Page 1

2018 ACTIVITY REPORT

© Vincent Reynaud-Lacroze


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2

Editorial p. 4 Aide et Action charter

p. 5

Our organization

p. 6-7-

2018 in numbers and worldwide

p. 8-9

Africa Region (by country)

p. 10-25

South Asia Region (by country)

p. 26-35

SouthEast Asia & China region (by country)

p. 36-43

France-Europe region (by country)

p. 44-47

Financial overview 2018

p. 48

Structure of our network

p. 50

Our offices in the world

p. 51

2018 ACTIVITY REPORT A publication conducted by AIDE ET ACTION INTERNATIONAL GENERAL MANAGER: Eric Ouannes INTERNATIONAL MANAGER OF TRANSITION: Charles-Emmanuel Ballanger EDITOR IN CHIEF: Isabelle Merny EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTIONS: A. Bah Diallo / O. Beronie / C. Kiran / S. Llort / V. Martin / I. Merny / A. Mertens / K. Poels / D. Sessouma / S. Yau

© Naïade Plante

COVER PHOTO: Vincent Reynaud-Lacroze GRAPHIC DESIGN & ILLUSTRATIONS: Stuart Martin, Intrinsic.cc TRANSLATION: Paul Robert

AI DA XUN CHINA: www.aea-china.org AIDE ET ACTION AFRICA: www.afrique.aide-et-action.org AIDE ET ACTION SOUTH ASIA: www.aea-southasia.org AIDE ET ACTION SOUTHEAST ASIA & CHINA: www.seac.aide-et-action.org AIDE ET ACTION EDUCATION FOUNDATION HONG KONG: www.aeahk.org.hk AIDE ET ACTION FRANCE-EUROPE : www.france.aide-et-action.org AIDE ET ACTION SWITZERLAND: www.aide-et-action.ch


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4 K

© Kristen Poels

Editorial

eeping the promise of education for all in 2030 is an imperative goal!

It’s been three years since 193 heads of state committed to “ensuring access for all to quality education, on an equal footing, and to promote the possibilities of lifelong learning” by 2030. Since then we have had some nice speeches, many promises of leaving no one behind and finally some previously unseen announcements of funding for education. These have even reached $112 billion during the Global Partnership for Education Financing Conference (GPE) in February 2018. This commitment reflects a real awareness of the essential role of education for the future of humanity. Nonetheless, has the situation really changed? Have we made any progress in the fight against inequality and exclusion of those who still deprive today 263 million children from access to education? There has been some progress, but the road is still long to achieve our goals. “Access to quality education is not just an objective in itself, it is especially the golden thread that will reduce famine, to fight

“ACCESS TO QUALITY EDUCATION IS NOT JUST AN OBJECTIVE IN ITSELF, IT IS ESPECIALLY THE GOLDEN THREAD THAT WILL REDUCE FAMINE, TO FIGHT AGAINST POVERTY AND DISEASE, TO LIMIT CLIMATE CHANGE, IN SHORT TO REACH ALL SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVES AND CREATE A WORLD OF LASTING PEACE.” against poverty and disease, to limit climate change, in short to reach all Sustainable Development Goals and create a world of lasting peace.” Indeed, for 10 years, the number of children that are excluded from education has remained at the same level, development programmes fail to reach Sources: UNESCO Institute for Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org)

populations that are the most marginalized. 617 million children, of whom more than half still go to school, yet do not master basic skills and more than 750 million adults are illiterate. By 2030, 800 million young people will enter the labour market without having the skills needed to get a job. In the current state of affairs, quality education for all will not be reached in 2030 but it will be a more than 50 year old delay. Once again, we will not succeed in keeping our commitment. Once again, the poorest children, those boys and girls who rely most on us will be deprived of their right to education. For Aide et Action, to not keep this promise is unthinkable, even reckless because it’s the future of the world that depends on it: access to quality education is not just an objective in itself, it is especially the golden thread that will reduce famine, to fight against poverty and disease, to limit climate change, in short to reach all Sustainable Development Goals and create a world of lasting peace. Increasing investments to offer this quality education for all is therefore a good starting point, but that will not be enough. We will also have to change strategy, revamp our programmes and put right in the heart of our actions a flawless determination to go and meet the Other. In Vietnam together with ethnic minorities; in India alongside unemployed youth, without training; in Africa, with illiterate women, our teams worked alongside those who suffer each day from exclusion and discrimination in 2018. Quality education, which is truly inclusive, is not built from an office but in the field, with exchanges, in touch with reality. And our strength is there: our teams are involved in cities as well as in the most remote

areas, they exchange with the most marginalized communities, teach them to foster contact and to create together not simply a school, but “their” school, an open learning eco-system, adapted to their needs and to their cultures. The education offered here is the result of outreach work with local teachers that we offer the means but also the opportunity to experiment, to innovate and deploy new learning methods while respecting national programmes. And the results, as you will read in this activity report, are there: in

2018, in our 74 projects conducted in 19 countries in Africa, South Asia, SouthEast Asia and Europe, 1,204,428 people were impacted by our activities (624,157 children and young people, 564,197 adults and 16,074 teachers from 2013 schools). The path remains difficult and many challenges lie ahead. But in front of them, we will be humble, ready to roll up our sleeves; listen to local people to forge new partnerships for the development of new projects that act simultaneously on all the obstacles towards education.

All this would be impossible without the mobilization of our teams in the field, our employees and our managers, who embody the values and know-how that has built our reputation in the 37 last years. I also want to thank our volunteers, donors and partners who relentlessly take action, on our side, so that education in 2030 will no longer be a mirage but a reality for all, without exclusion or discrimination. Aïcha Bah Diallo International President

The Aide et Action Charter

Aide et Action International works for a world where dignity is assured for all, thanks to education, a lever of human development. Our commitment and actions are founded, above all, on the values of freedom, respect, solidarity, equity and integrity. Devoid from any political and religious ties, we are committed to:

GUARANTEE transparency of our actions and the use of our financial resources

DEVELOP

principles of solidarity and exchange between cultures thanks to referral links

TAKE ACTION

to respect the right to quality education for all, especially children, who are the future of humanity

OUR COMMITMENT

PROMOTE

education that is open to the world, its diversity and cultures

RAISE AWARENESS mobilize and influence so that education becomes a worldwide commitment

GUIDE

populations so that they are in charge of their own educational projects

The Aide et Action International Charter is the backbone of the association, shared by all its members. It guarantees its unity and coherence. Its values and principles are accepted by all its partners.


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6

Our organization In 2015, 193 states committed to achieving 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. Among them, SDO 4, dedicated to education, provides for “ensuring access to quality education for all, on an equal footing, and to promote opportunities for life-long learning. In 2017, Peter Thomson, then President of the UN General Assembly said: “Education is the golden thread that runs through the SDOs.”

ndeed, giving each individual access to quality education, involves having a job, living in a dignified family, being in good health, becoming an enlightened citizen and stakeholder of sustainable development and at the service of all. For example: children of literate mothers are 50% more likely to live past the age of 5 than children of illiterate mothers; an extra year of school can increase by at least 10% the income of at least 20% of women; if all children of the least developed countries left school with basic skills, necessary for everyday life, it could lift 171 million people out of extreme poverty; creating universal access to upper secondary education by 2030 would prevent 200,000 deaths related to natural disasters in the 20 coming years ; if the schooling rate in secondary school is 10% higher than the current average, the risk of war is reduced by almost 3%; literate people are more likely to participate in democratic process and exercise their civil rights... These figures prove that investing in education is essential for the future of humanity and the world!

I

Even though, since the year 2000, the number of children excluded from education has almost been halved and if significant progress has been made in terms of education, 263 million children aged between 6 and 17 - 63 million of these children at the age to go to primary school - are still not in school; 152 million children (aged 5 to 15) are obliged to work, more than half of them in hazardous conditions; and 750 million adults

are still illiterate (2/3 are women). Universal education still does not reach the most vulnerable children and marginalized people (migrants and refugees that are handicapped etc.) On top of this, bad learning and teaching conditions are added (overcrowded classes, lack of materials and low level of qualification of teachers) and drive millions of children out of school without having acquired qualifications required. Thus, 617 million children and teenagers do not acquire basic reading and mathematics skills; however, 399 million of them are well and truly at school ...

links; and we guarantee transparency of our actions and the use of our financial resources. Aide et Action adopts a listening process towards populations to accompany them and help achieve projects that match their needs and their cultures. The involvement of all parties is essential to this process and we work within a multi-stakeholder framework with populations, local authorities, as well as governments. Together, we experiment, deploy, evaluate and value their educational projects and development. Our activities are conducted by employees and volunteers of Aide et Action originating in the countries of intervention and are supported by local partner associations. The goal: to promote the autonomy of populations and that of all the players who revolve around them (communities, pupils’ parents, teachers, local authorities, etc.)

Founded in 1981, Aide et Action, an international NGO, has been taking action to build a world where dignity is assured for all through equal access to education, which is key to human development. Convinced that, without education, no economic, social, health, ecological or political progress is possible, Aide et Action helps ensure that every individual, regardless of age and gender, receives quality education that will allow them to grow, flourish, find a job and support their family. We take action to respect the right to quality education for all, especially for children and vulnerable and marginalized populations; we raise awareness, mobilize and influence so that education becomes a global commitment; we accompany populations, prime contractors of their educational projects; we promote education which is open to the world, its diversity and cultures; we develop the principle of solidarity and exchange between cultures thanks to referral

Aide et Action is a recognized association of public utility and free from any political and religious affiliation. Our commitment and actions are based on the values of freedom, respect, solidarity, equity and integrity. In 2018, thanks to our teams in the field, our employees, managers and flawless support of our volunteers, donors and partners, we conducted 75 projects in 19 countries in Africa, South and SouthEast Asia, in Europe benefiting 1,204,428 people (624,157 children and youth, 564,197 adults and 16,074 teachers from 2,013 schools).

© William Davies Sources: UNESCO Institute for Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org)


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8 Aide et Action countries of intervention

2018 in figures

2,013 schools involved

and around the world France Romania

€19.8M

1,204,428

China

Nepal

raised

India Laos

Guinea

Burkina Faso

children and youth

Bhutan

Senegal

people directly impacted by our activities of which:

624,157

Niger

Mali

Cambodia

Ivory Coast

Togo

Vietnam Sri Lanka

Benin

Madagascar

19

countries

564,197 adults

16,074 teachers

74 projects

Regions of Aide et Action intervention: Africa South Asia SouthEast Asia Europe


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AIDE ET ACTION IN AFRICA

Benin

Africa Number of Number of countries projects

9

22

(see pages 20 – 25)

Number of people impacted by our activities

349,450

Number of children impacted by our activities

334,229

of whom 54.84% girls

Despite many difficulties (insecurity, conflicts, economic problems ...), education remains the absolute priority for the majority of African states. Despite a clear improvement in access to education, subSaharan Africa remains the region which still has the highest number of children that are excluded from education (34 million children aged 6 to 11 are excluded from primary school). The reasons for this exclusion are related to household poverty, lack of infrastructure or teachers or the persistence of discrimination (gender, disability ...). The quality of teaching remains extremely weak: 6 students out of 10 in the last year of primary

Number of adults impacted by our activities

15,221

Number of schools impacted by our activities

of whom 50% women Number of teachers impacted by our activities

In 2018, projects led by Aide et Action in Africa are mainly focused on the following themes:

117

Bénin

Budget

€7.4M

8,084

school (in French-speaking countries only) have not acquired basic skills. To meet these challenges, African states concentrate their efforts on primary education. Some of the other priorities are girls’ education in crisis situations; migrant populations as well as vocational training of young people. Sadly, national education systems must face important challenges: insufficient financial resources, lack of qualified teachers, failing governance ... Barriers to access to quality education for all remain numerous.

765

Number of AeA employees in Africa

// Access and quality of education // Education for sustainable development and global citizenship // Girls’ and women’s education In addition to structural problems, educational systems have been confronted with repeated strikes by teachers in a number of countries (Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, Guinea, Senegal, Benin, Togo), terrorism (resulting in the closure of many schools in Mali, Niger, Burkina Faso), preand post-election crises and tensions (Mali, Togo, Senegal, Madagascar, Guinea), as well as natural disasters (Madagascar).

WITNESS REPORT

“PROJEG, which Aide et Action manages, is the starting point of a frank and lasting dialogue between youth and public authorities.

No development is possible without taking into account the concerns of populations, especially youth. We have problems with public schools, health infrastructures, water conveyance in drinking water. Young people and women face employment problems, sustainable development and socio-economic integration. To make this dialogue a reality, I can contribute to mobilize young people and raise their awareness of non-violence through sports activities, especially in schools. With my efforts, young people from neighbourhoods impacted by projects would like to thank Aide et Action and the government for the promotion of this unifying action which places young people at the heart of the development of their local communities.”

© AEA

Sources : ISU, PASEC 2014

Kadiatou Diallo, President of the NGO Femme Active Pour son Épanouissement (FAPE), player of the Concerted Capacity Building Programme for Civil Society Organizations and Guinean Youth (PROJEG) led by Aide et Action in Guinea (see page 24)

© Kristen Poels

© Vincent Reynaud-Lacroze

Region

Number of inhabitants

11.1 million

45% < 14 years old

Compulsory education

Illiteracy rate of over 15 years old

From 6 – 11 years old 67% for both genders 77.9% for women

Net enrollment pre-primary school

Net enrollment primary school

Net enrollment secondary school

12.8% for girls

89.6% for girls

39.8% for girls

12.5% for both genders

Benin

97% for both genders

46.5% for both genders

The year 2018 was earmarked by numerous teacher strikes that disrupted the school year. Yet the end-of-year exams went through normally. In 2018, the government adopted its post-2015 Education Sector Plan. Key challenges for the state of Benin remain: increase access and maintenance for 3-15 years at school, provide inclusive and equitable education and improve the management and piloting of basic education.

PROJECT FOCUS

Project to improve hygiene and sanitation (PHASE) in schools in Benin: menstrual hygiene management sector for girls Support quality of education through the improvement of hygienic conditions From 2016 to 2018 In five communes of southern Benin: Adjarra, Avrankou, Aguégués, Porto-Novo and Sô-Ava

Partners: Claudine Talon Foundation, NSP

// Since 2016, the project led by Aide et Action aims to strengthen the quality of education by improving the conditions of hygiene and sanitation in schools. It provides, among other things, for the construction of sanitation equipment, training for use and maintenance of sanitary infrastructure, awareness campaigns for pupils and communities with hygiene rules in schools and families. // In 2018, 640 sanitary napkin kits were distributed to 325 girls in 50 schools in two target communities; 43 main contacts have been identified and trained to help girls better manage their menstrual hygiene; 323 girls were trained in the use of sanitary napkins; 144 mothers of schoolgirls were made aware about project; 2,446 brochures on reproductive health were distributed to girls from 8 colleges of the municipalities of Avrankou, Adjarra and Cotonou.

Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

For more about our other projects in Benin see pages 20 to 25 Sources: Demographic Data of Benin, UNESCO Institute for Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org)

Net enrollment rate: The number of students in the age range that theoretically corresponds to a given level of education, expressed as a percentage of the total population of that age group. Gross enrollment rate: Number of students enrolled in a given level of education, regardless of their age, expressed as a percentage of the population of the theoretical age group corresponding to this level of teaching. For higher education, the population used is that of the five consecutive years beginning with the secondary school graduation age.


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Burkina Faso

Ivory Coast

© Isabelle Merny

Number of inhabitants

43% < 14 years old

Illiteracy rate of over 15 years old

From 6 – 16 years old 65.4% for both genders

© AEA

19.1 million

Compulsory education

73.7% for women

Net enrollment pre-primary school

Net enrollment primary school

Net enrollment secondary school

Number of inhabitants

3.8% for girls

75.4% for girls

29.3% for girls

42% < 14 years old

3.5% for both genders

Burkina Faso

76.4% for both genders

29.1% for both genders

Bénin

Burkina Faso 2018 was characterized by the deterioration of the security situation in the country and as a result the closure of more than 1300 schools. 5000 teachers abandoned their positions and more than 500 000 children were deprived of education. In addition, no respite was observed on the social front: teachers went on strike several times. The main challenges for the authorities remain the development of technical education and vocational training and the promotion of employment for young graduates, teacher training, and improvement of quality, relevance and effectiveness of literacy actions.

PROJECT FOCUS

Learning For Change (APC)

Education for life From 2015 to 2019 In the provinces of Sissili and Ziro in the Midwest // The Learning For Change (APC) project is the result of collaboration between Aide et Action and the L’Occitane Foundation. It is a response to illiteracy of women, their extreme poverty in rural areas and their difficult access to factors of production.

loss without knowing it. Hence the interest of the APC project which combines literacy, technical training and financial support for women. To achieve this goal, the main activities planned are: information and awareness; organization of literacy sessions; training of women (technical training, use of information and communication technologies in financial management, setting up organizational management tools); granting of subsidies for the implementation of income generating activities.

// In 2018, 122 learners learned to read, write and count. The success rate in literacy sessions ranges from 97% to 100%. 131 women participated in the implementation of income generating activities (rice // Since 2015, the APC project aims at empowering women members of parboiling, beekeeping, farming); 33 women were trained in beekeeping the NUNUNA Federation in the provinces of Sissili and Ziro in Burkina production; 40 people were trained in simplified accounting, inventory Faso. Illiteracy and difficult access to loans and land for women are management and marketing; 20 people were trained in small livestock real hindrances to the development of their activities. It is also difficult farming; Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com5 women groups were supported both technically and for them to appreciate the profitability of their activities and to choose financially. the one that will improve their income. Some carry out activities at a

Partners: Villages of Sapouy, Léo, Cassou and Gao, Provincial Directorate of Education of Sissili and Ziro, NUNUNA Federation, L’Occitane Foundation. For more about our projects in Burkina Faso see pages 20 – 25 Sources: 2018 PDSEB Annual Monitoring Report, UNESCO Institute for Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org)

24.2 million

Compulsory education

Illiteracy rate of over 15 years old

From 6 – 15 years old 56% for both genders 63.2% for women

Net enrollment pre-primary school

Net enrollment primary school

Net enrollment secondary school

7.4% for girls

82.1% for girls

33.4% for girls

7.3% for both genders

Ivory Coast

85.9% for both genders

39.9% for both genders

Aide et Action takes action in Ivory Coast in a political and social context of post-crisis. The education system in the north of the country was disrupted or destroyed during the crisis from 2002 to 2010. Rebuilding this system in the whole country has been a priority.

PROJECT FOCUS

Improvement and Diversification Programme of the Educational Offer in West Africa (PADOE) Access and quality of education From 2015 to 2018 In the cities of Bondoukou, Bouake, Katiola

// For decades the education systems of many countries in West Africa, including Ivory Coast, counted millions of young people without a qualification. Given the weakness of apprenticeship systems and trades training, these youth, idle and without prospects, constitute potential

risks for the social and political stability of countries. The decline in the level of qualification and motivation of teachers, the difficulties to implement school programmes that are more adapted to needs and reality, the low quality of the learning environment are the main causes. // In this difficult context, Aide et Action set up a programme aimed at improving and diversifying the educational offer in West Africa through the development of local capacity for management and guidance of education systems and the promotion of alternative models of education for the care of those excluded from a formal system. // In 2018, 14,332 students (including 53% girls), 333 teachers and 50 primary schools were involved in our activities.

Partners: AFD, MENETFP, Decentralized State Services (DREN, IEPP) Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com For more about our projects in Ivory Coast see pages 20 -25 Sources: Ministry of National Education, Technical Education and Vocational Training (MENET-FP), pocket school statistics 2017-2018, edition: March 2018, UNESCO Institute of Education Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org)


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Guinea

Madagascar

12.7 million

42% < 14 years old

Compulsory education

Illiteracy rate of over 15 years old

From 7 – 12 years old 68% for both genders 78% for women

Net enrollment pre-primary school

Net enrollment primary school

Net enrollment secondary school

10.2% for girls

69.4% for girls

26.2% for girls

10.5% for both genders

76.7% for both genders

© AEA

Number of inhabitants

© Charles-Emmanuel Ballanger

Bénin

Number of inhabitants

25.5 million

41% < 14 years old Net enrollment pre-primary school

34.9% for both genders 36.5% for girls

33% for both genders

Madagascar Guinea

The educational context was affected by strikes initiated by the Free Union of Teachers and Guinean researchers (SLECG) who disrupted the courses in the first and fourth semester in 2018. In addition, the government massively recruited contractors to overcome the many absences of incumbent teachers on strike.

Compulsory education

From 6 – 10 years old 28.4% for both genders 31.7% for women

Gross enrollment primary school (net rate unknown)

143.8% for both genders 143.9% for girls

Support Project for Schooling and Sanitary Development (PASS) leaving the parental home to marry unlike the boy who has to support the family. We also note a high drop-out rate of girls due, in particular, to early marriages. Finally, the school being considered as belonging to the government, communities do not feel concerned.

Girls Friendship School (EAF)

Access and quality of education From 2015 to 2019 In the villages of Coyah, Boffa, Boké, Dubréka // The Girls Friendship School project addresses three issues to which the Guinean school is confronted: low education of girls in rural areas, the high drop-out rate and communities and parents in school management. In rural areas, parents continue to favour boys at the expense of girls: the girl is called to care for domestic tasks before

// The project contributes to the emergence of a favourable education environment, retention and success of children in school, especially girls. It raises awareness and builds the capacities of communities to become involved in school management. // In 2018, 5,000 children (including 53% girls), 4,000 adults (of which 51.25% women), 150 teachers and 21 schools were involved in our activities.

Partners: Orange Foundation, Turing Foundation, SUEZ Foundation

Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

For more on our projects in Guinea see pages 20 -25 Sources: 2017-2018 Primary and Secondary Statistics Yearbook / National Institute of Statistics RGPH3 2014 / National Economic and Social Development Plan 2016-2020, UNESCO Institute for Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org)

Net enrollment secondary school

29.1% for both genders 30.2% for girls

Madagascar suffers from education of low quality, a lack of educational provision as well as poor governance of the education system. The 2017-2018 school year was marked by the official launch of the operational implementation of the Education Sector Plan (SSE) whose main objective is to improve access to primary education. The following are planned: construction of 800 classrooms in 3 years; reduction to 9 years (divided into 3 sub-cycles) of the duration of basic education; abolition of the Certificate of Elementary Primary Education (CEPE); shift of the school calendar and change of teaching language.

PROJECT FOCUS

PROJECT FOCUS

Illiteracy rate of over 15 years old

Access and quality of education From 2018 to 2019 In 30 schools in the school district (CISCO) of Ampanihy

// The regions of southern Madagascar and more particularly those in Anosy, Androy and Atsimo Andrefana are Copyright the most by food © affected Free Vectorareas Maps.com insecurity. In these regions, the indicator rate of food insecurity is very high among households. It hovers between 42% and 68%. In addition, food, health and nutrition circumstances of school-age children are very worrying. A World Bank study on the health and nutritional status of students in two districts of southern Madagascar revealed that disease and malnutrition sharply reduced school participation: children

Partners : World Food Programme (WFP)

For more about our other projects in Madagascar see pages 20 - 25 Sources: Education Sector Plan (PSE), UNESCO Institute for Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org)

suffering from malnutrition clearly suffer significant delays in their psychomotor and intellectual development. Available food production is insufficient to cover food needs of the population of which more than a third is undernourished. In addition, Madagascar is exposed to cyclones that constitute true natural disasters destroying everything on their way. // The project aims to promote the adoption of favourable attitudes to good nutrition, hygiene and health by children and the school community in 30 target schools. It also aims to empower the school community to sustain the implementation of PAFIs (Small Feasible and Important Actions) in favour of nutrition, hygiene and health through education development planning, especially the project of a contracted establishment (pec). // In 2018, 6,954 children (47.2% girls), 76 teachers and 30 schools were impacted by our activities.


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Mali

Niger

© AEA

18.5 million

48% < 14 years old

Illiteracy rate of over 15 years old

Compulsory education

From 7 – 15 years old 66.9% for both genders 77.8% for women

Number of inhabitants

50% < 14 years old

Net enrollment pre-primary school

Net enrollment primary school

Net enrollment secondary school

4.8% for girls

57.6% for girls

26.1% for girls

4.7% for both genders

Mali

61.2% for both genders

Bénin 29.3% for both genders

With an extreme poverty rate of 42.7% (2017) Mali is 175th out of 188 countries in terms of Human Development (2016). Following the coup d’état of 2012, the security situation deteriorated, which led to an impact on the school system, especially in the Centre and in the North of the country. Mali is subjected to regular terrorist attacks that plague the population. The growing insecurity is the first challenge of the country: many schools are closed compromising the future of children. Whole areas are dangerous and their access is strongly discouraged. It is in this difficult context that Aide et Action takes action in support of public policies, in order to restore access to education.

PROJECT FOCUS

Improvement Project of Access, Quality and Governance of basic and secondary education (PAQAMA) Access and quality of education From 2016 to 2019 In the regions of Gao and Menaka, Northern Mali

// In 2012 Mali was hit by a security crisis that impacted the school system, especially in the centre and the north of the country. More than 700 schools were closed, sometimes destroyed, following the crisis.

© AEA

Number of inhabitants

// The project contributes to the recovery of education after the 2012 crisis by improving access, quality and governance of education in the Gao region. It strengthens the capacities of decentralized services and communities in charge of education. // In 2018, the project trained 14 pedagogical supervisors to realtime learning analysis (TRA) to inclusive education. 15 pedagogical supervisors were trained in the didactics of subjects, a balanced approach and management of the school in decentralized style. 200 teachers in total were trained in order to supervise 9,300 students, 40% of whom are girls. Finally, 50 schools were concerned by our activities.

21.4 million

Compulsory education

Not compulsory

Sources: National Institute of Statistics of Mali “Modular and Permanent Survey of Households, August 2017”, https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SP.POP.TOTL, https://www.worldbank.org/en/country/ mali/overview, UNESCO Institute for Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org)

77.5% for women

Net enrollment primary school

Net enrollment secondary school

7.7% for girls

60.7% for girls

17.1% for girls

7.5% for both genders

Niger

65.4% for both genders

20.3% for both genders

On the security front, repeated attacks by Boko Haram in the Diffa region and at the border with Mali, have led many refugees and displaced people to flee insecure areas, increasing especially human trafficking. Insecurity is also growing in the Tillabéri region with attacks conducted in the departments of Say, Tera and Torodi. A large-scale operation was conducted by the Nigerian Armed Forces in the areas of the Komadougou River and the river bed of Lake Chad. On the economic front, growth has been strong but remains below the growth rate of 7% required to fight poverty effectively.

PROJECT FOCUS

Diffa Youth Project (BANA)

Migration and vocational training of young people From 2018 to 2021 In the region of Diffa // The Diffa region is going through a complex and major humanitarian crisis: conflicts, extortions and terrorism led to the displacement of 302,387 people including 184,404 internally displaced persons. 88,668 refugees, of whom 29,315 young immigrants, returned to their village

of origin because of the insecurity of their host sites. These events have contributed to destroying all social bonds within communities. The economy is totally unstructured. // The project must promote reintegration of socio-educational frameworks for young people, while rehabilitating and institutionalizing spaces for dialogue and exchange within the entities of decentralized organizations and local civil society. // In 2018, the project benefited 54,967 people, including 27,864 women. Of these beneficiaries, 33,826 (60% of whom are women) are young people from the poorest and most vulnerable communities of 12 villages in the Diffa region.

Partners: French Development Agency (AFD), Care, Diffa Regional Council, High Authority for the Consolidation of Peace, Karkara, Nigetec, International Plan Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

For more about our projects in Mali see pages 20 – 25

69.4% for both genders

Net enrollment pre-primary school

Partners: Academies of Education (AE) of Gao and Menaka and Pedagogical Animation Centres of Ansongo, Bourem, Gao, French Agency of Development (AFD), Humanity and Inclusion (HI), International Rescue Committee (IRC), Menaka and Wabaria, Ministry of National Education, Norwegian Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com Refugee Council (NRC)

Illiteracy rate of over 15 years old

For more about our projects in Niger see pages 20 – 25 Sources: Monthly Project Activity Report, PDES 2017-2021, UNESCO Institute for Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org)


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18

Senegal

Togo

© Vincent Reynaud-Lacroze

© William Davies

Number of inhabitants

18.8 million

43% < 14 years old Net enrollment pre-primary school

14.9% for both genders 15.8% for girls

Senegal

Compulsory education

Number of inhabitants

Illiteracy rate of over 15 years old

7.7 million

From 6 – 16 years old 48.1% for both genders

42% < 14 years old

60.2% for women

Net enrollment primary school

74.1% for both genders 78.2% for girls

Bénin Net enrollment secondary school

38.8% for girls

In Senegal, barely 6 out of 10 children are in school and the quality of education is not always high. The proportion of children and young people out of school is estimated at 1,498,286 or 37% of the population of school age. This group is made up of 78% of children / young people who have never been to school and 22% of out-of-school youth. Girls’ drop-out is slightly higher (10.4%) than boys (9.1%) in the 6-11 age group. On the other hand, the trend is reversed in the 12-16 years age group. The Senegalese education system must go beyond formal education and face “new challenges “: Daaras, Franco-Arab schools, work and learning places, places of leisure are also spaces that the Senegalese education system must take care of. Aide et Action develops programmes so that by the end of their primary years children have acquired basic skills.

PROJECT FOCUS

Basic Education Improvement Project in Casamance (PAEBCA) Access and quality of education From 2015 to 2019 In the Sedhiou and Ziguinchor regions

// In the Sedhiou and Ziguinchor regions, classes are overcrowded. They are, for many, made of temporary shelters (24% of public elementary school classes in Sedhiou and 41% in Ziguinchor. This percentage rises to 35% in Sedhiou for secondary education and 63% in Ziguinchor).

The school environment is characterized by violence, particularly with regard to girls. Result: learning is very weak. The success rate in the baccalaureate reached only 29% in Ziguinchor and 26.37% in Sedhiou. // The project aims to improve the public education service in Casamance, to foster social cohesion, peace and fight against inequalities and enable better skills development for students. // In 2018, 7 new schools were opened, 21 new classes are under construction. 60 schools were equipped with hygiene and sanitation installations. Finally, 160 tutors were trained to provide school support to primary school children. 285,511 children (including 47% girls), 980 adults (42.8% women), 5,424 teachers and 140 schools were involved in our activities.

Togo

From 6 – 15 years old 36.2% for both genders 48.7% for women

Net enrollment primary school

Net enrollment secondary school

10.7% for girls

87.1% for girls

33.3% for girls

89.9% for both genders

For more about our projects in Senegal see pages 20 – 25 Sources: USAID Study Report on Out-of-School Children (February 2018), Report 2017 National Agency for Statistics and Demography (ANDS), UNESCO Institute for Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org)

40.9% for both genders

The education system in Togo is earmarked by a strong demand for educational provision because of demographic growth, a significant proportion of children are out of school or don’t go to school, the insufficiency of the non-formal educational offer, the weakness of school reception characterized by unfavourable teaching and learning conditions, a staff challenge of qualified teachers, a significant proportion of unqualified voluntary teachers, and low access and retention of girls in school, especially in high school. However, there is some progress, including the adoption of a special status for teachers, a 3% increase in the state budget allocated to education, effective medical coverage in pre-school and primary education, the adoption of the National Early Childhood Policy and the update of the Education Sector Plan and the State Report of the National Education System.

PROJECT FOCUS

for the Plateaux region. Difficulties in education (access, maintenance and academic results) are aggravated for girls.

Child Friendly School Project (EAE) Access and quality of education From 2018 to 2019 In the Plateaux and Savanes regions

// In both regions, between 32% and 60% of children aged 5 or more are not enrolled in the first year of primary school. They are often late, which favours repetition (20.8% to 23.6% school children have repeated their class). A significant proportion of children enrolled in nursery school do not access primary school: 53.9% for the Savanes and 34.1%

// The project fights against non-registration, late registrations and selective schooling to the detriment of girls and vulnerable children, as well as against violence especially those related to gender in middle school and within the family. It promotes the creation within schools of governments to promote the right to participation of children and to encourage the development of skills in everyday life. Finally, it trains members of the community to school governance.

// In 2018, the project benefited 74,676 people, including 53,537 children (43.77% girls) and 21,139 adults (40.64% women), 1,479 teachers and Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com 264 schools were involved in our activities.

Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

Partners: French Development Agency (AFD), CGE, APE, ARD, CLEF, DEE / DPRE / DEMSG, IA, IEF, MEN, UCGE

Illiteracy rate of over 15 years old

Net enrollment pre-primary school

10.5% for both genders

37.1% for both genders

Compulsory education

Partners: COGEP, CRPPE, DRE, IEPP, MEPSFP, UNICEF For more about our projects in Togo see pages 20 – 25 Sources: National Yearbook of School Statistics 2017-2018, United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects: 2017, UNESCO Institute for Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org)


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List of projects managed by Aide et Action in Africa in 2018

Impact: The project started in the last quarter of the year 2018; it was essentially the implementation of activities preparations, including launch of the project and planning with players in the field, as well as launch of the selection process of companies for the building of infrastructures (health centers, latrines, boreholes).  artners: Municipality of Manni; BEL Foundation; Orange P Foundation

Emergency Support Project to Education for All (PAUET)

ACCESS AND QUALITY OF EDUCATION

A Light For Africa (ALFA) Benin, Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, Guinea, Senegal From 2017 to 2018 Objectives: To improve the learning environment and the quality of education in schools, ALFA uses solar energy to provide electricity for schools in five West African countries (Benin, Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, Guinea, and Senegal) to improve the learning environment and quality of education in the targeted schools. Impact: In 2018, in Benin, for example, the project allowed the equipment in solar kits of 4 public primary schools; opening and facilitation of 3 literacy classes for 74 learners (including 67 women); training of 36 local craftsmen per school in order to maintain electrical installations around the schools; the organization of support courses for 667 children (including 327 girls) and 12 teachers / Burkina Faso: the project helped equip a public primary school with solar kits, the organization of support courses for the benefit of 17 students in the fifth grade class with learning difficulties in order to prepare them for the end-of-year exam.  artners: Ethik Investment; Abraham Hannibal Endowment P Fund; Club Med Foundation / ASIGMA / Archimedes Competition

Improvement and Diversification Programme of the Educational Offer in West Africa (PADOE) Benin, Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, Guinea, Mali, Niger, Senegal From 2015 to 2018 Objectives: For decades, many education systems in West African countries counted millions of young people without a qualification. Given the weakness of learning systems and trades training, these young people find themselves idle and without future prospects. In this context, Aide et Action has set up the PADOE project aimed at improving and diversifying the offer in West Africa. It promotes the development of local capacities for management and guidance of education systems and the promotion of alternative education models to care for the excluded ones from the formal system. Impact: In 2018, the project was carried out in 50 schools and benefited 330 teachers (one-third women). Ultimately, more than 14,000 students will benefit from this project (53% girls). In Mali: 610 copies of the report on integration of local knowledge into the Malian education system have been published and distributed. It was carried out by the competent departments of education with contact people and accompaniment by Aide et Action. 70 teachers were trained on teaching methods of writing and reading; 66 teachers were accompanied.

 artners: French Development Agency (AFD) / In Togo: Togolese P National Coalition for Education for All; ministry of social action, the promotion of women and literacy and its central services including DAENF; ministry of Primary, Secondary and Vocational Teaching (MEPSFP) and its decentralized services (DRE and IEPP); Network of journalists and communicators specializing in education / In Mali: SubaiGoumbo Association (ASG); ministry of National Education and its decentralized services: Academy of Education (AE) of Mopti and Douenza, CAP of Sévaré; NGO Awakening Mopti; NGO Guamina / In Burkina Faso: Association of municipalities of Burkina Faso (AMBF); Framework of Consultation NGOs and Active Associations in Education of Burkina Faso (CCEBF); National Coalition Education for All - Burkina Faso (CN-EPTBF) / In Ivory Coast, Senegal, Benin, Guinea, Niger: Ministries of National Education and Decentralized Services.

Project to support improvement of the quality of education (PAQUE-Nikki) Benin, Borgou Department, village of Nikki From October to December 2018 Objectives: The project aims to contribute to the improvement of access rates, of completion and success, through better governance in 121 schools and 36 nursery schools in the village of Nikki. It promotes capacity building of institutional and operational partners on the school project approach as well as on building capacity for planning, management and guidance in primary and nursery schools of the municipality. Impact: In 2018: training of 890 parents on the approach and tools for setting up, executing and monitoring school projects; Establishment of 112 three-year school development plans (EPGTD); development of 112 annual school development plans; training of 270 teachers on the tools and process of implementation of school governments; census of 7,298 out of school children including 3,291 girls and 4,007 boys; setting up of 121 child governments; training of 1,860 children members of governments on their roles and responsibilities. Partner: UNICEF

Orange Village Burkina Faso, Province of Gnagna, village of Manni From 2018 to 2019 Objectives: Contribute to improving access to quality education, drinking water and quality health services in the village of Obdaga in the rural village of Manni.

Madagascar, regions of Diana, Boeny, Betsiboka, Sofia and Antsinanana From 2015 to 2018 Objectives: In Madagascar, communities now provide responsibility for implementing the construction project of school infrastructure, including management of school markets and financial management. PAUET trains communities so they can ensure these new responsibilities. The project aims to improve reception capacity of public primary schools and strengthen capacity of local management committees in the implementation of their school infrastructure construction project. Impact: In 2018, the project enabled construction and equipment of 28 classrooms and 14 blocks of latrines. 14 committees of local management have been trained in participatory planning. Partner: Ministry of National Education (Madagascar)

Improved Access, Quality and governance of basic and secondary education (PAQAMA) Mali From 2016 to 2019 Objectives: In 2012 Mali was hit by a security crisis that has impacted the school system, particularly in the Centre and the North of the country. More than 700 schools were closed, sometimes destroyed, following the crisis. The project contributes to the revival of education after the 2012 crisis by improving access, quality and governance of education in the Gao region. It strengthens capacities of decentralized services and communities in charge of education. Impact: In 2018, the project trained 14 supervisors in pedagogical analysis of Real Time Learning (TRA) and inclusive education. 15 pedagogical supervisors were trained in didactics subjects, a balanced approach and management of the school in a decentralized style. 200 teachers in total followed training, including 50 women, to supervise 9,300 students, of whom 3,720 girls.  artners: Teaching Academies (AE) of Gao and Ménaka and the P Pedagogical Tutoring Centres of Ansongo, Bourem, Gao, Humanity and Inclusion (HI), International Rescue Committee (IRC), Menaka and Wabaria, Ministry of National Education and French Development Agency (AFD), Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC)

Access to Education for All Children in Mali (PACETEM) Mali, Mopti region From 2017 to 2021 Objectives: In the Mopti region, primary school enrollment rate remains very low, particularly because of household poverty and low quality of education. Local authorities, in charge education, are struggling to monitor the education system. The project aims to improve access of out-of-school children to primary education of quality and to promote their integration into an education cycle at the Mopti Academy and San Academy.

Impact: In 2018, the project benefited 3,324 out-of-school children (1,363 girls). 4,613 out-of-school children went to school. 30 centres of accelerated schooling strategy were opened for 856 children (including 390 girls), 33 facilitators were trained and 30 management committees were set up. Children over the normal age of enrollment will benefit from accelerated training in these centres for 9 months to be enrolled in schools. 1,765 vulnerable children were identified and enrolled in school (including 872 girls). The project has allowed the opening of 15 schools, 15 volunteer coaches were trained.  artners: Education Above All Foundation (Educate a Child P Programme); Ministry of National Education (Mali)

Accompaniment of youth and Territorial Communities in their Initiatives for Training and professional integration (ACTIF) Mali, Mopti region From 2018 to 2021 Objectives: The project aims to build the capacity of young people to meet the needs of the labour market or become self-employed. This helps reduce their sense of exclusion and increase their participation in the socio-economic development of the Mopti region. Main actions of the project are literacy, vocational training and teacher training. Impact: In 2018, 400 teachers from the Alternative Strategy for Recruitment of Teaching Staff were trained in didactics subjects; 4,864 students (including 258 students with disabilities and 2176 girls) benefited from the educational impact of this session. 73 teachers from the Teacher Training Institutes have been trained in Koro and Sévaré on the didactics of subjects.  artners: French Development Agency (AFD); Humanity and P Inclusion (HI); Ministry of National Education (Mali)

Learning by Information and Communication Technology (ATIC) Mali, regions of Sikasso and Koutiala From 2016 to 2019 Objectives: Mali suffers from a lack of qualified teachers. The project aims to improve the quality of education in the first cycle of basic education in the Sikasso region through teacher training. It’s about training contractual staff recruited by educational supervisors and to reinforce the abilities of other teachers to improve their teaching practices. Impact: The project has trained school principals and teachers in the Sikasso and Koutiala regions. During these trainings 735 smartphones were distributed to 840 teachers. This tool allows them to access specially designed training courses and in partnership with the Ministry of National Education to better prepare and deliver courses in mathematics and science in 5th and 6th grade classes. 46,742 students in total, including 50% girls will eventually benefit from this project.  artners: University Agency of La Francophonie (AUF); P University Skills in Research Laboratories / Bernard DUMONT; National Directorate of Normal Education (DNEN, Mali); Orange Labs Paris; Orange Mali

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List of projects managed by Aide et Action in Africa in 2018 Support Project for Promotion and Modeling Educational Gateways in Niger (PassEduc)

Project of Implementation of Standard Fundamentals of Quality and Equity (NFQE)

Niger, villages of Niamey, Kollo, Kouré, Hamdalye From 2017 to 2020

Niger, Zinder and Maradi regions From 2014 to 2018

Objectives: The villages of Niamey, Kollo, Kouré Hamdalye have the highest illiteracy rate in the sub-region (over 69% of the population aged 15 and over can neither read nor write). In addition, more than 2 million children aged 9 to 14 are not in school or have been out of school either for reasons of early marriage, or due to population displacement. The project must guarantee access to education for 1,600 girls and boys from 9 to 14 years old that are out of school or don’t go to school at all. They will be able to benefit, via bridging classes, from formal or informal education or join vocational training centres.

Objectives: The Zinder and Maradi regions suffer from an education system which is particularly weak. Analysis of the performance of the programme in the last ten years reveals that the Sector Programme of Education and Training (PSEF, 2014-2024) will need to address two major challenges: ensuring equity in education and improving quality apprenticeships for students, especially girls and those living in a rural environment. The most important progress has been observed in countries that have put in place an inclusive approach to defining standards of quality and equity, identification of needs at planning and monitoring / evaluation of interventions. The project aims to improve the quality and equity of education through implementation of school projects in 100 schools in the Maradi and Zinder regions.

Impact: In 2018, 1,053 students aged 9 to 14, out of school or not attending school, have benefited from both a non-formal and formal educational offer in a proper learning environment. 44 teachers from non-formal education centres were trained in pedagogical coaching of bridging classes. 280 members from 40 parents’ associations, 280 members of 40 associations of mothers and 280 members of 40 decentralized school management committees have been trained in management of the centres. Partners: French Development Agency; Ministry of primary education (Niger), Strömme Foundation

Impact: In 2018, the project benefited 20,922 children (including 9725 girls) and 1,200 adults. Partners: Ministry of Primary Education (Niger); UNICEF

Orange Village Niger, village of Banikane From 2017 to 2018 Objectives: To meet the challenges of education, health coverage and hydraulics of the village of Banikane. Aide et Action, in partnership with the Orange and Orange Niger Foundation, the urban commune of Dosso, the departmental directorates of education, health and of the Dosso region hydraulic works to improve access of people to basic quality social services. The project aims at including improvement of conditions of access for children, girls in particular. It facilitates people’s access to drinking water, as well as to quality sanitation and hygiene services. Impact: In 2018, 2 classrooms were built and equipped. A health centre was built. It is equipped with solar panels, pharmaceutical and delivery equipment. To facilitate access of populations to drinking water, a water point, equipped with remote water irrigation, has been put in place. A school vegetable garden has also been created, benefiting more than 2000 inhabitants and 317 children.  artners: Municipality of Dosso; Orange Foundation; Ministry P of education (Niger); Ministry of Hydraulics (Niger) Ministry of health (Niger); State Technical Services (Niger)

Education and Empowerment Project of Communities in Niger (NECS +) Niger, regions of Agadez, Maradi, Zinder, Diffa, Tilabéri and Dosso From 2013 to 2018 © Vincent Reynaud-Lacroze

Objectives: The low quality of education is notable. Teacher strikes are numerous and come to disrupt continuation of lessons. This results in a high drop-out rate (around 20%). The project is expected to increase performance in reading of first and second grade students, in improving teaching in schools and developing within communities a culture of reading.

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Impact: In 2018, the project reached 21,888 children, including 10,483 girls; 530 teachers, and 1,500 parents and other stakeholders; 100 Management Committees of Decentralized School Establishments with 700 members. In total, 76 schools impacted; about 400 teachers were trained and 7,000 students concerned.  artners: Ministry of Primary Education (Niger); PLAN P International; USAID

Management Improvement Programme for a Participatory School (PAGE) Senegal, regions of Kédougou and Tambacounda From 2016 to 2018 Objectives: Kédougou and Tambacounda are two regions where school statistics are the weakest. Gross enrollment rates as well as school achievement rates are below the national average. This is explained by the large number of children with difficulty in learning, low access to education (73.9%), weakness in learning, lack of family interest in education, the burden of domestic chores for children. The environment remains not very conducive to learning either, especially because of the lighting challenge in schools and homes and illiteracy of parents. The project contributes to the implementation of the Sector Programme for the Improvement of Quality, Equity and Transparency (PACKAGE, 2013-2025). It aims in particular at improving academic performance of students from both regions, as well as access to and maintenance of children in situations of high vulnerability, especially girls and children with disabilities. Impact: In 2018, 9,570 students (including 5,421 girls) benefited from schools, 1,100 vulnerable students were covered by Universal Healthcare. Out-of-school children were referred to bridging classes. 254 teachers and 70 members of the School management were trained in school support techniques. Pedagogical management has been improved in 35 schools and an ardent home (community support school space) was designed and implemented in 29 schools. Partner: UNICEF

Basic Education Improvement Project in Casamance (PAEBCA)

College Reform Support Project Togo, Maritime Region From 2014 to 2018 Objectives: The region suffers from a lack of infrastructure and equipment. Girls’ education and retention at school are a real challenge: they are often kept at home to perform domestic and farming tasks; families are unable to afford school fees for all their children. The community remains very little involved in education. These elements explain the low rates of access and school completion by children. The project contributes to implementation of the Sector Plan of Education (PES) through reform of secondary education in Togo. The project seeks to promote local colleges to improve reception capacity, equity, quality and local management of participative colleges in the Maritime Region. Impact: In 2018, the project benefited 181,052 people, including 66,526 children. Partners: French Development Agency (AFD); PLAN Togo

Child Friendly School (EAE) Togo, Savannah and Plateaux regions From 2018 to 2019 Objectives: In both regions, between 32% and 60% of children of 5 years or older are not enrolled in the first year of primary school. They are often late, which encourages repetition (20.8% to 23.6% of school children have repeated their class). A proportion of children enrolled in 1st year of primary school do not access 6th grade: 53.9% for the Savannas and 34.1% for the Plateaux. Difficulties in enrollment (access, retention and school results) are aggravated for girls. The quality of school supply is reinforced in 264 schools in the Plateaux and Savanes regions through the reinforcement of effective participatory governance. The project is fighting against non-registration, late registration and selective schooling to the detriment of girls and vulnerable children, as well as against violence, especially those related to gender in schools and families. It promotes the creation, within schools, of school governments to promote the right to participation of children and encourages the development of life skills education. Finally, it trains members of the community in governance of schools. Impact: In 2018, the project benefited 74,676 people, including 53,537 children Partners: UNICEF, COGEP, CRPPE, DRE, IEPP, MEPSFP

Senegal, regions of Sedhiou and Ziguinchor From 2015 to 2019 Objectives: In the Sedhiou and Ziguinchor regions, classes are overcrowded. They are, for many, temporary shelters (24% classes in public elementary schools in Sedhiou and 41% in Ziguinchor. This percentage rises to 35% in Sedhiou for secondary education and 63% in Ziguinchor). The school environment is characterized by violence, especially against girls. Result: apprenticeships are very weak. The success rate at the bachelor’s level is only 29% in Ziguinchor and 26.37% in Sedhiou. The project works to improve the public service of education in Casamance, in order to favour social cohesion, peace and fight against inequalities and better development of students’ skills. Impact: In 2018, 7 new schools were received, 21 new classes are under construction. 60 schools were equipped with hygiene and sanitation equipment. Finally, 160 tutors were trained to provide tutoring to primary school students.  artners: French Development Agency (AFD), CGE, APE, ARD, P KEY, DEE / DPRE / DEMSG, IA, IEF, MEN, UCGE

HEALTH EDUCATION

Improvement of Hygiene and Sanitation in Schools (PHASE) Benin From 2016 to 2018 Objectives: Improvement of hygiene and sanitation conditions in schools through the construction and equipment of structures, training in their use and maintenance, raising student and communities awareness on hygiene rules in schools and within the family. Impact: In 2018, 640 sanitary napkin kits were distributed in 50 schools for the benefit of 325 girls; 144 mothers of schoolgirls were made aware of the project; 2,446 reproductive health brochures were distributed to girls in 8 colleges of the communes concerned. Partner: Claudine Talon Foundation

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List of projects managed by Aide et Action in Africa in 2018 Support Project for Schooling and Sanitary Development (PASS) Madagascar, regions of Anosy, Androy and Atsimo Andrefana From 2018 to 2019 Objectives: These southern regions of Madagascar are the most affected by food insecurity. PASS aims to promote the adoption of attitudes conducive to good nutrition, hygiene and health by and for children and the school community of 30 target schools. Impact: In 2018, PASS was set up in 30 schools for the benefit of 6 954 children. Partner: World Food Programme (WFP)

LIFE EDUCATION

Learn To Change (APC) Burkina Faso, provinces of Sissili and Ziro From 2015 to 2019 Objectives: Since 2015, APC aims at empowering women of the NUNUNA Federation in the provinces of Sissili and Ziro in Burkina Faso. Illiteracy, difficult access to loans and land for women constitute real obstacles to the development of their activities. APC combines literacy, technical training and financial support for women. Impact: In 2018, 122 learners learned to read, write and count. The success rate at literacy sessions ranges from 97% to 100%. 131 women participated in the implementation of income generating activities.  artners: Communes of Sapouy, Léo, Cassou and Gao, P Directorate Provincial Council of Education of Sissili and Ziro, Federation NUNUNA, L’Occitane Foundation

SOLIDE promotes the accompaniment of sustainable dynamics of interaction and cooperation between groups of children, young people, and socio-educational players, constituted in “learning communities”, with other communities from different territories, especially via a web platform that allows them to interact. The project also provides training for educational staff of supported structures (teachers, socio-cultural coaches, specialized educators, etc.) at the ECSI to allow them to exchange on their professional practices or around common educational issues. Impact: In 2018, in Togo, 3,788 people, including 3,694 children (53.60% girls) were involved in the project. In Benin, the achievements are as follows: publication and distribution of the 100% Junior Magazine; 187 pieces of bio-degradable packaging made by learners. 81 learners including 50 school children and 5 young volunteers trained in the manufacturing of bio-degradable packaging. 2 complete kits with an annual internet subscription were given to both institutions (Siké and CEG of LAC); 5 volunteers and 2 teachers (1 from Siké-Sud and 1 from Collège du Lac) were trained to use the SOLIDE platform; 4 332 learners benefited from the project including 2 014 girls / Senegal: 26 teachers whose managers and Principals are directly affected by the project / Burkina Faso: effective start of activities in 2019

Local and International Solidarities for Development through Education (SOLIDE) Benin, Senegal, Togo From January to December 2018 Objectives: SOLIDE aims to create solidarity citizenship for children and young people through learning communities, the implementation of participatory approaches applied to education, citizenship and international solidarity, the sharing of know-how, as well as good practices in global citizenship and sustainable development. The project contributes to the emergence of new approaches to citizenship education and international solidarity (ECSI) with educational stakeholders, children and young people.

Family care project for small children (DOLL)

Guinea, villages of Coyah, Boffa, Boké and Dubréka From 2015 to 2019

Mali, city of Sénou From 2018 to 2019

Objectives: EAF responds to 3 problems that the Guinean school is confronted with: low school enrollment of girls in rural areas, high drop-out rate and insufficient involvement of communities and parents in school management. EAF contributes to the emergence of an environment conducive to schooling, retention and success of children in school, especially girls. It raises awareness and builds the capacity of communities to become involved in management of the school.

Objectives: The project contributes to improving the socio-cognitive awakening of young children and to facilitating their access to quality education through holistic family development from early childhood.

Impact: In 2018, EAF benefited 5,000 children (2,650 girls) and 150 teachers (40 women) in 21 schools. Partners: Orange Foundation; Turing Foundation

MIGRATION

New commitment of youth of Diffa to strengthen social ties (BANA)

Guinea From 2016 to 2019

Niger, region of Diffa From 2018 to 2021

Objectives: PROJEG was set up so that recurrent violations of human rights diminish in Guinea. It has also been designed to improve the accountability of institutions, to contribute to the construction and organization of Guinean civil society and increase youth participation in decision-making powers.

Objectives: The Diffa region is going through a major complex humanitarian crisis: conflicts, extortions and terrorism led to displacement of 302,387 people including 184,404 internally displaced ones; 88,668 refugees, of whom 29,315 young people returned to their village of origin because of insecurity of their host sites. These events contributed to the destruction of all social ties within communities. The economy is totally unstructured. The project is intended to promote socio-educational reintegration frameworks for young people, while rehabilitating and institutionalizing spaces for dialogue and exchange within decentralized entities and local civil society.

Citizen monitoring of public action and participatory local governance Guinea, Conakry and 14 communities in 7 regions From 2018 to August 2019 Objectives: The project aims to improve participatory democracy and representation by strengthening democratic processes, in particular via strong advocacy for democracy. It must also strengthen social dialogue and independent social partners, by developing transparency and accountability of public institutions. Impact: In 2018, the project benefited 503 adults (18.29% women).  artners: Ministry of Territorial Administration P decentralization (Guinea); European Union

and

Impact: In 2018, the project identified 120 children aged 3 to 6 years, including 61 girls; 20 tutors, including 18 women; as well as 3 facilitators. Tutors are trained by facilitators who are early childhood specialists. At the end of their training, tutors take care of the supervision of children. The facilitators also ensure monitoring and evaluation of tutors. Partners: Village of Meyrin; Sénou town hall

BUDGET AND HUMAN RESOURCES 2018 PER COUNTRY + REGIONAL OFFICE

Joint Programme for Strengthening Organizations of civil society and Guinean Youth (PROJEG)

Impact: Thanks to PROJEG, Guinean civil society, and especially youth organizations, are gaining strength to influence the definition and implementation of public policies, so that they contribute to sustainable development and reduction of inequalities and poverty. In 2018, the project benefited 3,044 adults (20% women).

EARLY CHILDHOOD

Girls Friendship School (EAF)

Partner: Thalès Foundation

 artners: 500 Guinean and French stakeholders (unions, P associations, OSI, universities, ministries, local elected officials ...), French Development Agency

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION

EDUCATION OF GIRLS AND WOMEN

Impact: In 2018, the project benefited 54,967 people (27,103 men and 27,864 women). Of these beneficiaries, 33,826 are young people from the poorest and most vulnerable communities (including 60% women) from 12 municipalities in the Diffa region.  artners: Care; Regional Council of Diffa; High Authority For P the Consolidation of Peace; Nigethec; NGO Karkara; PLAN International; Sahel Action

COUNTRIES Regional Office Africa

AEA BUDGET 2018

NUMBER OF AEA EMPLOYEES 2018

€1,311,204

16

Benin

€409,969

7

Burkina Faso

€605,548

7

Guinea

€1,619,513

12

Ivory Coast

€151,672

3

Madagascar

€136,898

4

Mali

€923,607

21

Niger

€864,102

10

Senegal

€798,256

17

Togo

€648,041

20

TOTAL

€7,468,807

117

AIDE ET ACTION WISHES TO THANK ALL OF ITS PARTNERS, BOTH FINANCIAL AND OPERATIONAL, WHO, IN 2018, WORKED AT OUR SIDE, IN AFRICA, FOR ACCESS TO QUALITY EDUCATION FOR ALL.


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AIDE ET ACTION IN SOUTH ASIA

Bhutan

South Asia Number of Number of countries projects

4

33

(see pages 30 – 34)

Number of beneficiaries

738,036

Number of child and youth beneficiaries

226,947

of whom 51% girls

The World Bank acknowledges South Asia as a paradox of development. It attracts the attention of the world through its economic growth, contrasting with its 70% of the poorest population of the world. Education is mediocre and is part of the development challenges faced by South Asian countries. About 11.3 million children at the age to attend primary school (5.8 million girls and 5.5 million boys) and 20.6 million children at the first cycle of secondary education (8.9 million girls and 11.6 million boys) do not go to school. According to UNICEF (2018), only half of the children of primary schools are educated according to minimal learning conditions. India is coming at the top of the list of countries in which a 2nd year pupil

Number of adult beneficiaries

511,089

of whom 49% women

Number of schools impacted

1,064

Number of AEA employees

383

Bénin Number of teachers impacted by our actions

Budget

6,257

cannot perform a two-digit subtraction and ranks second in the list of countries in which a 2nd year pupil cannot read a single word. Government priorities in South Asia regarding education are mainly focused on access rates, enrollment and completion rather than only on “learning outcomes”. This has created an unprecedented “learning crisis”. In 2018, the projects led by Aide et Action in South Asia are mainly focused on themes: // Access and quality of education // Early childhood // Livelihood Education // Migration

€3.1M With Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) turning mandatory in India, there is increased involvement of Corporates in development work. But, preference is towards urban/suburban locations around their company. This is alienating rural needs. Several set up Foundations and implements projects directly. The focus is more towards short term quick result bearing programs (eg: Vocational training projects) than for sustainable change initiatives. Our identity of ‘International’ often limits mobilising resources. With the region facing increased disasters, it is essential for organized preparedness to extend timely support.

WITNESS REPORT

“I work with children with disabilities, especially girls from poor families.

My role is to enroll them in neighbouring public schools so that they are properly supported. They eat regularly and interact with other children and teachers. There’s a lot improvement at home. A small effort on my part gives happiness to these children; that makes me happy » Shyamala works for the ENLIGHT project, operated in Hyderabad, India (see page 31).

© AEA

© Omar Havana

Region

Number of inhabitants

808,000

27% < 14 years old Gross enrollment pre-primary school (net enrollment unknown)

25.4% for both genders 26.1% for girls

Bhutan

Compulsory education

Not compulsory

Illiteracy rate of over 15 years old

42.9% for both genders 51.9% for women

Net enrollment primary school

Net enrollment secondary school

80.1% for girls

70.8% for girls

79.8% for both genders

65.7% for both genders

Bhutan is currently experiencing the highest growth rate of urban population and internal migration in South Asia. Due to rapid urbanization and modernization, problems become more and more complex and interdependent. Rural-urban migration has alarming environmental effects and generates related threats such as waste management, air and water pollution, increasing loss of biological diversity, reduction of forest area and degradation of eco-systemic services. While more than 50% of the total population is under 25 years old, the rural exodus of young people continues to threaten long-term sustainability of urban, rural and natural environments in Bhutan. It is therefore urgent to deal with the issue of rural exodus. To do this, it is necessary to tackle underlying problems of employment opportunities in rural areas.

PROJECT FOCUS

My village Gakidh Livelihood Education From 2014 to present In the Punakha district

// Bhutan suffers from a wide disparity in skills of young people and qualifications and attitudes required by the labour market, especially among rural youth who migrate to urban areas in search of employment

opportunities. High rates of unemployment (10.6% according to PHBB, 2017) are due to problems of substance abuse, crime and violence, as well as public health problems. // The project aims to curb migration and offer young people better job opportunities. In particular, it encourages recovery of trades in the community and the use and management of renewable natural resources. // In 2018, 140 young adults (including 52 women) were involved in our activities.

Partners: Bhutan Youth Development Fund

Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

Sources: UNESCO Institute for Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org)

Net enrollment rate: The number of students in the age range that theoretically corresponds to a given level of education, expressed as a percentage of the total population of that age group.

© AEA

Gross enrollment rate: Number of students enrolled in a given level of education, regardless of their age, expressed as a percentage of the population of the theoretical age group corresponding to this level of teaching. For higher education, the population used is that of the five consecutive years beginning with the secondary school graduation age.


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India

Nepal

© AEA

© AEA

Number of inhabitants

1.3 billion

28% < 14 years old

Compulsory education

Illiteracy rate of over 15 years old

From 6 – 13 years old 30.7% for both genders 40.7% for women

Net enrollment pre-primary school

Net enrollment primary school

Bénin Net enrollment secondary school

13% for girls

92.9% for girls

62.1% for girls

13.5% for both genders

92.2% for both genders

61.7% for both genders

Number of inhabitants

29.3 million

31% < 14 years old

India is the second most populous country and the largest democracy in the world. The Indian economy is the 6th largest in the world in terms of nominal GDP, the third in terms of power parity purchase and the country is considered newly industrialized. However, it continues to face challenges of poverty, unemployment, corruption, health and nutrition issues and hygiene, but also education problems.

Not compulsory

Education Development Project for children from ethnic minorities. Access and quality of education From 2010 to 2020 Andhra Pradesh

// Policies and decisions made by the government in tribal areas have led to the denial of children’s right to education from the tribes. Over the years, the government has focused on closing of primary schools in the villages and instead put children in boarding schools. This resulted in an increase in drop-out rates in tribal areas. Today, more than 20% of

Partners: Action In Rural Technology And Service For more about our projects in India see pages 31 – 35 Sources: UNESCO Institute for Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org)

// The project aims to promote the right to education, including tribal leaders and communities in order to respect the right to education of tribal children. It encourages in particular strengthening of school committees. It supports the creation of children’s clubs to improve school infrastructure and the local environment as well as new technologies of information and communication. Finally, an important part of project is promotion and protection of identity and tribal culture. // In 2018, 1,511 children (50% girls), 22,951 adults (51% women), 112 teachers and 55 schools were involved in our activities.

51.16% for women

Net enrollment secondary school

54.99% for girls

93.25% for girls

57.26% for girls

57.99% for both genders

94.7% for both genders

55.29% for both genders

Nepal is a landlocked country in South Asia located mainly in the Himalayas but also includes part of the Indo-Gangetic Plain. AEA commenced its intervention in the year 2009 focusing on Access and quality Education and Livelihood Education. Despite high enrollment rate (90%) of children in school only 38 % of children from the indigenous communities, 20% of Dalits and a mere 1% of disabled children are enrolled in primary schools. Due to lack of livelihood opportunities, the rate of migration is high. Most migrating youths are from underprivileged section lacking skills and therefore unable to explore gainful employment or entrepreneurial initiatives.

Rebuilding for Change girls who have dropped out of school are in tribal areas. The lack of a control and audit system within schools, especially by the communities themselves, is one of the factors explaining the lack of transparency and accountability of the authorities in education.

40.37% for both genders

Net enrollment primary school

PROJECT FOCUS

PROJECT FOCUS

Illiteracy rate of over 15 years old

Net enrollment pre-primary school

Nepal India

Compulsory education

Disaster Response Access & Quality Education Since 2015 Lamjung district, Nepal // Following the disastrous earthquake in 2015, AEA partnered with SCAN & DWO and intervened in 26 villages/hamlets of Bichaur, Ilampokhari and Dudhpokhari VDCs of Lamjung district. Immediate relief was provided to 200 families. School education was reinstated firstly through, temporary shelters and then through infrastructure support to 21 schools and Early Child Development (ECD) centres including rebuilding of 14 classrooms and 12 toilets with separate Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com facility for boys and girls. Teachers and social mobilizers were trained to provide psycho-social healing. This reduced post-disaster trauma. Teachers were capacitated in contextually relevant TLMs

Partners: SCAN and DWO For more about our projects in Nepal see pages 31 – 35 Sources: UNESCO Institute for Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org)

which improved quality of teaching & learning and developed better relationship between Teacher, Student and Parents. // The project aims: • To provide immediate relief to the survivors in 3 Village Development Councils of Lamjung district. • To provide psycho-socio support to reduce trauma • To reinstate school education through infrastructure support and improve quality of teaching and learning through teachers capacity building // In 2018, the review by SWC observes that all projects have rightly chosen the community, reached planned milestones and successfully capacitated the community and institutions in a sustainable way. // In 2018, 96 Schools, 707 Teachers, 15,481 school children and 350 youths benefitted from our activities. // 2019 onwards: AEA plans to expand its operations to two new districts (Rautahat & Sarlai) including Kathmandu and Lalitpur.


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30

Sri Lanka

List of projects managed by Aide et Action in South Asia in 2018 School development project India, Karnataka State (Tiger Hills Reserve) From 2012 to 2018

ACCESS AND QUALITY OF EDUCATION

Ensure quality education with the support of information technologies India, State of Assam From 2017 to 2022 © Omar Havana

Number of inhabitants

20.8 million

24% < 14 years old Gross enrollment pre-primary school (net enrollment unknown)

100.7% for both genders 99.4% for girls

Sri Lanka

Compulsory education

Illiteracy rate of over 15 years old

From 5 – 15 years old 8.1% for both genders 9% for women

Net enrollment primary school

99.17% for both genders 96.2% for girls

Objectives: To ensure quality learning for children via quality education and support of information. Computer support for schools. Participation of teachers and students. Impact: In 2018, 8,000 children and 120 teachers were directly concerned by our activities. Partner: Child Aid Network

Net enrollment secondary school

Access and quality of education for children from the Adivasi ethnic minority

90.4% for girls

India, State of Assam From 2018 to 2023

89% for both genders

Despite the ravages of a 27-year civil war that began in 1983 and ended in 2009, the country maintains one of the highest literacy rates in South Asia. If public studies in secondary and higher education are free of charge for all citizens, people living in regions still in the recovery phase of the civil war have less access to quality education than those living in other regions. Low school attendance, high drop-out rates, low educational attainment and poor teaching skills have an impact on general quality of education provided in schools. Drug addiction and unemployment are a few reasons why young people cannot earn a decent living.

Objectives: To improve functioning of schools, enrollment and retention rates in primary schools by developing the sense of need and relevance of education within the “Tea Garden” community. Promote participation in effective functioning of schools. To reinforce the capacity of teachers to adopt an innovative pedagogy and adapted to context and advocate quality education. Facilitating the right to education. Impact: In 2018, 24,474 people were directly affected through our activities Partner: 100% Aide et Action

iLEAD

Livelihood Education From 2006 to present In the districts of Galle, Ratnapura, Trincomalee, Vavuniya, Mullaithivu, Kilinochchi and Jaffna. // Sri Lanka has one of the highest enrollment rates in Asia for general education. The majority of students leave the system after the ordinary level of GCE (General Certificate in Education). Nearly 300,000 students Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

100% Aide et Action For more about our projects in Sri Lanka see pages 31 – 35 Sources: UNESCO Institute for Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org)

prepare for the “A-level” exam the GCSE (General Certificate of Secondary Education), but only 22,500 places are available in the classic university education system. This often results in a low employability status of vocational and technical training students. // The project must meet educational and development skills needs of communities affected by war and poor and marginalized youth in the northern, southern, East and Sabaragamuwa areas. It contributes to the rehabilitation process and post-war government reconciliation in Sri Lanka, thanks to the development of skills of young people and old fighters in the northern province affected by the war. // In 2018, 1,070 people (71% women) were involved

Impact: In 2018, 3,556 children were directly affected by our activities. Partner: Hemendra Kothari Foundation

Transforming villages through education India, State of Madhya Pradesh From 2018 to 2021 Objectives: To strengthen the educational ecosystem by promoting collaborative proactive actions among multiple stakeholders such as the vectors of change, parents, teachers, children, partners and educational authorities. Impact: In 2018, 4,821 children were directly affected by our activities. Partners: Transform Rural India (TRIF)

Provide quality education with ecological awareness India, State of Madhya Pradesh (Kanha Tiger Reserve) From 2013 to 2020 Objectives: To ensure children’s learning through quality education and environmental awareness. Improving skills and on-going education of children. Impact: In 2018, 2,255 school children and 46 teachers were directly concerned by our activities.

School development project in Bandipur

PROJECT FOCUS

Objectives: To ensure children’s learning through quality education and environmental awareness. Through regular training, peer learning and practical experience, the programme focuses on strengthening the capacity of teachers.

India, State of Karnataka From 2013 to 2020 Objectives: To increase and / or strengthen the capacities of teachers and improve their relationships with students. Improve skills levels of children. Reduce drop-out rate and reach 100% enrollment rate. Encourage involvement of proactive parents and a community that can play a key role in promoting education of tribal minority children. Impact: In 2018, 44,210 people were directly affected by our activities. Partner: Hemendra Kothari Foundation

Partner: Hemendra Kothari Foundation


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List of projects managed by Aide et Action in South Asia in 2018 Gurukul - Arumbu: School Development Project

ENLIGHT: Access and quality education for vulnerable girls

India, State of Tamil Nadu From 2015 to 2018

India, Delhi, Chennai, Salem, Kolkata, Hyderabad, Trichy, Mumbai, Bengaluru and Pune From 2015 to 2020

Objectives: To develop the overall performance of the child in school governance. Active participation of parents and the community to school governance. Impact: In 2018, 1,731 children were directly affected by our activities; 80% success rate between grades 6 and 10; 90% attendance rate in all schools. Partners: HCL Foundation

Objectives: To ensure a better life for girls through education. Improve the enrollment and retention rates of girls; Increase the number of girls opting for higher education and the number of girls who can enjoy the same status at home, school and at home from the community. Impact: In 2018, 2,000 girls were directly affected by our activities; 5,000 girls were indirectly affected. Partner: Capgemini

SIRAGUGAL: Helping children grow up in life (school development project) India, State of Tamil Nadu From 2010 to 2020 Objectives: To ensure children’s learning through quality education and environmental awareness. Through regular training, peer learning and practical experience, the programme focuses on strengthening the capacity of teachers. Impact: In 2018, 120 teachers and 11,625 people were directly involved in our activities. Partner: Hemendra Kothari Foundation

Youth employment and improvement of primary learning skills Nepal, states of Siraha, Saptari, Baglung & Parbat From 2010 to 2019 Objectives: To encourage organizations and institutions, and the community to show leadership and proactively solve problems related to access to education, livelihood and other rights. Impact: In 2018, 575 people were directly affected by our activities. Partner: 100% Aide et Action

Back 2 Basics: Guaranteeing the right to education for children from ethnic minorities India, State of Telangana From 2010 to 2021 Objectives: To guarantee the right to education of children from ethnic minorities through a new communication system and innovation. Provide early childhood education, which is both inclusive and quality, for girls aged 3 to 5 from the Lambada minority. Address school issues and impact global learning environment. Involve communities and the School Management Committee (SMC) in the management of the school. Putting children back into a process of learning; improve their learning abilities, their enrollment and retention rates and increase their skills levels. Impact: In 2018, 2,441 people were directly affected by our activities. Partner: 100% Aide et Action

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iLEAD: Education and Training Initiative for livelihood development - Initiative for Livelihood Education and Development

Support development of human capital

India From 2005 to ongoing

Objectives: To increase the capacity and responsiveness of teaching and technical and vocational training and the number of young people trained in skills needed to find a job or become self-employed.

Objectives: Development and promotion of micro enterprise. Enable better employability and / or entrepreneurship for disadvantaged youth so that they have a better life. Impact: In 2018, 52 operational iLEAD centres in India; 11,179 young people (especially girls) trained and employed or having started a business.  artners: Accenture; Synbionyme; Eicher; HCL Foundation; P TechMahindra; TFWA

iLEAD: Education and Training Initiative for livelihood development - Initiative for Livelihood Education and Development – Youth Spark India, multiple regions From 2012 to 2018 Objectives: Promote sustainable economic development among young people by improving their skills in entrepreneurship. Empowering young people from poor and marginalized social classes (including girls / women and people with disabilities) and enable them to benefit from better means of existence and lead a dignified life. Impact: In 2018, 12,000 young people were directly affected by our activities. Partner: Microsoft

Development enterprise LIVELIHOOD EDUCATION

India, Meghalaya State From 2014 to 2019

Impact: In 2018, 16,000 children and youth were directly concerned by our activities. Partner: Asian Development Bank

Himayat Project India, Jammu and Kashmir states From 2013 to 2018 Objectives: Skills development. Impact: In 2018, 5,987 young people were directly affected by our activities. Partner: Ministry of Rural Development (India)

Technical education and professional training for young people Nepal, slums of Kathmandu, Lalitpur and Bhaktapur From 2010 to 2019 Objectives: To provide vocational training to 1,800 vulnerable young people, aged between 18 and 35 years old. Impact: In 2018, 20,383 young people were directly affected by our activities. Partner: 100% Aide et Action

and

promotion

of

micro-

India, State of Assam From 2014 to 2018

iLEAD: Education and Training Initiative for livelihood development - Initiative for Livelihood Education and Development

My Gakidh Village

Objectives: Professional training and promotion of micro business via peer groups.

Sri Lanka, districts of Galle, Ratnapura and Kaluthara From 2009 to 2019

Bhutan, Punakha District From 2014 to 2018

Impact: In 2018, the project was deployed in 12 villages and slum districts, located on the bank of the river Brahmaputra and threatened by frequent floods.

Impact: In 2018, 1,000 children and 160 teachers were directly concerned by our activities.

Objectives: To limit the migration of young people from rural areas to urban areas and preserve the environment by offering these young people to train and develop their skills and leadership, for livelihood and sustainable employment (in the sectors of tourism and traditional crafts) in their communities of origin. Involvement and support of the community. Impact: In 2018, 2,036 young people were directly affected by our activities. Partner: Youth Development Fund – Bhutan

Partner: Asian Development Bank

Development and promotion of micro business India, Meghalaya State From 2015 to 2019 Objectives: Professional training and promotion of micro business via peer groups. Youth training, mainly women, to entrepreneurship. Improvement of income and family life. Respect and recognition in all areas of life. Impact: In 2018, 210 people were directly affected by our activities. Partner: TATA TRUST

Objectives: Acquisition of computer skills and literacy.

Partner: 100% Aide et Action

Develop leadership of young people and their skills to promote democracy and reconciliation in 3 districts of Sri Lanka Sri Lanka, Mullaithivu, Kilinochchi and Balangoda districts From 2017 to 2018 Objectives: To develop youth leadership, their abilities and their skills to find a job or become self-employed, but also to promote democracy and reconciliation in 3 districts of Sri Lanka. Peace, reconciliation and reconstruction through education to life. Impact: In 2018, 1,260 young people were directly affected by our activities. Partner: Embassy of the United States in Sri Lanka

>>


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List of projects managed by Aide et Action in South Asia in 2018

BUDGET AND HUMAN RESOURCES 2018 PER COUNTRY + REGIONAL OFFICE HEALTH EDUCATION

iLEAD: Education and Training Initiative for livelihood development - Initiative for Livelihood Education and Development International Academy

Educational centre for migrant children on construction sites

Sri Lanka, city of Panadura From 2014 to 2018

Objectives: Children of seasonal migrant workers have better access to their fundamental rights and live in a safe and healthy environment at the parents’ workplace.

Objectives: Acquisition of computer skills and literacy. Impact: In 2018, 835 young people were directly affected by our activities. Partner: 100% Aide et Action

India, city of Patna From 2016 to 2018

Impact: In 2018, 250 groups of young migrants aged 3 to 6 years were welcomed at the educational centre developed by Aide et Action. 150 children aged 6 to 14 were able to access nearby schools. Partner: 100% Aide et Action

Care and learning for migrant children on construction sites MIGRATION

Educational Centre for the care of migrant children India, Telangana State From 2017 to 2020

India, Delhi city From 2016 to 2018

Prevention of HIV-AIDS among intravenous drug users India, Punjab From 2012 to 2018 Objectives: Prevent new HIV-AIDS infections among intravenous drug users and liaising with care services and support for HIV-positive people. Impact: In 2018, 465 intravenous drug users have been identified and have received prevention advice and / or medical support.

COUNTRIES

AEA BUDGET 2018

NUMBER OF AEA EMPLOYEES 2018

Regional Office South Asia (Bhutan included)

€804,390

24

India

€2,040,400

Nepal

€96,410

32

Sri Lanka

€257,850

32

TOTAL

€3,199,050

383

324 (including staff of Ilead centres)

Partner: Punjab AIDS Control Society

AIDE ET ACTION WISHES TO THANK ALL OF ITS PARTNERS, BOTH FINANCIAL AND OPERATIONAL, WHO, IN 2018, WORKED AT OUR SIDE, IN SOUTH ASIA, FOR ACCESS TO QUALITY EDUCATION FOR ALL.

Objectives: To provide a protected environment and meet the educational needs of children. Impact: 830 people involved since the implementation of the project. Partner: Times Foundation

Objectives: To provide a protected environment and meet the needs of migrant children, aged 0 to 14, at 5 sites. Impact: In 2018, 570 children aged 0 to 14 years were directly concerned by our activities. Partner: SNCF

Educational centres for migrant children on construction sites India, State of Tamil Nadu, cities of Bhopal, Bhubaneshwar, Hyderabad From 2016 to 2018 Objectives: To provide nutrition, education and protection for child migrants. Impact: 60 childcare and learning centres have been opened for children and teenagers living on construction sites. In 2018, 5,150 children were directly affected by our activities. Partner: Bernard van Leer Foundation (BvLF)

EARLY CHILDHOOD

PAHAL: Care for children from sex workers India, New Dheli City From 2010 to 2019 Objectives: Care and protection for children of single prostitute mothers. Educational and vocational rehabilitation of their children. Impact: In 2018, 30 children of prostitutes and 100 children from the underprivileged community had access to the centre. 10 young people were hosted in a vocational training centre. Partner: 100% Aide et Action

School development project India, State of Madhya Pradesh, Balaghat City From 2014 to 2018 Objectives: To ensure children’s learning through quality education and environmental awareness. Improving skills and continuing education of children. Impact: In 2018, 2,255 school children were directly concerned by our activities. Partner: TATA TRUST © Naïade Plante


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AIDE ET ACTION IN SOUTHEAST ASIA AND CHINA

Cambodia

SouthEast Asia and China Number of Number of countries projects

4

16

see pages 40 – 42

87,759

Number of adult beneficiaries

30,223

Number of schools impacted

Bénin of whom 50% women

Number of child and youth beneficiaries

57,536

of whom 45% girls

135

Number of teachers impacted by our actions

© Marion Tranchant

© Vincent Reynaud-Lacroze

Number of beneficiaries

Region

Number of inhabitants

16 million

31% < 14 years old

Number of AEA employees

Gross enrollment pre-primary school (net enrollment unknown)

86

20.1% for both genders 20.6% for girls

Budget

While some countries have increased their rates of school attendance, retention and completion and reduced gender gaps, problems in educational opportunities remain. Access to basic education, especially in rural and isolated areas, as well as the quality of the results of teaching and learning must still be improved, as should school facilities, learning environments and teaching materials.

Too many children do not go to school or do not benefit from quality learning because of their socio-economic situation and geographical location, their disability and / or their state of health, their ethnic origin, their language barriers or their gender. High rates of poverty, especially in rural areas and areas where ethnic minorities live, exacerbate this inequality. Migration and rapid urbanization also push some populations to the margin of society thus compromising education of their children. For example, in Sichuan Province, China, children and women whose husbands and fathers are migrant workers suffer a learning disadvantage. In 2018, the projects led by Aide et Action in Southeast Asia are mainly focused on themes:

// Access and quality of education // Inclusive education // Early childhood education // Education of women and girls Through these projects, Aide et Action worked to open the way for long-term systematic changes in low-income communities, especially in areas where ethnic minorities face great challenges. For example, our community solutions reached children in remote villages in the District of O’Chum, in the province of Ratanakiri in Cambodia, Tam District Doung, in the province of Lai Chau in Vietnam and Van Vieng District, in the province of Vientiane in Laos. By reaching children from underprivileged groups, we can have a social impact and, in working at the national level, we can multiply this impact exponentially by providing solutions to communities and to entire countries.

WITNESS REPORT

From 6 to 14 years old 19.4% for both genders 24.9% for women

Net enrollment primary school

90.5% for both genders

Net enrollment secondary school

No data available

90.3% for girls

The World Economic Forum recently ranked Cambodia 101 out of 140 countries in terms of quality of education and schooling. Challenges include an education system which is under-financed, discrimination against children with disabilities and mature learners, belief that education is not important for all, poor school environments, geographical distance, lack of education in the mother tongue, migration, and exploitation of children, poverty and family difficulties. Thanks to Aide et Action, more and more children with intellectual disabilities and/or learning difficulties have access to quality education.

PROJECT FOCUS

Education for children with severe and moderate disabilities in Cambodia. Inclusive education From 2017 to 2022 In Phnom Penh and Kandal Provinces, Kampong Speu and Siem Reap

// In Cambodia, many children with disabilities are still not in school. There Copyright ©poverty Free Vectorof Maps.com are many reasons: households, distance from school, lack of means of transport, poor school facilities, lack of qualified teachers. But discrimination against people in a situation of disability remains very

significant and the parents themselves are not always aware of the need to take their children to school. // We seek to integrate children with disabilities with their peers by increasing access their access to schools (adapted to their needs) so that they can play a more active role in society. We enroll children with disabilities in school and provide tailored educational services to keep them in school and see their results improve. We also work with teachers to help provide the skills and tools necessary to provide quality education. // In 2018, 1,701 children (49.4% girls), 2,153 adults (49.8% women), 47 teachers and 18 schools were involved in our activities.

Partner: The Rabbit School

“My name is Ngim.

I’ve been a librarian at an Aide & Action mobile library for a year now. Five days a week, I visit various villages and schools in Saa Ang district, Cambodia. I wanted to become a mobile librarian with Aide et Action because I believe that educating our children is the best way to advance our society. I like this role because I can give books to children who otherwise would not have the opportunity to read or build on their knowledge outside of the classroom or acquire knowledge.“

For more about our projects in Cambodia see pages 41 – 43 Sources: CIA World Fact Book, UNESCO Institute for Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org) Net enrollment rate: The number of students in the age range that theoretically corresponds to a given level of education, expressed as a percentage of the total population of that age group.

© AEA

Ngim, volunteer librarian of the mobile library project in Cambodia (see page 42).

Illiteracy rate of over 15 years old

€1.7M

1,620

Cambodia Despite the socio-economic development of the region, the difference in GDP and income disparities between countries are considerable. Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam and Myanmar, whose GDP is among the lowest in the region, are struggling to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, including Goal 4 dedicated to education. In national budgets, investments in sectors such as health care have priority over investments in education, which has, generally, a long-term impact.

Compulsory education

Gross enrollment rate: Number of students enrolled in a given level of education, regardless of their age, expressed as a percentage of the population of the theoretical age group corresponding to this level teaching. For higher education, the population used is that of the five consecutive years beginning with the secondary school graduation age.


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38

Laos

China

© Vincent Reynaud-Lacroze

© Alexia Houel

Number of inhabitants

1.4 billion

18% < 14 years old

Compulsory education

6.8 million

From 6 to 14 years old 4.8% for both genders Bénin

Gross enrollment primary school (net enrollment unknown)

Gross enrollment secondary school (net enrollment unknown)

86.5% for girls

102.6% for girls

95.4% for girls

102% for both genders

33% < 14 years old

7.29% for women

Gross enrollment pre-primary school (net enrollment unknown)

85.9% for both genders

Number of inhabitants

Illiteracy rate of over 15 years old

Laos China

China’s economic development is stronger in the East Coast provinces than in the West, about 169 million migrant workers have settled (in 2016) in urban areas to find work. Gender inequality continues to disadvantage women on the socio-economic level, particularly in the more rural western provinces, and is exacerbated by the imbalance of the male-female birth rate. Together with the rapid changes in society, these factors pose additional challenges to women in particular and to education of younger ones from China.

PROJECT FOCUS

Developing livelihood for vulnerable women in rural China Girls’ and women’s education From 2017 to 2021 In Sichuan Province, Qionglai County and City of Chengdu Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

// Sichuan Province is the most populous rural area of Western provinces and has the largest number of migrant workers. Approximately 6 million married men have migrated from the province, leaving their wives at home to care for children and the elderly. Most of these women, as well as others living in the area, are at a disadvantage because of their low level of education, their financial vulnerability and their unequal social status.

// Sprung from the need for women to adapt to a society in rapid change, this project focuses on their development and empowerment. It strives to promote gender equality through non-formal education and encouraging women to participate in community development, networking and claim their rightful place in society. More specifically, it aims to improve the economic means of women by offering vocational education courses, helping them to build their social network with mutually supportive group actions, to make them aware of community volunteering, and to improve their leadership and management skills. // In 2018, 740 women, 6 teachers and 2 schools were impacted by our activities.

Partners: Air France, Chengdu Civil Affairs Bureau, Beijing Cultural Development Center for Rural Women, China Merchants Charitable Foundation, Jiaguan People’s Government, Qianjin People’s Government

For more about our projects in China see pages 41 – 43 Sources: CIA World Fact Book, UNESCO Institute for Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org)

From 6 to 14 years old 15.3% for both genders 20.6% for women

Net enrollment pre-primary school

Net enrollment primary school

Net enrollment secondary school

40.6% for girls

92.8% for girls

59.8% for girls

39.9% for both genders

95% for both genders

Illiteracy rate of over 15 years old

Compulsory education

93.3% for both genders

60.4% for both genders

Despite progress made in universal access to basic education, about 160,000 children aged 6 to 14 do not go to school (2016). The national literacy goal (95% by 2020) seems like an unlikely possibility due to high rates of many school drop-outs in the early years of primary education and poor learning outcomes. These problems are more obvious in rural, mountainous and minority communities.

PROJECT FOCUS

Inclusive and responsive primary environments for children from ethnic and marginalized minorities Access and quality of education From 2015 to 2018 In Vientiane province, Vangvieng districts, Feuang, Mad, Hinherb and Meun

// Many children in elementary schools do not master the basic reading, numeracy and essential knowledge Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com skills to succeed in apprenticeships and employment later on in life. The causes are largely down to poor quality of education and school governance, inadequate access to preprimary education, sanitation problems and malnutrition. Poor, remote, and non-Lao speaking communities were the most affected.

// This project aims to guarantee access for underprivileged children of ethnic origin to a quality primary education. It helps schools to create school development plans based on quality standards for school environments and governance. It trains teachers to improve their techniques focusing on approaches adapted to children and to develop quality learning materials. // The project aims to enroll all children in target schools, especially girls from ethnic minorities living in poor rural areas. It addresses the underlying issues of low attendance and learning through nutrition initiatives, the establishment of pre-schools, scholarships based on the needs and promotion of the rights of the child. // In 2018, 2,382 children (48.4% girls), 1,378 adults (of which 77% women), 107 teachers and 10 schools were involved in our activities.

Partners: Embassy of Canada in Thailand, Embassy of the Czech Republic in Thailand, Education and Sports Offices (DESB) Districts of Vangvieng, Quality Assurance and Education Standards Center (ESQAC) of the Ministry of Education and Sports, Feuang, Taiwan Children and Youth Fund Family, Hinherb and Meun, Mad, Provincial Education and Sport Service (PESS) of Vientiane Province, Etincelle Foundation, Masalina Foundation For more about our projects in Laos see pages 41 – 43 Sources: CIA World Fact Book, UNESCO Institute for Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org)


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40

Vietnam

List of projects managed by Aide et Action in SouthEast Asia and China in 2018 Targeted educational strategies for community development of the most destitute people ACCESS AND QUALITY OF EDUCATION © Vincent Reynaud-Lacroze

Number of inhabitants

95.5 million

23% < 14 years old

Compulsory education

From 5 to 14 years old 6.4% for both genders 8.6% for women

Net enrollment pre-primary school

Net enrollment primary school

Data unknown for girls

Data unknown for girls

77.7% for both genders

Vietnam

Illiteracy rate of over 15 years old

97.9% for both genders

Net enrollment secondary school

No data available

While Vietnam enjoys wide educational coverage, gaps and challenges remain. By ensuring access to quality education for all children in the country, especially those from poor households, isolated areas and ethnic minorities, we increase coverage further. The underlying issues include language barriers; poor quality of education, school programmes, facilities and infrastructure; water problems and sanitation; poverty; malnutrition and migration.

PROJECT FOCUS

Promote inclusive care and relevant education to young underprivileged children from ethnic minorities Early Childhood Care and Education From 2016 to 2018 In Tam Duong District, Lai Chau Province

// In 2018, 5,263 children (including 51.5% girls), 4,069 adults, 192 teachers and 6 schools were involved in our activities.

Partners: CISDOMA, Consultative Institute for Socio-Economic Development of Rural and Mountain Areas, the European Union For more about our projects in Vietnam see pages 41 – 43 Sources: CIA World Fact Book, UNESCO Institute for Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org)

Cambodia, Banteay Meanchey province From 2017 to 2018 Objectives: We helped children recover from their traumatic experiences and to reintegrate into family or society through a safe haven with various services dedicated to their needs. Impact: In 2018, 677 people benefited from our activities. Partner: 100% Aide et Action

Objectives: We strengthened the role of community centres by developing their communities through engagement with the most marginalized and vulnerable populations (early childhood, hygiene and health, nutrition, promotion of reading, youth empowerment). Impact: In 2018, 4,995 people benefited from our activities. Partner: Hong Kong Public Restricted Funds

Education of children from ethnic minorities Cambodia, Mondulkiri and Ratanakiri Provinces From 2014 to 2018

Khmer LEARN: Use technology to improve literacy, teaching and learning

Objectives: We have increased the volume, quality and availability of learning content in mother tongue languages for teachers, as well as for students and ethnic minority communities.

Cambodia, Banteay Meanchey Provinces, Kep, Kampong Cham, Siem Reap and Tbaung Khmum From 2017 to 2021

Impact: In 2018, 6,723 people benefited from our activities. Partner: Development Innovations (financed by USAID)

Objectives: Through the deployment of a series of online quality training applications, we promoted improvement of standards in reading, learning and teaching. We also developed mobile libraries so that the most marginalized children could access books and participate in reading activities. Impact: In 2018, 23,400 people benefited from our activities. Partner: PSA Foundation

Education for all: reaching marginalized children Cambodia, Kampot and Kampong Thom provinces From 2017 to 2021 Objectives: Through inclusive and adapted education approaches, we improved quality, accessibility and relevance of education for marginalized children. Impact: In 2018, 24,003 people benefited from our activities. Partner: 100% Aide et Action © Vincent Reynaud-Lacroze

// More than 75% of the local population in Tam Duong District are living in poverty. The majority of the population is made up of ethnic minorities and Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com the poverty they are living in is preventing children from attending school. A lack of access to education in their mother tongue couple with poor quality teaching creates further barriers to receiving a quality education.

// The aim of the project is to increase access for minority children from ethnic groups aged 3 to 8 to pre-school education of pre-primary quality. A key objective is to improve their learning outcomes and their preparation for school by training and coaching teachers in focused teaching methods for children, early detection of disabilities and integrating teaching in the mother tongue. It also stimulates and facilitates increased involvement of parents, community and authorities in the education and development of their young children. Another goal is to build the capacity of policy makers to implement inclusive education for these children through development of bilingual materials, documentation and distribution of good practices.

Improve the reintegration of street children and abused children

Cambodia, Kandal province From 2017 to 2021

>>


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List of projects managed by Aide et Action in SouthEast Asia and China in 2018

Improve quality of development and education of ethnic minority children EARLY CHILDHOOD

Innovative approaches for early literacy and numeracy Laos, provinces of Vientiane and Oudomxay From 2018 to 2023

LIFE EDUCATION

Objectives: By 2018, this project was in the preparatory phase. In 2019, we will improve children’s reading and math skills for infants and children from ethnic minorities who are geographically isolated and marginalized.

To develop livelihood of vulnerable women in rural areas China, Sichuan Province From 2017 to 2021

Partner: 100% Aide et Action

Objectives: We have promoted development and empowerment of women, encouraged them to participate in the activities of communitywide networks and the establishment of peer-to-peer networks. By doing so, we contributed to advancing gender equality in general. Impact: In 2018, 746 women benefited from our activities.  artners: Chengdu Civil Affairs Bureau, Centre for cultural P development of Beijing for rural women, China Merchants Charitable Foundation, People’s Government of Jiaguan, Qianjin People’s Government

Integrated Community Partnerships for improved development programmes of both child and school readiness Cambodia, Kep provinces, Prey Veng and Takeo From 2017 to 2021 Objectives: We have expanded our education services to young children aged 0 to 6, giving priority to children from communities and pre-school children at home. This focus allows us to increase quality and provide more equitable access to early childhood services. Impact: In 2018, 4,461 people benefited from our activities. Partner: TX Foundation

Children’s Aid and Care Centres China, Sichuan and Guanxi provinces From 2017 to 2021 Objectives: We helped to ensure that young people and children can benefit from good early development thanks to our adapted play centres and community activities that are organized.

Vietnam, Hoa Binh province From 2017 to 2021 Objectives: We have improved access to education and the quality of this one for better learning outcomes in children aged from 3 to 8 years; strengthened capacities and practices of parents in the protection and education of children; and strengthened support from local authorities and communities for protection and early childhood education. Impact: In 2018, 3,229 people benefited from our activities. Partner: 100% Aide et Action

Promote care and education for relevant and inclusive early childhood for children from ethnic and underprivileged minorities Vietnam, Lai Chau Province From 2016 to 2023 Objectives: We have increased access for children from ethnic minorities to pre-school and early primary education, quality and relevance, thanks to improved pedagogy, parental involvement and informed decision-makers. Impact: In 2018, 9,332 people benefited from our activities. Partners: HEAD Foundation; European Union

Impact: In 2018, 1,003 people benefited from our activities.

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION © Marion Tranchant

Focus on the activity “Mobile Bookshops” in Cambodia, in 180 villages of Kep, Kandal, Ratanak Kiri, Kampong Thom, Kampot, Banteay Meanchey and Pursat. From 2018 to 2020 Context: Developing reading in all regions of Cambodia represents a challenge, especially in rural and remote areas, due to a lack of available materials in the local language, lack of infrastructure, in and out of school pupils, knowledge gaps in teachers and lack of investment from the education stakeholders. Project Objectives: The Aide et Action project aims to improve literacy and children’s learning abilities for pupils aged between 3 and 11 in rural Cambodia by reducing the distance between children and infrastructure through the deployment of mobile libraries equipped with books and educational material in a local vehicle called “Tuk-tuk.” Community members will be trained to manage mobile libraries and carry out reading activities. Teachers’ skills will also be reinforced through specific training. Impact: 6,624 children in pre-primary school (including 50% girls), 14,400 children in primary and middle school (including 50% girls), 108 teachers (60% women), 5,900 parents and members of the community (60% of whom are women) will benefit from this activity.

Education for children with severe and moderate disabilities Cambodia, Kandal Provinces, Kampong Speu, Phnom Penh and Siem Reap From 2017 to 2022 Objectives: Children with disabilities are often excluded from education in Cambodia as well as from society at large. Our project increases access to education for disabled children, alongside their non-disabled peers, in mainstream schools adapted to their needs. Education and peer interaction enables them to become more active members of society. Impact: In 2018, 3,854 people benefited from our activities. Partner: The Rabbit School

Promote inclusive development of children and young people from ethnic minorities Vietnam, Lao Cai Province From 2017 to 2021 Objectives: We’re working with children and young people from ethnic minorities to: improve their life skills; educate them on child protection and the protection of minority children from ethnic groups; engage parents and teachers on best practices; improve nutrition and care of children; and build career readiness/development. Impact: In 2018, 1,401 people benefited from our activities.  artners: Embassy of France in Cambodia; Gertrude Hirzel P Foundation; HSBC Vietnam

 artners: Chengdu Charity Federation; China Merchants P Charitable Foundation; Air France Foundation and various other local private donors

Inclusive and responsive primary environments for children from ethnic and marginalized minorities Laos, provinces of Vientiane and Oudomxay From 2017 to 2023 Objectives: We have strengthened management of schools and we focused on quality-oriented programmes to create – pre-school and primary - inclusive and child-friendly environments. We have also favoured school readiness programmes.

BUDGETS AND HUMAN RESOURCES 2018 BY COUNTRY + REGIONAL OFFICE COUNTRIES

AEA BUDGET 2018

NUMBER OF AEA EMPLOYEES 2018

Regional SouthEast Asia Office (including €213,865 Hong Kong)

10

Cambodia

€725 595

54

China

€186,307

8

Laos

€258,211

8

Vietnam

€345 011

6

TOTAL

€1,728,989

86

Impact: In 2018, 3,760 people benefited from our activities.  artners: Etincelle Foundation; Masalina Foundation; HEAD P Foundation; Czech republic ; Taiwan Fund for Children and Families (TFCF) and Hong Kong Public Restricted Funds

AIDE ET ACTION WISHES TO THANK ALL OF ITS PARTNERS, BOTH FINANCIAL AND OPERATIONAL, WHO, IN 2018, WORKED AT OUR SIDE, IN SOUTHEAST ASIA AND CHINA, FOR ACCESS TO QUALITY EDUCATION FOR ALL


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AIDE ET ACTION IN FRANCE – EUROPE

France

© Kristen Poels

Number of inhabitants © Kristen Poels

Region

Europe Number of Number of countries projects

2

3

see page 44

Number of beneficiaries

13,222

Number of child and youth beneficiaries

5,445

of whom 45% girls

As of 1 January 2016, the European Union has a population of 510 million, of which 136 million young people between the ages of 0 and 24, 27% of the total population of the EU. In their institutional diversity (weight of public sector, mode of governance of institutions, training and recruitment of teachers, etc.), systems, European educational institutions are characterized by common phenomena such as gradual broadening up of education, different levels of education. Overall, European educational systems testify

Number of adult beneficiaries

7,664

of whom 52% women Number of teachers impacted by our actions

113

neither of the existence of a “Common core” challenge nor by continuity of structure between lessons of the primary and lower secondary education, without subject options at this level. In general, there are very high schooling rates at the final compulsory age of education in the EU in 2015. Only 5 countries do not reach 90% at this age: Bulgaria, Hungary, Luxembourg, Malta and Romania. In 2018, the projects led by Aide et Action in Europe are mainly focused on the themes:

Number of schools impacted

49

Number of AEA Bénin employees

66.9 million

18% < 14 years old

Compulsory education

From 6 to 15 years old

Illiteracy rate of over 15 years old

No data available

Net enrollment pre-primary school

Net enrollment primary school

Net enrollment secondary school

99.7% for girls

98.8% for girls

94.4% for girls

99.5% for both genders

98.5% for both genders

93.7% for both genders

6

Budget

€162,000

without Human Resources // Global development of education and citizenship // Education for life Although the goal of universal education is considered to be achieved in France (and more generally in Europe), the question of school inequalities, learning conditions and the relationship between education and social change question the quality and equity of education systems, especially in France. Every year, nearly 98,000 young people leave the French education system without a diploma or qualification.

WITNESS REPORT

“Going to school is a real challenge for one’s self-confidence. Children have to rely on themselves and accept an environment where they all lose their points of reference. It takes a lot of courage. Our wish is not of one as a substitute for school, but to ensure a personalized follow-up of each child so that he gets to feel good once in class. “ Clélia Chopinaud, educator and coordinator of the ASET 93 association, Aide et Action’s partner, on the project led to the education of children away from school in Seine-Saint-Denis (see page 44). Sources: Europe of education in figures - Ministry of National Education and Ministry of Higher Education and Research, UNESCO Institute for Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org)

France

In France, three observations stand out: school inequalities tend to be concentrated in the most disadvantaged areas, some populations remain distant from school and stakeholders in educational institutions need to cooperate better. Although the goal of universal schooling is considered to have been achieved, these issues question the quality and equity of the French education system. Every year, nearly 98,000 young people leave the system without a diploma or qualification.

PROJECT FOCUS

Access to education of vulnerable and marginalized populations in Seine-Saint- Denis Access and quality of education / Youth and adults From 2018 to 2022 In Seine Saint-Denis, France

// In Seine-Saint-Denis (93), a bordering department of Paris, one estimates that 600 children live in slums and that 80% of them do not have access to school. The project aims to defend the right to education of all children and to prepare them for school through a tool called “Bridge”, which is an intermediate preparation for schooling.

// Since September 2018, Aide et Action has been supporting ASET 93 for the implementation of a project to facilitate entry into school of excluded children. It’s about supporting families in the administrative process, support educational teams with the reception of children and their families and of course to bring children to success at school. This project is organized around 4 axes: to allow access to the children’s school; promoting retention in school and success at school contributes to social and professional integration of families; carry out advocacy actions. For this, children and their families are welcomed in a “school truck” made available to the ASET 93 association by Aide et Action. // In 2018, 49 children and 40 families were involved in our activities.

Partner: ASET 93 For more on our other projects in France see page 47 Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com Sources: INSEE (2019); Ministry of National Education (2016); UNESCO (2016); ANLCI (2018), UNESCO Institute for Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org) Net enrollment rate: The number of students in the age range that theoretically corresponds to a given level of education, expressed as a percentage of the total population of that age group. Gross enrollment rate: Number of students enrolled in a given level of education, regardless of their age, expressed as a percentage of the population of the theoretical age group corresponding to this level teaching. For higher education, the population used is that of the five consecutive years beginning with the secondary school graduation age.


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46

Romania

List of projects managed by Aide et Action in France-Europe in 2018 EDUCATION FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND WORLD CITIZENSHIP

ACCESS AND QUALITY OF EDUCATION

© STEA

Number of inhabitants

19.6 million

15% < 14 years old

Compulsory education

Illiteracy rate of over 15 years old

From 7 to 16 years old 1.4% for both genders 1.7% for women

Net enrollment pre-primary school

Net enrollment primary school

Net enrollment secondary school

78.9% for girls

86.3% for girls

80.8% for girls

78.6% for both genders

86.5% for both genders

80.7% for both genders

Promote vulnerable children’s education by a device of preparation to schooling for children and social and professional accompaniment for their parents

Develop educational approaches to citizenship and international solidarity to allow access to knowledge and to foster living together (SOLIDE)

France, Seine-Saint-Denis (93) From 2018 to 2022

France, Benin, Senegal, Togo From 2015 to 2018

Objectives: Increase the number of children away from school with access to education. By accompanying children and parents, a school truck as well as advocacy for the right to education of all children, we strive to build academic success of children away from school in Seine-Saint-Denis.

Objectives: We took care to train socio-educational stakeholders, to foster cooperation and exchange between pupils, teachers, coaches from different territories in an approach aimed at going beyond a vision of international solidarity in terms of underprivileged countries, but rather in terms of horizontal cooperation.

Impact: In 2018, 49 children and 40 families were affected by our activities.

Impact: 15,000 children, adolescents and young people were made aware and engaged directly and indirectly on the issues of sustainable development and global citizenship in areas of intervention.

Partner: ASET 93

Romania

More than 40% of Romania’s population and more than 49% of children are at risk of living in precarious situations because of the difficulties of access to health and education services, lack of information, exclusions and discriminations. A large gap in access to education is noted between rural areas and urban areas with a 25% higher drop-out rate in rural youths under 14 years of age. Added to this are a lower quality of education and an increased lack of qualified staff. Further analysis by the Romanian Ministry of Education shows that of a cohort of children followed for 8 years, almost 30.4% give up before the end of cycle 2 (14 years) and only 56.9% average the national assessment exam.

PROJECT FOCUS

Together for a better life: Project for social and economic inclusion of the Roma community of Satmarel Access and quality of education / vocational training From 2018 to 2019 In Satmarel, Satu Mare, Romania

// 350 inhabitants of which nearly 150 Roma children currently live in Satmarel, an outlying area of the city of Satu Mare, which has become the biggest slum of the region. The majority of these families have lived there without official authorization for more than 6 generations. Their living conditions are extremely precarious: unsanitary housing, infrastructure in very poor condition, difficult access to public

services, limited to electricity, running water, gas etc. They encounter difficulties of access to education, health, social assistance and employment services. // The aim of this project is to promote social inclusion of families living in the shantytown of Satmarel, including access to and retention of children from 6 to 14 years by improving, among other things, quality of education. The project also includes an approach with parents to involve them more in education and empower them in their access to rights. Finally, it proposes via the creation and the maintenance of a solidarity garden to increase the level of employability and skills of young adults. // In 2018, 45 children aged 6 to 16, 10 parents and 10 young adults in the process of socio-professional inclusion have been impacted by our activities.

Partners: CCFD-Terre Solidaire; Departmental Center for Resources and Educational Assistance (CJRAE); General Directorate of Social Assistance and Satu Mare Child Protection (DGASPC); Public Health Branch; Departmental Directorate for Youth and Sport (DJTS); Octavian Goga School of Satu Mare and its antenna of Satmarel; Swiss Foundation; Grenoble Isere Romania; School Inspectorate of Satu Mare Department; Satu Mare Town Hall; Secours Populaire Roubaix; Childhood Solidarity Romania; STEA; Hoy-Say For more on our other projects in Romania see page 47 Sources: www.romaniaeducata.eu, Unicef, UNESCO Institute for Statistics (www.uis.unesco.org)

Together for a better life: Project for social and economic inclusion of the Roma community of Satmarel Romania, Satmarel district in Satu Mare From 2018 to 2022

 artners: In France: Aide et Action Isère; Apprentices d’Auteuil; P Coolers of the World; Here and then; School of Peace; school establishments and socio-cultural coaching centres; GRDR; The box ; Thalès Foundation / In Africa: Aide et Action Afrique; Senegalese Association for Modern School (ASEM); Senegalese Synergy for Education and Development (SYSED)

Objectives: Increase in the school attendance rate among children and early involvement of mothers in monitoring children. Through school support for children, parents and an insertion garden for young people and adults, we make sure that education, health and social services and assistance to members of the Roma community of Satmarel are accessible.

BUDGETS AND HUMAN RESOURCES 2018 PER COUNTRY + REGIONAL OFFICE

Impact: In 2018, 45 children aged 6 to 16, 10 parents and 10 young adults in socio-professional inclusion were concerned by our activities.

Operational Projects

€1,382,905

Regional Office France-Europe

€4,044,738

36

TOTAL

€5,427,643

36

 artners: CCFD-Terre Solidaire; Departmental Centre of P resources and educational assistance (CJRAE); Direction General Social Assistance and Child Welfare Satu Mare (DGASPC); Public Health Branch; Direction Department for Youth and Sport (DJTS); Octavian School Goga Satu Mare and Satmarel antenna; Swiss Foundation; Grenoble Isere Romania; School Inspectorate of the Department from Satu Mare; Satu Mare Town Hall; Popular Relief of Roubaix; Childhood Solidarity Romania; STEA, Holy-Dis

BUDGET AEA 2018

NUMBER OF AEA EMPLOYEES 2018

AIDE ET ACTION WISHES TO THANK ALL OF ITS PARTNERS, BOTH FINANCIAL AND OPERATIONAL, WHO, IN 2018, WORKED AT OUR SIDE, IN FRANCE AND EUROPE, FOR ACCESS TO QUALITY EDUCATION FOR ALL


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48

Our financial overview 2018 was the year of the launch of our Transformation to even better meet increased quality requirements, efficiency and accountability to serve our social mission. Special consideration is given to strengthening Support Services, including Finance & Administration, Human Resources and Information Systems to put in place unique policies and procedures that are homogeneous within the network. In this context, we prioritize the homogenization of rules and accounting methods and strengthening of reporting on projects for the preparation of combined audited accounts.

Financial resources It’s the generosity of all - individuals, institutions, businesses, foundations - which has enabled us to fulfill our social mission and to help more than 1.2 million people in 2018. We thank them warmly.

The information presented are unaudited financial data in combination of the AEAI Network, composed of “Regions” Aide et Action International (AEAI), France & Europe (FR and CH), Africa (AFR), South Asia (AS), Southeast Asia and China (ASEC). The figures presented are therefore the subject of manual groupings for the purposes of aggregation of accounts. So far, some topics are not treated as homogeneous within the network especially the recognition of the South Asian cash flow approach and approach commitment for the rest of the Network. The figures presented are in Euros. The result amounts expressed in different currencies have been converted to annual average rates.

Products from the generosity of the general public represent more than 62% of our resources, i.e. €12.6 million which

% spending per programme 3%

In 2018, our operating expenses covered 74 projects in 19 countries.

1%

14% 25%

This is explained by a reduction in revenues, especially institutional and private donations, partially offset by a decline in costs.

Earnings (in million €) General public Private donations

AFR CH FR SA SEAC

Spending (in million €) Projects

Other expenses

Africa concentrates the majority of our social mission, with 9 country of intervention and more than one-third of network expenditure. With 4 countries each, South Asia and SouthEast Asia total, respectively a quarter and a sixth of our programmes. France, where we work with underprivileged populations, represents 3% of the mission. Finally, Switzerland, with its support for projects in Mali, India and Vietnam, represents 1% of project expenses.

Others

30,00 Operational Result: +€0,7M

25,00

Some significant projects financed by the institutions were completed at the end of 2017, explaining a lower level of income in 2018.

Institutions

More than 60% of the Network’s 2018 resources are unaffected.

Jobs

57%

Operational result The year 2018 ends with an operating deficit of €0.3 million, down €1 million compared to 2017.

is stable compared to 2017. Our second source of funding comes from public and institutional investors - €3.3 million, down more than 50%.

20,00

Operational Result: €(0,3)M

€19,9M 1,13 2,85

15,00

no 1

€24,2M 0,94 3,18

€20,1M 7,0

7,49

8,9

3,33

10,00

Asie du Sud-Est & Chine Afrique Direction Internationale France Amérique Latine & Caraïbes

Asie du Sud Suisse

16,5 12.63

2018

2017

11,2

2018

2017

© Vincent Reynaud-Lacroze

12.57 5,00

0,00

no 2 23/3/3/71

€23,6M 7/4/3/8/30/39/9

no 3 3/13/79


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CONTENTS    EDITORIAL    AEAI CHARTER    OUR ORGANIZATION    MAP 2018

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AFRICA    SOUTH ASIA    SOUTHEAST ASIA AND CHINA    FRANCE - EUROPE    FINANCIAL    STRUCTURE    OFFICES

50

Structure of our network International Congress

Our offices Aide et Action International Rue de Lausanne 45A 1201 Geneva – SWITZERLAND Tel : + 41 (0) 22 544 29 80 www.aide-et-action.org

Associative

International Board

Ai Da Xun China Rm6-1-9, 6# Fangcao St, Gaoxin Dist, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan – CHINA Tel : + 86 (0) 28-85173808 www.aea-china.org

International General Management

Management Africa

Management South Asia

Management SouthEast Asia and China

Management France

Aide et Action International Africa Grunitzky Akofala Building - Aflao Gakly Neighborhood Djidjolé B.P. 2998 Lomé – TOGO Tel : + 228 22 53 80 00 www.afrique.aide-et-action.org

Management Switzerland

Executive

International Board: President: Aïcha Bah Diallo Treasurer: Gwenaëlle Bouillé Secretary: Rajiva Wijesinha Administrators: Djibril Debourou Daniel Després Anoma Dissayanaka Jacky Lumarque Radhames Mejia Rukmini Rao Yves Tapiero

Aide et Action International South Asia 16/20, Gilchrist Avenue Harrington Road, Chetpet Chennai – 600 031 – Tamil Nadu – INDIA Tel : + 91 44 2836 5516 www.aea-southasia.org

Workforce of the network (employees), in the 1st quarter of 2019: International Management

Aide et Action Education Foundation Hong Kong Room 2601, Prosperity Place, 6 Shing Yip Street, Kwun Tong, Kowloon – HONG KONG Tel : + 852 2815-3834 www.aeahk.org.hk Aide et Action France-Europe 53 Boulevard de Charonne 75011 Paris – FRANCE Tel : + 33 (0) 1 55 25 70 00 www.france.aide-et-action.org Aide et Action Switzerland Rue de Lausanne 45A 1201 Geneva – SWITZERLAND Tel : + 41 (0) 22 716 52 10 www.aide-et-action.ch

2018 2017 6

7

Management Africa

117

135

Management South Asia

383

380

Management SouthEast Asia and China* 86

85

Management France

36

37

Management Switzerland

3.5

5

TOTAL

Aide et Action International SouthEast Asia and China #322, Street 182, Sangkat Teklaork, Khan Toulkork, Phnom Penh – CAMBODIA Tel : + 855 23 884 510 www.seac.aide-et-action.org

631.5 649

* Including 3 employees in Hong Kong © Vincent Reynaud-Lacroze

Profile for Aide et Action Hong Kong

國際愛達迅年度報告2018|Aide et action International Annual report 2018  

國際愛達迅年度報告2018|Aide et action International Annual report 2018  

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