Fucntion

X X X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X X X

X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X X X

X X

X X

X X X X

X X

X X

X X

X X X X

X X

X X

X X X X

Transfer Location **

By (Jasper Ave.! Whole By Area Taxi Tran 95 St.) -sit

X X

X X X X

X X X X X X X X

Service Coverage

X X

X X X X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

Hours of Operation

X X

X X X X

X X

X X

The 32 sub-alternatives applied to all four of the basic alternatives. The transfer locations at Downtown and Rowland Road/89 Street were not practical and were eliminated.

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X


- 30 6.5

Types and Levels of Services In terms of types and levels of services provided, a range of operation

strategies was chosen for detailed analysis: (i)

fixed schedule and fixed route.

(ii)

fixed schedule and variable route.

(iii) fully demand-responsive service, i.e. variable schedule and variable route. Under a fixed schedule type of operation, service would be provided at 30-minute intervals from the community and from a transfer location; for connections to the regular bus system with a variable schedule operation, service would be provided when there is a demand for it. Fixed route refers to the type of service whereby the current bus routing in the neighborhood is followed and regular transit zones are used for passenger pick-ups and drop-offs; door-step service is provided under a variable route system. 6.6

Hours of Operation To determine the hours of operations, the ridership data was consulted.

The survey results indicated that the transit patronage to/from Riverdale was extremely low after 11:00 P.M. (average of 2 to 4 passengers per hour). For this reason, the study group decided that the service should be terminated at 11:00 P.M. to reduce operating costs and maximize service productivity, yet still remain within City Policy for provision of service. 6.7

Service Coverage Two service coverage alternatives were considered in the preliminary

analysis, i.e. service provided only to those residents living beyond the City walking distance guidelines and to the whole community. The latter option was selected for inclusion in the detailed analysis phase of the study because of: (i)

difficulty in clearly defining the boundary of service.

(ii)

expected protests from those residents who are denied the service.

6.8

Dispatch Function Thd dispatcher is an important link in a shared-ride taxi system.

A number of dispatch procedures were reviewed and it was decided that in order to ensure efficient operations and to maintain accurate accounting


-- 31records, the,dispatch function must be carried out by both Ednonton Transit* and the taxidab company. 6.9

Transfer Location Among the three transfer locations examined, it was apparent that

the intersection of Jasper Avenue/95 Street would be the most logical choice because of the frequent bus service on Jasper Avenue and the relatively short distant to the community. To minimize the potential for fraud, it has been established that cash and transfers would not be exchanged between the patrons and taxicab operators. Consequently, if transfers to the regular bus route system are to be accommodated in the downtown area, a lot of patrons are expected to take advantage of this service and obtain "free" ride to Downtown. Furthermore, extending the service to the city centre would increase operating costs substantially. Establishing the transfer point at Rowland Road/89 Street would be the least attractive alternative in terns of maintaining efficient connectivity with the regular bus system. 6.10

Short Listing Based on the findings of the preliminary analysis, the 128 sub-alter-

natives were narrowed down to a short list of 5 alternatives: Alternative 1: Current taxicab tariffs with three variations in type and level of services, i.e. fixed schedule/fixed route; fixed schedule/variable route; and variable schedule/ variable route. Alternative 2: Flat hourly rate of $14.00/hour with the same variations as identified in Alternative 1. For comparison purposes, 3 other alternatives involving the provision of service by Edmonton Transit were also included in the detailed economic analysis.

The transit information clerks could be utilized to receive requests for service from the users.


-32Alternative 3: 8-passenger van vehicles operated by Edmonton Transit with the same variations as identified in Alternative 1. Alternative 4: 5-passenger leased vehicles operated by Edmonton Transit with the same variations as identified in Alternative 1. Alternative 5: The existing regular bus route, i.e. Route 63 at nights, Sundays and Holidays.


-33CHAPTER 7 ECONOMIC ANALYSIS 7.1

Introduction The previous section identified different combinations of operating

strategies for the implementation of a subsidized taxi service in Riverdale. The initial evaluation of the operating strategies resulted in the selections of five alternatives for more detailed examination. This chapter presents the procedures according to which the operating costs of the various alternatives were identified. The findings of the economic analysis, as well as the costing criteria and assumptions are also documented. 7.2

Costing Methodology The methodology used in arriving at the operating costs for the different

alternatives is outlined as follows: (i)

Establish costing criteria and assumptions such as: demand estimates; vehicle capacities; situations of overloads; taxi fares; and marginal transit operating costs.

(ii) Simulate the operations of the five alternatives by applying the costing criteria and assumptions established in (i). (iii) Identify the time and distance of operations on a daily and annual basis; and identify the daily and annual vehicle trips made in providing the service. (iv) Compute the annual costs of operations. (v)

Compute the performance indicators such as: cost/passenger; occupancy rate; revenue/cost; etc.

7.3

Definitions of Economic Terms In reviewing the results of the economic analysis in the following

sections, a number of economic terms are used. These terms are defined as follows: (i)

interest rate - this is the ratio between the interest chargeable or payable at the end of a period of time and the money owed at the beginning of that period.


-34(ii) Economic life - this is the "functional" time of a certain investment; at the end of this time period it is assumed that there will be no salvage value. (iii) annual cost - this can be interpreted as the equivalent uniform net disbursements at 12-month intervals. (iv) Capital Recovery Factor - this is used in converting a capital charge to an annual cost based on certain assumptions of economic life and interest rate. (v)

fixed costs - as applied to the transit industry, these are the costs that are independent of the extent of services provided.

(vi) marginal costs - these are the costs that are dependent on the extent of services provided. 7.4

Costing Criteria and Assumptions The criteria and assumptions used in generating the operating costs and

various performance indicators for each of the five scenarios are identified as follows: (i)

Service characteristics. Service is provided at least once every 30 minutes from Riverdale and Jasper Avenue/95 Street; service is available to all residents of the community between the hours of 6:30 P.M. to 11:00 P.M. on week nights, and 8:00 A.M. to 11:00 P.M. all-day Sundays and Holidays.

(ii) Demand estimates. To estimate the expected demand of a subsidized taxi service in Riverdale, the current transit trips and population statistics were used to generate a set of "trip-rate" factors for weekday nights and all-day Sundays/ Holidays. These factors were then applied to the total population of the community to determine the taxi riderships. The demand estimates are summarized below: trips/capita

daily taxi ridership

weekday 0.0664 (6:30 P.M. - 11:00 P.M.)

52

Sundays & Holidays 0.1033 (8:00 A.M. - 11:00 P.M.)

91


-35(ill) Probabilities of overloads. The estimated ridership data was used to determine the probabilities of overloads under a basic service frequency of 30 minutes. These probabilities are: weekdays (6:30 P.M. 11:00 P.M.)

Sundays & Holidays (8:00 A.M. 11:00 P.M.)

taxi (5-passengers): fixed route variable route

4.3% 10.2%

0.4% 3.8%

0.7% 2.3%

0.1% 0.6%

van (8-passengers): fixed route variable route

The above probabilities were then applied to the basic schedule to generate the hours and mileages of operations for each of the five alternatives. (iv) Taxi fares . The following assumptions were used in estimating the taxi fares: mileage (1-way)

(v)

taxi fare

fixed schedule/ fixed route

1.25 miles

$2.20

fixed schedule/ variable route

2.25 miles

$3.00

variable schedule/ variable route

2.25 miles

$3.00

Marginal transit operating costs. The 1979 marginal transit operating costs, based on the current Edmonton Transit Budget Statements, were used in the analysis. These costs are: ** time-related costs = $12.71/hour; and distance-related *** = $0.482/mile. These rates were used in estimating costs the operating costs of the current regular bus service and the "modified van" and "leased-car" options.

The taxi fare assumptions applied to Alternative 1 only, i.e. meter rate based on the existing taxicab tariffs. **

Include costs of transit operators and dispatch.

***

Include tire contract, fuel and power, accident repair, maintenance and garage servicing.


-36(vi) Annual expansion formula. The following formula was used in expanding the average weekday, Sunday and Holiday data to an annual base: (weekday data x 302) + (Sun./Hol. data x 63) = (Annual data). 7.5

Estimates of Hours and Mileages of Operations Using the service criteria and assumptions identified in the previous

section, the annual hours and mileages of operations for the five alternatives were computed. This information is presented in Table 7.1. The service hours and mileages were used to generate the various marginal operating costs. 7.6

Comparison of Annual Operating Costs Table 7.2 summarizes the annual operating costs by alternative and by

type of service provided. Among the taxi alternatives (i.e. alternatives 1 and 2), the least costly option would be to provide a fixed schedule/fixed route service and to compensate the taxicab company based on the current tariffs (total annual costs = $30,603). A similar type of service under Alternative 2 (flat hourly rate) would cost $37,452 over a 12-month period. Providing a fully demand-responsive type of service under both subsidized taxi options would cost over $50,000 annually. The alternative of Edmonton Transit supplying this service by using 8passenger modified van vehicles would cost between $57,081 (fixed schedule/ fixed route) to $65,470 (variable schedule/variable route) per annum. The alternative of utilizing leased cars with a seating capacity of 5 passengers was also costed out. The annual operating costs for this option would be in the range of $42,000 to over $50,000. The costs of operating the existing regular bus service at nights, Sundays and Holidays were estimated at over $56,000 per annum. 7.7

Comparison of Unit Operating Costs Table 7.3 compares the unit costs of service between the alternative

operating strategies. The unit costs compared were: costs/passenger; net costs or deficit/passenger; costs/vehicle-mile; and costs/vehicle hour. In terms of costs/passenger, Alternative 1 and 2 (i.e. the two taxi options) would cost between $1.83 to $2.60 for each patron carried depending on the type of service provided. Under Alternatives 3 and 4 (i.e. service


-37TABLE 7.1 SUMMARY OF HOURS AND MILEAGES OF OPERATIONS

Alternative*

Service Variation Schedule Route

Total Weekdays (6:30 P.M.-11:00 P.M.) No. of Hours Mileage Veh. Trips

Total Sun. & Hol. (8:00 A.M.-11:00 P.M.) No. of Hours Mileage Veh. Trips

1

Fixed Fixed Variable

Fixed Variable Variable

5,670 5,990 8,154

3,795 3,924 4,725

/ / /

4,744 8,829 10,631

9,465 9,914 12,879

/ / /

2

Fixed Fixed Variable

Fixed Variable Variable

/ / /

1,418 1,498 2,039

/ / /

/ / /

949 981 1,181

/ / /

/ / /

2,367 2,479 3,220

3

Fixed Fixed Variable

Fixed Variable Variable

5,474 5,561 8,154

1,359 1,359 1,359

6,843 12,512 18,347

3,784 3,803 4,725

945 945 945

4,730 8,557 10,631

9,258 9,364 12,897

2,547 2,547 2,547

14,122 23,386 31,533

4

Fixed Fixed Variable

Fixed Variable Variable

5,670 5,990 8,154

1,359 1,359 1,359

7,088 13,478 18,347

3,795 3,924 4,725

1,359 1,359 945

4,744 8,829 10,631

9,465 9,914 12,849

2,547 2,547 2,547

14,386 24,862 31,533

Fixed

Fixed

/

1,993

24,643

/

863

16,550

/

2,856

41,193

5**

*Alternative Alternative Alternative Alternative Alternative

1: 2: 3: 4: 5:

/ / /

7,088 13,478 18,347 '

Annual Total (includes deadhead time and distance) No. of Hours Mileagek Veh. Trips

Meter rate based on current taxicab tariffs. Flat hourly rate of $14.00/hour. 8-passenger van vehicles operated by Edmonton Transit. 5-passenger leased vehicles operated by Edmonton Transit. Regular Edmonton Transit bus service.

** The hours and mileages for the regular bus route was calculated by subtracting the hours and mileages operated by the Route 63 at nights, Sundays and Holidays during the July 1978 sign-up from the current sign-up. Service to Riverdale was discontinued during the July 1978 sign-up period.

11,832 22,307 28,978 / / /


-38TABLE 7.2 SUMMARY OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS - COMPARISON OF ANNUAL OPERATING COSTS (1979 dollars)

Annual Costs By Type Of Service Provided Alternative

Cost Item

Fixed Schedule/ Fixed Route

Fixed Schedule/ Variable Route

Variable Schedule/ Variable Route

1: (current taxitariffs)

taxi mileage costs adm, monitoring (10% of above) public information acct, audit *

$ 20,823

$ 29,742

$ 38,637

2,082 1,000 6,698

2,974 1,000 6,698

3,864 1,000 6,698

TOTAL

$ 30,603

$ 40,414

$ 50,199

taxi hourly costs adm, monitoring (10% of above) public infoLuation

$ 33,138

$ 34,706

$ 45,080

3,314 1,000

3,471 1,000

4,508 1,000

TOTAL

$ 37,452

$ 39,177

$ 50,588

veh. costs ** radio *** time-related costs dist-related costs public information

$ 16,084 814 32,373 6,810 1,000

$ 16,084 814 32,373 11,387 1,000

$ 16,084 814 32,373 15,199 1,000

TOTAL

$ 57,081

$ 61,658

$ 65,470

veh. costs ($95/month) $ 2,280 radio *** 814 mileage costs (21o/mi.) 3,021 fuel costs **** 959 time-related costs 32,373 maintenance (10o/mi.) 1,439 public information 1,000

$

$

TOTAL

$ 41,886

$ 45,832

$ 48,428

time-related costs dist-related costs

$ 36,300 19,855

/ /

/ /

TOTAL

$ 56,155

/

/

2: (fixed hourly rate)

3: (vans operated by Transit)

4: (leased cars operated by Transit)

5: (regular bus route)

2,280 814 5,221 1,658 32,373 2,486 1,000

1/2 of an Accounting Assistant's time (annual salary = $13,395) 2 vehicles @ $20,000 each; amortized over 3 years at 10% per annum 2 radios @ $2,500 each; amortized over 10 years at 10% per annum assumption: 12 mi./gallon @ $0.80/gallon

2,280 814 6,622 2,102 32,373 3,237 1,000


-39TABLE 7.3 SUMMARY OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS - COMPARISON OF UNIT OPERATING COSTS (1979 dollars)

Unit Costs By Type Of Service Provided Alternative

Unit Cost

Fixed Schedule/ Fixed Route

Fixed Schedule/ Variable Route

Variable Schedule/ Variable Route

1: (current taxi tariffs)

annual costs total costs/pass deficit/passenger* costs/veh-mile costs/veh-hour

$ 30,603 $2.13 1.73 2.59 /

$ 40,414 $1.89 1.49 1.81 /

$ 50,199 2.34 1.94 1.73 /

2: (fixed hourly rate)

annual costs total costs/pass deficit/passenger* costs/veh-mile costs/veh-hour

$ 37,452 $2.60 2.20 / 15.82

$ 39,177 1.83 1.43 / 15.80

$ 50,588 $2.36 1.96 / 15.71

3: (vans operated by Transit)

annual costs total costs/pass deficit/passenger* costs/veh-mile costs/veh-hour **

$ 57,081 $3.96 3.54 4.04 24.77

$ 61,658 $2.88 2.48 2.64 26.76

$ 65,470 $3.05 2.65 2.08 28.42

4: (leased cars operat2d by Transit)

annual costs total costs/pass deficit/passenger* costs/veh-mile costs/veh-hour **

$ 41,886 $2.91 2.51 2.91 18.18

$ 45,832 $2.14 1.74 1.84 19.89

$ 48,428 $2.26 1.86 1.54 21.02

5: (regular bus route)

annual costs total costs/pass deficit/passenger* costs/veh-mile costs/veh-hour

$ 56,155 $3.90 3.50 1.36 19.66

* Assumed a 40% and 60% split between children and adult fares. k* Not including "deadhead" travel time.

/ / / / /

/ / / / /


-40provided by Transit using 8 or 5-passenger vehicles), unit operating costs of up to $3.96/passenger are expected. The current regular bus route costs close to $4.00/ride. On a costs/vehicle-hour basis, Alternative 2 would be the most cost efficient option (under $16.00/vehicle-hour) compared to the other alternatives (from $18.00 to over $28.00/vehicle-hour). The existing regular bus service costs $19.66 for every hour operated.


-41CHAPTER 8 EVALUATING THE ALTERNATIVES 8.1

Introduction The initial objective of this study is to evaluate a number of subsidized

taxicab options relative to the regular bus service provided in Riverdale. This chapter outlines the criteria used in the evaluation process and selects the most appropriate alternative based on the results of the evaluation exercise. 8.2

The Evaluation Factors Specific factors are required to serve as a means by which the various

alternative operating strategies can be compared. Six such factors were used in the evaluation procedure. The following paragraphs describe these factors and how they were measured: (i)

Lowering the total costs of service. The costs of providing the current regular bus service was used as a basis of comparison in identifying the relative attractiveness of the five alternatives.

(ii) Lowering the costs/passenger ratio. This evaluation criterion was used to identify the impact of the alternatives on the actual costs of providing the service on a per passenger basis. (iii) Simplicity of operation. The operational constraints associated with each alternative were examined and compared. (iv) Meeting demand of community. An alternative form of public transportation service replacing the existing regular bus route in Riverdale must be able to meet at least the current travel demand of transit users in the community. This aspect was considered in the evaluation process. (v)

Ease of monitoring service quality. The selected alternative will be monitored to ensure some standards of service quality in terms of wait time and service reliability. The ease of monitoring the service was compared between the five alternatives.


-42(vi)

Ease of accounting/audit control. To minimize the potential for fraud, the selected alternative should not involve complex accounting and audit control procedures. This factor was included in the evaluation procedure.

8.3

Results of the Evaluation Process Exhibit 8.1 summarizes the findings of the evaluation process. Under the criteria that describe costs of service (i.e. total costs and

costs/passenger), the two taxi options in general received higher ratings than the other alternatives. Specifically, the alternative of a fixed schedule/ fixed route type of service (either based on the current tariffs or on a flat hourly rate) would decrease the operating costs substantially. In terms of simplicity of operation, the option of a fixed schedule/fixed route system was rated over the other alternatives as this type of service is similar to the regular bus service and would not require dispatching functions and other special arrangements to process requests of service. All the alternatives examined are expected to be able to meet the current demand of travel of the community. The monitoring requirements would increase as more complex types of services are provided. The fixed schedule/fixed route alternative was therefore ranked higher than the fixed schedule/variable route and fully demandresponsive options. Under the criterion of ease of accounting/audit control requirements, Altervative 1 (i.e. current taxicab tariffs) received the lowest rating as the meter charges must be recorded for each trip made and verified. 8.4

The Selected Alternative Based on the results of the analysis and evaluation of the various

operating strategies, the flat hourly rate taxi alternative, operated on a fixed schedule/fixed route basis, was selected to replace the existing regular bus service in Riverdale. The reasons for this selection are: (1)

The recommended service would decrease the annual operating costs by close to $20,000; and lower the costs per passenger figure from $3.90 to $2.60.


-43 EXHIBIT 8.1 RESULTS OF THE EVALUATION PROCESS

Service Variation Alternative Schedule

1:

2:

(current taxicab tariffs)

(fixed hourly rate)

3: (vans operated by Transit)

4:

(leased cars operated by Transit)

high

Lowering Total Costs of Service

Lower Costs/ Passenget

fixed fixed variable

fixed variable variable

40

fixed fixed variable

fixed variable variable

40 40 5

MW

fixed fixed variable

fixed variable variable

() ()

()

fixed fixed variable

fixed variable variable

MC

fixed

fixed

5: (regular bus route)

Rating:

Route

Evaluation Factor

0

moderate

5

60 40

5 10

41 MC

0

low 0

Ease 'of Accounting Audit Control

C)

C)

41 0 C)

4, 41 4,

41 10 ()

40

41

41 41 0

41

41

40

40

C) 0 41

()

Ease of Monitoring Service Quality

40 50 0

MC MW 50

Meeting Demand of Community

40 40

IC MC

MC

60 0

5

0 MC

Simplicity of Operation

41

MC 0

C)., U

40 1,

MC

40

41

10

C)

() ()

IP 41 40 40 40 40 40


-44(ii) The selected service is capable of meeting the current demand of public transit in the community and would not require complicated operating procedures in terms of service requests and vehicle dispatch functions. (iii) The monitoring, accounting and audit control requirements associated with the selected service are the least demanding among the alternatives examined.


-45CHAPTER 9 RECOMMENDED PLAN 9.1

Recommendations Based on the findings of this study, it is recommended that: (i)

The current regular bus service at nights, Sundays and Holidays in the Community of Riverdale be replaced by a fixed schedule/fixed route type of subsidized taxicab service; and the service be provided, through normal City tendering process, by one of the taxicab companies in the City of Edmonton at a rate of payment of not exceeding $15.00/hour.

(ii) The proposed subsidized taxicab service be implemented on a trial basis for a period of one year; and the service be monitored and evaluated over the course of the test period. The recommended subsidized taxicab program represents a less costly alternative of providing transit service to the residents of Riverdale compared to the existing regular bus route at night, Sundays and Holidays. However, it is noted if the current regular bus service is discontinued and an alternative form of public transportation is not substituted, an annual operating cost savings of over $56,000 could be realized. Under the "donothing" option, bus service at nights, Sundays and Holidays would still be available at Rowland Road/89 Street and about half of the population (500 people) of the community would be beyond 1,300 feet (current City walking distance policy) of a transit zone. It is further noted that the above recommendations are made specifically for the Riverdale case. The general applicability of shared-ride taxi on a city-wide basis has not been determined. Details of the service characteristics of the recommended service are presented in the following sections. 9.2

Service Coverage The service will be available to all the residents of or patrons destined

to the community within the boundary of 95 Street, Rowland Road, and the North Saskatchewan River.


-469.3

Hours of Operations The service will be provided in these time periods:

9.4

(I)

Monday to Saturday - 6:30 P.M. to 11:00 P.M.

(ii)

Sundays and Holidays - 8:00 A.M. to 11:00 P.M.

Method of Operations The taxicab operator will follow the routings of the existing regular bus

service. Transit patrons will be picked up at regular transit zones in the Riverdale area and driven to the intersection of Jasper Avenue/95 Street for transfer connections to the regular bus system. In the home-bound direction of travel, patrons will be picked up at Jasper Avenue/95 Street and dropped off at the nearest transit zone to their residence. 9.5

Fare and Method of Payment No fares or transfers are required for the "taxi" portion of the trip.

Current Edmonton Transit fares will be charged on the regular bus route system from or to which the patron transfers.


-47CHAPTER 10 IMPLEMENTATION AND MONITORING PROGRAMS 10.1

Introduction A program was developed for the implementation of the proposed subsidized

taxi service. The implementation program includes these activities: approval process; fine-tuning of system design; legal procedure including amendment to existing bylaws if necessary; preparation of contract forms; tendering process; review of tenders and award of contract; insurance and licensing arrangements; liaison with the selected taxicab company; schedule design; and an advertising/ promotional campaign. Exhibit 10.1 outlines the implementation timing. 10.2

Approval Process Upon review by members of the study group, the final report together with

a set of specific recommendations pertaining to the provision of public transportation service in the Riverdale area by a shared-ride taxi service will be submitted to the following Civic authorities for approval and/or information: (i)

Utilities and Engineering Committee

(ii) City Council 10.3

Fine-Tuning of System Design The service characteristics as described in the previous chapter will be

reviewed. A detailed system design of the proposed service will be developed. Criteria/standards of the following components of the proposed service will be identified in the system: (i)

Type and level of service.

(ii) Service coverage. (iii) Hours of operations. (iv) Operational procedure. (v) 10.4

Fare and method of payment.

Legal Aspects The existing taxi-bylaws will be reviewed and amended if necessary to

legalize the implementation of a shared-ride taxi service in Riverdale.


-48— Exhibit 10.1 Implementation Program

NUMBER OF MONTHS BEFORE IMPLEMENTATION DATE

ACTIVITY

6

1. Approval Process

2.

Fine-tuning of svt_(...m design

3.

Legal procedure (amendment to exist ing. bykikv) "

4.

Preparation of contract forms

5.

Tendering process

6.

Review of tenders and award of " contract.

7.

insurance, licensing arrangements

.8.

Liaison with the selected taxicab company

9.

Schedule design

10. Advertising/Promotion campaign

11.

Implementation

ainin

5

4

3

I

2

iMi

11111=1101•111

111111111•111=M 111111111111M111111111111111111MS

MOM

BRIMNIIMIMMO OMM*


-4910.5

Contract Preparation and Tendering Process Thist phase of the implementation program involves the following activities: (i)

Preparation of contract forms.

(ii) Calling for tenders. (iii) Review of tenders. (iv) Award of contract. The above process is expected to take about six weeks. 10.6

Insurance and Licensing Requirements The insurance and licensing requirements will be determined at approxi-

mately two months prior to the implementation date. 10.7

Liaison with the Selected Taxicab Company Upon the award of contract, close liaison between the Transit Department

and the successful tender will be maintained to review the operational details. 10.8

Scheduling A schedule of service will be identified to ensure efficient transfer

connections between the proposed subsidized taxi service and the regular bus route system. 10.9

Advertising/Promotion Campaign During the last month before the actual implementation date, information

pamphlets will be distributed and the service will be advertised in the news media to familiarize the public with the operations of the service. 10.10 Monitoring Program Over the course of the proposed six-month trial period, the following aspects of the service will be closely monitored: (ii) Ridership by time of day, and day of week. (iii) Comments from users. (iv) Comments from taxicab operator. (v)

Quality of service in terms of average wait time and travel time.


-50(vi) Costs of service in terms of total costs; costs/passenger; costs/vehicle-mile; and costs/vehicle-hour. (vii) Efficiency of service in terms of average occupancy rate; passengers/vehicle mile; and passengers/vehicle hour. (viii)Revenue. (ix) Connectivity to the regular bus route system.


-51APPENDIX REVIEW OF THE EDMONTON TAXICAB INDUSTRY Industry Structure and Taxicab Supply In the City of Edmonton there are five licensed taxicab companies with a total of 873 licensed taxicabs. Licensed taxicabs are owned by taxicab companies, by independent owner-drivers or by independent owners who do not drive. Independent owner-drivers and owners associated with specific taxicab companies operate through that company on a brokerage basis. There are currently 2,002 licensed taxicab drivers, of which approximately 1,000 are active and available. Licensed drivers who do not own a licensed taxicab rent licensed vehicles from companies, independent owner-drivers and independent owners. A summary breakdown of the individual taxicab companies by the number of licensed taxicabs and assigned taxicab stands per company is shown as follows.

Company

Number of Assigned Number of licensed Taxicab Stand Taxicabs/Companies Locations/Company

Yellow Cab Limited

392

17

City Cabs

190

33

Alberta Co-op Taxi Limited

168

3

Barrel Taxi Limited

91

3

Wagon Taxi Limited

32

4

873

60

The taxicab industry operates on a demand-responsive basis providing a direct origin to destination service. The public may obtain taxi services by telephone request or at designated taxicab stands. Telephone requests are coordinated by a central dispatch function which in turn assigns the trip request to an available taxicab. Dispatching of rides is by two-way radio on a real time basis. There are currently 60 taxicab stand locations within the City of Edmonton. Taxicab stands are assigned exclusively to specific taxicab companies (refer to Table 1.1), and are generally situated at high demand locations such as hotels, hospitals, inter-city passenger terminals and retail centres. Local regulations prohibit taxicab drivers from soliciting fares by means of cruising and the public from hailing service from the street. All taxicab companies provide city-wide service coverage and are required by local regulations to provide 24 hour service.


-52Taxicab Tariffs Current taxicabs tariffs (effective 1978 01 10) are specified in Bylaw 5247. Metered rates are applied to regular taxicab service, while hourly rates are applied when a taxicab is engaged in funeral service. A metered fare is a function of the time and distance traveled for a particular trip and is calculated by a point-to-point taxicab meter pre-set to the current structured tariff specified in the Bylaw. There are also set tariffs governing waiting times and trip cancellations for taxicabs engaged in regular demandresponsive services. The City of Edmonton Taxicab Tariff as specified in Bylaw 5247 is: (i)

$1.20 for the first 1/8 mile or 200 meters or fraction thereof;

(ii) $0.10 for each additional 1/8 mile or 200 meters or fraction thereof; (iii) $0.17 for each minute of waiting time or part thereof; (iv) $1.10 for any call when order is cancelled on arrival of taxicab, at the point ordered; (v)

$4.00 per hour for 7-passenger taxicab engaged in funeral services;

(vi) $3.00 per hour for 5-passenger taxicab engaged in funeral services. In addition Bylaw 1285 provides that: "A passenger taxicab may operate at a per hour rate without the use of a taxi meter when such taxicab is employed for periodic nonscheduled trips of individuals or small groups provided such taxicab does not infringe upon franchised or chartered routes inside or partially inside the city limits." Multiple Fares and Special Services Under the provisions of Bylaw 1285 taxicabs are allowed to carry more than one fare. In the Bylaw it is stated that: "Any licensed person operating a cab may carry two or more passengers from a common starting point to two or more destinations subhect to the following conditions:


-53(a)

Each stop to discharge a passenger shall be deemed to be the end of one trip and the commencement of a new trip.

(b)

At the end of each such trip the meter shall be cleared and started again at the commencement of each such new trip.

(c)

Whenever two or more passengers are discharged at the same place only the fare authorized by this bylaw shall be charged, and if such passengers are strangers, the driver shall collect from each his proportionate share of the fare payable."

In the City of Edmonton limited special services are provided by the taxicab industry to the handicapped. In two separate studies, The Disabled Children Transportation Study (August, 1977) and The Mentally Handicapped Transportation Study (February, 1978), 84 disabled children and 251 mentally handicapped persons were identified as using taxicabs daily for educational and employment purposes. Service arrangements are on a contractual subscription basis with full fares being subsidized either by the Department of Education, through the Separate or Public School Boards or by the Alberta Department of Social Services and Community Health, through Services for the Handicapped or Handicapped Children's Services. Regulations and Licensing The taxicab industry and the delivery of taxicab services are regulated by the Edmonton Taxicab Bylaw (Bylaw 1285). This Bylaw stipulates the requirements and responsibilities of taxicab companies, taxicab owners and taxicab drivers. Included are: (i)

license eligibility

(ii) licensing procedures (iii) license fees (iv) inspection procedures (v)

facility and equipment requirements

(vi) vehicle safety (vii) operating procedures (viii)specific driver responsibilities, and (ix) the membership and responsibilities of the Taxicab Board.


-54Bylaw 1285 has been amended to 1978 07 11. Bylaw 5247, an amendment to Bylaw 1285 dated 1978 01 10 stipulates current taxicab tariffs. In addition, the taxicab industry and the delivery to taxicab services must comply with certain provisions of the Motor Vehicle Transportation Act, the Municipal Government Act and the Highway Traffic Act.


DOWNTOWN BUS/TRANSITTAXI CONNECTION INFORMATION (101 Street/Jasper Avenue - Eastbound) To transfer to Transit-Taxi from 101 St. /Jasper Ave. Eastbound, take: Weekdays Frequent service on Routes 1 and 5 in early evening, after 9:00p.m. Route 5 at 14 and 44 minutes past the hour. Saturday Frequent service on Routes 1 and 5 in early evening after 7:30 p.m. Route 5 at 14 and 44 minutes past the hour. Sunday Route 5 at 14 and 44 minutes past the hour.

Information For route and schedule information and for Transit-Taxi service and regular transit service: Phone: 432-1234 Weekdays and Saturdays 6:30 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Sundays and Holidays 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Visit our information centre 100A Street, Jasper Avenue (Entrance to Central Station) for detailed information, pamphlets and guides. Hours of operation: Monday to Friday 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Saturdays 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. If you wish to register a compliment or complaint, please remember our operators are not able to deal with patron comments. Their full attention is required for the operation of the vehicle. Call the Complaints Officer at 428-5524 VVeekdays Only 8:30 a.m. to 12:00 Noon or 1:15 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

0

Edmonton transit

Service Details During the day, Riverdale residents will be provided transit service by regular Route 56 from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., Monday to Saturday. The Route 63 which currently provides night, Sunday and holiday service will be replaced by the Transit-Taxi service. The Transit-Taxi service will follow the regular Route 56 routing in Riverdale.

The TransitTaxi service is not a cash taxicab service.. .no money should be exchanged.

Nights, Sundays and statutory holidays, Edmonton Transit's Transit-Taxi service will operate as follows: Transit-Taxi patrons coming from Riverdale will be dropped off on Jasper Avenue, just west of 95 Street, at a designated Transit-Taxi zone. This special zone is adjacent to a regular transit zone from which patrons can transfer to regular transit routes 1 or 5 to continue their trip downtown or cross the street to go the other direction. The Transit-Taxi schedules are designed to allow for convenient transfers to these regular services (see map).

Transit-Taxi operators may not be able to do some of the "extras" that patrons might expect of regular taxi service, such as helping with heavy parcels or luggage. The Transit taxi drivers have a schedule to maintain and they will do their part if passengers do their part as well.

The Experiment

To return to Riverdale, the Transit-Taxi pick-up point is located on 95 Street south of Jasper Avenue (see map). This location is the only pick-up point for Transit-Taxi service into Riverdale. The bus Route 63 will also be stopping at this zone for transfer convenience to those transit patrons that wish to travel east beyond the Riverdale community. Once the Transit-Taxi vehicle enters Riverdale, it will be making stops, as requested, at the present transit zone locations (as shown on the map).

Transit-Taxi — What It Isn't The TransitTaxi service is not a taxicab service that people telephone to request service to the door of their residence.

Riverdale Evenings, Sundays and Holiday Public transit service provided by 0 0

The Riverdale Transit-Taxi experiment will last for a 12 month period. During this test period, Edmonton Transit will monitor the service closely as well as conduct surveys to seek comments and suggestions for improvements from Transit-Taxi users and the taxicab firm. At the conclusion of the experiment, a detailed assessment of the service will be made and the results presented to City Council.

eltilonton

e

Edmonton transit

Service starts Aped 27, INC),


Transit-Taxi Concept

TRANSIT-TAXI SERVICE SCHEDULE

Throughout North America a number of cities have implemented a shared-ride Transit-Taxi service in communities that do not require the capacity of a regular transit vehicle for the provision of an acceptable level of transit service outside of regular service hours. Edmonton Transit, with the financial assistance from Alberta Transportation, a provincial department, will implement an experimental Transit-Taxi service in the Riverdale community effective April 27, 1980 for a one year period.

Why Riverdale for Transit-Taxi? For two years, Edmonton Transit has examined various methods of providing a functional level of transit service for the Riverdale community (outside of regular service hours) which would not contribute a significant loss to the department's revenue. A study conducted by Edmonton Transit in 1979 showed that after 6:00 p.m. and on Sundays and holidays, the transit service provided to Riverdale was under utilized. The cost of operating a conventional transit vehicle in this area was inefficient and therefore the TransitTaxi service considered. The implementation of the Transit-Taxi service will reduce the cost of the service to the City and still provide the necessary and desired transit service in Riverdale.

How The Riverdale Transit-Taxi Will Work The Transit-Taxi service will provide a public transportation link between the community of Riverdale and the regular

LA.% AVE.

LEGEND •

Arrive from Riverdale

•El Depart for Riverdale 411 Riverdale Transit Zone X

transit network, outside of regular service hours, at the intersection of 95 Street and Jasper Avenue (see map of route layout). The Transit-Taxi service will operate on a fixed route and fixed schedule and will not go any further into Riverdale or into the downtown area than the route shown on the map. To use the service, Riverdale residents and visitors will still be required to walk to the nearest transit zone in their area and wait for the arrival of the Transit-Taxi. The specific service schedule for TransitTaxi is located on the last flap of this brochure.

Transit-Taxi patrons will not be required to pay the taxi operator any fare whatsoever, nor will they receive transfers from taxi operators. Transit fare will only be paid at the point that the Transit-Taxi patron boards a regular transit bus. Transfers will be issued at that point if requested. In the return trip to Riverdale, transfers will not be required. Transit-Taxi patrons will simply be able to board the taxi at the designated departure point (see map) and travel to Riverdale.

Sundays and Holidays: P.M.

The Riverdale Transit-Taxi service will test the idea of a fixed schedule and fixed route type of subsidized taxicab service. This Transit-Taxi service will replace the regular bus service at night, on Sundays and on statutory holidays in the community.

621 651 721 751 821 851 921 951 1021 1051 _

626 656 726 756 826 856 926 956 1026 1056

632 702 732 802 832 902 932 1002 1032 1102

751 821 851 921 951 1021 1051 1121 1151 1221 1251

756 826 856 926 956 1026 1056 1126 1156 1226 1256

802 832 902 932 1002 1032 1102 1132 1202 1232 102

121 151 , 221 I 251 ' 321 351 421 451 521 551 621 651 721 751 821 851 921 951 1021 1051

126 156 226 256 326 356 426 456 526 556 626 656 726 756 826 856 926 956 1026 1056

132 202 232 302 332 402 432 502_ 532 602 632 702 732 802 832 902 932 1002 1032 1102


Edmonton (Alta.) - 1979 - Riverdale shared ride taxi study (1979-08)