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alexis WILSON

FOLIO 2007-13 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


alexis WILSON

ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO

UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE, 2014 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA BACHELOR OF DESIGN, 2011 E. ADWILSON130@GMAIL.COM P. (954) 257.3711

2007-2013


EXPERIENCE

SKILLS / PROFICIENCIES

2007-2013

MAY 2013 – AUG 2013 Adrian Smith & Gordon Gill, Chicago, IL Architectural Intern · Produced presentation graphics for clients and design team · Utilized CAD software to develop and compose schematic documents · Performed site analysis, code and easement research · Designed and produced 3D presentation models for clients and design team JUNE 2012 – DEC 2012 Heery International, Orlando, FL Architectural Intern · Produced presentation graphics and renderings for clients and design team · Utilized CAD software to develop and compose construction documents · Design and development of interior floor patterns JAN 2012 – MAR 2012 William McDonough + Partners, Charlottesville, VA Architectural Intern · Produced mock-up renderings and digital models of construction details for commercial / office projects as submitted for design development and analysis. · Produced presentation graphics and renderings for clients and design team · Utilized BIM software to develop and compose shop drawings · Developed and produced digitally fabricated physical models for clients and design team


GRADUATE

1

Causemosis IDP [NCCER: New Headquarters Building]

4

Fractured Movements [MANHATTAN URBAN BLOCK DESIGN]

SELECTED WORKS

2

Meditative Mediation

[CRANBROOK WELLNESS CENTER]

5

Lyrical Luminaire [LIGHTING COMPETITION]

6 Safe Ground Cincinnati

[HOMELESSNESS: Public Interface]

Undergraduate

3

Taklamakan Insertion [HORIZONTAL LANDSCAPES]

7

Give and Take [SUPPORTIVE ENVIRONMENTS]


ARCHITECTURE + EDUCATION


Concept Development Conceptual links between the programmatic elements developed into the physical expression of “joint�. A series of spatial joints becoming inhabitable moments where systems collide to be reconciled to each other.

Three joints. Points of circulation, each housing a sustainable system to teach, promote, and encourage green building.


parti:

JOINT EXPLORATION the Art of

Garden Joint

making


USER AGENDA

SITE SYTEMS

Section Through Water Joint


LIGHT JOINT


PROJECT The Cranbrook Educational Community is a National Historic Landmark in the Detroit suburb of Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. The campus was founded in the early 20th century by newspaper mogul George Gough Booth and is renowned for its architecture in the Arts and Crafts Movement style; The chief architects being Albert Kahn and Eliel Saarinen. The design of the campus speaks to a landscape that is formally rich, boasting an array of eclectic columns and carvings that add to its timeless beauty. Our task, was to create a health and wellness center addition amidst the expansive history that is Cranbrook, complete with therapy pools, guest rooms and a library.


CONCEPT Situated on the eastern edge of Cranbrook’s historic campus, the challenge of this wellness center was to create an introspective place of contemplation and retreat in an otherwise highly public area. Nestling itself at the edge of the bluff, this design capitalizes on the privatized eastern context and serves as a transition between the public plaza to the west and the private home of the late George and Ellen Booth. The organic interior geometry inspires a fluidity that guides visitors instinctively and creates a sequence of private nooks within the space. The core programmatic spaces identifies by paneled wood skin serve to connect with the transcendental idea of breaking free from constraints as the cylindrical tubes penetrate the core and burst through the roof plane.

Section B


ENTRY_ Section Perspective


Section A


fractured MOVEMENTS


LOCATION:

44th Street & 10th Avenue

PROGRAM:

Mixed-Use Complex

This project was completed in teams of two. The task was to redevelop an existing Manhattan city block to house a mixed used complex. Key programmatic requirements included educational, residential and admininstrative components.

STUDIO DESCRIPTION:

_approach

The design was a result of a series of diagrammatic studies, investigating the multiple scales and interactions of movement that characterize New York City. *The digital model and drawings presented in this portfolio are of my contribution

_artery


Elementary School


Longitudinal Section

Cafe

Gym

Theater

Retail

Gallery


RESIDENTIAL TOWER

Phase I: Roof Garden


Plan Diagrams

Cross Section through School


RESIDENTIAL TOWER

Phase II: Communal Garden


The form, specifically, was developed from the to the right depicting a poet from the well-known P4CM’s Lyricist Lounge affront a thoughfully garnished microphone as she delivers her piece. The curvilinear frame of wire and bamboo reinforce the thematic juxtaposition of the crude and the delicate. The burlap fabric suggests the contrast of the


MATERIALS

Lyrical LUMINAIRE

Lyrical LUMINAIRE

The concept for LyricalLUMINAIRE was inspired by the artistically rich ambiance that inhabits the modern day artists lounge. This design seeks to capture the raw elegance that deďŹ nitively dwells within the art of jazz and spoken word.


SAFE GROUND Cincinnati PROJECT

This was a business research studio centered on behavioral design. The purpose was to use the architecture of behavior modification to shape the way that we interact with the built world and those around us. As architects, it is our social responsibility to understand the needs of a space, both immediately and within its larger context, and to create an environment that supports these needs and establishes the goals of the space as paramount. I chose to use this project as an investigation into the use of architecture to combat the NIMBYism associated with social housing projects. By addressing the issues that make us uncomfortable around the homeless, I was able to establish a set of design parameters to begin my research. I decided to design a 36,000 square-foot shelter facility for the homeless in Walnut Hills, Cincinnati. This facility was design to accommodate up to 200 men and women, and also included an outdoor camp site with up to 50 flex spaces for “rough sleepers�. Walnut Hills /Evanston Health Center

Talbert House park avenue

victory park way

east mcMillan street

gil

be rt

av en ue

Life Skills

Kroger

YMCA

Walnut Hills Pedestrian Traffic Bus Stop


i


Flight Instinct Humans try to avoid conflict and uncomfortable situations. Frequently we don’t understand why someone is homeless; we can’t identify with their situation and there is a subconscious shame that we have and they have not. This causes a flight reaction when confronted with and abnormal situation. It takes a lot to re-train our intincts.

Things feel abnormal Something isn’t right... An environment that evokes familiar feelings of safety and comfort eases tensions. Outsiders feel more comfortable and are more likely to FREQUENT the area, or incorporate it into their route.

The environment around most shelters is unfamiliar for outsiders. The street edge often carries a feeling of distress and abandonment. Empty lots, faceless buildings and idle behavior creates an uncomfortable corridor, especially for those without an invitation. Outsiders feel uneasy and typically RE-ROUTE themselves to avoid the area.

LEGEND business patron building edge visual access

FREQUENT

PORCH / BOARDWALK

(proposed model)

(current mod


OCCUPY

___________ACTIVATE EDGE


Flight Instinct

It’s often difficult to see pa the rugged outer-layer of a homeless person, as it’s typically the only quality o display. Shelter activities are rarely in the public ey Their many other qualitite are often hidden from pla view making it difficult for the homeless to be seen anything but...

Unable to identify with a person or their predicament...

Humans try to avoid conflict and uncomfortable situations. Frequently we don’t understand why someone is homeless; we can’t identify with their situation and there is a subconscious shame that we have and they have not. This causes a flight reaction when confronted with and abnormal situation. It takes a lot to re-train our intincts.

If the inner traits of a homeless person are brought to the forefront, it begins to break down their tattered exterior. When people are able to identify and relate to these other traits, it stimulates INTERACTion among them.

Outsiders feel as though they can’t relate to the homeless and tend to DISTANCE themselves from them.

LEGEND undesirable trait HOMELESS

OTHER

desirable trait

HOMELESS

exposed hidden

INTERACT

(proposed model)

PATIO / MARKETPLACE

(current mo


HOMELESS

OTHER

___________SOCIAL INTERACTION


&

give

t ke

...this project explores the ability of [architecture] to create and sustain permanent

supportive By co-locating communities individuals from differing stages of self-sufficiency, we may potentially harness the power of to perpetuate a

peer

system of growth and selfevaluation.

C DU ED BY AN S DE TO AU

ED

AU

UC

OD

K L

NA IO

AT UC

ED

UC OD

T

T

UC OD

PR

UC ED

I AT

AL ON

PR

client

E

SK D TO

OD

peer AN

AU

TO

DE

ED

BY

AN

ED

AU

UC

BY

PR

PR

AN

O PR

D

TO

BY

ED

T

UC

OD

PR

IO

AT

UC

K ES

L NA

...

“Permanent Supportive Housing ...

home less ness

support

shelter

SUPPORTIVE ENVIRONMENTS

for he need t o t e s n to In respo approach d e c n a l a sing a more b tive hou r o p p u s t permanen

v


CHRONICALLY HOMELESS

everyone else

[PROPOSED] model pERMANENT SUPPORTIVE

+

15.8%

of population

*CONSUMES*

58.2% AVAILABLE HOUSING

TRANSITIONAL

41.8% AVAILABLE HOUSING

peer support Peer support is distinct from other forms of social support in that the source of support is a peer, a person who is similar in fundamental ways to the recipient of the support; their relationship is one of equality. A peer is in a position to offer support by virtue of relevant experience: he or she has “been there, done that” and can relate to others who are now in a similar situation.


client to CLIENT As services are optional in permanent supportive housing, it becomes critical to foster and maintain a sense of belonging and connectedness.

interaction

Through the use of shared spaces the architecture of co-housing presents an opportunity for dialogue among other communal relationships.


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

shared space

shared space

shared space

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PSH units

PSH unit

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

[GROUP HOME] Model

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

[SHARED LIVING] Model


gilbert ave looking west

SITE (north)

SITE (south) five points community space


client to COMMUNITY Housing is integrated. Tenants have the opportunity to interact with neighbors who do not have psychiatric disabilities.

integration

a setting that allows for the greatest amount of interaction with people who do not have disabilities helps dispell thoughts that they are incapable or unworthy of participating in community life PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

visual access

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


P O RT F

thank YOU

Portfolio  

Selected works from my educational career.

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