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Amendments to the City of Edmonton Planning D

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GENERAL PtAN

CITY OF EDMONTON ALBERTA

487a .E3 E3731 1970

APPENDIX No. 1


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APPENDIX NO. I (Revised)

AMENDMENTS TO THE CITY OF EDMONTON GENERAL PLAN

CITY PLANNING DEPARTMENT JUNE, 1970


INTRODUCTION This appendix amends and updates the City of Edmonton General Plan which was published in August, 1967 by the City of Edmonton Planning Department. The amendments included in this appendix are only those reflecting policy changes and important changes in statistics and have been approved by the City of Edmonton Municipal Planning Commission. It is not the -purpose of this appendix to list the few minor printing errors in the General Plan nor is it intended that statistics for the years 1961 to 1965 upon which projections in the Plan are based be updated although more recent employment, population and housing figures were examined to gauge the extent of shifts in extent of shifts in emerging trends. Rather, the amendments are intended to update the Plan where new policies and courses of administrative action have been implemented or proposed subsequent to the printing of the Plan. LISTING OF AMENDMENTS The amendments to the General Plan contained in this appendix are numbered consecutively for each individual chapter. The Roman Numeral chapter number has been utilized as a prefix for the amendment numbers and numbers are assigned to each amendment in the order they appear in the text. THE GENERAL PLAN PROCESS The City of Edmonton General Plan is intended to provide a set of objectives and principles upon which decisions concerning the development and redevelopment of Edmonton may be based and, as such, has an emphasis on "how" as opposed to "where". It is a policy document which sets forth criteria which should be used as a guide in making decisions relating to urban growth and renewal. It is not appropriate for a Plan spanning a period of over ten years and beyond to include concrete proposals for development at specified dates in the future; these decisions must be based on the conditions that prevail at the time a project is to be undertaken and on a long term commitment to goals. Specific proposals which are contained in the document relate to policy decisions already established by City Council or to where comprehensive studies have been carried out in a particular area. However, the Plan should be viewed as a guide to growth rather than as an unalterable commitment to certain projects. Interpreted in such a manner the General Plan will provide a much more beneficial and lasting aid to City Council in the formulation of policy. For example, the Plan establishes a basis upon which urban expansion in any particular direction may be measured and, once an area is designated for growth, it further provides a more detailed basis upon which growth in that particular direction may be guided. This is applicable to both old area and new area growth and, as such, includes all facets of urban development.


The proper utilization of the General Plan in the sense described above requires that it be constantly reviewed and amended when and where necessary. It is not a static document but is one which should portray current City policy in the areas with which it is concerned and thus must be continuously examined as an integral part of the decision making process. It is hoped that, as the General Plan evolves over the years, future amendments necessitated by more in-depth studies and resultant policy changes will increasingly reflect this policy guideline aspect of the Plan with less and less emphasis being placed on its concrete proposal aspects which are better contained in district plans, outline plans and other such studies. NOTE: The amendments contained within this Appendix which are unchanged from the original Appendix No. I dated December, 1968 are noted with an asterisk.


- 1 INTRODUCTORY STATEMENTS AND CHAPTER I - HISTORY

*I - 1

Page iv - Paragraph 5, Lines 4 to 6 ORIGINAL:

"Shortly after the distribution of the General Plan, a proposed General Plan Bylaw will be presented to contain a summation of the more important objectives and principles of the General Plan."

AMENDMENT:

"Shortly after the distribution of the General Plan, a proposed General Plan Bylaw will be prepared to enable the adoption of the entire General Plan document with any amendments to be contained in adopted appendices."


- 2 CHAPTER II - EDMONTON REGION, DISTRICT AND METROPOLITAN AREA

*II - 1

*II - 2

Page 24 - Column 1 - Principle 6 ORIGINAL:

"To actively promote the availability of local services to the region and encourage the development of new services which directly benefit the region."

AMENDMENT:

"To actively promote the services of local business to the region and encourage the development of new services which directly benefit the region."

Page 27 - Column 2, Following Principle 9 COMMENT:

AMENDMENT:

The metropolitan land use zones require one more category to match the permitted uses of the Preliminary Regional Plan, Metropolitan Part. "10. Smallholding Zone - to provide land for groups of parcels suitable for market gardening and similar small scale agricultural pursuits. In the Smallholding Zone, site areas must be no smaller than three acres and no larger than twenty acres."


- 3 CHAPTER III - POPULATION AND EMPLOYMENT

III - 1

Page 28 - Column 1, Paragraph 1, Lines 6 to 11 ORIGINAL:

COMMENT:

AMENDMENT:

III - 2

III - 3

"Based on patterns of natural increase and net migration it is estimated that by 1981 the City's population should reach 570,000. The median estimate for the Metropolitan Area is 638,000 people by 1981." During the past two years there has been substantial variance between the estimated population growth and the actual population increases. It is felt that the revised forecasts presented in this Chapter more accurately outline anticipated population growth. "Based on patterns of natural increase and net migration it is estimated that by 1981 the City's population should reach 620,000. The median estimate for the Metropolitan Area is 695,000 people by 1981."

Page 33 - Column 1, Paragraph 2, Lines 1 to 6 ORIGINAL:

"Based on the best estimates of birth, death and migration rates available, the City of Edmonton 1981 population should range from 540,000 to 600,000 people. For statistical convenience, a median population of 570,000 has been used throughout the Plan."

AMENDMENT:

"Based on the best estimates of birth, death and migration rates available, the City of Edmonton 1981 population should range from 590,000 to 650,000 people. For statistical convenience, a median population of 620,000 has been used through the Plan."

Page 33 - Column 1, Paragraph 3, Lines 1 to 7 ORIGINAL:

"The Edmonton Metropolitan Area as presently delineated by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics is expected to have a population of 638,000 by 1981. The area within the Edmonton Regional Planning Commission boundaries is expected to have a population of 720,000 people."


-4-AMENDMENT:

III - 4

Page 33 - Diagram 7, Population Projections AMENDMENT:

III - 5

III - 6

III - 7

"The Edmonton Metropolitan Area as presently delineated by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics is expected to have a population of 695,000 by 1981. The area within the Edmonton Regional Planning Commission boundaries is expected to have a population of 776,500."

"The population projections for the City of Edmonton for the year 1981 contained in Diagram 7, Chapter III, Page 33 are amended to 620,000 and 695,000 respectively and the estimates for other years amended accordingly."

Page 33 - Column 2, Lines 3 to 5 ORIGINAL:

"The most variable segment of the population forecast, the rate of net migration, is estimated to equal about 3,000 per year."

AMENDMENT:

"The most variable segment of the population forecast, the rate of net migration, is expected to range from 6,000 to 10,000 per year.

Page 33 - Column 2, Paragraph 2, Lines 1 to 9 ORIGINAL:

"The distribution of the 1981 population, indicated on Drawing 5, is as follows: Edmonton 570,000, Sherwood Park 25,500, St. Albert 35,000, rural zones within the Metropolitan Area 7,500, Morinville 1,000, Fort Saskatchewan 10,000, Leduc 14,000, Devon 3,000, Spruce Grove 1,000, Stony Plain 2,500 and the rural area within the region 50,000, giving a total of 720,000 people.."

AMENDMENT:

"The distribution of the 1981 population is as follows: Edmonton 620,000, Sherwood Park 25,500, St. Albert 35,000, rural zones within the Metropolitan Area 14,500, Morinville 1,000, Fort Saskatchewan 10,000, Leduc 14,000, Devon 3,000, Spruce Grove 1,000, Stony Plain 2,500 and the rural area within the region 50,000 giving a total of 776,500 people.

Page 33 - Column 2, Paragraph 3, Lines 1 to 5 ORIGINAL:

"The future additional population of Edmonton will probably be housed in new residential areas in the northeast and southwest sectors of the City, as well as N. the burgeoning apartment districts in the vicinity of the City Centre."


- 5 AMENDMENT:

III - 8

III 1- 9

Page 33 - Column 2, Paragraph 4, Lines 3 to 9 ORIGINAL:

"Economic base studies undertaken by the Edmonton Regional Planning Commission and employment studies by the Alberta Bureau of Statistics indicate that by 1981 the Metropolitan Area labour force will approximate 254,600 or 38 per cent of the forecasted total population."

AMENDMENT:

"It is estimated that the labour force in 1981 will total approximately 278,000 or 40 per cent of the forecasted total Metropolitan Area Population."

Page 34 - Drawing 2, City Population 1881 - 2001 AMENDMENT:

III - 10

"The population projection for the City of Edmonton as outlined in Drawing 2, Chapter III, Page 34 is amended to 620,000 for the year 1981 and similar adjustments for other years are made accordingly."

Page 35 - Drawing 3, Urban Development 1902 - 1981 COMMENT:

AMENDMENT:

III - 11

"The future additional population of Edmonton will be housed in new residential areas in the west, southwest, south, southeast, northeast and north sectors of the City, as well as in the burgeoning apartment districts in the vicinity of the City Centre."

Over the two years since the General Plan was published there have been several significant changes in residential growth patterns which require amendment to the Plan. Accordingly, it is necessary to amend a number of drawings in the Plan which show projected uses, facilities or services to include these new growth areas. "Drawing 3, Chapter III, Page 35 is amended to include those expansion areas as shown on the amended version of Drawing 5, Chapter III. These areas are classified as being developed or under development by 1981."

Page 37 - Drawing 5, Population Distribution 1981 AMENDMENT:

"A revised Drawing 5, Chapter III is attached to this list of amendments. This revision incorporates changes created by the anticipated residential expansion to the west, north and southeast and replaces the drawing in the General Plan document."


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Lower figure = 1981 projected population Hatched area = partially developed neighbourhoods in 1981 n/a = data not available

40,000

27,569 28,000

28,060 28,100

13, 307 14\ 13,500

24,740 26,000 8,494

14,962 16,000 16,000

14,551 16,500

12,548 16,700

10,000

11,167 12,000

12,200 17,761 21,000

23,042 23.200

20,200

18,866 21,000

16,715 17,000

13,761 13,800

13,552

12,279 12,300

18.0 0

13,000 18,000

22,500

16,292 18,600

12,027 22,000

EDMONTON GENERAL PLAN

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POPULATION DISTRIBUTION 1981

5

POPULATION AND EMPLOYMENT

CHAPTER III


CHAPTER IV - URBAN GROWTH AND LAND USE

IV - 1

IV - 2

Page 40 - Column 2, Objective 1 ORIGINAL:

"To plan for an immediate urban area to accommodate 540,000 to 600,000 people by 1981, and for a Metropolitan Area of 600,000 to 670,000 people by 1981."

AMENDMENT:

"To plan for an immediate urban area to accommodate 590,000 to 650,000 people by 1981, and for a Metropolitan Area of 670,000 to 720,000 people by 1981."

Page 41 - Diagram 1, Future Land Requirements, 1965 - 1981 AMENDMENT:

IV - 3

1981 Land Use Plan - end pocket AMENDMENT:

IV - 4

"Diagram 1, Chapter IV, Page 41 is deleted from the General Plan."

"The 1981 Land Use Plan is deleted from the General Plan and is replaced by the 1981 Land Use Structure Plans I and II which are attached to this list of amendments."

Page 43 - Column 1, Table, Land Use - Net Acres AMENDMENT:

"The table in Column 1, Page 43 entitled 'Land Use - Net Acres' is deleted from the General Plan as is the sentence preceding this table."


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The 1981 Land Use Structure Plan for the City of Edmonton is a graphic portrayal of the major land use objectives and principles set forth in the Edmonton General Plan. Since the Plan is a general statement of objectives and principles for all phases of urban development in Edmonton to 1981, this map should also be viewed as a guide rather than as an unalterable commitment to future land use development. More detailed development proposals will be contained in the future Outline Plans for expansion areas and in District Plans for built-up areas of the City.

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Land Use Key General urban Industrial Industrial reserve and special uses River valley system Arterials developed to freeways by 1981 Freeways beyond 1981

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Rapid transit routes Outline plan areas

EDMONTON GENERAL PLAN

1981 LAND USE STRUCTURE PLAN I URBAN GROWTH AND LAND USE

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3 CHAPTER IV


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RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURE Outline plan areas

Viable and stable residential areas

Conservation and rehabilitation areas

Small- scale renewal areas

Redevelopment areas

Urban renewal scheme areas

EDMONTON GENERAL PLAN

19 81 LAND USE STRUCTURE PLAN II -"moor lor

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URBAN GROWTH AND LAND USE

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4 CHAPTER IV


- 7 CHAPTER V - RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT

V - 1

Page 44 - Table, Dwelling Unit Types and Land Requirements AMENDMENT:

"The table on Page 44 entitled 'Dwelling Unit Types and Land Requirements' is replaced with the following table: DWELLING UNIT TYPES AND LAND REQUIREMENTS

Residential Units Year 1961* Percentage 1981 Percentage.,

S.F. 55,300 63.2 93,200 51.3

2.F. 15,500 17.7 19,300 10.6

Row 2,500 2.9 9,600 5.3

1,000 10.0 1,600 9.5

150 1.5 600 3.6

Walk-Up High Apt. Rise 10,200 800 11.7 .9 41,700 16,400 22.8 9.1

Other 3,200 3.6 1,800 .9

Total 87,500 100.0 182,000 100.0

Net Residential Acreage * 1961 Percentage 1981 Percentage

8,500 85.0 13,300 79.2

140 1.4 1,000 5.9

10 0.1 100 .6

200 2.0 200 1.2

10,000 100.0 16,800 100.0"

* 1961 figures include Jasper Place and Beverly V - 2

V - 3

Page 44 - Column 2, Paragraph 2, Lines 1 to 4 ORIGINAL:

"It is expected that of the population increase of 255,000 between 1961 and 1981, 216,000 will be accommodated in new suburbs within the City and 39,000 in existing built-up areas."

AMENDMENT:

"It is expected that of the population increase of 197,600 between 1969 and 1981, 132,400 will be accommodated in outline plan areas, 42,000 in presently developing areas and 23,200 in existing built-up areas."

Page 44 - Column 2, Paragraph 3, Lines 4 to 8 (p.45) ORIGINAL:

"The ratio between single family and apartment dwelling unit construction per year has changed from 90 per cent single family and 10 per cent apartment prior to 1961 to 60 per cent and 40 per cent respectively at present."


- 8 AMENDMENT: "The ratio between single family-duplex and apartment-row dwelling unit construction per year has changed from 90 per cent single familyduplex and 10 per cent apartment-row prior to 1961 to 30 per cent and 70 per cent respectively in 1968." V - 4

Page 45 - Diagram 1, Annual Dwelling Unit Construction in Edmonton AMENDMENT:

V - 5

V - 6

"The dwelling unit projections for the year 1981 contained in Diagram 1, Chapter V, Page 45 are amended to 112,500 single family-duplex units and 67,700 apartment units."

Page 45 - Column 1, Paragraph 1, Lines 3 to 7 ORIGINAL:

"It is anticipated that by 1981 there will be a total of 14,000 such units, in other words, onethird of new apartment construction will consist of high-rise units."

AMENDMENT:

"It is anticipated that by 1981 there will be a total of 16,400 such units, in other words, onethird of new apartment construction will consist of high-rise units."

Page 46 - Column 1, Table, Population Distribution by Density Area AMENDMENT:

"The table on Page 46, Column 1 entitled 'Population Distribution by Density Area' is replaced with the following table:

POPULATION DISTRIBUTION BY DENSITY AREA 1961 Density Low Intermediate Medium High TOTAL

No. of People 205,000 104,000 4,000 2,000 — 315,000

1981 Percentage 65.0 33.0 1.4 0.6 100.0

No. of People 365,000 175,000 35,000 45,000 620,000

Percentage 59.0 28.5 5.5 1.0 100.0


-9 V - 7

Page 46 - Diagram 2, City Residential Development 1951 - 1981 AMENDMENT:

V - 8

Page 47 - Drawing 1, Residential Density by Area AMENDMENT:

*V - 9

"Tne dwelling unit projections contained in Diagram 2, Chapter V, Page 46 are amended as follows for the year 1981: Total Units - 182,000; Single and Two Family Units - 112,500; and Apartment Units 69,500. Similar adjustments for other years are made accordingly."

"Drawing 1, Chapter V, Page 47 is amended to include those expansion areas as shown on the revised version of Drawing 5, Chapter III. These areas are classified as Low Density Residential."

Page 51 - Column 2, Principle 13 ORIGINAL:

"13. The maintenance of high standards for active recreational areas in suburbs has deterred the provision of passive recreational areas on even a modest scale. The re-introduction of amenity parks of one-half acre to one acre in area is considered essential to provide relief from the otherwise uninterrupted housing mass."

AMENDMENT:

"13. The maintenance of high standards for active recreational areas in suburbs has deterred the provision of passive recreational areas on even a modest scale. The inclusion of amenity features such as ornamental parks, treed walkways and landscaped buffer strips is considered essential to provide relief from the otherwise uninterrupted housing mass."


- 10 CHAPTER VI - COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT *VI - I

Page 54 - Drawing 1, Anticipated Commercial Development - 1981 AMENDMENT:

VI - 2

*VI - 3

"Drawing 1, Chapter VI, Page 54 is amended to include three additional Planned Regional Shopping Centres on the 'Anticipated Commercial Development - 1981' map. They are: one in West Jasper Place, one in th Southeast Development Area and one in northeast Edmonton east of 50th Street."

Page 56 - Column 2, Paragraph 1, Lines 15 to 20 ORIGINAL:

"By 1981, it is probable that three more centres will have developed the proposed Woodward's centre in southwest Edmonton, one at the west limits of Edmonton, adjacent to Stony Plain Road and a third in the northeast residential sector.

AMENDMENT:

"By 1981, it is probable that five more centres will have developed or will be in the process of development: the proposed Southgate centre in southwest Edmonton, one at the west limits of Edmonton, adjacent to Stony Plain Road, one in northeast Edmonton, east of 50th Street, one in the Southeast Development Area and one in West Jasper Place."

Page 61 - Column 2, Point f ORIGINAL:

"Additional east-west thoroughfares are planned for across Mill Creek on 92nd Avenue and over the C.P.R. yards on 76th Avenue."

AMENDMENT:

"Additional east-west thoroughfares are planned for across Mill Creek on 88th and 89th Avenue and over the C.P.R. yards on 76th Avenue."


- 11CHAPTER VII - INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT *VII - 1

Page 65 - Drawing 1, Industrial Districts AMENDMENT:

VII - 2

VII - 3

Page 66 - Column 2, Paragraph 3, Lines 1 to 7 ORIGINAL:

"Based on 1951 Census data, estimates of 1961 Census data and studies of provincial and Canadian growth patterns, it is estimated that, by 1981, employment in metropolitan Edmonton manufacturing industries will reach 43,280 or 17 per cent of the 1981 total labour force of 254,600."

AMENDMENT:

"Based on 1951 and 1961 Census data, studies undertaken by the Alberta Bureau of Statistics and studies of Provincial and Canadian growth patterns, it is estimated that, by 1981, employment in metropolitan Edmonton manufacturing industries will reach 33,360 or 12 per cent of the 1981 total labour force of 278,000."

Page 67 - Column 2, Table, Industrial Employment - Metropolitan Edmonton AMENDMENT:

VII - 4

"In Drawing 1, Chapter VII, Page 65 in the Key, Item 1, the designation 'Industrial Estate District' is changed to 'Mixed Industrial'."

"The 1981 Labour Force statistics contained in the table on Page 67, Column 2 entitled 'Industrial Employment - Metropolitan Edmonton' are amended as follows: Primary - 8,340, 3%; Manufacturing 33,360, 12%; Construction - 22,240, 8%; Transportation, Communication & Other Utilities - 30,580, 11%;Trade 52,820, 19%; Finance, Insurance & Real Estate - 16,680, 6%; Service & Public - 111,200, 40%; Unclassified 2,780, 1%; and Total - 278,000, 100%."

Page 67 - Table, Manufacturing Employment - Metropolitan Edmonton AMENDMENT:

"The table on Page 67 entitled 'Manufacturing Employment - Metropolitan Edmonton' is replaced with the following table:


- 12

-

MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT - METROPOLITAN EDMONTON

1951

1961

1967

1981

Labor Force % Labor Force % Labor Force % Labor Force % Food & Beverage 3,236 30.0 5,300 30.3 6,016 30.8 8,670 26.0 Clothing 800 7.4 1,139 6.5 1,820 9.3 3,170 9.5 Wood 5.0 536 918 5.2 824 4.2 1,340 4.0 Furniture & Fixture 2.9 598 3.4 317 738 3.8 1,340 4.0 Paper & Allied 0.7 363 2.1 71 276 1.4 670 2.0 Printing, Publishing & Allied 715 6.6 1,294 7.4 1,127 5.8 1,830 5.5 Iron & Steel Products 2,917 1,587 14.7 16.7 2,652 13.6 5,340 16.0 Transportation Equipment 17.6 706 1,904 4.0 925 4.8 2,000 6.0 820 Non-Metallic Mineral Products 167 1.5 1,278 4.7 6.6 3,000 9.0 Petroleum & Coal Products., 762 7.1 1,113 6.4 626 3.2 1,170 3.5 Chemicals & Chemical Products 254 2.4 1,589 9.1 1,133 5.8 2,000 6.0 Miscellaneous* 379 3.5 631 3.7 2,090 10.7 2,830 8.5 TOTAL 10,797 100.0 17,477 100.0 19,505 100.0 33,360 100.0 *Includes: Textile & Knitting, Leather, Electrical, Rubber and Others. VII - 5

Page 68 - Diagram 3, Metropolitan Employment, 1961 - 1981 AMENDMENT:

"A revised Diagram 3, Chapter VII is attached to this list of amendments."

Page 68 - Column 2, Following Objective 5 COMMENT:

An additional objective is added to the list of objectives for industrial development.

AMENDMENT:

"6. To recognize and plan for the changing transportation patterns which will make Edmonton the dominant distribution and marketing centre for western Canada. In the past, Edmonton has been removed from the main commercial traffic routes for the distribution and trucking of goods. However, with the completion of the more economical Yellowhead Route to Vancouver and the anticipated completion in the early 1970's of a highway connecting Edmonton to Prince George and the port of Prince Rupert, Edmonton will be the only city in western Canada with direct access to two major seaports and thus, with its already excellent rail and air facilities, assume the dominant role as western Canada's distribution centre."


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KEY UPPER NUMBERS SHOW 1961 EMPLOYMENT LOWER NUMBERS SHOW 1981 EMPLOYMENT DIAG.3 — METROPOLITAN EMPLOYMENT, 1961 - 1981.


- 13 VII - 7

Page 69 - Diagram 4, 1965 and 1981 Industrial Areas AMENDMENT:

*VII - 8

Page 71 - Column 2, Following Principle 16 COMMENT: AMENDMENT:

VII - 9

Two additional principles are added to the list of principles for industrial development. "17. To enhance Edmonton's position in western Canada as an industrial centre and to enable the present and proposed industries in the City to adequately develop and remain competitive, plans should be formulated for an industrial research park composed of independently operated, industrially oriented research and development laboratories. Such a facility would permit contact and joint use of facilities such as computers by experts in an increased number of scientific and technical fields. The industrial research park should be located on an attractive site which is easily accessible to existing facilities such as the University of Alberta and the Alberta Research Council."

Page 71 - Column 2, Following Principle 17 AMENDMENT:

*VII - 10

"Diagram 4, Chapter VII, Page 69 is amended to include those areas designated 'Proposed Industry' throughout the Metropolitan Area as shown on the revised version of the 1981 Land Use Plan."

"18. Joint railway service must be provided to all new industrial areas wherever it is physically possible to do so and only those areas treated by the railway companies as being within the interswitching limits should be developed for industrial uses."

Page 71 - Diagram 7, Southeast Industrial Area Staging and Design Plan AMENDMENT:

"Diagram 7, Chapter VII, Page 71 is deleted from the General Plan pending the completion of an outline plan for the southeast industrial area."


- 14CHAPTER VIII - PARKS AND RECREATION

VIII - 1

Page 73 - Drawing 1, Parks and Recreation Plan AMENDMENT:

*VIII - 2

Page 74 - Column 1, Following Line 2 AMENDMENT:

*VIII - 3

*VIII - 4

"Column 1, Page 74 is amended by the addition of the following statement following Line 2: 'Of special concern are high and medium density apartment districts where heavy demands are placed on existing parkland facilities.'"

Page 74 - Column 1, Paragraph 2, Lines 7 to 11 ORIGINAL:

"Privately owned recreational facilities should only be allowed to locate on City owned parkland on a concession or lease arrangement whereby the City could enforce appropriate standards of operation."

AMENDMENT:

"Privately owned developments shall not be allowed to locate on municipally owned parkland. However, a privately financed public recreational facility could be allowed where a concession or lease arrangement will guarantee appropriate standards of development and operation and provides access to the public."

Page 74 - Column 2, Following Objective 4 COMMENT:

AMENDMENT:

*VIII - 5

"A revised Drawing 1, Chapter VIII is attached to this list of amendments."

An additional objective is added to the list of objectives for parks and development. To co-operate with other bodies in the field of parks and recreation and stimulate appreciation of the value of open space in the urban environment and the beautification of this environment."

Page 75 - Column 1, Line 3 AMENDMENT:

"The statement" 'Community Level (4 - 6 neighbourhoods)' on Page 75, Column 1, Line 3 is deleted from the General Plan."


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Existing District Park Proposed District Park

EDMONTON GENERAL PLAN

DWG.

PARKS AND RECREATION PLAN

1

PARKS & RECREATION

CHAPTER VI"


- 15 VIII - 6

Page 75 - Column 1, Lines 14 to 16 under "Playlot or Block Playground" ORIGINAL:

COMMENT:

AMENDMENT:

*VIII - 7

*VIII - 8

VIII - 9

"The size may vary from 2,000 to 10,000 square feet, depending upon the number of children in the immediate vicinity." The references to parks standards throughout the Parks and Recreation Chapter are amended to conform with the Master Plan for Parks and Recreation Preliminary Report which was adopted by City Council on May 11, 1970. "The overall standard for the provision of land for playlots, neighbourhood playgrounds and neighbourhood parks is 1.5 acres per 1,000 population.

Page 75 - Column 1, Lines 17 to 19 under "Playlot or Block Playground" ORIGINAL:

"In some instances, the playlot could constitute a part of a larger park area to provide flexibility of function."

AMENDMENT:

"In most instances, both playlots and playgrounds would consititute a part of a larger park area to provide flexibility of function."

Page 75 - Column 1, Lines 1 to 5 under "Neighbourhood Playground" ORIGINAL:

"FUNCTION: This playground is designed to serve the active recreational requirements of the surrounding neighbourhood, providing a place for groups to gather for communal activities."

AMENDMENT:

"FUNCTION: Neighbourhood parks and playgrounds are designed to serve the active and passive recreational requirements of the surrounding neighbourhood. It should be noted that 'Community Leagues' are in fact neighbourhood facilities and function as neighbourhood recreational centres.

Page 75 - Column 2, Lines 1 to 4 under "Size" ORIGINAL:

"A combined school and park area of 13.5 acres usually provides an adequate amount of land area subject to local variances according to the conditions that prevail."


-16AMENDMENT:

VIII - 10

Page 78 - Column 1, Following Line 3 AMENDMENT:

*VIII - 11

VIII - 13

VIII - 14

"Column 1, Page 78 is amended by the addition of the following statement following Line 3: 'In addition to parks located adjacent to schools, small amenity parks are suitable in more remote areas of the neighbourhood but should not be used in the calculation of land requirements."

Page 78 - Community Park and Playfield AMENDMENT:

*VIII - 12

"The combined school and park area is 14 acres in size. Total neighbourhood requirements are 16.5 acres subject to local variances according to the conditions that prevail."

"The section dealing with the 'Community Park and Playfield' appearing on Page 78 is deleted from the General Plan."

Page 80 - Column 1, Lines 8 to 11 ORIGINAL:

'LOCATION: Serving a population of 40,000 to 50,000 people a district park should be .adjacent to major urban roadways to ensure efficient access for all."

AMENDMENT:

"LOCATION: Serving a population of 40,000 to 60,000 people, district parks should be adjacent to major urban roadways and are best located adjacent to senior high schools to ensure efficient access for all."

Page 80 - Column 1, Lines 16 to 18 ORIGINAL:

"A district park may vary between 60 and 100 acres depending upon the location and site."

AMENDMENT:

"District parks and athletic grounds are provided at a ratio of 1.25 acres per 1,000 population and vary in size according to the location and site."

Page 80 - Column 1, Lines 20 to 22 under "City Parks" ORIGINAL:

"There exists no limit to the size of a city park other than economic and physical restNictions."

AMENDMENT:

"City parks and natural preserve areas are provided at a ratio of 12 acres per 1,000 population. There is no specific requirement in size."


- 17 *VIII - 15

Page 81 - Drawing 5, River Valley Parks System and Special Facilities AMENDMENT: "A revised Drawing 5, Chapter VIII is attached to this list of amendment."

*VIII - 16

Page 82 - Column 1, Principle 1 ORIGINAL:

AMENDMENT:

*VIII - 17

"1. The River Valley should be developed primarily for public recreational purposes. Other uses such as institutional and commercial recreation should be permitted as special uses only on an individually selected basis in keeping with the General Plan policies." The River Valley should be developed for public recreational uses. Special uses may be permitted only on an individually selected basis in accordance with policies of the General Plan and the Parks and Recreation Master Plan."

Page 82 - Column 1, Principle 2 ORIGINAL:

"2. The development of the River Valley in proximity to high density residential areas and the downtown central business district, should be co-ordinated with the principles and objectives proposed for these areas of intensive use."

AMENDMENT: "2. No development should be permitted in the River Valley and ravine system or on or near the top of the banks of this system that will mar the natural configuration and appearance of these features. A more precise definition of the limitations on development in and in the vicinity of the River Valley and ravine system should be forthcoming in the Parks and Recreation Master Plan and in the City's land use control bylaws." *VIII - 18

Page 82 - Column 2, Principle 4 ORIGINAL:

"4. Where parkland is essential for the location of transportation facilities such as freeways an:il expressways, every effort should be made, through alternative design proposals, to minimize effective loss of parkland. A cost for the parkland loss should be established and budgets for parkland acquisition should, subsequently, be related to the value of land removed from park use."


-18AMENDMENT:

VIII - 19

Where parkland is essential for the location of transportation facilities such as freeways and expressways, every effort should be made, through alternative design proposals, to minimize effective loss of parkland. A cost for the parkland loss should be established and budgets for parkland acquisition should, subsequently, be related to the value of land removed from park use and to the value of residual parkland which has been adversely affected by the roadway."

Page 82 - Column 2, Principle 6 ORIGINAL:

AMENDMENT:

"6. Where appropriate, park drives should be constructed throughout the River Valley to provide access to all parts of the park system and allow relaxed drives at low speeds. Such a system would function independently from cross river and limited access roadway facilities located throughout the park area." In all new residential areas abutting the River Valley and raVine system, the design of the subdivision should provide for the separation of housing or other development from the River Valley or ravines by either a public roadway or a sufficiently broad public upland area that will effectively prevent encroachment into the River Valley or ravines in order to preserve the natural amenities and maintain public access to the system for as many people as possible."


- 19 CHAPTER IX - PUBLIC AND SEMI-PUBLIC USES

*IX - 1

Chapter IX - Public and Semi-Public Uses AMENDMENT:

*IX- 2

Page 83 - Column 2, Following Principle 6 COMMENT:

AMENDMENT:

IX - 3

IX - 4

"The drawings in Chapter IX, Public and SemiPublic Uses are deleted from the General Plan pending the completion of a definitive Public Facilities Study."

An additional principle is added to the list of principles for the development of public and semi-public uses. Due to the need for co-ordination in planning for public uses, a public facilities plan, which would be a detailed statement of public policy for the maintenance, expansion and development of public facilities, should be prepared and adopted as part of the General Plan. Encompassing such areas as schools, libraries, police and fire facilities, the infolfflation would be of value in the subsequent preparation of long range capital budgets by the City of Edmonton."

Page 87 - Column 2, Paragraph 1, Lines 7 to 8 ORIGINAL:

"A full-time enrollment of 6,000 is anticipated by 1981."

AMENDMENT:

"A full-time enrollment of 8,000 is anticipated by 1978. With the possible development of a community college and additional apprentice and vocational training facilities in the City during the Plan period it is anticipated that N.A.I.T. will specialize to a greater extent in engineering technology with other subjects being taught at the new facilities."

Page 87 - Column 2, Paragraph 2, Lines 7 to 12 ORIGINAL:

"Projections indicate that 18,000 full-time students will be on the campus by 1972-73 and that facilities for 25,000 students will be needed in Edmonton by 1981. The staff of the University should increase to 4,350 full-time and 770 part-time by 1981."


-20AMENDMENT:

"Recent projections have indicated that there will be between 25,000 and 30,000 full-time students on campus by 1975-76 and that the number of staff and students at the total university complex including the health centre could number as many as 55,000 by this time. Plans are presently being formulated for a second university at St. Albert which will accommodate an additional 5,000 students by 1974 with an ultimate student population of 20,000."

IX - 5

*IX - 6

Page 88 - Column 2, Paragraph 1, Lines 1 to 6 ORIGINAL:

"Assuming that the main library serves 60,000 people (in addition to providing facilities for the Metropolitan Area) and each branch library is to serve 30,000, then one main library and 17 branch libraries will be required to serve the 1981 population."

AMENDMENT:

"Assuming that the main library serves 60,000 people (in addition to providing facilities for the Metropolitan Area) and each branch library is to serve approximately 30,000, then one main library and nineteen branch libraries will be required to serve the 1981 population."

Page 89 - Column 1, Paragraph 1, Lines 8 to 18 AMENDMENT:

*IX - 7

"The statement: 'Present proposals for the new coliseum and convention centre provide for, in addition to an arena with a seating capacity of more than 10,000 people, approximately 30,000 square feet of conference and exhibition space, an 850 seat theatre and an underground parkade. The coliseum and convention centre would provide an anchor for the southeastern end of the Civic Centre bringing people to downtown Edmonton and increasing the downtown's vitality.' on Page 89, Column 1, Paragraph 1, Lines 8 to 18 is deleted from the General Plan."

Page 89 - Column 2, Paragraph 2, Lines 11 to 15 ORIGINAL:

"The need to provide a modern covered arena or coliseum has been established. Although additional studies on the most appropriate location may be necessary, the Plan presently supports the Civic Centre site."


-21AMENDMENT:

IX - 8

IX - 9

"Proposals as of September, 1968 for a downtown sports, trade and convention centre include a 32,000 seat covered football stadium which can be adapted to a 12,000 seat hockey arena. The centre would also contain 100,000 square feet of trade display area, a theatre, auditorium, restaurant, meeting rooms and offices. The proposed site, east of 97th Street, is adjacent to the C.N.R. tracks and future rapid transit route."

Page 90 - Column 1, Paragraph 3, Lines 5 to 11 ORIGINAL:

"Using the desired standard of 8 active treatment beds and 2.5 chronic care beds per 1,000 population, and assuming a 1981 metropolitan population of 638,000 the number of active treatment and chronic care beds desired will be approximately 5,100 and 1,580 respectively."

AMENDMENT:

"Using the desired standards of 8 active treatment beds and 2.5 chronic care beds per 1,000 population, and assuming a 1981 metropolitan population of 695,000, the number of active treatment and chronic care beds desired will be approximately 5,660 and 1,730 respectively."

Page 90 - Column 1, Paragraph 3, Lines 18 to 25 ORIGINAL:

"If the additional new active treatment centres were to be the same size as the City operated Royal Alexandra Hospital, then three more hospitals would be required. Appropriate locations for these hospitals, possibly in the northwest sector of the City, in the northeast and in the southwest (perhaps as an auxiliary to the University Hospital) should be reserved."

AMENDMENT:

"If the additional new active treatment centres are to be the same size as the City operated Royal Alexandra Hospital, then four more hospitals will be required. Appropriate locations for these hospitals, possibly in the northeast, northwest, southeast and southwest (perhaps as an auxiliary to the University Hospital) should be reserved."


- 22CHAPTER X - CENTRAL AREA X - 1

Page 98 - Column 2, following Point f AMENDMENT:

"The following statement is added to Point f, Page 98, Column 2: 'In April, 1968 City Council accepted the principle of a downtown pedestrian circulation system as a guide to the planning of pedestrian movement in this area. This system incorporates the principles contained within this section and provides a basis for comfortable, convenient and safe downtown circulation. The system is outlined on the amended version of Drawing 1, Chapter X."

X - 2

Page 99 - Drawing 1, Proposed Street Modification in Central Edmonton AMENDMENT:

*X - 3

Page 104 - Diagram 7, Central Area Functional Uses AMENDMENT:

*X - 4

"Drawing 1, Chapter X, Page 99 is deleted from the General Plan and is replaced by a new Drawing 1 entitled 'Proposed Downtown Pedestrian Circulation System."

"Diagram 7, Chapter X, Page 104 is amended by designating the area east of 97th Street as 'Urban Renewal Study Area' and the C.N.R. land holdings in the Central Area are designated as 'C.N.R. Study Area."

Page 105 - Column 1, Point b, Paragraph 3, Lines 4 to 7 AMENDMENT: "The statement 'An integrated coliseum complex is planned for the southeastern part of the Civic Centre and will contain a large arena, an exhibition hall, meeting rooms, theatre, tourist bureau and a large underground parkade.' on Page 105, Column 1, Point b, Paragraph 3, Lines 4 to 7 is deleted from the General Plan."


MN

Major Downtown Traffic Arteries

Elm= Existing Underground Walkway Proposed Underground Walkways Proposed Major Street Level Walkways and Public Plazas Elevated Walkways Major Underground Activity Areas Existing and Under Construction Possible Location of Future Underground Commercial Development Existing and Proposed Parkodes EDMONTON GENERAL PLAN

DWG

PROPOSED DOWNTOWN PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION SYSTEM CENTRAL AREA

1

CHAPTER X


- 23 CHAPTER XI - URBAN RENEWAL

XI - 1

Page 110 - Column 1, Paragraph 4, Lines 1 to 9; Column 2 Lines 1 to 11 AMENDMENT:

XI - 2

Page 111 - Diagram 2, Cost Sharing Arrangements of Urban Renewal Programs AMENDMENT"

XI - 3

"The section on Page 110 entitled 'Available Assistance' is deleted from the General Plan pending clarification of the Federal position on urban renewal."

"Diagram 2, Chapter XI, Page 111 is deleted from the General Plan pending clarification of the Federal position on urban renewal."

Page 114 - Column 1, Paragraph 3, Lines 1 to 6; Column 2, Lines 1 to 6 ORIGINAL:

"The urban renewal process inevitably involves the provision of publicly assisted housing. Each time an urban renewal scheme is implemented, the amount of substandard housing stock is reduced. Public housing is necessary to provide safe, decent accommodation at reasonable rent levels to those persons unable to afford a decent standard of accommodation and to offer lodgings to those people displaced by urban renewal programs. Thus public housing forms an integral part of the urban renewal process."

AMENDMENT:

"A primary goal of government is the responsibility of ensuring that every citizen is afforded an equal opportunity of having a decent place in which to live. Some families and individuals, through reasons of disability, fixed income levels or lack of economic capacity, are presently forced to depend upon substandard accommodations located in the older blighted residential districts of the City. For these reasons public housing is necessary to provide safe, decent accommodation at reasonable rent levels. In response to this critical need for adequate low cost accommodation the City of Edmonton, in conjunction with the Provincial and Federal Governments, has initiated a public housing program. Under the auspices of the Edmonton Community Housing Organization (E.C.H.0.) a City of Edmonton agency, a program is being implemented to provide low income housing to citizens of low income in the City."


- 24 XI - 4

XI - 5

Page 114 - Column 2, Paragraph 1, Lines 14 to 18 ORIGINAL:

"The amount of the subsidy and the development of public housing is shared by the three levels of government on the following basis: Federal Government - 75 per cent, Provincial Government 15 per cent, City - 10 per cent."

AMENDMENT:

"There are presently three ways by which a public housing project may be financed. Firstly through a cost sharing technique whereby the Federal Government contributes 75 per cent of the cost of the project, the Provincial Government 15 per cent and the City 10 per cent. Secondly, through a loan technique where the Federal Government loans the City up to 90 per cent of the cost of the project and, thirdly, where the Federal Government provides a loan to a non-profit organization which, in turn, builds and administers the project."

Page 115 - Column 1, Paragraph 1, Lines 1 to 23; Paragraph 2, Lines 1 to 5 AMENDMENT:

"The section on Page 115 entitled 'Edmonton's Urban Renewal Program' is deleted from the General Plan and is replaced with the following section: 'THE DISTRICT PLAN PROGRAM The withdrawal of the Federal Government from urban renewal has necessitated a re-evaluation of the City's problems and needs in this area. Needless to say, the problems associated with the older areas of the City have not disappeared along with the Federal funds. In response to the need for studies of older areas a district plan process has been evolved so that problems associated with older areas can be studied at a more refined and intimate scale. Thus the district plan process is simply another type of urban renewal program but is one not dependent on senior government funds. However, a public rehabilitation program would benefit greatly from Federal participation. Fortunately, the district plan approach involving conservation and rehabilitation is much more appropriate in the City of Edmonton as opposed to massive redevelopment programs.'"


-25CHAPTER XII - TRANSPORTATION

XII - 1

Page 116 - Column 1, Paragraph 2, Lines 3 to 8 ORIGINAL:

"Of particular importance is the indication that between 1965 and 1981 population will increase by some 200,000, employment in the downtown area will double and vehicle ownership will increase from 151,000 in 1965 to 255,000 vehicles by 1981."

AMENDMENT: "Of particular importance is the indication that between 1965 and 1981 the City population will increase by some 250,000, employment in the downtown area will almost double and vehicle ownership will increase from 151,000 in 1965 to 275,000 vehicles by 1981." XII - 2

Page 116 - Diagram 1, Corridor Traffic, Population and Employment AMENDMENT: "Diagram 1, Chapter XII, Page 116 is deleted from the General Plan. Up-dated population and employment estimates may be determined from the revised versions of Drawing 5, Chapter III and Diagram 3, Chapter VII, copies of which are included in this Appendix."

*XII - 3

Page 126 - Column 1, Paragraph 3, Lines 5 to 10 ORIGINAL:

"Financial arrangements will permit approximately one-half of the M.E.T.S. proposals to be implemented by 1981. The program consists of thirteen miles of freeways, five new river bridges, six railway grade separations and improvements to existing roads and intersections."

AMENDMENT: "The roadway program consists of freeway and arterial construction, five new river bridges, at least six railway grade separations and improvements to existing roads and intersections." *XII - 4

Page 126 - Column 1, Paragraph 4, Lines 1 to 4 ORIGINAL:

"The freeway program consists of the Jasper, Mill Creek and North-East Freeways including the South and East legs of the Downtown Freeway Loop."

AMENDMENT: "The freeway program consists of portions of the Jasper, Mill Creek and Whitemud Freeways as shown on the revised version of Drawing 3, Chapter XII. Also included in the freeway program are parts of Highways 14, 15 and 16 and the Capilano and new 105th Street Bridges. As shown by the revised Drawing 3, major arterial roads will be constructed


-26 along a number of the proposed freeway routes but not developed to freeway standards until after 1981." Page 126 - Column 2, Lines 5 to 11 ORIGINAL:

"Other proposals designed to increase Central Area access include a west approach to the Dawson Bridge direct from 101st Avenue, a 97th Street connection to the Low Level Bridge and the Glenora Road connection from the River Road to 110th and 111th Streets."

AMENDMENT: "Other proposals designed to increase Central Area access include a west approach to the Dawson Bridge direct from 101st Avenue and a 97th Street connection to the Low Level Bridge." Page 126 - Column 2, Paragraph 1 under Transit Program, Lines 6 - 8 ORIGINAL:

"A study is recommended to formulate a detailed rapid transit plan and to determine when this system should be implemented."

AMENDMENT: "Also included in the transit program is a rapid transit system utilizing existing railway rightsof-way." XII - 7

Page 127 - Drawing 3, 1981 Roadway Plan AMENDMENT: "A revised Drawing 3, Chapter XII is attached to this list of amendments."

- 8

Page 128 - Column 1, Paragraph 2, Lines 3 to 4 AMENDMENT: "The statement: 'This is an indication of the urgency for a comprehensive rapid transit study.' on Page 128, Column 1, Paragraph 2, Lines 3 to 4 is deleted from the General Plan." Page 128 - Column 2, Paragraph 1, Lines 9 to 16 and Page 129 Column 1, Lines 1 to 10 ORIGINAL:

"Under present federal, provincial and local cost sharing arrangements simultaneous construction of a freeway and rapid transit system would appear financially impossible. As an interim solution, a rail commuting service should be considered, using existing railway rights-of-way and facilities.


4m, 4m. .mr 0 0

di

a t

ee.

0 ••

e°'

r I

I I I

I I I

1.•-•••••J

I

I e I

Tedvdniii

II IS Is

11 II KEY VIP Mwin• ••••••••••••

min FREEWAYS to be developed by 1981 MAJOR ARTERIALS to be developed by 1981 ( brought

to freeway standard after 1981 )

MAJOR ARTERIALS to be developed by 1981 RAPID TRANSIT ROUTES EDMONTON GENERAL PLAN

19 81 TRANSPORTATION PLAN TRANSPORTATION

DWG

3 CHAPTER XII


- 27 The primary purpose of these trains would be to serve peak downtown movements using the C.N. station as the main terminal. A secondary function would be to serve employment areas located adjacent to branchlines. The scheme would involve joint City and railway use of trackage and right-of-way with stations and parking areas served by distributor buses. This system could be converted in stages to the modern rapid transit system that will eventually be required for the City." AMENDMENT: "In view of this, City Council has approved the establishment of a rapid transit system utilizing existing railway rights-of-way which should be in operation in the mid 1970's. Stage 1 of this system includes lines running from a transportation centre in the downtown to the Industrial Airport in the northwest and to the Exhibition Grounds in the northeast. Stage 2 involves a line running across the North Saskatchewan River to the University and proceeding further south to terminate at the married student residences on the University of Alberta Farm. Stage 3 of the system would involve an extension of the northeast line along the C.N.R. right-of-way. The proposed routes of this system are shown on the revised version of the 1981 Land Use Plan and on the revised version of Drawing 3, Chapter XII." *XII - 10

Page 129 - Diagram 7, Existing Railway Facilities Suggested for Mass Transit Use AMENDMENT: "Diagram 7, Chapter XII, Page 129 is deleted from the General Plan."


- 28CHAPTER XIII - PUBLIC UTILITIES

XIII - 1

Page 136 - Diagram 1, Utility Requirements for the City of Edmonton AMENDMENT: "The 1981 projected requirements of population and utilities for the City of Edmonton contained in Diagram 1, Chapter XIII, Page 136 are amended as follows: population - 620; water - 18; gas 115; telephones - 337; power - 4.08."

XIII - 2

Page 137 - Drawing 1, Existing Major Water Lines - 1965 AMENDMENT: "Drawing 1, Chapter XIII, Page 137 is amended to include proposed major water lines in the residential expansion areas to the west, north and southeast which are shown on the revised version of Drawing 5, Chapter III."

XIII - 3

Page 139 - Drawing 2, Storm and Sanitary Interceptors AMENDMENT: "Drawing 2, Chapter III, Page 139 is amended to include proposed storm and sanitary interceptors in the residential expansion areas to the west, north and southeast which are shown on the revised version of Drawing 5, Chapter III."

*XIII - 4

Page 141 - Column 1, Paragraph 1, Lines 1 to 5 AMENDMENT: "The paragraph 'Additional incinerator capacity will be required in the near future and new sites should be located to minimize hauling distances. These could be located in industrial areas in the northeast, northwest and southeast.' on Page 141, Column 1, Paragraph 1, Lines 1 to 5 is deleted from the General Plan."

*XIII - 5

Page 141 - Column 2, Paragraph 1, Lines 4 to 11 ORIGINAL:

"This could be supplied by a new gas fired plant constructed upstream in conjunction with a new water treatment plant or a plant at Genessee or Ardley where large coal deposits can be utilized. At this time, it is most likely, however, that a gas fired plant will be constructed downstream on Edmonton's eastern outskirts."

AMENDMENT: "The bulk of this need will be supplied by a new power plant constructed in northeast Edmonton on the east side of the North Saskatchewan River opposite the Kennedale Ravine."


_ 29-

XIII - 6

Page 141 - Column 2, Paragraph 2, Lines 4 to 8 ORIGINAL:

"The load of 1.0 billion kilowatt hours per year is increasing approximately ten per cent per year so that by 1981 the load is expected to be 3.8 billion kilowatt hours per year."

AMENDMENT: "The load of 1.0 billion kilowatt hours per year is increasing approximately ten per cent per year so that by 1981 the load could reach as high as 4.1 billion kilowatt hours per year. *XIII - 7

Page 142 - Drawing 3, Electrical Distribution System AMENDMENT: "Drawing 3, Chapter XIII, Page 142 is amended to include a new power plant in northeast Edmonton on the east side of the North Saskatchewan River opposite the Kennedale Ravine."


- 30 CHAPTER XIV - PROGRAMMING

XIV - I

XIV - 2

Page 146 - Column 1, Paragraph 5, Lines 4 to 10 ORIGINAL:

"The program for new residential development consists of three five-year stages from 1966-1981 with provision for redevelopment in the built-up areas."

AMENDMENT:

"The program for new residential development consists of a two-year stage from 1969-1971 during which growth in the presently developing areas will progress rapidly and two five-year stages from 1971-1981 during which development will proceed in the six outline plan areas. Also included is provision for redevelopment in the built-up areas."

Page 147 - Drawing 1, Staging Plan AMENDMENT:

XIV - 3

"A revised Drawing 1, Chapter XIV is attached to this list of amendments. The Parks Program has been deleted from this Drawing but it may be anticipated that parks facilities will be developed in relation to the development of adjacent residential areas. A more explicit parks program will be included in the forthcoming Parks Master Plan."

Page 148 - The Program for Residential Development AMENDMENT:

"The section of Chapter XIV, Programming appearing on Page 148 entitled 'The Program for Residential Development' is deleted from the General Plan and is replaced by the following section: 'THE PROGRAM FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT The program for residential development is based on population projections and the anticipated distribution of people into new and built-up areas. Although the rate of expansion in any given direction will depend upon the ability of developers to service and market land, an estimation of growth distribution throughout the Plan period is essential to co-ordinate the provision of necessary municipal services and


BACM Annexation Area

KEY Residential

Program

Stage 1

1969-1971

Stage 2

1971-1976

Stage 3

1976-1981

Industrial Program Developed Area

tiMit

Stage 1

1966-1981

Stage 2 Beyond 1981 and Special Uses

EDMONTON GENERAL PLAN

STAGING PLAN PROGRAMMING

DWG.

1 CHAPTER XIV


- 31facilities. Population increases for three growth periods are given in the following table: POPULATION GROWTH Year

Population

Period

Growth

1969 1971 1976 1981

422,400 445,000 525,000 620,000

1969-71 1971-76 1976-81

22,600 80,000 85,000

Total Population Growth

197,600

The population increase of 197,600 is distributed into new areas in the west, southwest, south southeast, northeast and north sections of the City, into presently developing areas (Steele Heights, Londonderry, Dickinsfield, Rundle Heights and Duggan) and into developed areas throughout the City. DISTRIBUTION OF GROWTH Location West Southwest South Southeast Northeast North

Population Increase

Approximate Acreage Requirement

17,700 15,600 13,600 39,400 23,000 23,100

890 780 680 1,970 1,150 1,160

New Area Growth 132,400 Developing Area Growth 42,000 Developed Area Growth 23,200 Total Growth 197,600

6,630

The acreage requirements in the above table were derived using an average of twenty persons per gross acre including freeway and regional park needs but excluding any River Valley or ravine lands. These figures should be used only as a rough approximation as the actual figures in each area will vary depending upon the demand at any given time for different housing types and densities.


- 32 A discussion of items influencing the rate of growth for each of the six expansion areas, the presently developing areas and the built-up areas forms the remainder of this section. Southeast - Southeast Development Area Staging priority has been given to the Southeast Development Area where it is felt that the sale of land by the municipal authority will maintain reasonable lot prices and therefore a high demand. It is projected that approximately 39,400 persons will reside in this area by 1981 or 29 per cent of the total outline plan area population anticipated by this date. In all likelihood, growth in this area will not proceed until late 1971 or early 1972 due to the need for extending trunk sewer facilities from the east but, once started, will progress very rapidly throughout the Plan period. Planned improvements to the arterial road system in addition to the construction of the Mill Creek Freeway will provide this area with the essential transportation facilities necessary to handle the 1981 population. Northeast - Clareview, Casselman and the Hermitage The designation of this area for the provision of housing for the middle and lower middle income groups ensures that it will accommodate an important segment of the total forecast population. Accordingly, 23,100 persons are projected to reside in this area by 1981. This represents 17 per cent of the total population allocated to outline plan areas. Northeast Edmonton is one of the easiest areas in the City to provide with utility services since trunk sewer, gas and power lines already pass through the area, although trunk storm sewers have to be constructed from the Kennedale Ravine to 153rd Avenue and 50th Street. It is anticipated, at present, that construction of this sewer will not start before the winter of 1972-73. Improved access to this area will be provided by the Northeast Freeway which should be constructed to arterial standards by 1981 but early development of the area will be heavily dependent on implementation of the northeast leg of the proposed rapid transit line. As the outline plans for the various components of the northeast have been completed and are presently being processed it can be expected that servicing will commence in the spring of 1971. Rapid growth is forecast for the early years of development in the northeast as it is one of the few areas which can be quickly serviced but the rate of growth should decrease somewhat as the competing Southeast Development and B.A.C.M. areas come on to the market.


-33North - B.A.C.M. Development Area The acquiring of a large tract of land under single ownership in combination with the offering of housing intended for the middle and lower middle income groups indicates that this area should have a rate of growth similar to that of the northeast area. The main difference between the projections of growth for the two areas is that, since the plan for this area is still being prepared and since utility extensions are not as easy as in the Northeast, growth in the B.A.C.M. area probably will not commence until 1971 but, once underway, will proceed rapidly as this area is further removed from industrial influences than the Northeast area. The greatest constraint facing this area is one of access as roadway improvements required to move traffic from this area to the downtown are extremely difficult to undertake and only limited arterial improvements are anticipated during the Plan period. Problems will also be evident in the number of people which the existing water distribution system will be able to serve and in the provision of storm sewer facilities. West - West Jasper Place Growth in West Jasper Place over the next few years is expected to be very rapid due to the lack of other areas in the City capable of handling immediate growth. However, as other outline plan areas are developed it is expected that competitive land prices in other areas will tend to retard growth in this sector. Access to this area will be improved by proposed extensions to the Jasper and Whitemud Freeways while extensions to existing trunk facilities will largely provide the necessary utility services. Approximately 17,700 people are anticipated in this area by 1981 or 13 per cent of the total outline plan area population. Southwest - Riverbend Terwillegar Heights The Riverbend Terwillegar Heights area is expected to house a population of 19,000 by 1981; this accounts for 14 per cent of the outline plan area population. The projected rate of growth in this area is somewhat lower than that of other areas since, to date, this area has catered to meeting the needs of upper middle and high income housing market for which there is a limited demand. The higher land costs in this area also tend to mitigate against its rapid development. Roadways


-34and utilities will be extended to this area from the already developed portion to the north in accord with the provisions of the outline plan for the area. South - Kaskiteeo As the outline plan for this area is only in the initial stages of preparation it is unlikely that development will commence until 1971 and then development is expected to proceed at approximately the same rate as the West Jasper Place and Riverbend Terwillegar Heights areas. However, a smaller portion of the total projected outline plan area population (13,600 persons or 10 per cent of the total) has been designated for this area due to its smaller size and the fact that the entire Duggan subdivision has yet to develop. As in the Terwillegar Heights area utilities and roadways will be extended to the area south of Duggan from presently developing areas to the north. It should again be emphasized that these projections of growth by area are only estimates and that the development of any particular area will depend to a significant degree upon the ability of developers in each expansion area to successfully service and market lots. Presently Developing Areas It is estimated that, during the Plan period, presently developing areas will accommodate approximately 42,000 people. Much of this growth will occur in the early stages of the Plan period as existing subdivisions are filled in before the new outline plan areas can be serviced and made available for development. Drawing 5, Chapter III indicates the projected growth in each of these presently developing areas as well as for the remainder of the City. Built-up Areas Higher densities in developed areas are expected to account for an additional population of 23,200. Major increases are expected in the Central Area and adjacent fringes and in the Strathcona and Garneau areas. Minor increases are expected in central Jasper Place, Norwood and the University Campus. The extent of Central Area development will be influenced by existing public services, future mortgage lending policies and the growing transportation


- 35 problem. Some residential uses in the Central Area will be displaced by roadways, commercial uses, parks and public uses. At the same time there will be a growing use of air right developments over roads and railroad land in the Central Area. Industrial uses north of Whyte Avenue between 101st and 104th Streets are to be redeveloped residentially on a long term basis.'" XIV - 4

XIV - 5

XIV - 6

Page 149 - Column 1, Paragraph 1, Lines 4 to 6 ORIGINAL:

"Manufacturing employment for the Edmonton region is estimated to be 43,280 by the year 1981."

AMENDMENT:

"Manufacturing employment for the Metropolitan Area is estimated to be 33,360 by the year 1981."

Page 149 - Column 1, Paragraph 2, Lines 8 to 11 ORIGINAL:

"An additional 4,000 acres are designated as industrial reserve beyond 1981 and for special uses such as large land users or obnoxious or hazardous industry."

AMENDMENT:

"An additional 7,600 acres are designated as industrial reserve beyond 1981 and for special uses such as large land users or obnoxious or hazardous industry."

Page 149 - Column 1, Summary of Industrial Land Requirements AMENDMENT:

"The 'Summary of Industrial Land Requirements" appearing in Column 1 on Page 149 of the General Plan is deleted and replaced by the following table: 'SUMMARY OF INDUSTRIAL LAND REQUIREMENTS 1966-1.981 Beyond 1981 Total City of Edmonton Outside City Total Metropolitan Area

5,200 2,100

1,800 5,800

7,000 7,900

7,300

7,600

14,900'


- 36 CHAPTER XV - FINANCING AND CAPITAL PROGRAMMING

XV - I

Page 153 - Column 2, Lines 6 to 14 AMENDMENT:

"The statement 'In the operation of utilities the City is entitled to a fair gross profit on investment of six to eight per cent and this profit should be used in repaying debenture debts attributed to utilities or placed in a capital reserve for future capital improvements. Net utility profits should then be utilized in the best way and in recent years they have been used to balance expenditures against revenues. For example, 'on Page 153, Column 2, Lines 6 to 14 is deleted from the General Plan."


- 37 CHAPTER XVI - URBAN DESIGN

XVI - 1

Page 159 - Column 2, Lines 1 to 13 under Principles for the New Design ORIGINAL:

"1.

A Good Visual Effect and an Exciting Skyline a. Buildings and open spaces in Edmonton should be of different sizes and shapes scaled to human proportions. b. Each individual building or group of buildings should be designed as part of a whole composition to provide visual stability. This can be accomplished through the following channels: the architect should first diagnose that part of the City for which he is designing and then relate his building to the components of the area."

AMENDMENT:

"1.

The Creation of a Beautiful City-scape a. Building and open spaces should be considered in relation to the natural topography, to each other and to the scales of the pedestrian and the pedestrian and the vehicle. Each individual building or group of buildings should be designed as part of the total urban compositon: - to accomplish this the designer must examine the area in which he is working and relate his building to the worthwhile visual characteristic: of that area."

XVI - 2

Page 160 - Column 1, Paragraph 2, Lines 7 to 15 AMENDMENT:

"The statement 'The bluff supporting the downtown has green and brown color characteristics for the most part of the year, with snow during the winter. In order to obtain the maximum visual effect, buildings protruding from the bluff should be of light colors with dark accenting trimmings.' appearing on Page 160, Column 1, Paragraph 2, Lines 7 to 15 is deleted from the General Plan."


- 38XVI - 3

XVI - 4

Page 160 - Column 2, Lines 1 to 5 ORIGINAL:

"It Is important that this landscape features orientation towers properly arranged with reference to one another and extensive tree planting."

AMENDMENT:

"The city-scape must therefore compensate for the lack of natural features. Development must create the missing landmarks and punctuate the horizon with vertical accents, thereby making the components of the City more comprehensible. Higher buildings should give visual expression to those portions of the urban fabric having the greatest intensity of activity."

Page 160, Column 2, Lines 10 to 18 AMENDMENT:

XVI - 5

"The statement 'A development comprising one large tower requires a more distinguished design than a development consisting of a cluster of towers. Twin or triple towers can be designed to complement each other and, therefore, may be more modestly designed to give the same effect.' appearing on Page 160, Column 2, Lines 10 to 18 is deleted from the General Plan."

Page 160 - Column 2, Point c, Lines 1 to 5 ORIGINAL: ' "The City should also offer view points from the street level; traffic islands, skywalks, elevated streets and similar installations could provide a view of movement and architecture." AMENDMENT:

XVI - 6

"The City must offer a continuing variety of stimulating visual experiences for both the pedestrian and the motorist. Skywalks, elevated streets and public viewing platforms on major buildings could provide unexpected viewpoints for architecture and movement."

Page 161 - Column 1, Point a, Lines 1 to 23 AMENDMENT:

"Point a, Lines 1 to 23, Page 161, Column 1 is deleted from the General Plan and is replaced with the following section: a. Edmonton's streets of intensive activity should have both visual and physical punctuation as well as vistas to give them a feeling of enclosure, fluidity and entity. This may be achieved by:


- 39 -

- introducing visual interrupting devices such as skywalks or by placing a large building or landscape element at the focal or teLminating point of a long street. - varying the relationship of a building or groups of buildings to the noimal building line to create a variety of spatial experience.'" XVI - 7

*XVI - 8

Page 161 - Column 2, Point b, Lines 1 to 4 ORIGINAL:

"b. Numerous streets in Edmonton are congested with all types of traffic, have a diversity of uses, buildings and activities and lack entity.

AMENDMENT:

17

Page 161 - Column 2, Lines 19 to 25 AMENDMENT:

XVI - 9

XVI - 10

. Many streets in Edmonton are congested with too much traffic, have too diverse a mixture of buildings and uses and lack visual and functional coherence."

The sentence 'Such pedestrian connectors as trees should be extended from the proposed Coliseum site westward on 102A Avenue to the proposed shopping mall on 102nd Street and from Jasper Avenue north on 99th and 100th Streets to 103A Avenue.' appearing on Page 161, Column 2, Lines 19 to 25 is deleted from the General Plan."

Page 161 - Column 2, Lines 28 to 32 ORIGINAL:

"-small blocks can be consolidated into larger blocks for simpler traffic circulation and streets not essential for traffic could be turned into pedestrianways."

AMENDMENT:

"-small blocks can be consolidated into larger blocks for simpler traffic circulation and streets not essential for traffic could be turned into pedestrianways or developable area.

Page 161 - Column 2, Lines 5 to 9 under Point c ORIGINAL:

"-greater emphasis must be placed on wide landscaped boulevards, good street lighting and, in general, elegant, contemporary design in street furniture."


-40AMENDMENT:

XVI - 11

II -greater emphasis must be placed on the grouping and location of small elements such as traffic signs, phone kioskes, litter containers, mail boxes and the like which are currently scattered indiscriminately along the City streets giving an extremely cluttered and untidy appearance."

Page 162 - Column 1, Lines 1 to 3 under Point d ORIGINAL:

"d. The City should encourage owners of antiquated buildings to modernize or replace them with up-to-date structures."

AMENDMENT:

"d. The City should encourage owners of rundown buildings to rehabilitate or replace them with up-to-date structures."


- 41CHAPTER XVII - IMPLEMENTATION *XVII - I

Page 167 - Column 2, Paragraph 1, Lines 16 to 19 AMENDMENT: "The sentence 'Once the Plan has been adopted by Council, it or any other public authority, cannot enact any bylaw or take any action which is inconsistent or at variance with it (s. 99-b).' on Page 167, Column 2, Paragraph 1, Lines 16 to 19, is deleted from the General Plan."

*XVII - 2

Page 167 - Column 2, Paragraph 2, Lines 1 to 4 ORIGINAL:

COMMENT:

AMENDMENT:

*XVII - 3

"The adoption of the General Plan makes it mandatory to provide a zoning bylaw to regulate the use and development of land in the manner prescribed in the Plan (s.99-a)." Following recent amendments to the Planning Act it is no longer necessary to enact a zoning bylaw for all areas covered by a general plan. City Council may exercise or continue to exercise development control within any areas of land included in the General Plan but must enact a zoning bylaw for all areas covered in the General Plan in which development control is not exercised. "After the General Plan is adopted, City Council may exercise development control within any areas of land included in the General Plan but must enact a zoning bylaw for all areas covered in the General Plan in which development control is not exercised (s. 99-a,b)."

Page 167 - Column 2, Paragraph 3, Lines 1 to 5 ORIGINAL:

"The enactment of the General Plan Bylaw the submission of the Plan and Bylaw to Provincial Planning Director for advice its content and later to the Provincial Board for approval."

involves the as to Planning


- 42AMENDMENT: "The enactment of the General Plan Bylaw involves the submission of the Plan, amendments and Bylaw to the City's development officer who shall immediately advise Council with respect to the content of the Bylaw and its conformity with the Planning Act (s.130-1)." *XVII - 4

Page 168 - Column 2, Paragraph 1, Lines 1 to 9 ORIGINAL:

"Shortly after the General Plan is published, an accompanying document, the Draft General Plan Bylaw, will be presented. Important objectives and principles outlined in the General Plan will be contained in this document and, after extensive discussion and revision by Council, City officials, businessmen and other citizens, a General Plan Bylaw will be presented for adoption by Council."

AMENDMENT: "After the General Plan is published, extensive discussion and revision of the document will be undertaken by the Municipal Planning Commission, City officials, businessmen and interested citizens prior to the Plan's presentation to City Council. At the same time, a General Plan Bylaw will be prepared to enable the adoption by City Council of the entire General Plan document with any amendments to be contained in adopted appendices. The final step will entail detailed discussion of the Plan by City Council after which it is hoped that the General Plan with amendments will be formally adopted by bylaw." *XVII - 5

Page 168 - Column 2, Paragraph 3, Lines 4 to 11 ORIGINAL:

"Provisions for zoning as a result of the General Plan Bylaw are included in the Planning Act (s. 99-a): 'When a general plan has been adopted, the Council shall proceed with thb enactment of a zoning bylaw to regulate the use and development of land in the manner prescribed and within the area or areas referred to in the general plan.'"


-43AMENDMENT: "Provisions for zoning and development control for areas covered by the General Plan are included in the Planning Act 99-a,b): When a general plan has been adopted, the council (a) may, at any time thereafter, exercise or continue to exercise development control within any areas of land included in the general plan..., and (b) shall immediately thereafter proceed with the enactment of a zoning bylaw to include those areas of land within the general plan in respect of which development control is not exercised." XVII - 6

Page 170 - Column 1, Paragraph 2, Lines 1 to 8 ORIGINAL:

"Chapter XI outlines the various types of urban renewal projects and the Federal and Provincial financial aid available for various stages of each project. Suffice it to say here that the urban renewal scheme planned by the City and financed with the aid of Federal and Provincial help is an important means of implementing parts of the General Plan."

AMENDMENT:

"Chapter XI outlines various techniques which may be utilized in the preparation of plans for aging areas of the City. Also outlined is a district plan process for the examination of these older areas which is considered most appropriate in the Edmonton situation. Suffice it to say here that plans and techniques such as these are vital to the implementation of the General Plan for those areas of the City subject to blight or in danger of becoming deteriorated."


-44XVII - 7

Page 170 - Column 1, Following the Urban Renewal Section

AMENDMENT:

"The following section dealing with outline plans as an implementation technique of the General Plan is added to the Implementation Chapter: 'OUTLINE PLANS The General Plan contains a vast array of objectives and principles concerned with the manner in which the City should develop or redevelop. Needless to say, many different implementation techniques are both necessary and essential to translate the broad policies of the General Plan into forms useable on a short term basis. Just as the district plan process outlined in Chapter XI, Urban Renewal is necessary to properly implement the Plan in older areas of the City so, too, is an outline plan process required to implement General Plan Policy in expansion areas. Basically speaking, an outline plan is a very broad land use and transportation plan which establishes the distribution of major uses throughout an expansion area with the fundamental objective of providing a framework upon which detailed subdivision plans may be based. Such a plan thus ensures that major uses such as schools, shopping centres, arterial roadways, etc. are located in an orderly and economic manner and in a manner consistent with the needs of the neighbourhood, district and City. An outline plan, therefore, is simply a translation of the broad policies contained within the General Plan to a more refined and intimate scale and provides a most important link between the General Plan and detailed subdivision. Outline plans are prepared for both residential and industrial expansion areas. As indicated on the revised version of the 1981 Land Use Plan, outline plans have been prepared or are in the process of preparation for six residential expansion


- 45areas and three industrial areas. These plans are most important in ensuring that the policies of the General Plan are properly utilized in the preparation of planning studies for growth areas of the City and as such are a most important means of implementing the General Plan. 1


MAYFAIR GOLF COURSE

VICTORIA PARK

( Private club on leased parkland )

Future redevelopment of existing golf course, family golf centre - par three golf course, driving range and putting greens ; group picnic area

BUENA VISTA FLATS Future sports centre

RIVERSIDE GOLF COURSE (Public) JASPER VIEW POINT PARK McDOUGALL HILL PARK Future major downtown viewpoint and promenade area

LAURIER PARK Existing Storyland Valley Zoo and family picnic areas

RIVERDALE Phased acquisition of land for future

ROSSDALE FLATS

GRIERSON HILL PARK

Long range land acquisition for future

Held for future development

Future viewpoint, pavilion and picnic areas

park development HIGHLANDS GOLF COUR! ( Private club on leased pal

park development

PATRICIA PARK Future long range development

EMILY MURPHY PARK Existing picnic areas CAPILANO PARK QUEEN ELIZABETH PARK Existing swimming pool and picnic area

MAYFAIR PARK WHITEMUD PARK TERWILLEGAR PARK

FORT

Future major family recreation pork, boating and skating lagoons, picnic areas, marina, ski and toboggan run; active recreation centre

EDMONTON PARK

Reconstruction of Fort Edmonton historic buildings and interpretive centre WHITEMUD PARK RAINBOW VALLEY

WHITEMUD PARK Future ski runs and family picnic area

PARKS AND RECREATION

future group picnic areas extension of ski facilities and equestrian centre.

promenade and picnic areas; future swimming pool ,amphitheatre and playground

GALLAGHER PARK Existing winter sports area and sports fields FOREST HEIGHTS PARK MILLCREEK PARK

WALTERDALE PARK

Walter's historic site; future additions to the fieldhouse and additional picnic areas

interpretive centre

RIVER VALLEY PARKS SYSTEM

Major family recreation park, boating and skating lake, park pavilion,

Existing Kinsmen sports fields , fieldhouse, pitch and putt golf course and picnic areas; John

Existing campground, and ski runs ; future picnic areas and

EDMONTON GENERAL PLAN

Existing family picnic area and ski runs;

Existing swimming pool ,future picnic areas and winter sports areas

ARGYLL PARK Existing sports. fields ; future family recreation , picnic and winter sports areas

DWG.

5

CHAPTER VIII

Existing picnic area and winter sports area

Existing sports centre and picnic area HOUG RAVINE PARK Hold for future development



Edmonton (Alta.) - 1970 - Amendments to the City of Edmonton general plan_appendix no. i (1970-06)