Page 1

41

EUROPEAN

BIOENERGY STORIES


Š 2018 European Biomass Association (AEBIOM) All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the publisher. For permission requests, write to the publisher at the address below, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other noncommercial uses permitted by copyright law. AEBIOM Place du Champ de Mars 2 1050 Brussels, Belgium T : +32 2 318 40 34 info@aebiom.org www.aebiom.org


41

EUROPEAN

BIOENERGY STORIES


About the Bioenergy Day campaign Most Europeans today lack a clear and simple way to understand where the EU stands in the development of renewables. This is particularly true when considering the case of bioenergy. Who knew that biomass is on its way to surpass coal and become the first European energy source? Who knew that bioenergy is Europe’s first source of renewable energy, making up 61% of the total share of clean energy produced in Europe with 107,212 kilotonnes of oil equivalent (ktoe)? While this is great news, it is still difficult to visualise what this means in the bigger picture of renewables. To better understand, let’s take the calendar year and split it according to the share represented by each source in the European mix : in 2017, Europe relied on fossil and nuclear energy from January 1st to October 26th, representing 299 days in total. Then from October 27th onwards, Europe was fueled by renewable energy, that’s 66 days in total. Bioenergy alone contributed to 41 days, which means that from November 21st until December 31st, Europe theoretically relied on bioenergy only for all its energy needs. The European Bioenergy Day therefore marks this symbolic date, which has been happening earlier and earlier every year over the last decade!

www.europeanbioenergyday.eu #bioenergyday


FROM NOVEMBER 21ST 2017 UNTIL THE END OF THE YEAR, EUROPE RELIED ONLY ON BIOENERGY FOR ALL ITS ENERGY NEEDS. TO CELEBRATE EACH OF THESE 41 DAYS, WE’VE COMPILED 41 BIOENERGY STORIES FROM ALL ACROSS EUROPE.


Our Partners

Romanian Associon of Biomass & Biogas

bioenergy2020+

European Biogas Association

ehi association of the



LITHUANIAN BIOMASS ENERGY ASSOCIATION

SERRA CITY COUNCIL


About the European Biomass Association The “European Bioenergy Day� campaign is powered by the European Biomass Association (AEBIOM), its networks the European Pellet Council (EPC) and the International Biomass Torrefaction Council (IBTC), and relayed across Europe by partners all convinced that bioenergy is more than a renewable energy source, but also the reliable path Europe should take to achieve its energy transition in the shortest span of time. The European Bioenergy Day campaign is locally represented by over 30 national bioenergy associations and supported at EU-level by a dozen sectorial organisations involved in the development of bioenergy throughout the value chain.


About the European Pellet Council The European Pellet Council (EPC) is the voice of the wood pellet sector in Europe. Its members are national pellet associations or related organisations from 16 countries. EPC was founded in 2010 and is an umbrella organisation of the European Biomass Association (AEBIOM). EPC is the platform of the European pellet sector dedicated to solving the issues attached to the transition from a niche product to a major energy commodity. These issues include the standardisation and certification of pellet quality, safety, security of supply, education and training, and the quality of pelletusing devices.

EUROPEAN PELLET COUNCIL A N A E B I O M N ET WO R K


About the International Biomass Torrefaction Council The International Biomass Torrefaction Council (IBTC) is a Brussels-based international platform founded in 2012, which brings together 23 companies from all over the world. IBTC was founded by the European Biomass Association (AEBIOM) together with major torrefied biomass stakeholders who decided to join forces and create a discussion platform for companies with similar interests. IBTC was also initiated in collaboration with the Dutch Torrefaction Association (DTA).

INTERNATIONAL BIOMASS TORREFACTION COUNCIL A N A E B I O M N ET WO R K


Index DAY 1 Making the internet a greener place ................................................................................................................. 12 DAY 2 Are forest fires inevitable ? ........................................................................................................................................ 16 DAY 3 Bio-CHP produces ethanol with 90% less GHG ....................................................................................... 20 DAY 4 An award-winning bio-natural gas bus fleet .............................................................................................. 24 DAY 5 Heating Třebíč, a Unesco heritage site ............................................................................................................ 28 DAY 6 Green steam for fish canning ................................................................................................................................. 32 DAY 7 Heating with used horse bedding ...................................................................................................................... 36 DAY 8 The real power of Italian cheeses ........................................................................................................................ 40 DAY 9 Curing a gas addiction with local biomass .................................................................................................. 44 DAY 10 Manufacturing carbon-neutral tissues ............................................................................................................ 48 DAY 11 Bioheat entrepreneurs in Finland ....................................................................................................................... 52 DAY 12 Miscanthus : a smart solution to fight erosion ........................................................................................... 56 DAY 13 Generating heat, power & biomethane out of waste ........................................................................... 60 DAY 14 Almost every Swedish city has its own biomass DH ............................................................................. 64 DAY 15 Helsinki transport going renewable by 2020 ............................................................................................. 68 DAY 16 EU leads research efforts with Bioenergy 2020+ ...................................................................................... 72 DAY 17 Kindergarten cuts GHG by 90% with bioenergy ...................................................................................... 76 DAY 18 Energy efficiency with biomass district heating ...................................................................................... 80 DAY 19 Sturmberger, a model of regional economic cycle ................................................................................ 84 DAY 20 Biogas facilitating rural investments in Czechia ....................................................................................... 88


DAY 21 Pyrolysing wood to generate bio-oil .................................................................................................................. 92 DAY 22 Lucerne’s green papers ............................................................................................................................................... 96 DAY 23 Biomethane from straw only ? ............................................................................................................................ 100 DAY 24 A Skiing World Cup resort heated with wood .......................................................................................... 104 DAY 25 Wood fit for purpose in Estonia .......................................................................................................................... 108 DAY 26 Heating Barcelona with Waste-to-Energy ..................................................................................................... 112 DAY 27 The world’s largest biomass gasifier .................................................................................................................. 116 DAY 28 Circular economy, giving waste a new life ................................................................................................... 120 DAY 29 100% sustainable biomass in Denmark ........................................................................................................ 124 DAY 30 Connecting local resources to local needs .................................................................................................. 128 DAY 31 Win-win solution for forest residues in Allgäu .......................................................................................... 132 DAY 32 Biomass driving down heating costs ............................................................................................................... 136 DAY 33 Managing olive oil residues in Greece ............................................................................................................ 140 DAY 34 Wood torrefaction, the future of biomass fuel ? ....................................................................................... 144 DAY 35 When a pellet boiler met a heat pump… ...................................................................................................... 148 DAY 36 Aduro creates smart fire ........................................................................................................................................... 152 DAY 37 Growing flowers with bioenergy in Ukraine ............................................................................................... 156 DAY 38 A Croatian bioenergy village ................................................................................................................................. 160 DAY 39 Firing up ceramics with biomass ........................................................................................................................ 164 DAY 40 FireCube: thinking outside the (bioenergy) box ...................................................................................... 168 DAY 41 A zero-carbon milk processing facility ............................................................................................................ 172


DAY 1


82% OF THE ENERGY USED FOR HEATING AND COOLING IN EUROPE COMES FROM FOSSIL FUELS


TRIGENERATION PLANT

MAKING THE INTERNET A GREENER PLACE BISSEN, LUXEMBOURG

14

The internet has become so commonplace that many of us have difficulty imagining what it takes to make this digital world a reality, including the number of servers and hubs required to power it. Most data centers worldwide rely heavily on fossil fuels to produce the electricity and cooling required to run the necessary equipment–what some call the “dark side” of the internet. Statistics are eloquent in that respect: a single Google search consumes 20 mg of CO₂, while an email is between 0,3 to 4 g. Therefore, the 192 billion emails we send annually are equivalent to the footprint of 3,1 million cars per year. Estimates show that the internet consumes around 1037 TWh of electricity globally, representing the production of dozens of nuclear power stations across the world. This finally represents 609 million tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions, equivalent to the emissions from all civilian flights over a year!

Against this backdrop, most internet stakeholders are trying to find ways to make the internet greener. In this respect, bioenergy has a lot to offer, whether providing electricity or heating and cooling solutions. A great example showing such synergies can be found in Luxembourg, close to the city of Bissen, where the Kiowatt plant operates. Kiowatt uses waste wood to produce electricity, heating and cooling. The project began in 2011, when LuxEnergie S.A., a Luxembourgish energy contracting company and Groupe François, a Belgian wood industry and bioenergy company, decided to create a joint venture to take advantage of all benefits of bioenergy on a shared site. Inside the Kiowatt plant, everything starts with a 17 MW boiler designed to use local wood waste which was not mobilised before. The boiler is equipped


with a turbine to produce both heat and power. The electricity produced, around 21 GWh, is then sold directly to the grid. The heat, representing the most substantial energy produced (93 GWh) is used in three key applications: drying low quality wood for the manufacturing of wood pellets, fueling the district heating of the industrial area around the plant, and finally, two absorption machines convert the heat into cooling. The cooling system is then routed to the data center, which is operated by DataCenterEnergie Company S.A., providing internet servers with a renewable source of cooling. In 2013, this synergy was the first of its kind in Europe. Today, Kiowatt provides 15 full time jobs onsite and contributes quite significantly to Luxembourg’s renewable energy targets. The Kiowatt plant represents 5% of Luxembourg’s goals for the production of green electricity, heating and cooling by 2020. According to expert estimations, some 350.000 tonnes of CO₂ will not be emitted during this period thanks to the project, contributing to a direct reduction of almost 15% of GHG emissions for the country!

© MEDIATION

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

15


DAY 2


IN 2015, FOREST FIRES IN EUROPE DESTROYED A SURFACE EQUIVALENT TO THREE TIMES THE CITY OF BERLIN


FOREST & BIOENERGY

ARE FOREST FIRES INEVITABLE ? SERRA, SPAIN Every year, over 60.000 forest fires break out all across Europe. Globally, forest fires affect close to 350 million hectares, equivalent to 40% of the European territory. In the past thirty years due to warmer summers, the total surface area burned has doubled, increasing the amount of CO₂ released into the atmosphere. But are forest fires simply an inevitable force of nature?

18

Although occurring naturally, forests fires can be avoided if sound measures to prevent them are applied. In fact, municipalities all across Europe are developing innovative solutions to prevent forest fires and their resulting environmental and economic damage. Developing bioenergy projects is one of the most interesting options available, which is the very approach taken by the small mountain town of Serra in Valencia, near Spain’s Mediterranean coast.

In 2015, 11.928 fires were recorded throughout Spain, with 33.500 of the 103.200 hectares affected tree-covered. Forest fires are spread by factors including wind force, direction, topography, and the density of biomass in the forest. This last factor is the only one that humans can play an intervening role in through the sustainable use of biomass and fire-preventative forestry, making forests more resilient to fire. Due to Serra’s excess of biomass and dry climate, the decline of traditional forestry practices has led to an excessive growth of vegetation, with the last great forest fire in 2004 affecting over 400 hectares. As 85% of Serra’s 5.730 hectares is forested, a bioenergy project, led under municipal engineer and communal authority Juan José


Mayans, sought to convert green waste from gardening, agriculture, and fire-preventative forestry into a fuel suitable for local use. To make the project feasible, public buildings first needed to be upgraded to utilise biomass by replacing traditional heating systems with modern pellet boilers. The green waste is then collected and processed into pellets, the solid fuel used by the installations. Fire-preventative forestry involves reducing the overall hectares of forest surface to lessen the damage in the case of fire, which is done by removing the biomass along roadsides, which can cost up to €10.000 per hectare.

Last winter, Serra’s work protected 130 hectares of forest while supplying a quality wood chip for their pellet production. Furthermore, the municipal government has invested in an industrial pellet production line and hopes to produce 600 tonnes of high quality pellets–200 tonnes to be used in local biomass boilers, and 100 tonnes that will be available for residents of Serra at low prices. The remainder will go to the local market, contributing to an economic cycle that decreases the high cost of forestry works.

Serra’s bioenergy project has set a precedent for reducing dependence on fossil fuels while preserving natural areas to lessen the impact of forest fires. In fact, its reworking of the circular economy has been coined the “Serra Model” by Valencian authorities. The great news is that this model can be replicated all over similar communities, utilising green waste for economic development while decreasing the threat of forest fires.

© SERRA CITY COUNCIL

As 78% of fires are directly caused by humans due to activities such as agricultural burning, Serra also replaced this culturally-rooted practice with green waste chipping, offering municipal services to farmers to dispose of their waste to prevent dangerous agricultural burnings from starting more fires.

lates the economy by creating rural employment. In the past four winters, Serra has been able to already reduce CO₂ emissions by 100.000 kg and has been able to protect 130 hectares last year alone, with hopes to protect 500 hectares by the end of 2020.

The switch to biomass has not only drastically cut utility costs for the municipality, but also protects the environment, reduces pollution, and stimu-

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY: SERRA CITY COUNCIL

19


DAY 3


BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION ACCOUNTS FOR €6,6 BILLION IN EU FARMERS’ ANNUAL INCOME


BIOREFINERY CONCEPT

BIO-CHP PRODUCES ETHANOL WITH 90% LESS GHG HÄNDELÖ, SWEDEN Ethanol can be produced with over 90% greenhouse gas (GHG) savings when compared to petrol, as brilliantly demonstrated by Lantmännen Agroetanol, Sweden’s largest ethanol producer. The secret of this exceptional performance lies in the fact that the ethanol plant is part of a integrated process whereby a biomass combined heat and power plant (CHP) supplies the energy needed for the ethanol plant to operate. In addition to ethanol, the plant also produces protein feed and “green carbon dioxide” which make it a perfect example of what specialists call “the biorefinery concept”–a facility that integrates biomass conversion processes and equipment to produce fuels, power, heat, and value-added materials from biomass.

22

The ethanol plant and the CHP, run by E.on, are located on Händelö, an island just on the outskirts of Norrköping on Sweden’s Baltic coast. The CHP

plant delivers bioheat to the district heating grid of Norrköping, a city with over 100.000 inhabitants. The plant also produces biopower. The fuels used to run this unit are mostly woodchips, recycled wood and other types of biomass. All of Agroetanol’s energy needs for the processing of ethanol–such as drying, fermentation, and distillation–come from the CHP plant. This means no fossil fuels are used at all– that all of the electricity is renewable. Grain from the region including wheat, barley, and triticale, are used as feedstocks for the ethanol production. To produce one litre of ethanol, 2,7 kg of grain are needed. Besides the ethanol, an additional 0,85 kg of protein feed is derived from the process. But this is not all–the carbon dioxide released during the ethanol fermentation is recovered and used to produce “green CO₂”. This is done


©AGROETANOL S.A

in a separate unit run by Aga/Linde, which produces 0,8 kg of CO₂ per 2,7 kg of grain. Green CO₂ is then sold to food industries including the producers of carbonated drinks, replacing CO₂ produced from fossil feedstocks. In the region Östergötland, an ambitious program has started to introduce “fossil free farming,” substituting fossil diesel with biodiesel for tractors and harvesters, as well as for grain dryers. This will reduce the greenhouse gas emissions from the ethanol produced in Norrköping and eventually make the supply chain 100% renewable and fossil free in the future. The ambitions of the Swedish biorefinery do not stop there: the development of protein-rich food products for human consumption is being considered to satisfy the growing demand for meat substitutes from vegetarian consumers. In the meantime, the use of waste products from bakeries and food stores – discarded bread for instance – is also considered as a potential feedstock for the factory. Following Lantmännen Agroetanol’s success story, many bioenergy stakeholders all across Europe are currently developing similar initiatives in order to adapt and extend the biorefinery concept to local needs and feedstocks to make an optimal use of their resources.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

23


DAY 4


BIOFUELS ALLOWED GERMANY TO CUT ITS GHG EMISSIONS BY 7,3 MILLION TONNES IN 2013


BIOGAS FOR TRANSPORT

AN AWARD-WINNING BIO-NATURAL GAS BUS FLEET AUGSBURG, GERMANY In 2017, Stadtwerke Augsburg (SWA) (DE) was awarded the “International Busplaner Sustainability Award” for its positive example in reducing the particulate matter, nitrogen oxide and carbon dioxide emissions by the city’s bus fleet. The busplaner magazine, which organises the competition, praised the decision of Augsburg to opt for natural biogas buses using compressed natural gas (CNG).

26

Since 1995, SWA has been a pioneer in providing alternative driving technologies for local, public transport. At the time, Augsburg was a national model city for the use of CNG as fuel. “Our focus has already been on a sustainable management in all of our business segments: energy, water and transport, for quite some time,” commented SWA co-CEO Alfred Müllner. Following this path, the entire SWA bus fleet shifted to bio-natural gas

made from agricultural waste in 2011. As a result, all the 91 SWA buses have been CO₂ neutral for more than 5 years. This is a strategic choice as Augsburg buses emit about 95% less nitrogen oxide and almost zero soot particles in comparison to buses that use diesel engines. This success story continued into 2016 with SWA deciding to commission 23 new Mercedes-Benz Citaro natural gas buses with newly developed engines for an even lower fuel consumption and more environmentally friendly impact. The day of the award ceremony, busplaner editor Julia Lenhardt stated, “We would like to commend this exemplary sustainability in the omnibus segment. The fact that bio-natural gas as a fuel is also a driving technology for the future is proven by the many fact-finding visits to Augsburg from other transport companies and the countless invi-


© STADTWERKE AUGSBURG

tations SWA received for lectures on the subject across Europe. In the overall balance, nothing can beat bio-natural gas buses in the coming decades – not even electric buses.“

Like SWA’s success story, similar initiatives to help improve the ecological footprint of public transport are underway, as it is the case in Helsinki, but this is another Bioenergy-Day story…

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

27


DAY 5


SINCE 2000 DIRECT WOOD REMOVALS IN EU FORESTS REMAINED STABLE WHILE BIOENERGY USE DOUBLED


BIOMASS IN DISTRICT HEATING

HEATING TŘEBÍČ, A UNESCO HERITAGE SITE TŘEBÍČ, CZECH REPUBLIC TTS energo operates three biomass heating plants in Třebíč, a Unesco heritage site in Czechia famous for its uniquely preserved Jewish Quarter. Since 1995, TTS energo has been a leader in using biomass for heating, burning mainly wood chips and straw, and as such, depends 90% on bioenergy. It serves almost 10.000 households, hospitals, schools, and local industries and businesses. The central heating system distribution network is almost 40 km long. The biomass is sourced locally and, unlike imported natural gas, the money needed to purchase the fuel stays in the region and supports the local economy.

30

The company expanded to neighbouring Slovakia when the company Národná energetická (which operates 10 other biomass heating plants) became part of the TTS Group. The TTS Group is also a manufacturer of biomass boilers which are sold

not only to Czech customers but also to Slovakia and Ukraine. The success story is still unfolding as the group plans to sell boilers to China, reinforcing European leadership in the renewable energy sector. Knowing what they owe to the region, TTS decided to engage with the social fabric. In 2015, the company established an educational centre, called Alternator, which organises interactive exhibitions and programmes focused on climate change, the environment and energy. The centre is open to schools and the public, representing one part of the renewal of a previously abandoned industrial zone, called Borovina, in Třebíč. Every year Czech Republic produces over 300.000 tonnes of wood pellets, enough to heat between 60.000 – 80.000 households. On the other hand, some 380.000 households are still using coal to heat their homes.


© CZBIOM

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

31


DAY 6


SOLID BIOMASS PROVIDED EUROPE WITH 29 DAYS OF CLEAN ENERGY IN 2017


BIOENERGY & INDUSTRIAL PROCESSES

GREEN STEAM FOR FISH CANNING PONTE CALDELAS, SPAIN

34

The company Industrias Conserveras Orbe, one of the leading canning companies in the province of Pontevedra (ES), inaugurated its new facilities this past April after 18 months of continuous work. This factory is dedicated to the production of canned foods, producing 25 million tins of seafood, shellfish and fish products per year. 60% of the final products are sold in Spain, while the rest reaches markets including the USA, Germany, the UK, France, Panama, Costa Rica, Colombia and Mexico.

ly-zero CO₂ emissions and a saving of 65% when compared to conventional energy sources. Orbe also worked on energy efficiency with the incorporation of a curtain wall, low-emission glazing and an envelope around the entire premises that allows natural light to enter. The whole system is reinforced with a precise thermal control of the plant. All of this results in significant energy savings for the company, as the company plans to save €657.572 over 12 years.

The new factory was a challenge for the company aiming to achieve a cutting-edge facility based on renewable energy and energy savings, yet equipped with the latest canning sector technology. In order to achieve its energy transition, Orbe decided to opt for bioenergy. Its innovative features include a wood chip biomass boiler that offers environmental benefits, with near-

The biomass boiler is at the center of the process for Orbe as it provides the steam required in the canning process. The company, Aresol Servicios Energéticos, which undertook the installation of a steam biomass boiler manufactured by LSolé, assured a productive capacity of 4.000 kg/hr of steam at a maximum service pressure of 10 bars.


Š INDUSTRIAS CONSERVERAS ORBE S.A.

The installation of a remote monitoring system allows oversight of the facility, ensuring its correct operation along with the registration and statistical processing of the main operational parameters. The modulating control means that every parameter is automatically adjusted depending on the demand of the boiler and as such, the system operates continuously within the 30-100%

range. In terms of energy consumption, the new biomass installation will achieve an annual savings of 172.840 kWh compared to a traditional installation powered by fossil fuels, due to the improved overall performance of the renewable units.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

35


DAY 7


IN 2015, SOLID BIOMASS SAVED THE EU €32,1 BILLION WORTH OF FOSSIL FUEL IMPORTS


HORSE BEDDING BRIQUETTES

HEATING WITH USED HORSE BEDDING PHILIPPEVILLE, BELGIUM Using horse bedding to heat homes? This can sound strange at first, but this idea is far from being a joke. Since last November, the Belgian start-up, Equiwood, has been selling briquettes made of chips and dung. Through the upgrading of waste, Equiwood provides service to stable owners while offering an alternative fuel to consumers and forming a short production process.

38

In 2015, entrepreneurs Dany De Bolle and StĂŠphane Licata founded the Equiwood SPRL, whose production site is located in Philipeville, in the French-speaking part of Belgium. Their project aims to transform the wood chips used for bedding in equestrians into briquettes suitable for wooden stoves and boilers. For Belgian stables, this approach is an intelligent and sustainable solution for the disposal of their waste. Indeed, horse manure is seldom used by farmers as a

natural fertilizer. For now, about ten Belgian teams are using Equiwood’s services and the demand is increasing. According to De Bolle, Belgium is one of the countries with the most horses per square meter. Currently, 7.000 tons of equestrian bedding are used by Equiwood, and the logs are sold to some 80 Belgian and Luxembourg retailers. The Equiwood log is a good complement to other fuels (pellets, chips, wood-logs); it remains simple to handle and offers good energy performance. According to De Bolle, it is drier (10-12% moisture only, compared with about 20% for firewood) and has a high density. In addition, it has a good burning combustion: the log burns for 1,5 hours and embers keeps the temperature of the fireplace for an additional 4 to 5 hours. De Bolle adds that an Equiwood log pallet (540 logs) is sufficient to guarantee a supplementary heating to a house-


Š VALBIOMAG

hold during a winter. Thanks to its high energy density, this fuel allows space saving compared to conventional logs (storage 4 to 5 times less bulky). The annual heat requirements for the log manufacturing process are fully covered by a biomass boiler acquired by the company. With a power of 1.000 kW, this boiler is also powered by horse bedding. Concretely, once the raw material is sorted (waste disposal such as pieces of iron or plastics) and dried at 95 °C, the large pieces are transformed into logs and the remainder serves as fuel for the boiler. Besides the boiler, an additional 150 kW electricity is required to operate the site. That is why, in the long-term, Equiwood would like to strive towards total energy autonomy by equipping itself with a system of photovoltaic panels or cogeneration. A good example of smart synergy between biomass energy and other renewables !

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

39


DAY 8


EU28 BIOGAS PRODUCTION EQUAL 25% OF THE TOTAL GROSS GAS CONSUMPTION OF GERMANY


ANAEROBIC DIGESTION PLANT

THE REAL POWER OF ITALIAN CHEESES MOTTA DI LIVENZA, ITALY Latterie & Caseificio Moro S.r.l is a dairy and cheese factory in northeast Italy, established in 1978 for the production of award-winning Italian cheeses. In the mid-nineties, the factory was renovated in order to increase production. Today, the company produces milk and a wide variety of local cheeses, especially ricotta cheese, with widespread distribution throughout central and northern Italy. In addition to the production of high-quality cheese, the factory has also developed a successful biogas solution.

42

The ‘scotta-whey’, a by-product of cheesemaking, was initially used as pig feed; however, the declining pork market and decreasing number of piggeries required a disposal solution for excessive amounts of scotta-whey. Even with a wastewater treatment plant, Moro dairy farm lacked a cost-effective disposal method, an issue due to the

high costs and strict environmental regulations involved. Water treatment solution provider RWL Water (today Fluence Italy SRL) faced the challenge of providing a solution that did not interfere with operation of the existing anaerobic plant at the factory. RWL Water refurbished the wastewater treatment plant in order to treat both the dairy wastewater and scotta-whey after anaerobic fermentation, without interrupting the plant’s operation. Because biogas plants use biodegradable wastes as feedstock for anaerobic digestion, the company has become more cost-efficient, while meeting national and European waste recycling regulations. Moreover, anaerobic digestion produces not only biogas, but also digestate, which consists of leftover indigestible material and dead microorganisms, which are excellent sources of organic fer-


Š LATTERIE & CASEIFICIO MORO S.R.L

tiliser and are a substitute for additional mineral fertilisers, reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Biogas versatility allows for a great range of new applications, such as high-tech process energy, effective small-scale power generation, flexible energy production, and more.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

European Biogas Association

43


DAY 9


IN 2013, THE EU28 SPENT MORE THAN ONE BILLION DOLLARS PER DAY ON ENERGY IMPORTS


LOCAL BIOMASS

CURING A GAS ADDICTION WITH LOCAL BIOMASS LITHUANIA As part of the Nordic Baltic region of Europe, for Lithuania and its population of 3 million people, the dependence on imported fossil fuels from Russia was an economic and political challenge. In 2014 when Lithuania became a Member State of the EU, it paid the highest price for imported gas—a price regarded as “political” as it was not comparable to the market situation.

46

Meanwhile, indigenous biomass resources were (and still are) abundant. From 2000 to 2016, biomass use in the district heating sector increased from 2% to ~65% — the first time the share of biomass used in district heating exceeded the share of imported gas. The main reason for this switch is the enormous renewable energy resources in Lithuania, where forests cover ~33,2% of the country (2,2M hа). In addition, the price of using biomass for heating is up to 3x lower than

the price of natural gas. The amount of biomass per capita in Lithuania is one of the highest in the European Union and it is estimated that in 2020, Lithuania will take the lead in the EU regarding to the quantity of available biomass for energy needs. As a result, the transition from imported gas to local biomass fuel has resulted in lower prices of heat for local consumers as well as reduced CO₂ emissions. The main benefits of using biomass are much more than just ecological. More than 7.500 people (expected to be 10.000 people in 2020) are employed by companies related to the technology, production and supply of biomass. The export of equipment and technology reached €100M in 2015, but is expected to grow to €300M in 2020. The average salary in this sector is approximately 1,5x higher than the average salary in Lithuania. Annual turnover of this sector is about €41M.


© LITBIOMA

Thanks to the fast pace of bioenergy development, Lithuania has already achieved the EU directive regarding the incentives for consumption of renewable energy resources. For Lithuania, the target is to increase this share to 23% by 2020. In 2016, the share of RES in the total energy balance of the country reached 25,86%.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

LITHUANIAN BIOMASS ENERGY ASSOCIATION

47


DAY 10


SINCE 2002 THE EQUIVALENT OF 35 MILLION EUROPEANS’ GHG EMISSIONS WAS SAVED THANKS TO BIOENERGY


BIOENERGY & INDUSTRIAL PROCESSES

MANUFACTURING CARBON-NEUTRAL TISSUES BESALÚ, SPAIN This past July, LC Paper inaugurated a biomass boiler that allows the company to manufacture tissue products with neutral CO₂ emissions. This boiler was the last step of a challenge that began more than a decade ago, when the company rethought all elements of the production process with the aim of being able to manufacture paper without emitting carbon dioxide. Achieving “zero emissions” is an important milestone, resulting from the aims to reduce energy, water and raw material consumption.

50

In traditional tissue paper processes, manufacturing one tonne of paper consumes around 3.000 kWh. By re-engineering the manufacturing process, LC Paper has reached a final consumption of only 1.100 kWh per tonne–a decrease in energy consumption by two thirds. Following its constant innovation process, LC Paper’s switch from a gas

boiler to a new industrial biomass boiler with a steam generation capacity of 4.000 kg per hour, allows for the production of more than 50.000 tonnes of European eco-label certified and carbon neutral paper. This will halt the consumption of 2.930 kW of natural gas –a substantial saving–while consuming 1,26 tonnes per hour of sustainability certified wood chips from forest near the factory. A zero value is imputed in the emission of carbon dioxide CO₂ because the gas that is released in the combustion is the same one that the plant has taken in its process of photosynthesis. Forestal Soliva, founded in 1946, will be in charge of supplying the approximately 8.000 tonnes per year of “biomass kilometer zero”. On this occasion, Inypsa Eficiencia acts as an energy services company within the project; proving steam (4tn/hr) to the three papermaking lines of the plant. In addition


Š LC PAPER

to using clean energy for the environment, it will provide 10% savings on primary energy consumption. For Inypsa Eficiencia, which currently operates 12 energy service contracts, this project represents a pioneering entry into the industrial sector, a strategically important area. All this has allowed LC Paper to lower manufacturing costs and increase the value of paper made with a powerful message of sustainability. For them, today a new task begins: to look for those markets where sustainability is a rising value, markets such as France, Germany, Holland, Belgium, Denmark, Scandinavia, Australia and New Zealand. Recently, LC Paper has innovated in the field of sustainability, creating a new manufacturing technology called OnePly, which has participated in the Horizon 2020 program of the European Union. OnePly products have physical characteristics similar to conventional tissue paper, although they require significantly lower amounts of energy and raw material, allowing the company to remain a leader in the field of sustainability.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

51


DAY 11


BIOENERGY CREATES 10 TIMES MORE JOBS THAN NUCLEAR PER UNIT OF ENERGY PRODUCED


BIOHEAT ENTREPRENEURS

BIOHEAT ENTREPRENEURS IN FINLAND FINLAND There are over 600 cases in Finland where local SMEs have helped municipalities, companies and individuals stop heating with fossil fuels–especially oil. All these companies generate 1,5 TWh of energy and create €50M in turnover. The total thermal capacity for these boilers is around 370 MW. Heating with bioenergy has a long tradition in a country of over 20 million hectares of forests. Nevertheless, from the 1960s to 1990s, oil heating gained wide popularity. Early 1990s entrepreneurs– mainly from farming and machine contracting– began wondering how to offer heating services to a variety of customers to make it easier for them to get renewable, locally based energy. The solution they came up with was a heating entrepreneurship business model.

54

Bioheat entrepreneurs offer the customer an easy solution, most often by investing on behalf of the customer, in a boiler, produce or purchasing of local bioenergy feedstocks and maintaining the boiler. This allows customers to heat their business or homes easily without worrying about maintenance or investment. Heating entrepreneurs are often maintaining small and medium sized heating networks – few hundred meters to few kilometers, which they often invest in, build and maintain themselves. Over the years, the government has actively helped entrepreneurs through investment aid and forestry politics to make bioenergy more competitive against low oil prices. In recent years, the price of oil has steadily risen due to tax policy and global market prices, which has made bioheat a true market success. A recent study shows that such


© BIOENERGIA

support for these activities is wise: the economic impact of a bioheat entrepreneur company, as 5.000 MWh of oil heating is replaced, is for state over €200.000 and for local economy over €300.000 while creating 2,5 jobs. The most suitable locations for bioheat networks have already been built. However, there are plenty of individual oil heating on individual building and within industry solution. Here these SMEs are facing the rising competitor from national and global industry service companies. The common feature for both is that their favoured source of energy is bioenergy. Prospects are good for the entrepreneurs to grow and more to come in. At the same time they struggle with a constricting financial environment when seeking new clients and investments. The pay back time for investments is typically between 8-15 years, which private banks have started to see a too long time. Increasing regulation for the sector, mainly related to emissions and to show sustainability of their feedstocks is also well debated among the entrepreneurs.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

55


DAY 12


95% OF ALL BIOENERGY CONSUMED IN EUROPE IS SOURCED LOCALLY


ENERGY CROPS

MISCANTHUS: A SMART SOLUTION TO FIGHT EROSION GEMBLOUX, BELGIUM The Foyer Bothey, a residence for disabled people in Gembloux (Walloon town located in the Province of Namur, Belgium) will soon equip itself with a biomass boiler, operating with miscanthus. This decision will allow this residence to reduce its its bills between €10.000 to €15.000 and its emissions by 184 tonnes of CO₂ per year.

58

Miscanthus is a perennial (20-year-old) plant originally from Asia, known as elephant grass. This plant grows very well in European climates, as evidenced by the many planted in Europe. Unlike annual crops, miscanthus does not require fertilisation or the application of pesticides. Miscanthus can be used as animal bedding, horticultural mulch, eco-building material and fuel. Remarkably, energy production from miscanthus has a totally neutral greenhouse gas balance, thanks in particular to carbon storage at the soil level and

to the lack of fertilisation of the crop. In Belgium, farmers, public authorities and local entrepreneurs work together to set up joint projects that harness the many advantages and opportunities of miscanthus. The Foyer Bothey is a good example: for the supply of its future biomass boiler, it has formed an alliance with local farmers, who have benefited from the financial support of the City of Gembloux which – in addition – wanted to take measures against erosion and mud slides. In recent years, Gembloux has been heavily affected by mudslides, sometimes of agricultural origin. To counter this problem, the City of Gembloux, decided to finance the installation of bands of miscanthus in critical places. According to studies, miscanthus filters sediment, slows down erosion and promotes water penetration into the soil at a low cost and free of maintenance


© VALBIOMAG

from the farmer. Six farmers are currently engaged in this pilot scheme; nearly 3 hectares of miscanthus were planted in May 2017 at six sites, near roads and neighborhoods regularly invaded by mud. Crushed miscanthus will be used in the future biomass boiler of the Bothey Foyer. The residence will thus replace its annual consumption of 60.000 litres of fuel oil with a renewable fuel. By financing the miscanthus, the city will reduce its road cleaning costs for at least 20 years. The farmer, meanwhile, is assured to generate a gross margin of € 1.350 to €1.500 per hectare, per year while protecting its immediate environment.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

59


DAY 13


FRENCH BIOPOWER PRODUCTION MET THE NEEDS OF 1,5 MILLION HOUSEHOLDS IN 2016


COGENERATION & BIOMETHANE

GENERATING HEAT, POWER & BIOMETHANE OUT OF WASTE MORSBACH, FRANCE The Lorraine-based Méthavalor plant was the first methanisation site in France to simultaneously produce electricity, heat and biomethane ready for dispatching to the grid. It has a unique system of waste separation by flux, developed so as to make it easier to recover biowaste.

62

Sydeme, the syndicate for the transport and treatment of household waste in the eastern Moselle, manages the project. Sydeme is responsible for the treatment and transport of household waste in the region, covering 14 local authorities formed by 298 communes to comprise nearly 385.000 inhabitants. Every year, 45.000 tonnes of waste are processed through anaerobic digestion and turned into biomethane, which is injected into the gas grid by GRDF (Gaz Réseau Distribution France)–the main natural gas distribution network operator of the country.

The production of biomethane, electricity and heat fits into the circular economy model as waste is reused to produce biogas, which is then upgraded to biomethane quality before being injected into the grid. This biomethane is also used to fuel the fleet used for waste collection. The digestate from the production of biogas is used as fertiliser but also composted in an environmentally friendly way. The biomethane injected supplies 375 households with green gas every year.


© MAIRIE DE MORSBACH

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

European Biogas Association

63


DAY 14


IN 2014, BIOMASS USED IN EUROPEAN HOUSEHOLDS HEATED THE EQUIVALENT OF 15 TIMES THE CITY OF LONDON


BIOMASS IN DISTRICT HEATING

ALMOST EVERY SWEDISH CITY HAS ITS OWN BIOMASS DH SWEDEN Svebio (The Swedish Bioenergy Association) publishes every year a Bioheat map, showing all district heating plants in the country that use biomass as fuel. The 2017 map, published in February this year, shows 511 units using biomass or biogenic waste. 292 of these plants deliver more than 10 Gigawatthours (GWh) of heat. The remaining 219 are smaller plants delivering 2-10 GWh. Aside from these plants, there are a number of even smaller ones – not shown on the map. Today, almost every city and town in Sweden has district heating to heat apartment buildings, single-family homes, and deliver hot water or steam to industries. District heating accounts for 57% of all energy used for the heating of buildings and hot water.

66

Almost all of the district heating plants use biomass or waste as energy sources. A few also use peat, while a couple use straw. Almost all of

the biomass used comes from wood fuels such as woodchips, bark, sawdust, forest residues, wood pellets, waste wood, or short rotation coppice. Bio-oil is often used for peak load. The latest fuel statistics from 2015 show that 63% of all fuels used for district heating in Sweden came from biomass, with 13% from municipal waste and peat, and 8% from industrial waste heat, of which a large part came from forest industries. The use of fossil fuels in district heating is less than 8% and has continued to decline year after year. Most of the biomass used is residues and waste products with low value that are locally sourced, creating jobs for farmers, forest owners and local entrepreneurs and truckers. But more and more biomass is transported long-distance by train or by boat to supply big cities such as Stockholm with biomass to large heating plants. 90% of


Š SVEBIO

the heating plants are CHP (combined heat and power) plants producing both heating for the district heating grid, and electricity. The energy efficiency of such plants is very high – around 95% of the energy in the fuel ends up as power and useful heat. Very little energy escapes through the chimney, and with flue gas condensation, almost all the energy in the flue gases is recovered. Before the

oil crisis in the 1970s, all Swedish heating plants used oil. Today, almost no oil is used, and only limited amounts of coal and gas. The switch from fossil oil to renewable biomass has been virtually completed.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

67


DAY 15


EUROPEAN ETHANOL CONSUMPTION PREVENTED THE GHG EMISSIONS OF 4 MILLION CARS


ADVANCED BIOFUEL

HELSINKI TRANSPORT GOING RENEWABLE BY 2020 HELSINKI, FINLAND The move towards low-emission mobility in Finland took a leap last June when Helsinki declared that all city buses, working machines, and other heavyduty vehicles would switch to advanced biofuels made from residues and waste, by 2020. The shift will remarkably cut COâ‚‚ emissions of the existing fleet. The buses will also meet strict emissions requirements and achieve significant reductions in NOx, NO2 and particulate matter. The regional transport system will be decarbonised in a very cost-effective manner with air quality in Helsinki expected to improve, especially in the city center. The shift is a result of the Smart & Clean project which aims at making Helsinki one of the most sustainable and environmentally friendly cities in the world.

70

Some 1.400 buses are currently operating in the Helsinki area, making 360 million trips every

year–a number that is constantly increasing. In this context, all changes to the network must be handled with care and advanced biofuel appears as the strategic choice for the city, looking at regional feedstocks and traditions. In fact, using high quality advanced biofuels does not necessarily require new infrastructure or new vehicles for the alternative fuels, meaning that substantial results can be obtained at a reasonable cost. At the moment, the Helsinki bus fleet requires 40.000 tons of fuels on an annual basis. In comparison, advanced biofuels production capacity in Finland is reaching 500.000 tons with biodiesel alone. Moreover, Helsinki can also rely on national champions such as Neste Ltd, which are counted among world leaders of the sector. The environmental benefits of the shift will be carefully assessed. The Bio-Sata project will be monitoring


© BIOENERGIA

the effects on air quality, energy efficiency and service needs for the fleet. It is expected that particle emissions will be cut by 30% and GHG emissions by 80-90% following the methodology outlined in EU’s Renewable Energy Directive.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

71


DAY 16


1 OUT OF 5 HEATING APPLIANCES IN ITALY IS TECHNOLOGICALLY OUTDATED AND SHOULD BE REPLACED


RESEARCH ON BIOENERGY

EU LEADS RESEARCH EFFORTS WITH BIOENERGY 2020+ GRAZ, AUSTRIA With 100 employees, BIOENERGY 2020+ is one of the largest international research centres dealing with technologies for the energetic use of biomass. Companies from all over the world use the specialised know-how of BIOENERGY 2020+. At the same time, the research institution acts as a competence centre and is fully committed to the development of efficient and sustainable energy systems. BIOENERGY 2020+ combines exemplary, publicly co-financed basic research with privately funded contract research.

74

The research focus of the centre includes all the essential technologies for the efficient and environmentally friendly provision of biomass fuels, heat, electricity and fuels. The focal points in detail are biomass combustion systems, biomass gasification, bioconversion, biogas systems, intelligent control systems for thermal technologies

and processes, and higher-level energy management. Moreover, in the field of biorefineries and biobased economy, research is also being done on the possibilities of industrial, non-energetic use of biomass, e.g. the production of basic materials for the chemical industry. The services range from contract research, studies and analysis as well as consulting to market research. The competence centre is headquartered in Graz, with another two locations and two research centres spread over Austria. BIOENERGY 2020+ mediates between the economic needs of private companies and the opportunities for cutting-edge research, making it an important industry partner when it comes to developing cutting-edge technologies for using biomass. The research of BIOENERGY 2020+ always takes place with partners from industry and science. In order to sustainably


Š BIOENERGY2020+

secure the transfer of knowledge to the economy, BIOENERGY 2020+ also continuously educates young scientists. The partners of the centre are composed of the most renowned education and research institutions in Austria. The Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien), the Graz University of Technology (TU Graz), the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU Wien), Joanneum Research and many more form the foundation of BIOEN-

ERGY 2020+, and will continue to do so in the future. The Competence Center is funded by the Austrian Ministry for Transport, Innovation and Technology, the Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy and the federal states of Burgenland, Lower Austria and Styria as part of COMET – Competence Centers for Excellent Technologies. COMET is managed by the Austrian Research Promotion Agency.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

bioenergy2020+

75


DAY 17


IN 2012, ONLY ONE-THIRD OF ALL PUBLIC MONEY SPENT ON ENERGY IN EUROPE WENT TOWARDS RENEWABLES


BIOENERGY & PUBLIC BUILDINGS

KINDERGARTEN CUTS GHG BY 90% WITH BIOENERGY CHEPELARE, BULGARIA The kindergarten Elhitsa is located in Chepelare, on the slopes of Rhodope Mountain (BG). It is a three-storey, massive brick building. Before 2007, the heating in the kindergarten was supplied by a heavy, oil-fueled boiler. As such, the high energy cost was an economic strain for the municipality’s budget. For this reason, the kindergarten’s management sought solutions to improve the energy efficiency and to cut energy costs, leading the kindergarten to opt for a biomass boiler in 2008 which brought economic, social and environmental advantages to the municipality.

78

The cost for heating with pellets the past eight years was 156.390 BGN (79.955 €) when compared to the 33.676,20 BGN (17.217 €) that was spent in 2007 alone. The social benefits for substituting the heavy oil-fueled boiler with a biomass boiler were also significant: the heating provided comfort and

health to the children through using biomass as a renewable energy source. The switch also allowed for interesting environmental advantages through the reduction of CO₂ emissions that resulted by using a high efficient technology based on ecological biomass combustion. Calculations showed that the annual greenhouse gas savings after the implementation of the bioheat project was 90,9%. Highlights to be taken from the implementation of the bioheat project in kindergarten Elhitsa show that municipality buildings have significant potential for successful energy efficiency projects. Also, public procurement is proven as economic and ecological while bringing benefits to municipalities.


© BGBIOM

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

79


DAY 18


ABOUT TWO-THIRDS OF THE OVERALL HOUSEHOLD ENERGY CONSUMPTION GOES TO HEAT


BIOMASS IN DISTRICT HEATING

ENERGY EFFICIENCY WITH BIOMASS DISTRICT HEATING VALLADOLID, SPAIN Renewables have the ability to change neighborhood life style. One of the best examples of this theory can be found in Spain in Torrelago district in Laguna de Duero, Valladolid (ES). District resident have seen a complete retrofitting including renovation of the buildings’ façade and an upgrade to a district heating system which now integrates renewable energy and smart control solutions. This integrated approach leads to 50% energy savings in the district and a general empowerment regarding energy management issue. Torrelago’s district heating transition was integrated in the CITyFiED project, a smart city demonstration project supported by the European Commission. Praised for its approach the project won a special award at the Global District Energy Climate Awards in 2017.

82

Torrelago is a residential district located in Laguna de Duero, near Valladolid, formed by 31 buildings

that respond to three different typologies, containing a total 1,488 dwellings where more than 4.000 residents live. Every building has ground plus twelve floor levels, occupied by an entrance hall and a total of 48 dwellings each with a surface of about 80 m² or 95 m² , representing over 140.000 m² in total. Prior to the retrofitting, the district had two different district heating systems, composed by two independent gas-fired boiler rooms. The system was controlled by an analogical system that managed the flow temperature from the boiler and the temperature of storage domestic hot water tank. The heating temperature set point was configured by maintenance personnel according to their experience, the weather conditions and the requirements of the neighbours. During the project feasibility stage, it was recommended to


transform the previous district heating systems in a more efficient, sustainable and smart one. A shift to a biomass boilers was considered as the best option. Both district heating systems were joined into one in order to harmonise the district overall consumption. A new building was built to place the biomass boiler room and biomass silo. The underground area occupied by the biomass silo is 72.4 m² and height 5.9 m, with a useful volume of approximately 400 m³. Using a digital control system and modulating regulation, boilers reach a performance of 90%. Thanks to the refurbishment in the district heating system, the share of energy savings is increased from 40% to 50% and the system saves 3,392 tCO₂ /year compared to the initial gas-fired system, presenting a CO₂ reduction of 94%. In a truly cooperative approach, CITyFiED representatives carried out workshops with the residents on visualising the district’s renovation. In this way, the project took account of user perspectives and placed residents at the heart of the decision-making process, key for long-term success in green energy projects. Such an approach raises awareness of energy challenges and increases the prospect of replication through citizen engagement.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

83


DAY 19


IN 2015, THE EU WAS ABLE TO DO WITHOUT 6 BILLION LITRES OF IMPORTED OIL THANKS TO WOOD PELLETS


WOOD PELLETS

STURMBERGER, A MODEL OF REGIONAL ECONOMIC CYCLE WARTBERG, AUSTRIA The pellet production of the company Sturmberger is a prime example of the ecological production of a regional energy source. Chips from nearby sawmills are dried with the waste heat from an incineration plant, processed into pellets and then sold to households in the immediate vicinity – a model of regional economic cycle that transforms sawmill by-products into energy and climate friendly fuel. The CO₂ reduction when using wood pellets is 99% compared to heating oil. The success story of the Sturmberger Group began more than 20 years ago, meanwhile Sturmberger Pelletproduktions GmbH alone has 50 employees.

86

The Sturmberger Group is, first and foremost, a family and regional story. Marianne and Franz Sturmberger founded the first company in Upper Austria and since then has rapidly expanded the product range from originally only bark mulch to

wood chips and pellets. The capacities were constantly increased and expanded. Today, almost 45.000 tons of pellets are produced each year and thus cover the annual demand of around 9.000 households. The pellets of Sturmberger GmbH are produced exclusively from by-products of nearby sawmills such as sawdust and shavings. These are the raw material for the high-quality pellets from Sturmberger. To optimise the eco-friendliness of the production process, Sturmberger Group logically decided to bet on regional synergy. A local waste incinerator supplies the heat which is used to dry the wet sawdust – a key step of all pellet production processes. By exploiting this synergy effect, 30.000 tonnes of CO₂ are saved every year. In addition, the pellet plant also receives the power needed for its presses from a local electricity supplier, assuring that 90% from electricity is coming from renewable energy.


© STURMBERGER GMBH

In its evolution, Sturmberger Group has never compromised on quality. The Welser Pelletwerk relies on the so-called pellet tower technology of the Austrian producer Teccon. This technology guarantees first-class quality, only ENplus® certified pellets of class A1 are produced, and maximum efficiency in production. The investment in a large warehouse at the main site consolidates Sturmberger’s role in the market and secures the supply of regional pellets even in phases of particularly high demand. The produced pellets are consumed in the region within a radius of 60 km. In comparison to the transport of fossil fuels, these short transport routes only cause extremely low CO₂ emissions.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

87


DAY 20


BIOGAS PROVIDED EUROPE WITH THE EQUIVALENT OF 5 DAYS OF CLEAN ENERGY IN 2017


BIOGAS PLANTS

BIOGAS FACILITATING RURAL INVESTMENTS IN CZECHIA TŘEBÍČ, CZECHIA Biogas plants have become a natural part of the Czech countryside, with around 600 installations throughout the whole country. In many cases they bring new investments and jobs to regions beyond the industrial zones of large cities, bringing new opportunity to rural areas. A great example of this is the farm of Karel Kuthan in Suchohrdly, a village in South Moravia (CZ).

90

Karel Kuthan started farming his family property after his academic career as a chemical engineer. The farm grows wheat and rapeseed while breeding pigs. This led him to invest and operate a biogas plant which became an attractive opportunity for a Swedish investor who decided to build one of the most modern greenhouses in Europe close to the farm. The cooperation resulted in the creation of a new company, Bylinky. The greenhouse is supplied with heat and electricity from

the biogas plant to grow fresh herbs in plant pots year-round which are then sold in supermarkets. Fresh herbs, whether in pots or cut, are intended for cooking at home and catering facilities. With the same objective to be as eco-friendly as possible, irrigation is supplied solely by rainwater and bioagents, natural predators, and plant preparations are used to fight pests inside the greenhouse. The availability of a local source of clean energy from the biogas plant has been a central element in the decision to invest for Bylinky owners.


© CZBIOM

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

91


DAY 21


BIOENERGY REPRESENTS 500.000 JOBS IN THE EU, EQUAL TO THE PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY


WODD PYROLYSIS

PYROLYSING WOOD TO GENERATE BIO-OIL JOENSUU, FINLAND In 2013, Fortum commissioned the world’s first industrial-scale, “bio-oil plant” integrated with a combined heat and power (CHP) plant in Joensuu (FI). The targets of the investment were to increase total efficiency and the value of the existing CHP plant, as well as to explore the possibility of new interesting business opportunities. The new plant has an annual capacity of 50.000 tonnes of bio-oil from wood-based fuels. The use of bio-oil has a significant positive environmental impact because the energy produced with it can reduce greenhouse emissions by up to 90% as compared with fossil fuels. The bio-oil plant was supplied by Valmet as a turnkey delivery. In Joensuu, bio-oil is produced mainly from wood chips using fast pyrolysis technology. Constructed in connection with a fluidised bed, the solution features a reactor where the wood is vaporised. In fast pyrolysis,

94

wood is decomposed in an oxygen-free atmosphere at high temperatures. The resulting vapors are condensed and the end product, bio-oil, looks and smells like tar. Bio-oil can be used as a replacement for heavy and light fuel oil at heat plants or in the production of industrial steam. Fortum’s bio-oil has been successfully used at Savon Voima’s heat plant in Iisalmi and at the company’s own heat plants in Joensuu and Espoo (FI). In 2015, Fortum exported its first batch of 160 tonnes of bio-oil for test combustion at E.ON’s Karlshamn power plant in Sweden. As one of the biggest peak-load and reserve power plants in the Nordic countries, this plant wanted to decrease its environmental load and get further assurance that biofuel can replace some of the heavy fuel oil in the future. In the successful test combustion, bio-oil was incinerated at a record output of 175 megawatts.


Š FORTUM

Currently Fortum and Valmet are further developing and optimising the process as well as testing other feedstocks, such as forest residues and sawdust. The target is to maximise fuel flexibility, while maintaining the required quality parameters, such as heating value. In the future, bio-oil may become a valuable raw material for various biochemical or traffic fuels. To promote this development, Fortum and Valmet have joined forces in the LignoCat project, which develops catalytic pyrolysis technology to produce high-value biofuels that replace fossil transportation fuels and to create new business for the consortium companies.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

95


DAY 22


MUNICIPAL WASTE PROVIDED EUROPE WITH THE EQUIVALENT OF 3 DAYS OF CLEAN ENERGY IN 2017


MUNICIPAL WASTE-TO-ENERGY

LUCERNE’S GREEN PAPERS LUCERNE, SWITZERLAND In recent years there has been a lot of discussion on the best ways to sustainably manage growing amounts of waste. With the average European in 2015 generating 476 kg of municipal waste, nearly 62M tonnes of waste ended up in a landfill. Landfills not only pose environmental risks, but they also take a great amount of space and lock in resources that could otherwise be recycled or treated in waste-to-energy plants. Although Switzerland is not an EU Member State, it has been a front runner in European waste management in the last years with their new plant in Lucerne proving how innovative waste-to-energy technologies can be. It lit its first fire back in January 2015 and has the capacity to treat 220.000 tonnes of municipal waste per year–enough to cover the electricity

98

demand of approximately 38.000 households. The plant is built next to a highway in direct proximity to a paper factory and district heating connection point. This allows for minimal traffic noise (the traffic across residential areas can be completely avoided) and maximum export of steam and heat are ensured. The plant’s efficiency is high, up to 70%, as it delivers steam straight to the neighbouring paper mill through an integrated supply network. Further heat is distributed to the entire region of Rontal via a district heating network. Thanks to the Renergia plant, PEPA (the paper mill) is reducing its heating oil consumption by 40 million litres annually and is lowering its CO₂ emissions by 90.000 tonnes. Steam is a highly valuable product for the paper industry which is used to either dry the incoming sorted paper or to boil the paper mix in order to make paper paste, the very first step in paper manufacturing.


© RENERGIA

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

99


DAY 23


BY 2050 BIOENERGY COULD SUSTAINABLY SUPPLY UP TO 26% OF THE ENERGY DEMAND IN GERMANY


BIOMETHANE

BIOMETHANE FROM STRAW ONLY LEIPZIG, GERMANY Through the support of the European Union, VERBIO Vereinigte BioEnergie AG has developed an innovative production plant for biomethane that is manufactured from 100% straw. VERBIO has reached the first project milestone on schedule, feeding the first gigawatt hours of biomethane generated from 100% straw since October 2014 into the local natural gas network operated by Stadtwerke Schwedt. “Straw bio-methane technology is a clear demonstration that second generation biofuels using local supply chains are no longer a thing of the future, but are today’s reality,” commented Dr. Lüdtke, Chairman of the Management Board of VERBIO AG. VERBIO AG has been the operator of two large biomethane plants since 2011, each with a capacity of 30 MW. These plants produce approximately 480 GWh of biomethane from distillation slop, a waste

102

raw material by-product generated from bioethanol production, with the resulting biomethane used as biofuel for vehicles powered by natural gas. With the volume produced VERBIO supplies more than 100 of the 900 natural gas fuel stations in Germany, making it the unchallenged market leader in this segment. The new plant, also developed internally, is based on mono straw fermentation technology. The plant will be extended to reach 16,5 MW capacity by the year 2019, generating 140 gigawatt hours of biomethane annually for sale as biofuel from approximately 40.000 tons of straw. To date, EUR 25 million has already been invested in the construction of the plant. Further amounts will be invested in the coming years to optimise the plant. The straw used to fuel the plant is gathered within a radius of 80km of the plant to ensure maximum


© VERBIO VEREINIGTE BIOENERGIE AG

economic and ecological efficiency. In exchange, the fermentation waste is provided to farmers as organic fertiliser. This local production chain creates employment in the region’s agricultural sector and ensures maximum CO₂ efficiency. The new VERBIO technology makes it possible to leverage a massive potential raw material source which has been unused to date. In Germany alone, an

annual quantity of between 8 and 13 million tons of straw that could be used to manufacture bioenergy currently remain unused according to a study by the DBFZ (German biomass research center). This energy quantity represents the fuel required annually by more than 5 million motor cars.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

103


DAY 24


THE SHARE OF BIOENERGY IN THE FINNISH ENERGY MIX IS THE SECOND LARGEST IN EUROPE


LOCAL BIOMASS

A SKIING WORLD CUP RESORT HEATED WITH WOOD LEVI, FINLAND Levi, the largest winter holiday resort in Finland, is heated with energy from local wood. Levi is situated in Lapland, some 150 kilometers north of the Arctic Circle, and has around 700.000 visitors annually. Levi is also well-known for being the start of the annual alpine skiing world cup in the middle of November. “In circumstances where temperatures often hit below -20° C, we are proud to supply local, environmentally sound and reliable fuel to guarantee tourists warm hotels and cottages after they have spent refreshing moments in the outdoors” says Kyösti Rannila, Procurement Manager of Adven Oy, the company which owns and operates the local district heating plant and network which were built 10 years ago to supply the needs of the fast-growing and popular winter holiday resort.

106

Excluding some smaller cottages, practically the entire resort, which includes numerous hotels, restaurants, shops and a spa, is heated with wood energy from Adven´s district heating plant. The plant produces approximately 25.000 MWh energy annually, equivalent to the heating needs of about 1.500 single-family houses. The Finnish State Forest Enterprise, Metsähallitus, is in charge of the supply of wood chips. The energy wood is procured alongside more valuable assortments. “We optimise the use of wood by taking the most valuable parts, such as construction and pulp wood assortments, for board and paper production,” says Samuli Myllymäki, Account Manager in Metsähallitus. “The lowest qualities are turned into wood chips for energy. Thus, the demand for energy wood supports the efficient use of local resources.”


© Eustafor

Not only economic efficiency but also environmental aspects are thoroughly taken into consideration when procuring wood. The heating wood is obtained from the vicinity of the plant. This not only ensures very short transport distances, minimising the environmental impact, but also provides work for local contractors and employees. As a state forest management organisation, Metsähallitus applies the national legislation’s high requirements for sus-

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

tainable and multifunctional forest management. Valuable biotopes are left standing, protecting biodiversity, harvesting is accomplished in ways which do not present a risk for nutrient flow, etc. Metsähallitus thereby ensures that environmental concerns are taken into account also on sites which supply biomass for energy. Metsähallitus sells close to 6 million m³ of wood annually. At the moment under 5% of this is biomass for energy, but this could be moderately increased. Furthermore, only a bit more than a half of the annual growth of the region´s commercially used state forests is currently utilised for wood harvesting.

107


DAY 25


EUROPEAN FORESTS ARE INCREASING BY THE SIZE OF A FOOTBALL FIELD EVERY MINUTE


BIOENERGY & FOREST

WOOD FIT FOR PURPOSE IN ESTONIA TALLINN, ESTONIA Forests have always been important to Estonians, as a place for relaxation, berry and mushroom picking, and as a source for wood. “We have always loved and taken good care of our forests. Now that same attitude can be seen in our efforts to replace non-renewable energy sources with wood and other renewables”, says Ulvar Kaubi, Head of Timber Marketing Department of Estonian State Forest Management Centre (RMK). Today, in Estonia, there is 40% more forest land than 60 years ago. Half of the country (2 million ha) is covered with trees and approximately half of this is managed by the Estonian State Forest Management Centre (RMK). Every year, around 15% (about 600.000 m3) of the wood harvested by Estonian state forests is used for bioenergy. This wood is mainly derived from silvicultural thinnings and regeneration fellings and it is not suitable for

110

other purposes such as construction or furniture production. Using wood for heating has been a long tradition in Estonia and it has become the country’s main renewable energy source – already 89% of renewable energy used in Estonia is based on wood. This amounts to 2,1 million cubic meters a year, or some 20% of the country’s total annual cuttings. The demand for this renewable energy source, especially in the form of pellets, is growing. Low-quality wood is consumed mainly by heating plants and combined heat and power (CHP) installations. The demand for firewood for households in local markets should also not be underestimated. Wood energy allows consumers to save around 20-30% on their energy bills.


It should be noted that sufficient demand for lower-quality wood assortments and forest residues for bioenergy use supports the economic viability of forestry and incentivises the silviculturally important but often costly tending of young forests. Timely tending is necessary to grow timber assortments for use in high value-added products such as furniture and construction materials. Therefore, the bioenergy sector enlarges the customer base for forest products, by creating demand for low quality wood and forest residues, and thus encourages the efficient use of all raw materials resulting from silvicultural operations in state forests. “The production of wood pellets has helped us use our main natural resource wisely: Estonia has already reached its 2020 goals in using renewables”, says Ulvar Kaubi. “We have the knowledge and resources and we have the potential to further increase the production of bioenergy. The shift from fossil energy towards bioenergy is widely supported by Estonians. Wood is the largest alternative to non-renewables in Estonia and, as a state forest management organisation, RMK is proud to be a part of this shift”, says Ulvar Kaubi.

© EUSTAFOR

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

111


DAY 26


250 MILLION TONNES OF WASTE GENERATED IN EUROPE ANNUALLY COULD BE USED FOR ENERGY


MUNICIPAL WASTE-TO-ENERGY

HEATING BARCELONA WITH WASTE-TO-ENERGY BARCELONA, SPAIN Waste is a vast resource. According to the European waste hierarchy, waste should be prevented, reused, and recycled. Instead of going into a landfill, energy should be recovered from waste that cannot be recycled because it is too dirty, mixed or degraded having undergone several times of recycling. In 2015, the average European generated 476 kg of waste–26% of this waste ended up in landfills, which is the least desirable option. Landfills pose a number of environmental risks: they emit methane which is a very potent greenhouse gas while microplastics from uncontrolled landfills find their way into oceans and rivers. Over time, groundwater can even become polluted through landfill leaching.

114

With a population of over 46 million, Spain still landfills around 11 million tonnes of municipal waste every year meaning that around 1/6 of all landfilled

European waste is Spanish waste. However, Districlima, a heating and cooling network in the city of Barcelona is a clear example of how residual waste can contribute not only to sustainable waste management but also to the Energy Union targets of reducing greenhouse gas emissions and European energy dependence on fossil fuels. Under the current Renewable Energy Directive, energy recovery from the biodegradable fraction of municipal waste is considered renewable energy (biomass). While the obvious preferable option for biowaste is to compost it, this needs to be clean biowaste. If the biogenic waste is polluted or difficult to separate from the remaining residual waste (a good example of that is a used cardboard pizza box), this waste is not suitable for quality compositing or recycling. The best option for this waste is to be treated in Waste-to-Energy plants that produce clean, renewable and local energy from it.


Since the commissioning of the Districlima network back in 2004, TERSA, the Waste-toEnergy plant of Barcelona, has been directly supplying the network with energy in the form of steam. Depending on the time of year, the steam is used to produce heating or cooling. Using district network for cooling also reduces the use of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), normally used in stationary air conditioners, which are thousands of times more destructive to the climate than CO₂. The TERSA Waste-to-Energy plant produces most of the heat and a good share of the cold for this 16.8 km long network, which helped Barcelona reduce its fossil fuel consumption by 58% and save almost 19.000 tonnes of CO₂ emissions yearly. Because of the reduced CO₂ emissions in heating and cooling compared to fossil fuels, the energy performance of the buildings served by Districlima improved from 99,83 kg CO₂/m² (E-label) to 55,14 kg CO₂/m² (C-label). The network currently supplies 95 clients including hotels, hospitals, convention and education centres and continues to expand.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

115


DAY 27


IN 2016, 31% OF ALL GHG EMISSIONS IN THE EU CAME FROM THE ENERGY SECTOR


BIOMASS COFIRING

THE WORLD’S LARGEST BIOMASS GASIFIER VAASA, FINLAND The world’s largest biomass gasification plant located in Vaasa (FI) started its commercial operation in early 2013. This is the first time ever that biomass gasification has been adopted to replace fossil fuels on such a large scale. The target for the investment was to use more renewable fuels in production and to reduce coal consumption by 25–40%. Vaskiluodon Voima, the local plant operator, also wanted to be able to use multiple fuels and thus optimise costs and environmental impact. Therefore, Vaskiluodon Voima decided to convert its existing high-efficiency production unit to use gasified biomass.

118

Valmet, the finish worldwide technology leader, delivered the biomass gasification plant that was built as part of the existing coal-fired power plant and integrated with the pulverised coal boiler. The gasifier feeds the boiler with product gas that is

combusted together with coal. The 140 MW gasification plant delivery included a fuel yard, a large-scale belt dryer, a circulating fluidised bed (CFB) gasifier, modification and integration on the existing coal-fired boiler, and an extension to the Valmet DNA automation system with advanced applications. Having everything from one supplier ensured a perfect match of solutions. Only minor modifications were needed in the existing Benson-type boiler, although it had originally been built for coal firing only. The utilisation of biomass that comes from a radius of 100 km around the plant has created new jobs in the area, and thus boosted the local economy. “We have succeeded very well in reaching our targets, and the outcome has exceeded our expectations” states Matti Loukonen, Plant Manager at Vaskiluodon Voima. “Most importantly, product


© VALMET

gas has become a new fuel in our fuel range”. Thanks to biomass gasification, the company now has the capability to replace about 25–50% of the coal with local biomass, depending on the boiler load. Trial runs carried out in September 2014 proved that the boiler can be fueled solely with product gas. Since then, the boiler has been run purely on product gas when the load is low during autumn and spring. Despite the modification, also the original coal-firing capacity of the boiler is still available when needed. For Vaskiluodon Voima, this was a riskfree solution.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

Another main target for the investment was to reduce emissions – and this has been achieved, too. Through biomass gasification, the plant has been able to lower its CO₂ emissions by approximately 230.000 tonnes per year. SO2 emissions are also lower. To monitor emissions, the plant uses the Valmet DNA emission monitoring tool. The application provides all necessary information for emission monitoring and reporting. “Our future challenge lies with NOx emissions. We need to decide how to stay under the new EU limit values after the transition period. We are currently considering options such as a SCR (selective catalytic reduction) or SNCR (selective non-catalytic reduction) method,” Loukonen says.

119


DAY 28


ITALIAN FORESTED AREAS MORE THAN DOUBLED OVER THE LAST FIFTY YEARS


CIRCULAR ECONOMY

CIRCULAR ECONOMY, GIVING WASTE A NEW LIFE VALDAONE, ITALY “Sustainable forest management is a good example of a low-impact, circular economy and represents an opportunity to create and distribute value in the territory,” states Imerio Pellizzari, owner of Coradai S.r.l. of Valdaone (Trento), a family-owned company specialised in wood activities. As an expert of his native region, Pellizzari is aware that only through best practices is it possible to protect the natural heritage of Trentino, while at the same time create a virtuous circle which generates opportunities for employment and income. In addition to managing the lots from which it provides logs to local sawmills, Coradai is committed to giving new life to waste through obtaining wood chips from secondary raw materials. The waste is obtained through a biomass management platform that was created with a local partner.

122

Thanks to a mini cogeneration plant that produces 90 kW of electricity and 210 kW of thermal energy, the company can guarantee the correct dryness of the wood chips which they supply to three large power plants and other medium-sized plants including schools, hotels, and two greenhouses– all within a radius of a few dozen kilometers from the production site, proving the company focused activity in south-western Trentino region. “This allows us to count on the benefits of the short chain, an asset since we work in a mountainous environment that can be hard and difficult to reach by mechanical means,” Pellizzari continues. Due to the location, the handling of vehicles and logistics make up a significant portion of the budget. The same cannot be said for the ten Coradai employees, the farthest of whom lives 4 km from the company’s headquarters. An


© AIEL

extra benefit of the company’s regional focus is that local business strongly benefit from this activity, especially the maintenance of vehicles, spare parts, and other services that are almost exclusively local suppliers. According to Pellizzari, the resilience of the forestry sector is illustrated by its rebounding following decades of semi-abandonment. This allowed, during times of economic crisis, for the rediscovery of interest by returning “back to the origins” by re-evaluating renewable energy sources such as wood. However, much misinformation still exists; forest management is a complex operation with the purpose of achieving an economic return while keeping the guiding principle of safeguarding the forest itself. This can only be done through viewing the forests through a circular-economy perspective. So-called waste can be managed: abandoning it in the woods causes damage, such as attracting parasites that can also infect the healthy plants around. It’s therefore better to remove the waste in order to facilitate the growth of new trees and produce quality wood chips to be consumed locally. “As sector operator,” Pellizzari claims, “I hope the knowledge of the forestry world and the opportunities offered by it will increase through moments of exchange and the spread of best practices. Only then we can keep believing in the future and creating that critical mass to give to our businesses the necessary confidence to invest, not only in installations and technology but also in human resources.”

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

123


DAY 29


67% OF THE FOSSIL FUEL USED IN THE EU IN 2015 COULD HAVE BEEN SUSTAINABLY REPLACED WITH WOODY BIOMASS


BIOMASS SUSTAINABILITY

100% SUSTAINABLE BIOMASS IN DENMARK VEJLE, DENMARK Danish forest entrepreneurs have been working on a risk-based approach to biomass since 2016 with the help of an approval scheme developed in collaboration between trade associations, energy producers and a certification agency. In 2014, a voluntary industry agreement was signed between Dansk Energi and Dansk Fjernvarme (Danish District Heating) to ensure the sustainability of biomass (chips and pellets) used for energy production. The agreement will be implemented in the period 2016-2019. The objective is to move from 60% of highly sustainable biomass in 2017 to a 100% by 2019.

means they meet the sustainability requirements of the agreement. FSC and PEFC, famous international sustainability schemes, were both certifying limited-scale forest in Denmark, and most of the Danish forests remained uncovered. Therefore, sustainability must be ensured through scheme taking another approach such as the Sustainable Biomass Partnership (SBP) certification or alternative documentation. Both methods are based on a risk-based approach to biomass, which means assessing the area where biomass should be harvested and then assessing whether the biomass can be produced sustainably on this area or not.

The purpose of the voluntary Danish industry agreement is to encourage industry members to conduct a certain behavior, namely to purchase only highly sustainable biomass, but also to allow the members the freedom to choose by which

Danske Maskinstationer og Entreprenører (DM & E), the Danish branch organisation for forest contractors, quickly chose to use alternative documentation. One of the major advantages of the alternative documentation, is that it can adapt to

126


© CEETAR

Danish situation (ownership, protection of forests, sustainable management…) and the way in which business is conducted in this country. In this context, DM & E has developed an approval scheme, “Approved Biomass Supplier”. It is a management and due diligence system that can easily be implemented

by the small and medium-sized forest contractors. FSC, PEFC, SBP together with the Approved Biomass Supplier scheme will cover most type of situation and business ensuring Denmark to reach its 2019 sustainability target.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

127


DAY 30


NEARLY 60% OF ALL BIOELECTRICITY PRODUCED IN EUROPE COMES FROM COMBINED HEAT & POWER PLANTS


COGENERATION & DISTRICT HEATING

CONNECTING LOCAL RESOURCES TO LOCAL NEEDS BRUNSWICK, GERMANY The “Hungerkamp” project is an innovative initiative in the city of Braunschweig in Germany. Its origins are rooted in the energy provider’s ambition to contribute to climate protection and its experience in the fields of energy generation and district heating. The project was triggered by the need to renovate a police station’s heating installation that ran on oil and coal. The project leaders decided to use this opportunity to go beyond the mere replacement of the heating plant and to develop a project of green and local heating network in the neighbourhood. The meeting with a wood trader further helped to work out the concept of the system. The project’s creation was then completed with the search for a suitable location for the plant, winning other potential customers and the signature of long-term contracts for heat delivery. The project won an award at the 2015 Global District Energy Climate Awards.

130

The heating and power station is composed of four main components. The CHP unit powered by biogas, has an electric capacity of 1,19 MWel and a thermal capacity of 1,16 MWth. It produces heat as a base load and runs throughout the year. Secondly, the hot water boiler is powered by wood chips and has a thermal capacity of 2 MWth. It runs from October to March / April as a medium load, and completes the hot water production from the CHP unit during the winter time. The third element is a 6,5 MWth hot water boiler powered by natural gas. It is used for the peak load and as a reserve. The last component is the hot water storage, composed of two 50 m³ tanks, which enables to balance supply and demand. The local heating network is 4 km long and distributes hot water for heating purposes to 32 customers. The maximum heating demand amounts to 8 MWth, and the network distributes about 14.200 MWh per year to the customers.


The whole system replaces 34 old plants running on heating oil and coal and achieves 8.000 tonnes of CO₂-savings per year, thanks to the use of cogeneration and the replacement of fossil fuels by renewable raw materials.

©PETER SIERIGK

The biogas cogeneration unit is supplied by a pipeline connected to a network and consumes yearly 2 million m³ of biogas. The biogas comes from production sites throughout Germany created by the fermentation of renewable raw materials and waste from the agriculture and breeding farms. The second component of the system is the wood boiler, to complete the heat generation. It produces 6.000 MWh of renewable warm water, and alone provides the needs of 375 households. The wood boiler is owned and operated by the fuel trader who acts as business partner. The produced heat is then sold to the energy provider and injected on the heat network. It consumes 1.600 tonnes per year of residual forest wood and materials from landscape management, such as treetops and smaller branches. The wood mostly comes from the surrounding region: from forests, municipal landscaping and neighbouring mountains. So, apart from using renewable materials, this boiler runs on waste that would otherwise be lost.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

131


DAY 31


FOREST FIRES RELEASE TWICE AS MUCH GHG EVERY YEAR AS THE TRANSPORT SECTOR


FOREST MANAGEMENT & WOOD CHIPS

WIN-WIN SOLUTION FOR FOREST RESIDUES IN ALLGÄU KEMPTEN, GERMANY During the 1980s-1990s, private forest owners in the Allgäu region in southern Germany began mobilising an increasing amount of timber. Until then, only 40-50% of the annual growth of private forests was used despite forests being dominated by 90% spruce. However, with the increased use of timber, the downside was that there was no use for the treetops. The price of oil was at € 0.12/l and the pulp industry needed better quality wood–not treetops full of branches. In order to prevent bark beetle outbreaks and to make room for planting and natural regeneration, the treetops were gathered and set on fire in so-called “Mott” fires. These Mott fires increased so much that clouds of smoke passed over the Iller River, resulting in residents’ calls to fire departments because of fear of forest fires. This challenging situation eventually led to the construction of the first wood chip plant

134

in Allgäu and the establishment of the first wood chip logistics chain. While in the beginning there was no economic gain for the forest owners, they were happy that there was now a way to get the forest residues out of the forest without any cost. This allowed for the successful natural regeneration of the forest and reduced the threat of bark beetle outbreaks. With the continued establishment of wood chip heaters for the local heating of entire districts, (e.g. Sonthofen, Immenstadt, Buchenberg and Scheidegg) and the increased competitiveness, a new viable market for wood chips was created. This is a successful example of the valuation of a resource that was previously treated as waste, offering the forest owners an additional income of 2-6 €/m3.


The renaissance of mankind’s oldest fuel source–firewood–and above all, the increase in broad-leaved tree species and investment into the forests, prompted the conversion of the forests into more climate-resilient mixed forests. However, the future for bioenergy in the region remains uncertain. The current subsidy policy promotes oil-run heating systems to the disadvantage of wood boilers and recent years not have not seen a single new woodchip heating system

installed. The fall in price of fossil fuels also means that significant wood chip heating systems in the region were shut down in favor of natural gas. This led to an enormous oversupply of wood chips and a massive price collapse. The situation was further exacerbated by a large storm and bark beetle attacks in Bavaria in recent years. Currently, in several regions in Bavaria, treetops are again left in the forest.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

135


DAY 32


LITHUANIAN CITIES THAT SWITCHED TO BIOMASS REDUCED THEIR ENERGY BILL BY 40% ON AVERAGE


BIOMASS IN DISTRICT HEATING

BIOMASS DRIVING DOWN HEATING COSTS KAUNAS, LITHUANIA In 2012, Lithuanian district energy provider AB Kauno Energija embarked on an ambitious renovation, conversion and expansion investment programme. Celebrating over 50 years of service to Kaunas, the second largest city in Lithuania, the company reduced consumer prices to some of the lowest in the country. Changes in national legislation have encouraged increased heat competition and energy efficiency, reduction of distribution losses and a switch to biomass fuel. Until 2012 the company was obligated to purchase at least 80% of the heat consumed in the city’s integrated heat network from UAB Kauno termofikacijos elektrinė (KCHP), a 170 MW electric capacity gas-fired combined heat and power (CHP) plant in the city. In 2012, Kauno Energija produced slightly more than 6% of the heat supplied to the integrated city network. In addition, over 92% of

138

its own heat production used imported fossil gas as fuel. However, by the end of 2012 with the purchasing obligation between KCHP abolished, three new independent heat suppliers, each having built new biomass-fired heat plants, entered the Kaunas heat production market. Kauno Energija too embarked on an ambitious €56 million investment programme, partly funded with EU structural funds to increase the share of renewables in the company’s heat production to 23% by 2020 and expand the district heat market and its own relative share. After two years, Kauno Energija spent over €42 million in numerous network refurbishments and boiler replacement projects, including 72 MW of new biomass heat capacity for the integrated city network. The results have been significant, radically changing the Kaunas heat market while lowering prices by a 14.5% decrease compared to 2013, placing Kaunas on the second lowest rate in Lithuania in 2014.


Š AB KAUNO ENERGIJA

Last year the company produced over 21% of the total heat supplied to all networks, up 80 GWh in 2012, purchasing just over 1 TWh heat from eight independent producers including KCHP, still the dominant supplier. Kauno Energija more than doubled its heat share to the integrated city network, from just over 6% in 2012 to 16% in 2014. Furthermore the share of fossil gas dropped to 71%, having been replaced by cheaper solid biomass and a fraction of biogas and

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

peat. Other benefits include a reduction in fuel and electricity consumption per MWh heat produced, a reduction in heat losses in the distribution networks and an 11% reduction in the amount of water needed to supplement the network. More GWh of their own heat was supplied but at a lower rate. The decrease in the comparable expenses has led independent producers of heat, from which the company buys and distributes the heat to the consumers, to reduce the cost of sold heat. All of this adds up to around a 27% reduction in operating costs compared to 2013, increasing the profitability of the company despite a 22% drop in revenue from heat sales.

139


DAY 33


BIOENERGY REPRESENTS LESS THAN 1% OF EUROPE’S YEARLY ENERGY IMPORTS


AGRICULTURAL BIOMASS FOR ENERGY

MANAGING OLIVE OIL RESIDUES IN GREECE NEO PSICHIKO, GREECE Olive oil is one of the most renowned food products of Europe’s Mediterranean countries. The European Union is both the leading producer and consumer of olive oil in the world, accounting for more than 80% and 70% of the production and consumption respectively. Olive groves are also one of the most iconic features of Mediterranean landscapes, comprising a total area of around 4.65 million ha in the EU in 2012. A lesser known fact, however, is the enormous amount of biomass generated through the pruning operations of the olive trees. An untapped source of energy that “AGROinLOG” project (funded from the European Union’s Horizon 2020) aims at converting. The biomass potential related to olive oil production is today hardly exploited. The largest branches are often the only waste removed from the fields and used as firewood, while the remaining

142

material is usually either disposed of in open-field fires or mulched on the ground. The agro-industrial residues generated by the production of olive oil are also important. The average oil content of an olive fruit is 20%. In 2015, the annual production of olives for oil processing was 10.4 million tons, therefore more than 8 million tons of olive pressing residues were produced by olive mills; these materials are usually further processed by secondary mills – known as pomace mills – to produce residual oil fractions and solid by-products which are typically used as solid biofuels in various applications. The olive oil sector faces challenges similar to those of other agro-industries around Europe: seasonal operation, idle time of specialised equipment and other capacities. On the other hand, having a central role in agricultural areas, they can natu-


rally evolve to the next phase of operation, e.g. their transformation into Integrated Biomass Logistic Centres (IBLC). An IBLC is defined as a business strategy for agro-industries to take advantage of unexploited synergies in terms of facilities, equipment and staff capacities, to diversify regular activity both on the input (biomass feedstock) and output side (biocommodities & intermediate biobased feedstocks). The “AGROinLOG” project (funded from the European Union’s Horizon 2020) aims to demonstrate the IBLC concept in three agro-industries (cereal processing, animal feedstock and olive oil processing) around Europe and to replicate the concept in other agro-industrial sectors. The olive oil sector demonstration is based around one of the leading companies in the sector in Greece, NUTRIA S.A..

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

The demonstrative aspects of the project foresee the mechanised harvesting of olive tree prunings in the area of Agios Konstantinos in Central Greece, where NUTRIA is located. The harvested, chipped biomass can lose its residual moisture through treatment at the rotary dryers of pomace milling facilities, and then is either sold on the market as dried chips or further processed and turned into pellets. The validation of the solid biofuels produced will be performed through combustion tests in commercial boilers or specialised laboratories. Considering the local availability of olive tree prunings, it is estimated that up to 8.000 tons of upgraded biomass fuel can be brought into the market on a yearly basis. Overall, the application of the IBLC concept to a Greek olive oil industry is expected to widen its business orientations, increasing its annual turnover while also promoting the concepts of circular economy and sustainable rural development.

143


DAY 34


1 OUT OF 3 EUROPEANS IS NOT ABLE TO NAME A SINGLE RENEWABLE HEATING & COOLING TECHNOLOGY


WOOD TORREFACTION

WOOD TORREFACTION, THE FUTURE OF BIOMASS FUEL ? HOOFDDORP, THE NETHERLANDS Most people know torrefaction today for its application in food processing industries. However, the process of torrefaction is also rising in rank in the energy sector, quickly becoming one of the most advanced options to efficiently substitute the burning of coal. For this reason, Baltania OÜ, a fully owned Estonian subsidiary of the Dutch private equity investment firm Momentum Capital, decided to invest in a first industrial-scale torrefaction plant in Vägari, Estonia. Providing that all conditions of the investment decision are met, the construction of the unit will start in 2018. Biomass torrefaction involves heating the biomass to temperatures between 250 and 300 degrees Celsius in a low-oxygen atmosphere. When

146

biomass is heated at such temperatures, the moisture evaporates and various low-calorific components (volatiles) contained in the biomass are driven out. During this process, the hemi-cellulose in the biomass decomposes, which transforms the biomass from a fibrous, low-quality fuel into a product with excellent fuel characteristics. After torrefaction, the product is cooled down and pelletised, resulting in a black, torrefied pellets with a high calorific value—the perfect fuel to replace fossil coal in power stations. In fact, the energy density and grindability of torrefied pellets are closer to thermal steam coal and significantly higher than that of white wood pellets or wood chips. This is why torrefied pellets have been nicknamed “bio-coal”. The torrefaction process is not bound to woody biomass feedstocks alone, but may also include straw, coconut shells, cacao


© IBTC

shells, Miscanthus, elephant grass, and even olive residues—opening the door for further innovations. In this nascent market, Baltania OÜ announced its willingness to develop a first commercial plant in Estonia whose construction should begin in at the end of 2018. The investment of approximately €45 million will be funded by Momentum Capital, together with other investors and financial institutions. The European Union has approved NER300 grant of €25 million for the torrefaction project. The torrefaction project will be carried out in co-operation with the

Estonian Ministry of the Environment. Baltania OÜ indicated its focus will be on production of 160.000 tonnes of torrefied bio-coal pellets per annum, and that its main customer base will consist of utility companies in the Nordic countries and central Europe currently running on fossil coal. Besides limiting boilers adaptations, according to Baltania, the biocoal pellets produced can be stored and handled using existing fossil coal infrastructure due to their hydrophobic nature.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

147


DAY 35


GHG EMISSIONS IN THE EU28 WERE CUT BY A MILLION TONNES A DAY IN 2014 THANKS TO BIOENERGY


WOOD PELLET BOILERS

WHEN A PELLET BOILER MET A HEAT PUMP… BRISSAGO, SWITZERLAND When you find a perfect pairing of two components, their overall performance often exceeds the sum of its parts – and with 100% renewable energy. Hoval, a well known Liechtenstein heating appliances company, has combined heat pumps with wood pellet boilers to create an “all-terrain” system tailor made for apartment blocks in Brissago, southern Switzerland. Here more than anywhere else, efficiency has to be coupled with environmental protection: Lake Maggiore sparkles in the sun and the view from the buildings’ projecting balconies almost takes your breath away. In this blocks an air/water heat pump and a wood pellet boiler have been brought together for the first time. The three buildings, each of which contains eight apartments, were built in 2013. In spring and autumn, the Belaria® heat pump copes perfectly well on its own. In the depths of winter,

150

the BioLyt® wood pellet boiler supplies the heat. And in between, the two units share the work between them. In this system, each unit neutralises any potential weak points of the other unit: the pellet boiler does not have to keep switching on and off during spring and autumn, which only reduces its efficiency, and there is no need for it to struggle in low-load operation. For its part, the heat pump – which would otherwise reach its limits at low outside temperatures and consume excessive amounts of power – can relax and let the pellet boiler take over. Claudio Galliciotti, service manager at Hoval Switzerland in the canton of Ticino, has been monitoring the system in Brissago over the past few years: “The pellet boiler covers 60-65% of the annual demand of 150,000 kWh, while the heat pump covers 35-40%.” Although the pellet


boiler is designed for 100% of the heating load, the pellet store can be smaller than usual as the biomass only has to provide 60-65% of the annual heat. There is also a separate energy buffer storage vessel for each heat generator. This means that the efficiency of the heat pump can be kept high with its lower flow and return temperatures, and the energy can be stored and layered in accordance with the heat generator in question. Daniel Hegele, who is responsible for developing the wood pellet boilers at Hoval, highlights some other key points: “The bivalent hybrid system, which combines a heat pump and a wood pellet boiler, excels in four key areas for larger systems above 50 kW output in particular: the investment

is relatively low compared to other cascade heating systems, as are the space requirements. The system works with 100% renewable energy – and is still more efficient than a pellet heating system or a heat pump on its own.� The solution is particularly worthwhile for new builds, but is also an option when refurbishing apartment blocks because the pellet boiler can provide the high flow temperatures required on cold days. And in southern regions, a heat pump offers additional benefits in summer: it can be put into reverse operation and used for cooling instead.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

ehi association of the



151


DAY 36


REPLACING AN OLD LOG STOVE WITH A MODERN APPLIANCE CUTS FINE DUST PARTICLES UP TO 95%


SMART TECHNOLOGY

ADURO CREATES SMART FIRE HASSELAGER, DENMARK Every year, Denmark saves ~500.000 tons of heating oil by switching to carbon neutral biomass. With over 250.000 stoves sold across Europe, the Danish stove manufacturer Aduro is an active contributor to this energy transition, providing consumers with high efficiency and “smart” stoves. With the recent surge of smart technologies offering solutions with greater energy efficiency and fewer emissions, digitalisation and user-friendliness are the two key components that allow technologies to be considered “smart”. Firstly, the technology must be able to gather data about energy consumption and adjust the equipment accordingly. Lastly, the consumer needs be able to transform this data into action and control over the system in an intuitive way, yet effective way. In this context, Aduro offers smart technologies that are not only energy efficient, but yield multiple

154

benefits for consumers. Aduro’s proprietary Smart Response technology allows consumers—regardless of the brand or model—to monitor their stove via an app on their smartphone or tablet. This is done with a unit that wirelessly transmits real-time data to the app, allowing users to monitor how hot their stove is burning and when they should add fuel—saving time, money, and energy by optimising the combustion of fuel and ensuring correct use of the stove. Another aspect of ensuring optimal combustion when using wood stoves is allowing proper air supply and flow should be maintained during the combustion process and when refuelling the stoves. The Aduro-tronic Automatic is a device that regulates this automatically—resulting in less work and improved combustion that can translate into a saving of up to 40% less wood. This not only saves


© ADURO

money, but also is a more ecological use of fuel. Lastly, Aduro manufactured stoves combine the both the Aduro-tronic Automation and Aduro Smart Response technologies, putting the power in the hands of the consumer to better monitor and manage their energy use. All Aduro stoves are Nordic Swan eco-labelled, meeting strict environmental and climate criteria while ensuring that the stoves have a minimum efficiency of 76% and low particulate, carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions. Aduro’s dedication to innovation has also allowed consumers the opportunity to enjoy hybrid stoves that can be supplied with either wood pellets or regular firewood. Arduro’s stoves can also operated an entire 24 hours after one filling and can be started and controlled remotely via the user’s smart phone. With innovative companies like Aduro, it’s clear that smart technologies and bioenergy have a real potential symbiotic relationship, not only improving the lives of the individual user— but for all.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

155


DAY 37


EUROPE’S USE OF BIOENERGY WOULD HAVE TO GROW BY 4% PER YEAR TO ACHIEVE ITS 2020 RES TARGETS


BIOENERGY IN INDUSTRIAL PROCESSES

GROWING FLOWERS WITH BIOENERGY IN UKRAINE KIEV, UKRAINE According to the Energy Strategy of Ukraine until 2035, Ukraine is going to reduce fossil fuels consumption and increase the share of renewable energy sources in the total primary energy production from 4% (in 2016) to 25% (in 2035). In recent years, biomass has accounted for about 80% of renewable energy in the country, and is expected to remain stable in the future. Therefore, projects that replace fossil fuels (natural gas, coal) with biomass are very popular now in Ukraine and their number will increase in the future. One such successful example of this is the company “Camellia”, which grows flowers in an 11 ha greenhouse. Established in 1994, the company used to use natural gas for heat production, accounting for 45% of production costs of the grown flowers. When the price of gas started rising in 2013, the

158

company decided to switch to biomass which was less than 5% of production costs of the grown flowers. To make this happen, “Camellia” installed 2 x 3.5 MW boilers that use wood chips/agro-pellets, and produces heat of 58 GWh/yr. The average price of heat is 40-50 €/MWh. The annual amount of biomass fuels needed is 25 kt/yr (fresh) or 70,000 MWh. Among the advantages of such a project is that a reliable local equipment provider has been chosen, and the consumer is located in the area with sufficient available biomass resources. The fuels are purchased from local producers in the form of wood chips, log wood and straw pellets. “Camellia” is interested yet in further implementation of bioenergy technologies.


© UABIO

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

159


DAY 38


BIOHEAT REPRESENTS 89% OF RENEWABLE HEAT CONSUMMED IN 2015 IN THE EU28


BIOENERGY VILLAGE

A CROATIAN BIOENERGY VILLAGE POKUPSKO, CROATIA Pokupsko is a municipality in north-western Croatia near the Kupa River. Surrounded by forests and hills, its 2.500 residents are accustomed to living in harmony with nature, a facet of life supported by the municipality’s aims for sustainable development. This has been achieved by investing in projects and maximising the utilisation of financial incentives from both national and EU funds. In the last 10 years, a number of projects related to energy efficiency and renewable energy have been implemented, having visible impacts on the residents’ quality of life. As 70% of Pokupsko is covered by forested areas, one such project was the establishment of a biomass district heating plant to provide heat to public and commercial buildings, as well as households located in the centre. While there are plans to connect other parts of the municipality

162

to the district heating facility, already 30 consumers benefit, meaning that over 75% of the energy needs in Pokupsko are satisfied through local resources, with the plan to reach 100% in the next five years. The construction of the communal biomass heating plant has increased the quality of life of the residents; instead of having to chop wood into logs and light old wood furnaces manually, heat is now readily available by simply pressing a button. Not only is the price of this heat cheaper than fossil fuel, the regulation system also enables each customer to define the desired comfort level and monitor the heat consumed. One of the main beneficiaries of the new biomass heating plant is an elementary school in Pokupsko – which, unsurprisingly, is very involved with environmental protection and eco-topics. Through a wide range of


© MARIO ŽILEC

activities, its students are instilled with respect for nature preservation and environmental protection. The biomass heating plant in Pokupsko also provides a strong positive social component, as part of the revenues from the heating is used as a scholarship for local children. The main challenge faced by the project was securing the necessary subsidies in order to finance the construction of the biomass district heating plant. This was achieved by applying to the IPARD (Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance in Rural Development) as well as through the Fund for Environment Protection and Energy Efficiency in Croatia–the first of such financing schemes in Croatia. The investment received as about €1,2 million. Finally in 2015, after more than six years of preparation, the first and only communal biomass heating plant in Croatia was constructed. The Municipality of Pokupsko has been the key driving force of this project by recognising the benefits and actively participating in the project’s implementation, educational and promotional activities, and providing feedback, leaving them with more interest to pursue future projects.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

BioVill

163


DAY 39


IN 2015, THE EUROPEAN BIOHEAT SECTOR KNEW A YEARLY GROWTH OF 7,7%


BIOENERGY IN INDUSTRIAL PROCESSES

FIRING UP CERAMICS WITH BIOMASS CAMPELOS, PORTUGAL The Ceramics of Outeiro do Seixo is a company dedicated to the production and marketing of red clay construction bricks and tiles. Based in the central region of Portugal, the raw materials used in this industry can be found in abundance. In order to keep it this way, the company is dedicated to safeguarding the maximum protection for the environment by enforcing measures in the sourcing and management of natural resources, using cleaner technologies, and establishing appropriate waste management to meet waste policy targets. Keeping to this philosophy, in 2007, the company first began partially replacing the fossil fuels used in the manufacturing process with biomass, reducing fossil fuel dependence while harnessing biomass resources from the local regions. The primary objective for using biomass in the pro-

166

duction of heat (firing) was the reduction of COâ‚‚ emissions and the profit generated by the sale of allowances that resulted from burning of biomass (zero emission) rather than fossil fuels. In brick and tile manufacturing, the greatest consumption of energy and gas emissions occur in the drying and cooking stages of the production process. The drying phase aims to reduce the amount of water in the products before entering the furnace. After shaping the brick, it is dried in chambers at temperatures between 30 and 70 degrees Celsius. The drying time is variable and fluctuates around 16 hours. After drying, the bricks are baked in kilns where they are continuously subjected to temperatures ranging between 800 and 1.000 degrees Celsius. The furnace is composed of several parts such as the Ante-Fire and the cooking and cooling areas. The objective


Š CERAMICA ASSU

of these steps is the gradual increase of temperature to the firing zone and the decrease afterwards. The firing time during this stage is variable, around 24 hours. The main innovation in this project was adapting the existing equipment that had previously only worked with petroleum coke and implementing changes to make it compatible with biomass only, or by co-firing biomass

with petroleum coke. Because only a few changes for the existing system for solid fuels were made, the costs were not very significant. Since then, the Ceramics of Outeiro do Seixo has kept increasing the consumption of biomass in its energy mix.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

167


DAY 40


1 OUT OF 2 PEOPLE WORKING IN RENEWABLES IS EMPLOYED IN THE BIOENERGY SECTOR


COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGIES

FIRECUBE: THINKING OUTSIDE THE (BIOENERGY) BOX SAINTE-HÉLÈNE-DU-LAC, FRANCE It cannot be stressed enough: bioenergy is a field of continuous innovation, always seeking to further advance. FireCube—a project developed by Ecosoftec, a company ran by Jean-Pierre Ravix and partners in the Alpine region (FR) —exemplifies not only such an innovative solution, but presents a unique catalytic process to improve boiler combustion. FireCube is a story of committed entrepreneurs and their rural start-up finding initial market opportunities in the bioenergy sector. Everything began in 2010 with a single aim: incorporating a catalytic process in installations using combustion technologies to better facilitate, accelerate and complete the chemical reaction of thermal oxidation to solve many daily concerns faced by plant operators. Initially Mr. Ravix and his partners considered heavy fuel and hard processed residues

170

to be niche markets for their newborn technology; however, unexpected outcomes and partners began to spring up, and Ecosoftec found bioenergy operators had an even greater willingness to test their solutions. FireCube can provide great advantages for the biomass industry as well as the environment. FireCube technology consists of transforming a precursor containing manganese oxide-based compounds (the catalysts) into quantified vapours at nano-scale. The action of the catalyst allows for the lowering of the combustion temperature, which reduces ash vitrification phenomenon and nitrogen oxidation. It also reduces excess air, since the combustion process is improved and the boiler’s fouling limited, preventing long and costly maintenance operations. These issues are fundamental concerns for plant owners as it has a direct


Back in 2010, developing such a project was far from easy. As banks had and still tend to have a limited understanding of such technology and the potential partners from the bioenergy sector, Mr. Ravix still managed to fund the company in a start-up fashion by finding angel investors and securing public funds from national and regional bodies. After this first stage, convincing initial partners was not an easy task either: As FireCube technology cannot be fully simulated in laboratories, it touches at the very crux of installations – the combustion chamber itself and by extension, the heart of many industrial processes. This is where trust and appetite for innovation come into play. This is where local bioenergy operators provide a big push in the right direction for Ecosoftec.

© HEAT MANAGEMENT

impact on plant efficiency in the range of 3% to 15% according to the first companies testing FireCube.

In 2013, Laurent Fustinoni, one of the manager of AEB (Alpes Energie Bois), a cogeneration plant from the region, was one of the first to adopt the technology. After two years of using FireCube, AEB’s manager is positive about his experience, claiming “The use of FireCube has generated improved combustion with a visible reduction in fouling. This decline has reduced steam soot sequences that have a direct impact on the electricity production. This allowed us to produce 1 MWh more of electricity production per day.”

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

171


DAY 41


IN 2015, BIOGAS PRODUCTION IN THE EU28 WAS HIGHER THAN THE TOTAL GAS CONSUMPTION IN BELGIUM


ANAEROBIC DIGESTION PLANT

A ZERO-CARBON MILK PROCESSING FACILITY AYLESBURY, UNITED KINGDOM ABP Food Group is recognised as an industry leader in the UK when it comes to sustainable practices and environmental initiatives. In 2015 the company opened the world’s first certified carbon neutral abattoir in Ellesmere (UK) where waste material from the food processing operation is used in conjunction with used cooking oil to provide the energy requirements on site. Earlier this year, ABP achieved triple accreditation from The Carbon Trust for the third consecutive year and is one of only a handful of companies to have achieved such accreditation. The company which employs over 600 people across the UK decided to invest in a new project, that should result in the production of a zero-carbon milk.

bury, Buckinghamshire, will create enough green energy to sustainably power the equivalent of 12.000 homes. The ABP Food Group facility is located adjacent to the Arla dairy, allowing the dairy producer to become a zero-carbon milk processing facility. Robert Behan, MD of Olleco, said the new facility is an excellent example of the circular economy in action, with multiple supply chain partners working together to deliver a truly sustainable outcome. This state of the art Olleco facility will convert in excess of 100.000 tonnes of waste into heat, power and bio-methane for export to the national grid, and bio-fertiliser for both of ABP Food Group’s and Arla’s farmer suppliers.

A £22 million investment (€24,6 million) by ABP Food Group’s renewable division Olleco to open a 15 MW anaerobic digestion facility in Ayles-

“Sustainability is a key priority right across the ABP Food Group. The company has invested and implemented innovative sustainability measures

174


© ABP FOOD GROUP

that are world class, trail blazing and meet the exceptionally high targets – to reduce the environmental footprint of our business – we have set ourselves,” Mr Behan explained.

A STORY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

175


How to multiply bioenergy success stories in Europe? The present booklet only features 41 stories out of the countless cases where bioenergy sustainably powers and heats local businesses, public buildings, private houses, etc. in Europe, thus facilitating an effective energy transition for all. But European bioenergy also has the potential to offer a thousand more of these stories, and to make the EU28 the actual world leader in the energy transition process. EU decision makers have a key role to play in unlocking this potential, which is why AEBIOM, as the voice of the European bioenergy sector in Brussels, thrives to raise awareness and promote what constitutes today the most important source of renewable energy in the European mix. The next page will present you our policy platform for the future of European bioenergy.


Our policy messages First and foremost, a better recognition is needed from policy makers on the role that bioenergy can achieve in reaching EU long term climate and energy goals. The EU bioenergy sector needs ambitious climate and energy targets in the upcoming 2030 legislative package. It is only with a strong bioenergy sector that the EU will reach its international climate commitments. The EU bioenergy sector needs certainty and visibility when it comes to the future sustainability requirements. Clear rules should be defined in a stable legislative framework continued over time. A fair market for renewables should be established, by eliminating fossil fuel subsidies and introducing carbon tax in the heating and cooling sector. The heating sector (50% of EU energy consumption) is still highly dominated by fossil fuels (more than 80%). The EU bioenergy sector needs modern and efficient direct sources of renewable heat to be promoted by accelerating the replacement of old heating installations while increasing the renovation rate of buildings to reduce energy consumption. As far as the electricity sector is concerned, the storable and dispatchable aspects of biomass should be recognized. These characteristics allow for the stabilisation of power grids by complementing supply when variable RES cannot deliver, or during peak energy demand. More coherence between EU policies is needed (trade, industrial, energy and climate, etc.) and counter-productive measures should be avoided. This would allow the development of a local and innovative RES industry, stimulating the economy and creating jobs in Europe. Investing in EU RES industries not only prevents GDP leakage but also reduces our energy dependency.


41 European Bioenergy Stories  

From November 21st, 2017 until the end of the year, Europe relied only on bioenergy for all its energy needs. To celebrate each of these 41...

41 European Bioenergy Stories  

From November 21st, 2017 until the end of the year, Europe relied only on bioenergy for all its energy needs. To celebrate each of these 41...

Advertisement