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F R AN Ç AI S

ACTIVITY REPORT F RA N Ç A I S

© Vincent Reynaud-Lacroze

EN G LI S H

E N GL I S H

E S PAÑOL

ES PAÑOL

Changing the world through education


CONTENTS

EDITORIAL

CHARTER

OUR ORGANISATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD

YOUTH AND ADULTS

PROJECTS MAP

AFRICA

SOUTH ASIA

SEA & CHINA

FRANCE

FINANCES

NETWORK

OFFICES

2

CONTENTS

F RAN Ç AIS

E N GL ISH

E SPAÑOL

Editorial p. 4 Aide et Action Charter p. 5 Our organisation p. 6-7Focus on a thematic: Early childhood care and education

p. 8-9

Focus on a thematic: Livelihood education for youth and adults

p. 10-11

2017 at a glance p. 12-13 Africa Region (by country) p. 14-19 South Asia Region (by country) p. 20-22 South East Asia & China Region (by country) p. 23-25 Europe Region: France p. 26-27 2017 Finances p. 28-29 Structure of our network p. 30 Our offices in the world p. 31

2017 ANNUAL REPORT A publication by AIDE ET ACTION INTERNATIONAL INTERNATIONAL DIRECTOR GENERAL: Eric Ouannes INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION AND FUNDRAISING DIRECTOR: Séverine Ougier EDITOR IN CHIEF: Séverine Ougier

© Naïade Plante

EDITING: Aïcha Bah Diallo Renaud Contini Mathieu Cros Jérôme Geoffroy Chandra Kiran Savy Lach Sara Llort Vanessa Martin Isabelle Merny Li Mingli Guillaume Noblot Séverine Ougier Carine Sakran Dramane Sessouma Shirley Yau

WWW.AIDE-ET-ACTION.ORG

COVER PHOTO: Vincent Reynaud-Lacroze

GRAPHIC DESIGN & ILLUSTRATIONS: Stuart Martin, Intrinsic.cc

PHOTOS: Yves Buliard (p. 26) Sandro Di Carlo Darsa (p. 23) Vu Doan (p. 8, 25) Benjamin Dubuis (p. 17) Didier Pazéry (p. 20) Naïade Plante (p. 2, 21, 22) Vincent Reynaud-Lacroze (p. 1, 14, 19, 23, 24, 28) Anne-Emmanuelle Thion (p. 7)

TRANSLATION: Freelance Interpreters & Translators – India Pvt. Ltd. (FITI PVT. LTD.)


CONTENTS

EDITORIAL

CHARTER

OUR ORGANISATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD

YOUTH AND ADULTS

PROJECTS MAP

AFRICA

SOUTH ASIA

SEA & CHINA

FRANCE

FINANCES

NETWORK

OFFICES

4

AEAI

s the proud President of Aide et Action International (AEAI), I am happy to say that our organisation has spared no effort to achieve its objectives this year. In a context of social movements, natural disasters and security crises in many countries, we have continued to advance our social mission with all the determination, knowledge and expertise that we are known for.

A

© Aïcha Bah Diallo

Editorial

In 2017, 2,244,111 disadvantaged and vulnerable people have benefited from our support – a 47% increase compared to 2016 – through 80 projects implemented in 19 countries! Among these beneficiaries, 1,545,611 were children. We owe this fantastic success to many highly committed people – our 649 employees; our thousands of volunteers; our 16,775 teachers; our thousands of donors; our numerous partners; and the millions of local actors we work with every day.

“IT’S BY INVESTING OURSELVES LIKE WE DID IT IN 2017 THAT WE WILL BUILD A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE WITH LOCAL POPULATIONS, WITH QUALITY EDUCATION AS ITS BEDROCK.”

A network based on the values of community, solidarity and equity, where everyone brings their domain of expertise for the benefit of the whole. Our organisation rests on the shared conviction that local populations have the key to solutions. Our principles – such as work with communities; respect for different

1

Source: Sustainable Development Goal, United Nations, 2016.

Aide et Action Charter

cultures; listening; consideration; openness; sharing; fraternity; empathy; empowerment (so that projects become theirs), and capacity building of local actors – transcend geographical boundaries and cultural differences. “Ensuring inclusive and equitable quality education and promoting lifelong learning opportunities for all” (SDG 41 on Quality Education) is our commitment, together with the international community, to make education not just a right but a reality. We did this in Cambodia, within a consortium of 17 organisations (CCOSC) to ensure schooling for 57,448 children in three years. In South Asia, our projects for the vocational training and work placement of out-of-school youth have reached the threshold of 600,000 beneficiaries. In Africa, we have had an impact on the lives of 1.3 million people and signed eight new partnership agreements in ten countries of intervention.

Aide et Action acts for a world where dignity for all is ensured, through education – an enabler of human development. Our commitment and our actions are based, above all, on the values of liberty, respect, solidarity, equity and integrity. Free from all political and religious affiliations, we undertake to:

GUARANTEE

transparency in our actions and in the use of our resources

DEVELOP

the principles of solidarity and exchange among cultures through sponsorship

On behalf of the International Board, I want to warmly thank everybody who got involved with us this year. It’s by investing ourselves like we did it in 2017 that we will build a sustainable future with local populations, with quality education as its bedrock. I want to thank you with all my heart and I look forward to next year for yet more resounding successes. /// AÏCHA BAH DIALLO International President

ACT

to ensure respect of the right to quality education for all, especially children, who are the future of humanity

OUR ENGAGEMENT

PROMOTE

an education that is open to the world, its diversity and its cultures

CREATE AWARENESS mobilise and influence, to ensure that education becomes a global commitment

SUPPORT

communities, who are the true owners of their educational projects

Aide et Action’s charter is the Association’s raison d’être. It is shared by all its members,and ensures the organisation’s unity and coherence. Its values and principles are accepted by all its partners.

FRANÇAIS

ENGLISH

E S PAÑOL


CONTENTS

6

EDITORIAL

CHARTER

OUR ORGANISATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD

YOUTH AND ADULTS

PROJECTS MAP

AFRICA

SOUTH ASIA

SEA & CHINA

FRANCE

FINANCES

OFFICES

AEAI

Our organisation education for children from minorities, definition of an educational offer adapted to working children

“Everyone has the right to education. Education shall be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental stages. Elementary education shall be compulsory. Technical and professional education shall be made generally available and higher education shall be equally accessible to all on the basis of merit.” - Article 26 of the Universal Declaration of Human rights. ven today, there remain more than 263 million children and young people with little or no education, and 750 million illiterate adults – among whom two-thirds are women. Access to education is not the only challenge. Of the 1.5 billion children who have the chance to go to school, 617 million in the 6-14 years age group fail to acquire the minimum competence thresholds. According to UNESCO, if all children from low-income countries were to leave school knowing how to read, 171 million people could escape poverty.1

E

As countries strive to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education by 2030, and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all – a key target of the United Nations' 2016 Sustainable Development Goals (SDG 4), Aide et Action International has been working in this direction since its creation in 1981. Our international solidarity association engages with children, as well as with population groups that suffer discrimination and are the most vulnerable.

Our mission: to promote access to education and improve the schooling conditions of children; to improve the quality of education (teachers’ training, development of adapted teaching practices, provision of equipment, etc.); to support communities in the development of their educational projects; to promote the social and professional integration of the most vulnerable; to raise awareness and mobilize global public opinion for a fairer and more equitable world; to ensure education in emergency and postemergency situations. Present in 19 countries, the association carried out 80 projects in 2017, around nine thematics:

Early childhood care and education

Education in emergency and post-emergency situations

Education in the context of migration

OUR THEMATICS

Girls’ and women’s education

Inclusive education

Health education

Source: UNESCO Institute for Statistics (2016).

Sustainable development and global citizenship education: human rights education, development education, access to drinking water and natural resources management, and reforestation //

For more than 36 years, we have been working to ensure that every individual receives quality education that enables them to grow and thrive, find employment and support their families with dignity. We intervene everywhere deemed necessary and feasible, and are recognized as being of public benefit and free from any political and religious ties.

Access and quality of education

1

NETWORK

Livelihood Sustainable education for youth and adults development and global citizenship education

// Livelihood education for youth and adults: literacy, vocational training to enable young adults to become key actors of their community’s development, in-depth learning about managing a budget, a company, etc. // Health education: training programs about hygiene, nutrition, water management, HIV/AIDS prevention (screening, counselling, introduction of the issue in schools’ curricula)

© Anne-Emmanuelle Thion

These thematics aim at improving: // Access and quality of education: elimination of obstacles to education, ensuring the relevance of education so that it is adapted to the needs of the target population groups. // Early childhood care and education: construction and improvement of early childhood care facilities, development of early learning and development activities, training of early childhood educators, consideration of early childhood in family strategies and national policies // Girls’ and women’s education: women’s literacy, raising awareness of communities on the issues of the education of the girl child, setting up income-generating activities for parents, training teachers on ‘gender equality’, definition of an adapted educational offer (vocational training with real job opportunities, setting up specific support courses), support for women’s grouping initiatives aimed at acquiring financial independence // Inclusive education: establishment of preschool centres and learning centres for out-ofschool street children, creation of facilities and adapted pedagogies for children with disabilities, work with governments on child-friendly

// Education in the context of migration: adapting/making educational systems available in migrants’ origin and destination zones, working in partnership with competent authorities to ensure the recognition of migrants’ rights, enhancing inter-culturalism and promoting ‘living together in harmony’ in the locations where migrants settle, supporting them during their journey through the different phases of the migration process // Education in emergency and post-emergency situations: intervening during conflicts or natural disasters to preserve, maintain or restore the educational system and family assets, disaster management and prevention education

AEAI works with communities so that they may define and implement their own educational projects. Because we believe that people themselves have the solutions, we adopt a process of listening and supporting local actors. With respect for the freedom and culture of these communities, our projects are carried out by employees and volunteers from the countries of intervention and are supported by local partner associations. The aim is to foster the autonomy of the communities and of all the actors revolving around them (local associations, parents, teachers, communities, etc.). This principle of dialogue and partnership is also applied within our organisational structure: AEAI is a network of international associations present in Africa, South Asia, South East Asia and Europe, bringing together their resources, ideas and skills. ///


CONTENTS

EDITORIAL

CHARTER

OUR ORGANISATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD

YOUTH AND ADULTS

PROJECTS MAP

AFRICA

SOUTH ASIA

SEA & CHINA

FRANCE

FINANCES

8

NETWORK

OFFICES

EARLY CHILDHOOD

of the poorest in the country, located 80 kms from the capital. The few schools there are at a considerable distance from the children's homes. Furthermore, they are most often in deplorable conditions: no water, no kitchen, no latrines, and they lack teaching and play manuals.

© Vu Doan, Aide et Action International

The language barrier adds to all these problems. The Da Bac district has seven minorities. Children from these ethnic minorities have trouble communicating with teachers who only speak Vietnamese, find it difficult to understand lessons, and quickly give up school.

Focus on a thematic:

Early childhood care and education here is no doubt today about the importance of the care and learning delivered during the first 1000 days of a child's life: they make it possible both to reduce psycho-motor disorders, prevent dropouts, combat inequalities, and promote the social and educational integration of future generations. That is why the Sustainable Development Goals, adopted in September 2015, included early childhood as one of the goals (SDD 4.2) for the very first time, to ensure that by 2030, all children, with no exceptions, have access to early childhood development and care, as well as preprimary education.

T

Despite this goal, 150 million children between three and five years old today do not have access to pre-primary education around the world. 80% of these children live in low-income countries, which presently have neither the means nor the financial or political will to invest in the early childhood sector. International development aid is not a sizeable ally either, since very little (less than 2%) is dedicated to the development of early childhood education.

Since its foundation in 1981, Aide et Action International has made early childhood education one of its strategic thrust areas. It has participated in the research and development of methods specific to early childhood, as well as the training of qualified teachers for this particular educational sector. It has always been careful to never impose any single educational model, but to always associate modern and traditional educational experiences. Vietnam: Promoting inclusive education and early childhood for disadvantaged children from ethnic minorities More than 56 ethnic minorities live together in Vietnam. They are one of the poorest and most marginalized population groups and inhabit remote areas. In addition to extreme poverty, one of the obstacles to schooling children from ethnic minorities remains the language barrier – ethnic groups speak many different dialects, but do not know Vietnamese, the only medium of instruction. AEAI intervenes in the province of Hoa Binh, one

The bilingual educational approach focusing on the mother tongue is recognized as a particularly effective mechanism for improving the education of children from ethnic minorities. AEAI implements it in the context of the project, "Promoting Inclusive Education and Early Childhood for Disadvantaged Children from Ethnic Minorities in Vietnam". In the three community kindergartens and 21 satellite schools established by the association, teaching is done in the Hmong language as well as in Vietnamese. On December 9, 2016, AEAI and its partner, the Consultative Institute for Socio-Economic Development in Rural and Mountainous Zones (CISDOMA), published a teaching manual in the Hmong language and in Vietnamese, in order to better prepare children for entry into primary school, where the medium of instruction is Vietnamese only. China: Protection of underprivileged children from ethnic minorities Since 1985, nursery education has been provided in China for children aged 3 to 5 years, but it is neither free nor compulsory and therefore reserved for urban and privileged communities. Children born in disadvantaged areas are practically excluded. The vast majority of these children are left to the care of their grandparents, who are often uninformed about early childhood educational methods. Unofficial pre-primary education appears to be one of the possible solutions for these communities, insofar as it offers a less rigid mode of care and more flexible hours at a lower cost. It makes it possible to improve the academic performance of these disadvantaged children and can be used as an excellent way to unify communities. In particular, it makes it possible to provide these children, who receive little or no

care, the psychological support and assistance necessary for their development. AEAI has therefore developed and equipped Early Childhood Care Centres since 2011. With the construction of two children's centres in Chengdu City and Lushan, as well as the setting up of three mobile centres, the project has made it possible to take care of the most disadvantaged children, and especially to train parents. Young health or education professionals there receive special training to take care of these children. Mali: Early childhood care by village members While early childhood education is one of the priorities of educational policies in Mali, it nonetheless remains a "sub-sector", whose rate of access is the lowest compared to other sectors of the education system. Overall, the lack of support for early childhood development needs is not as much due to parental poverty as it is to the lack of organization of community actors and the commune-level administration. Consistent with its desire to work with the most disadvantaged communities as priority, AEAI took interest in the community of Sénou, about 15 kms from Bamako, populated by people from rural areas who had come to the capital with their families in search of work. Very few children in this area go to preschool establishments because parents cannot afford the necessary costs. The youngest children are left out and are in fact exposed to risks of accidents or child kidnapping, and are often pushed into begging through Koranic schools. The project developed by AEAI, "Early childhood care by village members", is founded on an original approach, based on community commitment and participation. Members of the community, people who have command over reading and writing, receive training to take care of the youngest children while the parents are working. Turned into "parental reference persons", their duty is to devote three hours a day, five days a week, to the village's youngest children and to facilitate early-learning activities on the basis of a pre-established program and with the support of early childhood professionals. They are supervised by facilitators holding Preschool Instructors' diplomas, specially trained by early childhood professionals. This rather inexpensive initiative can reach out to a maximum number of children. ///


CONTENTS

EDITORIAL

CHARTER

OUR ORGANISATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD

YOUTH AND ADULTS

PROJECTS MAP

AFRICA

SOUTH ASIA

SEA & CHINA

FRANCE

FINANCES

10

NETWORK

OFFICES

YOUTH & ADULTS

Focus on a thematic:

Livelihood education for youth and adults radicate poverty by 2030 – that is the primary Sustainable Development Goal that more than 190 heads of state had agreed upon in September 2015. The ambition is a sizeable one. It is true that the extreme poverty rate in the world, set by the World Bank at less than US $ 1.90 per day, has continued to decline over the last 30 years, but there are still over 800 million people living below the poverty line today, a large majority of them in developing regions.

cooking, etc., depending on the market needs estimated beforehand. This training, combined with support for integration in the labour market, enables young people to regain confidence, improve their incomes and even encourages them to start their own businesses.

E

Developing entrepreneurship and contributing to the empowerment and self-assertion of marginalized population groups is now part of AEAI's missions. In 2017, the association trained more than 350 women from marginalized communities in Dibrugarh, in the state of Assam in India, as part of the project on the "Promotion of Micro-Enterprises for Dibrugarh's Youth", financed by the Asian Development Bank and the Government of Assam. These women, often affected by floods and natural disasters, have been trained in tailoring and carpentry work.

By its leveraging effect on growth and inequalities, the training of young people and adults is now internationally recognized as one of the major, sustainable solutions to help the most vulnerable and marginalized to emerge from poverty. Hence the determination, laid down in Goal 4, to promote lifelong learning opportunities. Nonetheless, all or almost everything remains to be developed in this area. Indeed, education and technical and vocational training today account for between 3% and 10% of national budget allocations to education, depending on the country. This crying lack of funding makes it impossible to structure vocational training programs that are adapted to employment requirements. As a result, the number of youth aged 15 to 24 years who are neither studying nor being trained and are unemployed is estimated today at 621 million today. This number is expected to grow in the coming years, since, according to UNESCO, 617 million young people today do not have basic reading and writing skills. Giving these young people the means to develop, to take charge of their lives and to play a useful role in society is a priority for AEAI, which has been developing training and mainstreaming support programs for more than 15 years for the most marginalized population groups. South Asia: Training and support for youth in the labour market and microenterprise development South Asia is the region of intervention where AEAI developed its first training and mainstreaming programs. After the 2004 tsunami, in this difficult context, the association

China: Vocational Training: A second chance school for women in rural environments With China's economic development, inequalities between the countryside and the city are widening. Men leave their villages for large urban areas, while women stay home alone, where they take over the management of their homes and take care of the children as well as the elders. But for taking care of their families, they above all need to have a job and earn a salary. The responsibility is all the more difficult as in China, they are still the most overlooked group by the education system: in 2010, women accounted for 74% of the illiterate in China. To provide these women support so that they can join the job market, AEAI has developed literacy classes in four Chinese provinces (Guizhou, Gansu, Ningxia and Sichuan), which enable more than 200 women to learn how to read and write every year. It has also developed training and learning centres to enable them to acquire skills in tourism, hotels, confectionery, photography, computer science and entrepreneurship.

first and foremost sought to support unemployed youth in the 18-25 year age group from marginalized and disadvantaged backgrounds. The idea of training these young people in barely three months in different trades, responding to local market needs, in partnership with local entrepreneurs, proved immediately successful. Today, the association has 74 iLEAD Centres (Initiative for Livelihood Education And Development). These are fully-fledged training centres that equip young people with vocational skills in handicrafts, tourism, as mechanics,

Š Aide et Action International

In addition to the development of a women's self-help network, each centre has to support at least 300 women a year to become economically empowered. ///


CONTENTS

EDITORIAL

CHARTER

OUR ORGANISATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD

YOUTH AND ADULTS

PROJECTS MAP

AFRICA

SOUTH ASIA

SEA & CHINA

FRANCE

FINANCES

NETWORK

OFFICES

12

PROJECTS MAP

Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

Aide et Action International

2017 at a glance

4,001 schools involved

France

24,4 M€

China Morocco

collected

Nepal Niger

Mali

2,244,111

India

Laos Bhutan

Senegal Guinea

Cambodia

Ivory Coast

people benefited from our help, including:

Burkina Faso

Togo

Vietnam Sri Lanka Benin

Madagascar

1,545,611

19

countries

children, and

16,775 teachers

80 projects

FR A N Ç A IS

E N GL ISH

E SPAÑOL

AEAI Countries of intervention: Africa South Asia South East Asia & China France


CONTENTS

EDITORIAL

CHARTER

OUR ORGANISATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD

YOUTH AND ADULTS

PROJECTS MAP

AFRICA

SOUTH ASIA

SEA & CHINA

FRANCE

FINANCES

NETWORK

OFFICES

14 Burkina Faso

Africa Region

beneficiaries (total)

1,270,573

children, pupils and youth

28,369Bénin

adults, including:

8,084 teachers

1,932schools

© Vincent Reynaud-Lacroze

10.87 million inhabitants

Our action

43% under the age of 14

// Equipping six public primary schools with

In the face of rising insecurity due to religious extremism (Jihadist Islamic sect), particularly in schools, and slower economic growth with declining export prices (gold and cotton), Burkina Faso faces strong barriers in terms of education and development. 2017 was a year during which we redoubled our mission’s efforts in two areas: - participatory local governance of education and school projects (providing support to local people who are themselves responsible for and managers of the projects) - socio-professional training and inclusion of women, offering alternatives to those excluded from the formal education system.

Partners

Life expectancy at birth: 60 years

18,422 beneficiaries, including 17,669 children

Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

Field team: 8 employees; 72 schools 2017 budget:

€ 1,821,018

Ivory Coast

Compulsory education: 6-15 yrs

Gross rate of access to the last year of primary school: 77.9%

and looking after of computer equipment.

47,492

// Training of 18 people in the maintenance

beneficiaries, including 46,227 children Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

Support for improving reception and learning conditions in kindergartens and primary schools (AC2A)

Field team: 11 employees; 70s schools 2017 budget*:

Money Gram Foundation; local authorities; AFD

461,892 out-of-school children Gross secondary school enrolment rate: 43.87%

// Coordination of the electrification

Program for the improvement and diversification of the educational offer in Western Africa (PADOE3)

A Light For Africa (ALFA)

*

Direct costs of countries + equalization costs of national bureaux (for all country files) NB: source for data and stats used in these country files is UIS/ Unesco (2016), unless otherwise indicated

The long political crisis in the Côte d'Ivoire has negatively impacted the education sector, especially in the north of the country. In 2017, we had to increase our action to ensure the right to access and quality of education for all. Our approach is based on helping communities and other stakeholders participate fully in education and school projects – with the objective of enhancing competence, autonomy in decision-making, accountability of the people concerned, and the appropriation and sustainability of their educational projects.

economic/social empowerment through the construction of three literacy centres and training in farming techniques to combat rural poverty and low/no access to factors of production (APC).

Projects PADOE3 Joint Water Environment Education Action for Tomorrow (AC3ED) Program for the Improvement of Teachers’ and Students’ Working and Learning Conditions (PACTE) Learning to Change (APC)

AFD; local authorities

capacity building of local actors (local authorities, local education committees), and members of the network of all those involved in the educational sphere.

// Improvement in the rate of access and

quality of the educational offer.

// Local planning of education.

14,632 beneficiaries, including 14,322 children

Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

Field team: 3 employees; 50 schools 2017 budget:

€ 164,267 Partners

// Reduction of barriers to women’s

// Educational planning and management

// Facilitation of 18 digital libraries.

Projects

training through the building and equipment of school infrastructure via delegated owner building (PACTE).

Our action

43% under the age of 14

200,000 schools with no access to electricity in Sub-Saharan Africa

// Improvement of work conditions and

23.69 million inhabitants

computer equipment.

of four schools to improve children’s learning conditions and provide access to information to all (literacy classes in the evenings for women).

sanitation to inform and raise awareness amongst pupils, setting up of ‘health clubs’ within the schools covered by the project.

AFD; Occitane Foundation; Rotary Foundation; Rotary de Lyon; Ouaga Millélium; State of Burkina Faso

Net preschool (pre-primary) enrolment rate: 12.5% (2015)

€ 568,494 Partners

// Teachers’ training on hygiene and

Rural population: 69%

1,307,875

2017 was marked by the launch of a project to "Support the improvement of Reception and Learning Conditions in Nursery and Primary Schools (AC2A)", with the integration of information and communication technologies (ICT) in learning methods. Initiation to computers and the use of a digital library made both students and teachers rejoice.

45% under the age of 14

6,189,473 illiterates (15 years old or above), i.e. 1/3 of the population

in 10 countries of intervention

With a high adult illiteracy rate (67.4% of which 3/4 are women), education in Benin remains a major concern. Enrolment rates for tpre-schoolers and for the last years of primary school still remain very low.

Our action

761,443 out-of-school children

22 projects

Benin

18.64 million inhabitants

Project PADOE3


CONTENTS

EDITORIAL

CHARTER

OUR ORGANISATION

EARLY CHILDHOOD

YOUTH AND ADULTS

PROJECTS MAP

AFRICA

SOUTH ASIA

SEA & CHINA

FRANCE

FINANCES

NETWORK

OFFICES

16 Guinea

Mali 12.39 million inhabitants

Our action

17.99 million inhabitants

Our action

55% live below the poverty line

// Structuring and professionalization

48% under the age of 14

// Involvement and participation of local

42% are under the age of 14 362,777 out-of-school children, of which more than 2/3 are girls Compulsory education: 7-12 yrs Guinea has significant mining potential and natural resources. However, the Guinean economy collapsed in 2015 due to the Ebola epidemic. The rebound expected in 2016 did not meet expectations and, according to the IMF, 55% of the population lives below the poverty line. Education, especially of girls, is a key factor in the country’s economic and social development. Hence, in 2017, we continued to increase our work with Guinea’s civil society for the country’s development. Our actions were aimed at raising awareness, enrolling and keeping girls in school, particularly in rural areas.

Partners

Rural population: 62%

18,617 beneficiaries, including 9,684 children

Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

Field team: 16 employees; 42 schools 2017 Budget:

€ 1,499,933

of civil society organisations for a better operational capacity and a good governance.

Primary school completion rate: 50%

// Advocacy and consultation activities

related to access to basic services at a local level; the defence of human rights; etc.

// Construction of school facilities and

canteens in order to retain pupils at school.

// Teachers’ training in active pedagogy

and awareness-building of parents on the importance of school, up to high school level.

// Scholarship offers.

Projects

PADOE3 Concerted Programme for strengthening Guinean civil society and youth organisations (PROJEG) Girl-friendly School (Ecole Amie des Filles EAF) Bénin Project to provide support for schooling and health development (PASDS)

Repetition rate: 20.9% For several years, the country has been facing a multidimensional crisis, to which a new form of insecurity has been added due to religious extremism (active Islamic groups in the north). Education is suffering, with barely half the pupils completing the primary cycle and one pupil in five repeating. The latest research done shows that children at the end of the primary cycle barely have half the basic knowledge required. This is due, among other things, to the low level of competence of the teachers, who are recruited in large groups, without a degree or prior pedagogical training. 2017 was therefore a year devoted to improving the quality of education at primary level.

70,481 beneficiaries, including 69,045 children

Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

Field team: 13 employees; 376 schools 2017 budget:

€ 390,044

communities and decentralized bodies in the sphere of education.

// Assessment of the initial level of teachers

(ATIC).

// Training of 840 teachers and 42 instructors

in the teaching of mathematics and observational sciences (ATIC).

// Identification, design and provision of tools

and teaching resources to these teachers, via mobile telephones and individual tablets (ATIC).

Projects PADOE3 Bamako-Sénou Early Childhood Care Improvement Project (POUPEE) Project on Access to Education for All Children in the Mopti Region (PACETEM) Improving Access, Quality and Governance of Basic and Secondary Education, Gao Region (PAQAMA) ICT Learning Project (ATIC)

Partners AFD; MEDICOR and SYMPHASIS Foundations; EAC/Qatar; Ministry of National Education (MEN); Academic Agency of La Francophonie

AFD; Turing Foundation; Air France Foundation; Orange Foundation

(AUF)

Morocco

Madagascar

24.89 million inhabitants

Our action

41% under the age of 14

// Training communities on fund

*Poverty level: 71.5% of the population (source: IMF) **Compulsory education: 6-10 yrs The low level of growth and high level of poverty* slowed down all development prospects in the country in 2017. Since 2009, the education system has been suffering a significant drop in the number of children enrolled in school. And Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com in 2012, only three out of 10 children attended primary school**. Inadequate and unsuitable educational beneficiaries, opportunities; lack of teachers; parental including 12,240 children poverty; and at times, children forced to work – all unfortunate reasons for this disaffection.

12,348

2017 hence consisted of delegating responsibility to the communities concerned, for them to implement their school building project, including procurement and financial management.

1,159,687 out-of-school children

Field team: 6 employees; 17 schools 2017 budget:

management and on issuing calls for tenders in order to reduce the building costs of schools’ infrastructures, without neglecting quality.

// Supervision and monitoring of the

building work, quality assurance and compliance with standards.

In early 2017, this project was completed and closed, and will be revisited in the near future.

28% under the age of 14

// Consolidation of the Asni commune’s

education plan in order to structure the educational system for the region and promote girls’ education.

Gross pre-primary (preschool) enrolment rate: 50.3%

// Construction or rehabilitation of 15

Women’s literacy rate (15 years +): 59.1% (2012)

// Recruitment and training of specialized

5,022,598 illiterate women

classrooms, provision of furniture, educational games and textbooks. educators.

// Awareness-building and training of

communities in activities enabling them to finance educators’ salaries.

// 17 local associations created to manage

the finances and accounts of preschool centres.

N.A,

Project

Field: Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com 1 commune; 1 school

Support for community management of the construction of school buildings: Emergency Support Project for the Education for All Program

2017 Budget:

€ 627,050

Partners Global Partnership for Education (GPE); World Bank

Our action

Compulsory education: 6-14 yrs

// Feasibility study of sub-projects

– respecting and safeguarding the environmental.

35.27 million inhabitants

€ 7,700 Partners

RIM; local associations; Asni commune

// 10 committees of mother educators set

up in order to involve parents.

Project Education for Development in the Imlil Valley


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YOUTH AND ADULTS

PROJECTS MAP

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SEA & CHINA

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NETWORK

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18 Togo

Niger 20.67 million inhabitants

Our action

7.6 million inhabitants

Our action

50% are under the age of 14

// Improvement in reading, writing and

42% under the age of 14

// Supporting decentralized educational

1,282,980 out-of-school children 1,231,412 out-of-school teenagers Rural population: 81% Security crisis in the Sahel (organized armed violence and terrorism); forced migrations; poverty – the chronic instability in Niger has had a devastating effect on education. In Niger, close to 30% of school-age children do not go to school*. In addition, those who do go to school have a low level and do not acquire the required knowledge and skills the job market needs. Educational programmes and the insufficient level of a section of teachers are some of the reasons explaining this situation. In addition, eastern Niger is also confronted to a new form of insecurity, with the presence of the Islamic sect Boko Haram. In 2017, we endeavoured to improve opportunities for children to have access to education, whilst strengthening the links between schools, the community and state entities.

calculation skills of primary school pupils through improved teaching and the promotion of a reading culture in the communities – i.e. public reading sessions, followed by the establishment of village libraries.

// Building women’s capacity to promote

257,525 beneficiaries, including 244,312 children Field team: 18 employees; 371 schools Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

2017 Budget:

€ 678,598

girls’ schooling – i.e. setting up of the Mother Educators’ Association (AME).

// Work with Muslim communities. // Awareness-building sessions for girls and

women on schooling, especially schooling for girls.

// Strengthening of the social link for Diffa youth.

Projects PADOE3 Niger Education Community Strengthening (NECS) Fundamental Standards for Quality and Equity Project (NFQE) Girls’ Schooling in Junior Secondary Schools project (SCOFI) Emergency Project in Diffa (PUD) for refugees that fled from Boko Haram

Compulsory education 6-15 yrs 161,030 out-of-school children 227,522 illiterates (15-24 years) Demonstrations by volunteer teachers, calling for improved living and working conditions; late registration of children in schools; frequent repetition of a year by pupils; large number of drop-outs before reaching the fifth year of primary school (CM2); significant proportion of children enrolled in the first year of primary school (CP) who do not reach CM2; and difficulties in attending school… All the more reasons which pushed us, in 2017, to focus on an ideal schooling system that would make it possible for all children to go to school, advance from one level to the next, complete their studies within the prescribed time frames, and improve their learning by helping them to succeed.

Partners

Partners AFD; Plan Niger; USAID; UNICEF

AFD; UNICEF; local authorities

Senegal 15.41 million inhabitants

Our action

43% are under the age of 14

PAGE - Approach to improving participatory school management, based on:

Compulsory education: 6-16 yrs 677,256 out-of-school children 1,246,260 illiterates (15-24 years) The Casamance region has witnessed more than 30 years of conflict, with thousands of people being displaced, the destruction of public infrastructure and a massive exodus of people from the Sedhiou and Ziguinchor regions. This has led to a situation of increased poverty, poor schooling conditions and low quality of learning – all of it exacerbated by teachers' strikes. To remedy this situation, we have strengthened basic learning and developed children's life skills, reinforced the professional and academic skills of teachers, raised awareness about the fundamental rights of pupils, and advocated for the end of violence against children.

// The establishment of an online citizen's

barometer, which monitors the children's performance; it assesses their reading, mathematics and general culture skills all through the project, to see how they evolve.

// Mobilization of all actors around the quality of

education.

333,708 beneficiaries, including 325,428 children

Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

Field team: 23 employees; 286 schools 2017 Budget:

€ 885,718

Partners AFD; Kumba Ressource; UNICEF; State of Senegal; partner associations

// Implementation of corrective measures

through classroom remediation by teachers; community educational support organized at home; community areas designed on the model of Koranic schools.

Projects PADOE3 Getting trained for life Improvement of Basic Education in Casamance (PAEBCA) Improvement in Participatory Management of School Program (PAGE) Local and International Solidarity for Development through Education (SOLIDE) © Vincent Reynaud-Lacroze

534,650 beneficiaries, including 531,636 children

players (regions, inspection departments and communities) to plan responses to educational problems at a local level, with the effective participation of children in school life.

// Eliminating disparities and promoting

gender equity to get to school and keep in schools a large proportion of children, whilst ensuring a basic quality of learning.

// Managing schools through performance

contracts to ensure a greater sense of responsibility among the teaching community – in terms of the quality of the educational services offered.

Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

Field team: 32 employees; 648 schools 2017 Budget:

€ 1,227,710

Projects PADOE3 Child-friendly/Girl-friendly school (EAE-AF) Junior Secondary Reform Support Project (PAREC)


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20 India

South Asia Region

1.324 billion inhabitants

37 projects

28% under the age of 14 Compulsory education: 6-13 yrs 300 million seasonal migrants

in 4 countries of intervention

2,897,747 out-of-school children and 11,109,371 teenagers (2013)

760,615

beneficiaries (total)

481,835

SOUTH ASIA IN FEBRUARY 2018

adults

External assessment conducted for My Gakidh Village project in Dr. Prabhat, a well known economist and Director - Jaipuria Institute of Management accompanied by Dr. Aishwarya Mahajan, Director - Livelihood Education, AEA visited ‘My Gakidh Village’ project in Bhutan to assess the overall impact brought about by the project for the last four years of its initiation. The assessment focused on the impact © Didier Pazéry brought in by the My gakidh village project in the Bhutan field of education, livelihood, economic and social

Bénin

well being for the youth and community people. My Gakidh Village is a joint initiative of The Bhutan Youth Development Fund and Aide et Action South Asia with overall goal to curb rural urban Youth migration by providing livelihood skills and opportunities within their own community. The project is located at Toepisa Gewog under Punakha Dzongkhag, Bhutan.

3,810 teachers

1,043 schools

Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

Our approach in 2017 focused mainly on migrant populations, early childhood, women and girls, and vocational training for young adults through our professional training program, iLEAD.

Field team: 324 employees; 29 projects; 1,022 schools 2017 Budget:

€ 2,585,665

Projects Back to Basics (5); Children of Mishing Community, Golaghat; Bandipur School Development Project; Ensuring Quality Education with Ecological Sensitization (Kanha Tiger Reserve project); BR Hills Tiger Reserve (school development project) ; SIRAGUGAL Helping children to rise up in life (school development project); My School; Arumbu-Boys Club; Project Enlight; Balaghat (school development project) PAHAL MIRC ; Caring & Safe Environment for young migrants at worksites; Care & Learning for Young Migrant Children at Construction Sites Targeted Intervention (Santé, VIH et SIDA) Himayat ; Supporting Human Capital Development (Meghalaya); Micro-Enterprise promotion for Youth (Dibrugarh); MicroEnterprise Development Promotion; iLEAD; Beautifying Dreams; Digital Literacy; Project Ujjivan (IT programme coding)

Partners Abhigyan Disha; Accenture; American India Foundation; ARTS; Asian Development Bank; Bernard van Leer Foundation (BVLF); CAPGEMINI; CARD; Catholic Relief Services; Chanel; Cognizant Foundation; COMMITMENTS; DEEP;

Nepal 28.98 million inhabitants

Our action

27% under the age of 14

// Valuing the country’s attractiveness for tourists following the 2016 renovation of the ancient St Choeji Drukpa Kunle road, which allowed a large number of jobs to be created.

32% under the age of 14

// Skill-building program for disadvantaged

Rural population: 61%

420

has been to promote learning and training among young people, in particular through the development of entrepreneurship and Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com eco-tourism. Our flagship iLEAD training and integration program has helped these young people become self-sufficient and find a job.

111,681 youth

beneficiaries, including 160,348 children and adolescents, 110,950 youth, and 472,575 adults

introduction of simple teaching methods to improve basic skills (reading, writing and maths); increasing the retention rate of schoolchildren; parents’ knowledge of education; and vocational learning for young people.

Our action

Gross enrolment rate (higher education): 10.51% (2013)

To address this issue, our approach in 2017 AT A GLANCE

children and adolescents

There are enormous opportunities for young adults, but the gap between supply and demand (of skilled and semi-skilled people) is still far too wide.

743,873

// Multiple – mainly based on the

0.79 million inhabitants

Gross enrolment rate (secondary education): 63.5%

The “happiest country in the world” is slowly opening up to other countries. Tourism is one of its main income resources. Work opportunities are expanding, but the gap between demand and supply (of skilled and semi-skilled manpower) is still too wide.

163,289

Too many children are still disadvantaged in India – migrant children are out-of-school and lose their access to education; tribal children have a very low level of literacy because their education is in a language other than their mother tongue.

Our action

beneficiaries Field team: 1 project

2017 Budget:

€ 14,810

Partners Bhutan Youth Development Fund (YDF) iLEAD Hikkaduwa (Sri Lanka) trainees visit tea industry as part of Industrial Visit

// Training of 420 rural youth to work as tourist guides, thereby mitigating ruralto-urban migration and creating work opportunities in the youth’s areas of origin. // Promoting ecotourism and trekking, two activities deeply embedded in Bhutan’s history. // Publication of “My Gadikh Village – A journey”. // Development of other types of professional training, such as tea processing, ICT, weaving, sewing, hospitality and pottery.

Project My Gakidh Village, Punakha

159,211 out-of-school children and 222,237 teenagers 823,462 illiterates (15-24 years) In the country that calls itself the “roof of the world”, children unfortunately remain largely disadvantaged because of poverty. The earthquake that devastated Nepal in 2015, destroyed more than 6,000 schools and affected 990,000 children. The repercussions are still being felt today…

11,585 beneficiaries, including 2,941 children and adolescents, 311 youth, and 8,333 adults

Two years later, we remain present in the country. Our activities are now more focused on training, expanded to include Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com Field team: employability skills for young people whose 3 employees; 3 projects; 21 schools lives have been harshly affected by the earthquake, as well as the reintegration of adults in the workforce. 2017 Budget:

€ 154,685

Partners Aasaman; Dalit Welfare Organisation; Republic and Canton of Geneva

youth in Kathmandu, Bhaktapur and Lalitpur, to enable them to get a better job and/or start their own business projects. // After the earthquake, reconstruction of 21 schools in 3 villages in the Lamjung district where 1,950 children are being educated. // Training of 42 teachers in psycho-social intervention techniques for helping children overcome trauma and improve their learning capacities. // Training of 21 youth affected by the earthquake, in automobile sales and placement in companies.

Projets iLEAD - Technical Education and Vocational Training to Youth, Kathmandu, Bhaktapur et Lalitpur Back to Basics - Youth Employment and Enhancement of Learning Skills among Primary School Children, Saptari & Baglung Rebuilding for Change, District of Lamjung


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22 Sri Lanka 20.79 million inhabitants

Our action

24% were below 14 years

Multi-level - Vocational training of 638 young women and 289 young men in trades such as beauticians, tailoring, design/ graphics, electricians and information technology. 247 youth participated in the training module, "Start Your Business" for the acquisition of entrepreneurial skills.

Compulsory education: 5-15 yrs 15,984 out-of-school children (2015) 75,708 out-of-school teenagers (2013) The 30 years of civil war that raged in the “pearl of the Indian Ocean” until 2009, continue to have a detrimental effect on the level of employability of Sri Lankan youth: thousands of children were displaced and were unable to continue their normal course of schooling. They did not acquire the necessary knowledge for the job market.

59,744 illiterates (15-24 years)

927 beneficiaries

Field team: Bénin Copyright © Vector Maps.com 53 beneficiaries; 4 projects; Our iLEAD program seeks toFree integrate 12 iLEAD centres these young men and women into the workforce by providing them with ‘life skills’ that build their self-confidence – by training them in fields which will enable them to find a job, look after themselves and their families.

2017 Budget:

€ 254,872

South East Asia and China Region

16 projects

// Support for ex-combatants, war

widows and others displaced by civil wars. The iLEAD program is very effective for the reconciliation, rehabilitation and reconstruction of lives affected by war.

including 8 in Cambodia, 3 in Vietnam, 3 in Laos and 2 in China

161,321

beneficiaries (total)

Projects iLEAD Developing employability and entrepreneurship skills for marginalised youth, Jaffna District, Northern Province iLEAD International Academy, Kalutara District (Panadura), Western Province Emergency support after the floods in the Districts of Galle, Ratnapura and Kaluthara

Partners Catholic Relief Services; US Embassy in Colombo; Samurdhi Ministry; Women Rural Development Societies; Farmers’ Organisations; Fishermen Societies; Children Societies; Sports Clubs; Youth Clubs

105,949 children 50,491 parents & adults

4,881 teachers Cambodia

989 schools

© Vincent Reynaud-Lacroze

15.76 million inhabitants

Our action

31% under the age of 14

// Construction of schools in remote areas;

More than 250,000 out-of-school children and adolescents 395,795 illiterates (15-24 years) Geographical isolation, family migrations, lack of infrastructure, shortage of teachers, discrimination and poverty – these are just some of the many obstacles to primary education in Cambodia. Over 250,000 children are out of school; they live on the streets, are disadvantaged, often geographically isolated, disabled, too old for school and/or belong to ethnic minorities. Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

Our intervention as the leader of the CCOSC consortium for the implementation of the Educate A Child program, enabled us to ensure the reintegration of 58,792 children in the school system in three years. The project's main thrust areas involved the quality of teaching and learning.

136,503 beneficiaries, including 92,098 children, 40,445 parents and adults, and 3,960 teachers Field team: 62 employees; 8 projects; 917 schools 2017 Budget:

€ 2,609,228

teachers' training to enable them to care for children with disabilities; ICT through our access platform to "LEARN" books in the Khmer, Phnong, Kroung and Tampoun languages. // Nutritious school meal program. // Education of street children. // Vocational training, internships in companies, and help with finding a job.

Projects Cambodian Consortium for Out-of-school Children (CCOSC) Targeted educational strategies for community development for disadvantaged groups Rescue and reintegration of street children and abused children Development of a reading environment to improve the quality of education and literacy Innovative ICT for teaching and learning Integrated Community Partnership Program to improve child development and Academic Readiness Education of children with disabilities School training for ethnic minorities

Partners Cambodian Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports; Cambodia Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications; Cambodia Ministry of Social © Naïade Plante

Affairs, Veterans & Youth Rehabilitation; Education Above All Foundation/Educate A Child (EAC);


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24 Vietnam

China

In China, many women too often find themselves isolated, left behind during the waves of rural exodus. In their villages, they care for children and the elderly, and work on farms. Because of their low level of education, they have very few opportunities to improve their lives. Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

In 2017, we focused on the development of ‘life skills’ such as bread-making and social work skills, in order to generate a long-term, local and mutual support system, and the promotion of a network for education development.

1.403 billion inhabitants

Our action

94.57 million inhabitants

Our action

Compulsory education: 6-14 yrs

// Improvement in the living conditions of

23% under the age of 14

// Forming a team of social workers to raise

53,766,856 illiterates, 2/3 of whom are women

vulnerable women in rural areas, through the learning and development of livelihood skills (confectionery, micro-financing, etc.).

Rural population: 43%

// Strengthening the positions of women in

6,542 beneficiaries, including 2,669 children, 3,858 parents, and 15 teachers

Field team: 7 employees; 2 projects; 11 communities; 9 schools 2017 Budget:

€ 212,419

society to make them more autonomous and help them find work opportunities, by learning vocational skills. // Provision of parent-child classes and

kindergarten classes; training of local women in the post of "mothers' guides"; group activities at home and in the neighbourhood – all of this being aimed at improving parental abilities.

Projects Sisters Workshop - 'Homemakers' learning centers for women, Sichuan Province Support and care centers for vulnerable children, Sichuan and Guangxi Zhuang

Partners Chengdu Civil Affairs Bureau; Qionglai Civil Affairs Bureau; People’s Government in Jiaguan, Qionglai;

Despite a reduction in poverty, Vietnam still has a problem of quality education; a significant lack of school equipment and facilities; and limited knowledge amongst parents about the educational and nutritional needs of their children (less than six years of age), particularly in mountainous areas. To address this deficit in 2017, we worked closely with some of ©the communities Copyright Free Vector Maps.com in Tam Duong and Da Bac districts – to raise awareness amongst them, of the importance of early education in the overall development of children, so they can develop skills, especially social and behavioural ones.

Our action

33% under the age of 14

// Development of a shelter center for street

Compulsory education: 6-10 yrs

children to help reintegrating them into society.

39,567 out-of-school children

// Training of social workers to teach

129,254 out-of-school teenagers More than half of the Laotian population lives below the poverty line. Children are deprived of their most basic rights: access to care, to food, to an education... Often in conflict with their parents, they easily leave their homes to live on the streets, where they are exposed to drugs and are badly exploited. In 2017, AEAI continued to reintegrate street Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com children in society, taking account of the specific educational needs of children from ethnic minorities and providing parents with the nutritional and educational knowledge they needed to raise their children.

407,159 illiterates (15-24 years)

4,962

children how to live in a group again, as well as their social and educational obligations.

// Reintegration of these children, where

possible, into their families and into the traditional school system.

// Nutritious school meal program.

beneficiaries, including 3,294 children, 1,574 parents and adults, and 94 teachers Field team: 4 employees; 10 schools 2017 Budget:

€ 145,096

Projects Schooling of street children in Vientiane Environment and inclusive education for ethnic minority children Early childhood care and education

Partners Education Standard and Quality Assurance Center (ESQAC); Embassy of Canada, Vientiane; Friend International ; The HEAD Foundation; Information and Communication Technology Center for Education and Sports (ICTC); Laos Ministry of Education and Sports; National Research Educational Sciences

awareness amongst communities of the importance of holistic child development.

Rural population: 66%

// Involvement and mobilization of minority

High-level of malnutrition: 25% of children below the age of six years (National Institute of Nutrition)

13,314

beneficiaries, including 7,888 children and adolescents, 4,614 parents and adults, and 812 teachers Field team: 6 employees; 53 schools 2017 Budget:

€ 284,362

Partners Committee on Ethnic Minority Affairs (CEMA), National Assembly;

Laos 6.75 million inhabitants

Compulsory education: 5-14 yrs

© Aide et Action International

and non-minority communities for early childhood care and development – ethnic minorities and disadvantaged children (Phu Yen).

// Creation of bilingual school material. // Nutritious school meal program. // Assigning a team working on the project

management and implementation of educational projects at provincial, district and municipal levels.

Projects Inclusive early childhood care and education for ethnic minorities and disadvantaged children Early Childhood Care and Development Education of Ethnic Minority Children, Hoa Binh Province


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26 Europe Region

5 projects

Bénin

France

in France

64.72 million inhabitants 18% are under 14¹

Our action (Citizens’ Mobilisation)

Compulsory education: 6-16 yrs

// Mobilisation of civil society around access

46,000 out-of-school children, adolescents and youth (2015)²

Thanks to our volunteers, who act as local change agents:

to quality education for everyone.

// Awareness building regarding the

environment, citizens’ responsibilities and capacity for action.

In 2017, young people under 25 remain the most exposed to unemployment in the European Union (EU). Despite inroads made in access and quality of education – with an increase in the number of students obtaining university degrees coupled with a decrease in early drop-outs – such improvements are unequal among European States and certain populations remain marginalised. Students from disadvantaged and/or immigrant backgrounds are less likely to attain the level of qualification sufficient to ensure socio-professional insertion. Such a context confirms that our thematic orientations are more necessary than ever to combat “educational poverty” at the root of unemployment and social exclusion. These are:

// Development of a collective consciousness

on the importance of quality education for everyone.

// Valuing and involvement in the financing

of innovative, participatory and efficient education programmes.

// Sensitisation to the topic of global

citizenship.

// Representing Aide et Action France in the

different regions, vis-à-vis the general public and local actors.

Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

// Fundraising to support our various

projects.

// Sustainable development and global

citizenship education // Livelihood education for youth and adults // Access and quality of education in France

for the last four years.

14,300+

beneficiaries (total)

8,500+

youth and adults

© Yves Buliard

5,800+ children 300 volunteers 37 schools

The context also informs the evolution of our strategic orientations: to intervene at a European scale and to work on the topic of migration. Insee 2 UNESCO 1

14,300+ beneficiaries, including 5,800+ children

Field team: 300 volunteers; 35 local teams; 26 departments covered; 37 schools 2017 Budget:

€ 380,133

Projects Local and International Solidarity for Development through Education (SOLIDE) Citizens’ Mobilisation (Mobilisation Citoyenne) Partnership for Educational Effectiveness (P2E) Partnership for Integration and Support of Young People and Adults in Val-d’Oise (PIAJ) iLEAD France

Partners Agence Française de Développement (AFD); Conseil Départemental d’Isère; Maison de l’Éducation du Val d’Oise - Atelier Canopé 95; Ministère de l’Education Nationale; Ville d’Argenteuil; Fondation AG2R; Fondation France Télévisions; Fondation MACIF;


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28

FINANCES

Finances 2017 © Vincent Reynaud-Lacroze

Resources: Sources and distribution in kind Resources stemming from public generosity account for more than half of our total resources, i.e. 12,734 K €, and are up by 1.1% from 2016. Our second source of resources is from public/institutional funding. Amounting to € 7,590,000, these resources constitute almost a third of our total resources – a 3.3% increase.

2017

The most significant growth in current resources may be observed in private sector funding (companies and foundations), thanks to fundraising efforts in South Asia. It is the generosity of all – individuals, institutions, companies and foundations – which has enabled us to fulfil our social mission and to help more than 2.2 million people in 2017. We thank them warmly for it. ///

7,590 K€

12,734 K€

3,176 K€ 31%

52%

2016 Methodological preamble The data presented below consists of unaudited combined financial summaries of the AEAI Network; it has been drawn from the financial statements of our regions, which are themselves subject to local audits (e.g. 2017 regional supplements). Our regional structure includes Aide et Action International and its five entities (Africa, South Asia, South East Asia & China, France and Switzerland). Within our network, considerable emphasis is laid on organisational accountability principles. In this context, we are working on homogenizing accounting rules and methods (in particular income recognition: cash-based approach in South Asia and accruals-based approach in the

Network's operating income A positive result of Euros 853,364 can be seen for 2017 – a 5% increase as compared to 2016. This can be explained by the higher growth in resources as compared to their utilisation, in particular due to a rise in public funding and private sector generosity in South Asia.

rest of the Network), as well as on strengthening project reports, with a view to establishing combined accounts to be audited in 2018. Similarly, we are restructuring our cost accounting in order to ensure better processing homogeneity as well more detailed financial information. The data presented on these pages was therefore manually grouped together for account aggregation requirements. The figures, expressed in different currencies, have been converted into Euros at the average 2017 exchange rates.

The growth in fund utilization is due to the addition of a few projects, specifically in South Asia, and the increase in the number of beneficiaries. The surplus generated in 2017 will be re-injected to support even more people in 2018. ///

7,350 K€

12,591 K€ 54% Generosity of the public

Generosity of public donors

Resource utilization: Operating expenses In 2017, our operating expenses covered 80 educational projects in 19 countries. The majority of our social mission is concentrated in Africa, with 10 countries of intervention. With 4 countries each, South Asia and Southeast Asia total one-fifth of our operating expenditure respectively. France, where we work with disadvantaged population 5% groups, accounts for 5% of the social mission.

19 € : 23,215,6 Ressources - 22,802,502 € ure : - Expendit ear End-of -y balance

€ = 413,117

32%

End-of-year balance =

853,364 €

4%

23,216 K€

11% 3% Other income

Region-wise breakdown of direct project costs and project support: 1%

22%

Resources: 24,439,1 46 € - Expenditure: - 23,5 85,782 €

675 K€

24,439 K€

Finally, Switzerland, with its support for projects in Burkina Faso, Nepal and Vietnam, accounts for 1%. ///

2017

2016

13%

2,600 K€

Generosity of private donors

939 K€

52%

20%


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30

OFFICES

Our network's structure

Our offices in the world

Structural organigram: International Congress Associatif

International Board

International Office

Africa Office

South Asia Office

South East Asia & China Office

France Office

Switzerland Office

Network’s headcount (staff):

President : Aïcha Bah Diallo (from June 2017), Yasmin Abdeen (until June 2017) Treasurer: Gwenaëlle Bouillé (from December 2017), Yves Tapiero (until December 2017) Secretary: Rajiva Wijesinha (from December 2017), Daniel Després (from June to December 2017), Jeannine Agounke (until June 2017) Administrators: Abdeljalil Akkari (until September 2017) Gwenaëlle Bouillé (from June 2017) Djibril Debourou (from December 2017) Daniel Després (from June 2017) Anoma Dissanayaka Jacky Lumarque Radhames Mejia (from June 2017) Teeka Ram Bhattarai (until June 2017) Rukmini Rao Yves Tapiero

International Office

2017 2016 7

7

Africa Office

135

146

South Asia Office

380

448

South East Asia & China Office*

85

78

France Office

37

38

5

5

Switzerland Office TOTAL

Aide et Action France 53 Boulevard de Charonne 75011 Paris – FRANCE Tel : + 33 (0) 1 55 25 70 00 www.france.aide-et-action.org

Aide et Action International Africa Immeuble Grunitzky Akofala - Aflao Gakly Quartier Djidjolé B.P. 2998 Lomé – TOGO Tel : + 221 33 869 19 69 www.afrique.aide-et-action.org

Aide et Action Education Foundation Hong Kong Room 2601, Prosperity Place, 6 Shing Yip Street, Kwun Tong, Kowloon – HONG KONG Tel : + 852 2815-3834 www.aeahk.org.hk

Aide et Action International South Asia 16/20, Gilchrist Avenue Harrington Road, Chetpet Chennai - 600 031 - Tamil Nadu – INDIA Tel : + 91 44 2836 5516 www.aea-southasia.org

Executive

International Board:

Aide et Action International Rue de Lausanne 45A 1201 Genève – SWITZERLAND Tel : + 41 (0) 22 544 29 80 www.aide-et-action.org

Aide et Action International South East Asia and China #322, Street 182, Sangkat Teklaork, Khan Toulkork, Phnom Penh – CAMBODIA Tel : + 855 23 884 510 www.seac.aide-et-action.org

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國際愛達迅年度報告2017|Aide et action International Annual report 2017  

國際愛達迅年度報告2017|Aide et action International Annual report 2017  

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