Page 1

RTAT1ON

Prepared by the CITY OF EDMONTON TRANSPORTATION & ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT TRANSPORTATION PLANNING BRANCH Conducted by Richard E. Plunkett (Research Planner)

Report 72-100


T070 7740 1971

AN EXAMINATION OF PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA

Edmonton, City of, Transportation & En ineerin De artment

iiimaniacr Dcrportment

LIBRARY ThQ City of Edmonton

T070 7740 1971

A.C. 6164


AN EXAMINATION OF PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA 1972

Prepared by the CITY OF EDMONTON TRANSPORTATION & ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT TRANSPORTATION PLANNING BRANCH Conducted by Richard E. Plunkett (Research Planner)

Report 72-100


ii

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The success of the University Study as an on-going project is due to the co-operation and assistance of many individuals; John Williamson (U of A Institutional Research and Planning) who administered the project from the University end and was responsible for the scheduling of all personnel; the U of A students for their long hours during those cold November days; Dale Rhyason of the City Traffic Engineers for his full co-operation on the auto traffic counts; Ted Komick whose drafting talents are exhibited in the report, and our secretary Mrs. D. Gibb who can find an error in anything.


TABLE OF CONTENTS VOLUME ONE

Page i

Title Page Acknowledgements Table of Contents List of Diagrams

iv

List of Tables

v

Introduction Purpose of Study Study Area Study Period Conditions of the Study Period

vi 1 1 1 1

SUMMARY OF 1971 UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA TRANSIT REPORT

4

FINDINGS

5

1. 2.

5

3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

1971 U of A Transit Patronage Peaking Characteristics of University of Alberta Transit Patronage Transit Peak Seated Capacities Peak Period Capacities Daily Patronage Characteristics Characteristics of Route Decreases Route Utilization Automobile Trip Characteristics Transit Efficiency Proposed University Transit Improvements Uncalcu I ated Patronage

APPENDICES: The appendices are enclosed under a separate cover — Volume 2.

5 5&6 12 12 12 12 17 17 17 17


iv

LIST OF DIAGRAMS

DIAGRAM A

Page University Area Bus Routes and Location of Cordons

2

B

University of Alberta Transit Routes

3

C

University of Alberta Transit Riders

7

D

University of Alberta Auto Patronage Cordon Count Points

15


LIST OF TABLES

Page

TABLE 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Transit Passengers Arriving and Leaving The University of Alberta Comparison 1970 — 1971: Transit Passengers Arriving and Leaving the University of Alberta

6

8&9

A.M. Peak Patronage To and From the University of Alberta

10

P.M. Peak Patronage To and From the University of Alberta

11

A.M. Peak Bus Capacities (Seats Available)

13

P.M. Peak Bus Capacities (Seats Available)

14

A.M. and P.M. Peak Automobile Patronage To and From the University of Alberta

16

A Comparison of A.M. — P.M. Peak Passenger Traffic Via Automobiles and Transit Buses To and From the University of Alberta

18


vi

AN EXAMINATION OF PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA Introduction

The University of Alberta and the Edmonton Transit System cooperated in 1970, to conduct a survey of transit patronage to and from the University of Alberta. Knowledge gained from that study was applied to increase patronage on University routes in 1971. The survey was again conducted in 1971. The results of the knowledge gained from the 1970 study and applied in the 1971 study were indicated in a three per cent increase in patronage on University routes in 1971. This increase is more significant because University enrollment decreased and automobile parking increased. The success of this joint University — Transit program indicates the need for a continuing year by year analysis. If this analysis is carried out, the traffic situation can only improve on the U of A campus.

Richard E. Plunkett August 1972


Purpose of Study

The Research and Planning Staff of the Edmonton Transit System and the Institutional Research and Planning Staff co-operated for the second year to study University patronage and to compare the two year patterns. It was hoped that knowledge gained from the 1970 study had contributed in increasing University transit patronage and that 1971 data would improve transit's capability to meet Universitygenerated travel demands in 1972. Study Area

For comparative purposes the study area remained the same as 1970; the University proper together with the University Hospital and Health Sciences area. All these facilities were included within the boundaries of the study area, shown in Diagrams A and B. Study Period

The study was conducted from Monday, November 22 to Friday, November 26, 1971. This week was chosen to approximate the week during which the study was conducted in 1970. The week was divided into two periods: (1) Monday, Wednesday, and Friday; and (2) Tuesday and Thursday. These two periods were examined by bus routes within fifteen minute intervals. Conditions of the Study Period

Weather was seasonal with no influencing changes. The study was conducted close to mid-term exams, this was also the case in 1970.


DIAGRAM A - University Area Bus Routes and Location of Cordons (Checkpoints A, B, C, and DI Week of November 22 — 26, 1971.

R2 U2

R2 NOTE: U3 route not included because it was considered internal circulation.

R1

BUS ROUTE

CHECK POINT (Coi- don) ON BUS ROUTES

ska Drive

N.T.S.

89ave

U2 R2

U5

U2 R2 87 ave

U3 U6

U2 Si S6 U4 R1

U2 U3 U6 R2

U2 U4 U5 S6 R1

S6 U4

U4 S6 R1 U3 U4 U6

U2 R1

83 ave

R2 U4 U5

A R1 S6 82ave INOMMINOMI

R2 S6

2


DIAGRAM B

NIVERSITY OF /I TRANSIT ROUTES

U2 untown VIA HIGH LEVEL

P1 R2 aowntown /

NOV 71

VIA 105 ST BRIDGE

U5WESTMOUNT 122 AVE UNIV RSITY 87 AVE

87AVE

AND HEALTH SCIENCES /

DOWNTOWN VIA WHYTE AVE 99 ST Whyte Ave

S6

R1 R2 Whyte BONNIE DOON 79 ST

U3 NOT INCLUDED BECAUSE IT IS CONSIDERED INTERNAL CIRCULATION

U4

VIA QUESNELL ' MEADOWLARK

J6

MICHENER PARK ASPEN GARDENS (A)

112 idrum


SUMMARY OF 1971 UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA TRANSIT REPORT 1.

University Route Patronage Increase

Transit patronage on U of A routes increased between 1970 and 1971. 2.

Peak Period Patronage Increases

Transit patronage to and from the University of Alberta is dominated by three hour A.M. and P.M. peaks. Peaking has increased over the past two years. 3.

Peak Period Bus Capacities

During the A.M. three hour peak transit vehicles run at between 70 — 80% seated capacity, and from 76 — 92% seated capacity in the P.M. peak. However, at specific periods during these peaks most routes are well over the 100% seated capacity with some fifty-two seat vehicles carrying around 100 people. 4.

Additional Vehicles Needed

Transit vehicles inbound during the A.M. peak increased from 475 in 1970 to 593 in 1971 during the study week. The weekly total of P.M. outbound vehicles increased from 419 to 574 adding to capacity. 5.

Daily Patronage Consistant

No day or group of days appear dominant for E.T.S. U of A patronage. 6.

All-Day Patronage Up On Most Routes

Of the eight routes serving the University, only three experienced decreases. In one case, U2, this decrease increased the attractiveness of the line and in another, U5, a new routing had been undertaken and patronage had not yet stabilized. The third, S6, decreased by less than one per cent and for all purposes remains unchanged. 7.

R1-R2 and U2 Heaviest Lines

The R1-R2 downtown and R1-R2 Whyte Avenue and the U2 downtown were the most heavily used lines in 1970 and again in 1971. 8.

Peak Hour Automobile Congestion Significant 7590 automobiles penetrated the University campus during the A.M. peak and 7512 left during the

P.M. peak. 9.

Transit More Efficient Than Autos

While E.T.S. buses were carrying 57 persons per vehicle, autos were carrying only 1.4. 10.

Transit Increases Reduce Congestion

Transit ridership to and from the University increased approximately 2500 between 1970 and 1971. This increase minimized added automobile congestion by about 2000 automobiles.

4


FINDINGS

The analysis of 1971 data and a comparison of the 1970 University of Alberta transit study has revealed some new findings and confirmed aspects of the 1970 study. 1.

1971 U of A Transit Patronage

(The total volume for 1971 averages about 7600 passengers in both directions for a total of about 15,200 daily or an increase of about 500 a day over 1970.) Table 1 and Diagram C summarize the general characteristics of 1971 transit patronage to and from the University of Alberta. Table 2 compares 1970 and 1971 findings Transit patronage increased to and from the University of Alberta as expected. 2.

Peaking Characteristics of University of Alberta Transit Patronage

The University of Alberta experiences a three hour peak traffic problem. The peak three hours in the A.M. has approximately 4400 or 59% of the total daily inbound traffic, (Table 3), while the three hour P.M. peak has 5000 or 64% of the total outbound traffic (Table 4). During the 1970 study 59% of the transit patronage occurred during these two peaks, in 1971 it had risen to 62%, indicating an increase in "peaking". The peaks experienced on Tuesdays and Thursdays are quite different from those on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. Though both periods experience three hour A.M. and P.M. peaking the time of the highest peaking varies. The major peak on Tuesdays and Thursdays occurs between 4:30 and 5:15 P.M. while Monday, Wednesday, and Friday peaks occur somewhat earlier, at 4:00 P.M. Little variation occurs during the A.M. peak period. The difference in the P.M. peaks can be explained through the class and Lab scheduling at the U of A. Tuesday and Thursday are characterized by one and a half hour classes which end on the hour. Many Tuesday and Thursday classes and Labs end around 4:30 P.M. making it necessary for them to catch their buses at the same time as the staff is leaving for home. This does not occur on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday as students can leave earlier thus giving a much flatter three hour peak. The Tuesday, Thursday pronounced peaking causes heavy loadings on transit vehicles. Because of maximum automobile, pedestrian, and transit traffic converging at this 4:30 — 5:15 P.M. period, it would be costly to increase transit service to minimize the heavy load factors. Alterations to these factors could reduce the cost of additional transit capacity, and speed up service by reducing delays, thus making transit more attractive to the University Community. University officials could also limit campus parking and reschedule working hours. One transit vehicle averages approximately 56 patrons during the peak period and certainly distracts less visually, pollution, and space-wise than a campus crowded with automobiles carrying 1.4 persons per vehicle. This emphasis on transit would also increase the efficiency and reduce costs of internal servicing of the University. Service vehicles would no longer be held up or blocked from loading areas by heavy traffic or illegally parked cars. 3.

Transit Peak Seated Capacities Transit vehicles operate at between 70 and 80% seated capacity during the three hour A.M. peak (Table 3). The problem arises during two periods within these three hour A.M. and P.M. peaks: 7:30 — 8:30 A.M. and 4:00 — 5:15 P.M. at which times seat availability falls to less than one seat per patron. During these periods, some buses with a maximum of 52 seats, arrive with more than 100 passengers on board. The P.M. peak is heavier with transit vehicles running at 76% — 92% seated capacity with only

5


Thursday running below 80% capacity, all other days were over 85% capacity with barely one seat per patron during the three hour peak (Table 4). This reveals that for a large percentage of the three hour peak, and especially between 4:00 and 5:15 P.M. transit vehicles are extremely crowded. In conclusion there are two P.M. peaks, 2:30 — 5:30 P.M. for the student body plus the 4:00 — 5:15 P.M. peak for faculty, staff, and students; it is this 4:00 — 5:15 P.M. period that presents the extreme crowding. To help alleviate this problem the student population could be encouraged to take earlier buses, for in most cases, especially Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, there is a minimum, as a total per cent, of classes scheduled during the later afternoon.

TABLE 1 TRANSIT PASSENGERS ARRIVING AND LEAVING THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA WEEK OF NOVEMBER 22 —26, 1971 6:00 — 12 Midnight MONDAY Route

Outbound

Inbound

7:00 — 8:00 P.M. WEDNESDAY

Outbound

Inbound

Outbound

7:00 — 8:00 P.M. THURSDAY Inbound

Outbound

7:00 — 8:00 P.M. FRIDAY Inbound

Outbound

R1 R2 Downtown

1789

2494

1971

2189

2010

2030

1838

2248

1894

2459

R2 91 Whyte Avenue

1561

1368

15821

1462

1497

1352

1457

1286

1381

1341

892

1169

781

1083

853

1059

780

1057

794

1108

1094

976

1202

1043

1053

1032

1170

1173

1188

U2 Lendrum

655

758

818

698

798

758

701

672

766

U6

395

396

396

424

458

425

458

466

352

389

U5

402

423

364

399

390

419

458

417

404

415

U4

493

436

597

395

524

473

377

394

495

394

7281

8020

7711

7693

7583

7548

7239

7713

7274

8119

56 U2 Downtown

DAILY COMBINED TOTAL

WEATHER

6

Inbound

7:00 — 8:00 P.M. TUESDAY

1272) These totals ) are minus ) ride 741) throughs

200 windy

250 clear

200 light

200 light

150 light

snow flurries

light wind

wind & snow

wind &snow

wind &snow


8000

I I 7000 1 I 1 I 1 1 1 II I I 1 1 I I 1 !I 60001'1 1I III

DIAGRAM C

UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA TRAN21T RIDERS INBOUND AND OUTBOUND NOVEMBER 22 - 26 - 71

II 5000 II

TOTA L PASSENGERS

II

4000

3000

1

2000 I

1 1

II

1000

IN OUT MONDAY

1 I 1.1 I IN OUT TUESDAY

IN OUT FRIDAY


COMPARISON TABLE 2 TRANSIT PASSENGERS ARRIVING AND LEAVING UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA 1970 & 1971 7 a.m.— 8 p.m.

R 1 - R2 CBD DAY

1971

1970 Inbound

1789 ,

1940

Oif ference

R 1 - R2 WHYTE

Difference

Difference

S6

1970- 1971

1970

1971

1970- 1971

1970

1971

• 151

1196

1561 ;

+ 365

822

892

1368 I

+ 326

1002

1169

1582

+ 306

874

781

MONDAY. Outbound

2001

2494 I

+ 493

1042

Inbound

1603

1971

+ 368

1276

TUESDAY Outbound

2005

2189 I

+ 184

1024

1462 I

+ 438

998

1083

Inbound

1724

2010

+ 286

1418

1497 I

79

985

853

1970 - 1971 I

I 1 I

2255

2030 ,

- 225

1004

1352

+ 348

1131

1059

1970- 1971

U2 LEN DRUM 1970

Difference

1971 1970- 1971

1970

1971

+ 70

1324

1094

230

581

655 I

+167

1225

976

249

743

758

+ 15

-93

1262

1202 I

60

642

818 1

.176

+ 85

1058

1043 ,

-

15

697

- 132

1436

1053 I

• 383

769

698 , 1 798

+ 29

758

• 30 + 24

WEDNESDAY Outbound

Difference

U2 CBD

74

72

1133

1032

101

788

- 97

1454

1170 ,

284

677

701 I

+ 60

1285

1173 I

112

723

6271

-51

- 33

1584

1188 ,

396

716

766

+ 50

258

710

741.1

+ 31

3385

3738 I

+353

1

-

I

Inbound

1888

1838 I

50

1442

1457

+

15

877

780

Outbound

2285

2248

37

1044

1286 I

+ 242

997

1057

1894

+ 104

1346

1381

+

35

827

794

1341

+ 349

1122

1108

I

- 14

1530

1272 I

7478 I

+ 800

4385

4100

I

-285

7060

5707

-1353

6809

+1706

5250

5476

,

+226

6231

5496 I

- 735

3661

3627

- 34

14287 I

+2503

9635

9576

I

- 59

13291

-2088

7046

7365 I

+319

THURSDAY

Inbound

1790

Outbound

2241

2459 I _

+ 218

992

Inbound

8945

9502 I

+ 557

6678

10787

11420 I

+ 633

19732

20922 I

+1190

FRIDAY

WEEK TOTAL TOTAL IN & OUT

Outbound

5106 11784

*Mondays count ran from 6 a.m. to 12 p.m. Transit passengers for 6 A.M. — 7 A.M. and 8 P.M. to Midnight have been separated.

11203


Difference

U5

Difference

U4

Difference

Totals

Unassigned

Totals

Difference %

1970

1971

1970- 1971 1970

1971

405

395 I

-

10

501

402

362

+

34

499

423

407

396 I I 396 i

-

11

478

364

403

424

+21

379

3

398

I 458 . I

+ 60

633

390

425 I

+ 11

414

509

295

7064

7281

+ 217

+ 3

392

7266

8020

+ 754

+10

-114

597

+ 597

6542

7711

362

6904

7711

+ 807

+12

20

395

+ 395

6564

7693

593

7157

7693

+ 536

+ 7

-243

524

+ 524

7363

7583

278

7641

7583

-

58

+ 1

- 90

473

+ 473

7234

7548

347

7581

7548

-

33

---

-56

377

+ 377

7273

7239

151

7424

7239

-185

- 33

394

+ 394

7233

7713

399

7632

7713

+

64

495

.1- 495

7108

7274

336

7444

7274

- 170

415 1 _--394 + 394 ---_ 1

_ 7508

8119

97

_ 760 5

8119

_ +534

35055

37088

1422

36477

37088

+ 611

458

450

417

2008

I

2059 I

+ 51

2594

1971 0970- 1971 Increase

9020

514

404

_

NEW

1970

7281

+ 17

497

1970

6874

+ 37

389 I

1971

6769

466I

416

1970

+ 436

I

419

468

1970- 1971 + 493

I 458. I

- 25

1971 493

449

352

99

1970

ROUTE 436

421

377

1970- 1971

I

2018

2044

2100 !

+ 56

2334

2073

4052

4159 I I

+107

4928

4091 I I

- 76

-576 -261

2486

+2486

.

_

81 - 2 _

*7 + 2

Total% Increase Inbound

2092

+2092

35413

39093

1828

37241

39093

+1852

+ 5

Total % Increase Outbound

4578

+4578

70468

76181

3250 70468

73718

76181

+2463

+ 3

Total % Increase 1970 1971

73718

9


TABLE 3 NUMBER OF PASSENGERS A.M. PEAK TRANSIT PATRONAGE TO AND FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA 7:00 A.M. — 10:00 A.M.

Week of November 22 — 26, 1971

% of Total Weekly Inbound Patrons Utilizing U of A Monday Inbound Outbound

Wednesday

Tuesday Inbound Outbound

Inbound Outbound

Total Patrons

Friday

Thursday Inbound Outbound

Inbound Outbound

Inbound

Outbound

Routes During The A.M. Peak

Seats/Patron Ratio Seats Available

U2

521

207

564

197

513

198

555

234

599

194

2752

1.030

41

1.47

U2 LENDRUM

680

52

769

53

742

44

594

48

647

40

3432

237

62

1.27

R1—R2 CBD

978

184

1080

195

882

146

880

160

842

179

4662

864

49

1.21

R1—R2 WHYTE AVENUE

895

53

947

57

1003

70

881

59

1007

65

4733

304

63

1.09

S6

405

44

389

52

527

45

375

48

354

67

354

67

50

2.24

U6

241

34

223

42

301

41

247

58

194

38

1206

213

59

1.37

U5

311

38

262

34

304

27

282

21

308

27

1467

147

71

1.33

U4

372

6

378

14

404

14

228

15

335

14

1717

63

69

1.28

TOTAL DAILY PATRONS 4403

618

4612

644

4676

585

4042

643

4286

624

22019

55

1.35

A.M. PEAK INBOUND

1.40

1.25

1.28 I

1.42

1.40

3114

1.35

(Seating Capacity Ratio) (Seats/Patron) RUNNING A.M. PEAK INBOUND 72% cap. Capacity % (Patron/Seats)

80% cap.

78% cap.

70% cap.

71% cap.

74% cap.


TABLE 4 NUMBER OF PASSENGERS P.M. PEAK TRANSIT PATRONAGE TO AND FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA 2:30 P.M. — 5:30 P.M.

Week of Nov. 22 — 26, 1971,

% of Total Weekly Outbound Patrons Utilizing U of A Monday Inbound Outbound

U2 U2 LENDRUM

Wednesday

Tuesday Inbound Outbound

Inbound Outbound

I

293 I

629

346

99

645

131 I

I

652

358

603

I

Thursday

Total Patrons

Friday

Inbound Outbound

Inbound Outbound

Seats/Patron Ratio

Routes During The

Inbound

Outbound

P.M. Peak*

Seats Available

727

441

824

329

774

1767

3606

66

1.16

132

704

158

616

101

614

621

3182

67

1.24

R1—R2 CBD

154 I 1302

136

1211

170

1272

142

1365

146

1312

748

6462

57

R1—R2 WHYTE AVENUE

292

917

365

986

303

895

307

925

250

837

1517

4560

67

1.07

S6

99

617

117 I

684

93

713

109

675

83

664

501

3353

61

1.32

U6

69

240

59 I

277

63

245

101

266

63

233

355

1261

60

1.39

U5

27

251

23

274

30

307

36

274

17

274

133

1380

67

1.39

U4

51 I

322

66

284

37 I

361

28

333

42

233

224

1533

73

1.31

1243 I

4971

5224

1322

5288

1031

4941

5866

25337

65

1.13

TOTAL DAILY PATRONS

1084 I 4923

P.M. PEAK OUTBOUND (Seating Capacity Ratio) (Seats/Patron)

1.18

Capacity % (Patron/Seats)

1.10

I

1.13

1.09

I

I I

RUNNING P.M. PEAK OUTBOUND

1.15

1186

I

I

1.13

I I

I

I

85% cap.

I

87% cap.

90% cap.

92% cap.

.88

*Total Week Outbound P.M. Peak Patrons

I

76% cap.

88% cap.

—••—

— ••

— •

ns


4.

Peak Period Capacities Point three showed that extreme overloading exists at specific times during the major three hour peaks. The transit system has increased services over the past year but has barely managed to keep up with peak hour volumes. During 1970 study period, there were 475 weekly inbound buses during the A.M. peak, by 1971, this number had been increased to 593 (Table 5). During the P.M. peak in 1970, 419 outbound vehicles were made available, by 1971 this increased to 574 (Table 6). The present traffic stivation, makes it difficult to increase the number of transit vehicles to and from the University with any degree of efficiency. It appears that the University staff and transit officials must develop alternate traffic schemes and introduce programs to reduce the number of automobiles on campus if transit is to provide a higher level of service.

5.

Daily Patronage and Route Characteristics For the two-year period in which these studies were undertaken, no day or groups of days appear to dominate in transit patronage. Patronage appears to be fairly consistent from day to day.

6.

Characteristics of Route Decreases Decreases in patronage occurred on three lines between 1970 and 1971: A. S6: B.

A decrease of 56 in patronage over the survey week of 1970. This represents such a minimal decrease that for all purposes patronage has remained constant.

U2 CBD: During the 1971 study period patronage decreased 2088. The new U4 route across Quesnell began service in 1971 providing students and staff in South West Edmonton and Jasper Place with a faster more direct service to the University. This new west-end service cut the number of transfers necessary for many University patrons who would otherwise use the U2 CBD or R1—R2 CBD as a transfer route to the U of A. This slightly reduced the heavy loadings which were occurring on the U2, providing somewhat more comfortable peak-hour conditions for the remaining U2 CBD patrons. The addition of the U4 increased peak transit carrying capacities and the level of service being provided to the U of A.

C. U5:

D.

The U5 is largely a new route serving Westmount instead of Jasper Place Centre. The new U4 serves much of the territory previously served by the old U5, and this accounts for the slight decrease in U5 patronage over the period 1970-71. A patronage decrease of 837 was initiated by routing the U5 bus to Westmount and combining it with the U6. This new routing combination made better use of equipment and enabled thirty minute headway service for patrons who previously had hourly service. The U5, U6 combination is one of the few routes serving the University which does not terminate there. Of the approximate 800 rides a day five per cent or about forty rides continue through the campus without dis-embarking at the University. On the U5 approximately twenty or three per cent ride through.

7.

Route Utilization The most utilized lines in 1970- and again in 1971 were the R1, R2 CBD, the U2 CBD and the R1, R2 Whyte Avenue. Transit routes operating through low-density residential areas also had increased patronage.

12


TABLE 5 BUS CAPACITIES (SEATS AVAILABLE) A.M. PEAK 7:00 A.M. — 10:00 A.M. Week of November 22 — 26, 1971

AM. Peak Seating Capacities NUMBER OF A.M. PEAK BUSES INBOUND—OUTBOUND TO & FROM THE U OF A

MONDAY Inbound Outbound

TUESDAY Inbound Outbound

WEDNESDAY Inbound Outbound

THURSDAY Inbound Outbound

FRIDAY Inbound Outbound

BUS TOTALS In Out

SEAT TOTALS (bus totals x 50)

TOTAL SEATS Inbound & Outbound

U2 CBD

17

12

16

11

16

12

16

12

16

11

81

58

4050

U2 Lendrum

18

14

17

13

17

13

17

13

18

12

87

65

4350

2900 3250

6950 7600

R1—R2 CBD

24

14

21

14

24

14

22

12

22

15

113

69

5650

3450

9100

R1—R2 82 Ave.

21

14

19

13

23

14

19

13

22

12

104

66

5200

3300

8500

S6

18

14

18

15

19

12

18

15

19

14

92

70

4600

3500

8100

U6

7

6

7

5

6

7

7

7

6

6

33

31

1650

1550

3200

U5

9

9

8

7

6

6

8

6

8

6

39

34

1950

1700

3650

U4

9

7

9

6

9

6

8

6

9

5

44

30

2200

1500

3700

123

90

115

84

120

84

115

84

120

81

593

423

29650

21150

50800

TOTALS TOTAL A.M. PEAK INBOUND—OUTBOUND BUSES

123

199

204

199

201

TOTAL A.M. PEAK INBOUND—OUTBOUND SEATS AVAILABLE MONDAY

TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY IN OUT IN OUT IN OUT IN OUT IN OUT

6150 4560 5750 4200 6000 4200 5750 4200 6000 4050

1016

50800


TABLE 6 BUS CAPACITIES (SEATS AVAILABLE) P.M. PEAK 2:30 P.M. — 5:30 P.M. P.M. PEAK SEATING CAPACITIES

Week of November 22— 26, 1971 NUMBER OF P.M. PEAK BUSES INBOUND—OUTBOUND TO & FROM THE U OF A BUS MONDAY Inbound

Outbound

TUESDAY Inbound

WEDNESDAY

Outbound

Inbound Outbound

THURSDAY Inbound Outbound

FRIDAY Inbound

TOTAL SEATS

TOTALS

Outbound

IN

OUT

SEAT TOTALS

INBOUND &

(bus totals x SO)

OUTBOUND

U2 CBD

14

17

12

17

13

17

14

17

13

16

66

84

3300

4200

7500

U2 Lendrum

13

16

14

15

13

16

14

15

14

17

68

79

3400

3950

7350

R1—R2 82 Ave.

14

22

16

23

14

23

14

23

14

23

72

98

3600

4900

8500

R1—R2 CBD

14

20

11

20

14

19

14

20

14

19

67

114

3350

5700

9050

S6

17

18

18

19

17

18

16

17

17

17

85

89

4250

4450

8700

U6

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

35

35

1750

1750

3500

U5

7

7

7

7

6

7

7

7

7

7

34

35

1700

1750

3450

U4

8

9

7

7

7

7

7

9

7

6

36

40

1800

2000

3800

94

116

92

115

91

116

93

115

93

112

463

574

23150

28700

51850

TOTALS TOTAL P.M. PEAK INBOUND—OUTBOUND BUSES

210

207

MONDAY IN OUT

TUESDAY IN OUT

207

208

205

TOTAL P.M. PEAK INBOUND—OUTBOUND SEATS AVAILABLE WEDNESDAY IN OUT

THURSDAY IN OUT

FRIDAY IN OUT

4700 5800 4600 5700 4550 5800 4650 5700 4650 5600

1037

51850


DIAGRAM D

UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA AUTO PATRONAGE CORDON COUNT POINTS N.T.S. SASK. DR.

88

AVE

U of A Campus

Cordon point

Cordon point

87 AVE

87 AVE

83 AVE

t:›

Cordon point Cordon point 82 Ave 82 AVE

Conducted Nov. 23-24,1972 7:15 am -10:00am and 115 pm - 6:00pm E TS


TABLE 7

A.M. AND P.M. PEAK AUTOMOBILE PATRONAGE TO AND FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA

November 24, 1971

7:00 A.M. - 10:00 A.M.

15 Min. ENDING

7:15

7:30

7:45

8:00

8:15

8:30

8:45

9:00

9:15

9:30

9:45

10:00

Vehicles In Occupants In

306 412

547 748

960 1491

1231 1908

934 1269

646 915

608 849

675 871

559 793

608 821

306 395

210 287

7590 10759

Vehicles Out

102

206

311

384

326

253

258

203

191

211

222

193

2850

Occupants Out

116

237

387

422

387

303

329

232

231

256

267

240

3398

IN Occupant Rate

1.3

1.4

1.6

1.5

1.4

1.4

1.4

1.3

1.4

1.4

1.3

1.4

1.4

OUT Occupant Rate

1.1

1.2

1.2

1.1

1.2

1.2

1.3

1.1

1.3

1.2

1.2

1.2

1.2

November 24, 1971

3:00 P.M. - 6:00 P.M.

15 Min. ENDING

TOTAL

3:15

3:30

3:45

4:00

4:15

4:30

4:45

5:00

5:15

5:30

5:45

6:00

TOTAL

Vehicles In Occupants In

255 334

314 406

285 363

313 409

290 372

378 495

292 368

348 429

257 317

245 322

240 329

303 408

3520 4552

Vehicles Out Occupants Out

366 533

417 549

560 728

504 659

823 1113

684 901

988 1407

891 1244

941 1428

561 829

407 551

360 500

7512 10442

IN Occupant Rate

1.3

1.3

1.3

1.3

1.3

1.3

1.3

1.2

1.2

1.3

1.4

1.3

1.3

OUT Occupant Rate

1.5

1.3

1.3

1.3

1.4

1.3

1.4

1.4

1.5

1.5

1.4

1.4

1.4

CO


8.

Automobile Trip Characteristics

Automobile trip counts of the University of Alberta were conducted for the first time in 1971 (Diagram D). During the A.M. peak, 7590 vehicles carrying 10,759 people entered the U of A. Of these, 4740 vehicles and 7361 people remained at the University. In the P.M. peak 7512 vehicles carrying 10,442 U of A people left the campus (Table 7). The lower numbers leaving the campus by automobile during the P.M. peak could explain the higher southbound P.M. peak transit patronage as compared to the A.M. peak. Many students probably obtain rides to the campus in the A.M. peak with their parents who are on their way to work and take the bus home in the afternoon. Some traffic monitors felt this was due to mid-term exams and the necessity to arrive early to ensure a place to study. With less exacting hours than their parents, many will take a bus home in the afternoon, thus accounting for the A.M. — P.M. differences. 9.

Transit Efficiency

The efficiency of transit in moving large numbers of people to and from the U of A has been clearly demonstrated by this year's study. A daily average of 175 transit vehicles were able to move 9900 A.M. and P.M. peak passengers at 57 people per vehicle. The private automobile required 15,109 vehicles to move 21,201 people at only 1.40 people per vehicle (Table 8). The University of Alberta must increase its transportation efficiency by encouraging the use of transit and discouraging the use of the private automobile. To accomplish this, a preferential consideration must be given to transit vehicles. Between the 1970 and 1971 study periods, transit ridership increased by 2463. This means that close to 2000 additional automobiles were kept off the campus. These figures are more significant in that the University enrollment decreased and parking availability increased. 10.

Proposed University Transit Improvements

The E.T.S. and University are now working together to establish 89 Avenue in the centre of the University as a main transit stop, closer to many University destinations than the present bus stop area on 87 Avenue. As part of this project, it is proposed that parking be banned on 89 Avenue between 112 Street and 114 Street, and that 89 Avenue be closed to automobile traffic south of the Student Union Building. This change, if made to work, would be a step toward on-campus transit improvements. 11.

Uncalculated Patronage

The survey does not account for transit passengers coming to the University via 109 Street transit lines (S1-S2 trolleys, S9, and S12 Express buses from downtown), and walking from 109 Street. Probably this figure is not of a high magnitude, but would likely be significant. Thus, total transit passengers to and from the University — Health Sciences area are probably greater than indicated in the tables (1970 Report).

17


TABLE 8 A COMPARISON OF A.M. — P.M. PEAK PASSENGER TRAFFIC VIA AUTOMOBILES AND TRANSIT BUSES TO AND FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA FOR WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 24, 1971. A.M. THREE HOUR PEAK 7:00 A.M. — 10:00 A.M. A.M. PEAK CARRYING CAPACITIES INBOUND VEHICLES TRANSIT AUTO

OUTBOUND VEHICLES

INBOUND PASSENGERS

OUTBOUND PASSENGERS

LOADING RATIO (PASSENGERS/VEHICLES) INBOUND

91

116

4676

585

51.38

7590

2850

10759

3398

1.41

P.M. THREE HOUR PEAK

2:30 P.M. — 5:30 P.M. P.M. PEAK CARRYING CAPACITIES

INBOUND VEHICLES TRANSIT AUTO *

OUTBOUND VEHICLES

INBOUND PASSENGERS

OUTBOUND PASSENGERS

LOADING RATIO (PASSENGERS/VEHICLES) INBOUND OUTBOUND

120

84

1186

5224

9.88

62.19

3520

7512

4552

10442

1.29

1.39

COMBINED A.M. AND P.M. PASSENGER TRAFFIC INBOUND + OUTBOUND PEAKS VEHICLES TRANSIT AUTO

LOADING RATIO (PASSENGERS/VEHICLES)

175

9900

56.57

15108

21202

1.40

P.M. peak for automobiles was 3:00 P.M. — 6:00 P.M. This does not significantly affect the results.

PASSENGERS


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Edmonton (Alta.) - 1972 - An examination of public transportation to and from the University of A...  

An examination of public transportation to and from the University of Alberta

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