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For all life’s ups and downs. The 2020 Subaru Forester offers adventure-ready features like X-MODE® with Hill Descent Control and Symmetrical Full-Time All-Wheel Drive. Make the most of all life’s rallies at Subaru.ca/Forester.

MODELS BUILT AFTER OCTOBER 2019

EyeSight® is a driver-assist system, which may not operate optimally under all driving conditions. The driver is always responsible for safe and attentive driving. System effectiveness depends on many factors such as vehicle maintenance, and weather and road conditions. See Owner’s Manual for complete details on system operation and limitations. Ratings are awarded by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). Please visit www.iihs.org for testing methods. Forester and Subaru are registered trademarks.


Jodi DeLong

Darcy Rhyno

37

Honeybeans Coffee, Tea & Treats

10

23 5 Festivals and fun events

34 Towns of the Tantramar

Summer and autumn activities for all ages

37 Coffee shop cool

10 Ride the Harvest Moon Trailway

Need a caffeine fix on your travels? Look no further

Explore the Annapolis Valley

40 Genuine souvenirs

Made right here favourites

14 The perfect picnic

Historic Sites offer unique venue

18 Live like a Loyalist

Candlemaking and other timeless talents

23 A giant feast

The sea-to-table lobster adventure

From the stunning salt marshes to unique artisans

46 The Fredericton weekender

The small city with a huge heart

50 Moncton is for families

From spas to science projects

27 Authenticity in Lunenburg

53 For the love of fibre

Festivals, workshops and more celebrate the needle arts

Visit a retired fishing vessel

30 Atlantic Canada's World Heritage Sites Check some of the unique historical sites of our region

55 A walk on the wild side Saint John's natural places

58 Gourmet choices

Savour New Brunswick flavours

Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

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2020 issue

Saltscapes Co-Publishers Jim & Linda Gourlay • gourlays@saltscapes.com Advocate Group Publisher Fred Fiander • ffiander@saltscapes.com Editor-In-Chief Jim Gourlay • jgourlay@saltscapes.com

50

58

Food Editor Alain Bossé • alain@kiltedchef.ca

Janet Wallace

Courtesy of Resurgo

Associate Editor Jodi DeLong • jdelong@saltscapes.com

VP Sales and Marketing Linda Gourlay • lgourlay@saltscapes.com Sales Management Patty Baxter • pbaxter@saltscapes.com Account Executives Susan Giffin • sgiffin@saltscapes.com Pam Hancock • phancock@saltscapes.com Kathy Greene • kgreene@saltscapes.com Stephanie Balcom • sbalcom@saltscapes.com Connie Cogan • ccogan@saltscapes.com Production & Creative Director Shawn Dalton • sdalton@saltscapes.com Production Coordinator Paige Sawler • psawler@metroguide.ca Production and Design Assistant Nicole McNeil • nmcneil@metroguide.ca Senior Designer Graham Whiteman • gwhiteman@saltscapes.com

79

75

60 Market magic

The farmer venues of Fredericton

63 The Fundy tides

An unending fascination

Darcy Rhyno

Designer Roxanna Boers • rboers@saltscapes.com

Saltscapes is published seven times annually by: Metro Guide Publishing, a division of Advocate Printing & Publishing Company Ltd. 2882 Gottingen St., Halifax, NS B3K 3E2 Tel: (902) 464-7258, Sales Toll Free: 1-877-311-5877

78 The stunning west coast of NL

Contents copyright: No portion of this publication may be reprinted without the consent of the publisher. Saltscapes can assume no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or other materials and cannot return same unless accompanied by S.A.S.E.

Corner Brook and beyond

75 The CAT's out of the bag

Publisher cannot warranty claims made in advertisements. Saltscapes is committed to Atlantic Canada’s unique people, their culture, their heritage and their values.

Travel between Maine and Nova Scotia just got quicker

65 Eat here

Don't-miss dining in Saint John

68 The PEI road trip Relax and enjoy

86 Cheers to 80 years

Northumberland Ferries’ “saltwater bridge”

70 The hidden hooch makers

87 Sail the Bay of Fundy

73 Plenty to occupy

88 Cook like a chef

PEI's bona fide booze makers

Three generations enjoy PEI

Take a cruise on the Fundy Rose

Local chefs share some great recipes

75 Big challenges, big rewards

Hike and bike Gros Morne

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CMCA AUDITED


Take a different route to Nova Scotia this summer. Bar Harbor, Maine, to Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, in just 3.5 hours

ferries.ca


Danish décor • Restigouche River • de Adder’s latest • Gardening gifts

Sawler Gardens • Unclutter the cottage • Dairy Isle cheese • Laura Calder

The cabin at Christmas

Piping plovers Their struggle continues

Bittersweet memories

p.24

Foraging for dinner

p.49

p.63

Retrieving history

Life on the LaHave

The ferryman’s wife

lus:guide to Good Taste PYour

Great dogs of Atlantic Canada

p.66

p.42

lus:annual amateur photo POur contest winners p. p.30

Gracious Living on the East Coast

‘Man overboard!’

od Go ste Ta

The unacceptable death toll among deck hands p.52

lus:guide to Good Taste PYour

NEWFOUNDLAND HOSPITALITY The wartime shipwreck that changed a community p.15

Gracious living on the East Coast

Heritage mittens

Acadian food in Shediac • Sable Island’s past • A veteran pilot’s life in the air

Setting Day in PEI Some things don’t change—thank goodness

p.38

p.38

Fear of Flying

MADE RIGHT HERE Juniper BBQ Scrapers

Will our new passenger

rights actually protect you? p.48

Kingross Quilts MacIsaac Kilts

Goin’ back down the road

DeltaCrete

p.45

On young people returning to their roots p.26

Plus

lus the status PPreserving

Our 2018 Comfort Food Recipe Contest Winners p.55

GoodTaste Gin cock

: side to e In e Se guid ur Yo

p.72

Keeping warm with Newfoundland patterns

Boar •

p.32

A 12 year-old charity fundraising superstar

Sailmaker • Hayes Farm • Bright winter décor • Mark Arendz • Old, bold pilots

Tide and

Helping ‘the clown of the sea’

A bird’s eye view of our waterways p.38

Nature’s bounty for the picking

Felted whimsy

Puffin rescue

The road kill casualty list p.44

p.36

Bella McBride’s unique creations

Indoor gardening • Ham radio nuts • Repurposed churches • Painted turtles

Haunted houses • Library love • Vintage yard decor • Wild mink • White Point

tails • Eatin

g for hear

Modernising a Victorian era home

p.73

t health

Spring/Sum

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G R A C I O U S

Road snackstrip

L I V I N G

O N

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Marc D'Entremont

Participants enjoying the Gran Fondo in Baie Sainte-Marie, Nova Scotia.

Festivals & other fun events Editorial note: Because of the ongoing situation around COVID-19, please check venues in advance to make sure they are still hosting their festival or event.

NOVA SCOTIA June 6-7 Cold Waters Seafood Festival Lake Charlotte 877-287-0697 coldwatersfestival.ca June 26-28 Privateer Days Liverpool 902-354-4500 privateerdays.ca June 27-July 4 Royal Nova Scotia International Tattoo Halifax 800-563-1114 nstattoo.ca July 2-5 Halifax Lebanese Festival Halifax 902-422-5056 lebanesefestival.ca July 5-12 Antigonish Highland Games Antigonish 902-863-4275 antigonishhighlandgames.ca

July 7-12 Halifax Jazz Festival Halifax 902-229-5472 halifaxjazzfestival.ca

July 24-25 Harmony Bazaar Festival of Women and Song Lockeport harmonybazaar.com

August 7-8 Halifax Seaport Cider and Beerfest Halifax 877-451-1221 seaportbeerfest.com

July 10-12 Pictou Lobster Carnival Pictou 902-485-5150 pictoulobstercarnival.ca

July 25-August 1 and August 15 Festival Acadien de Clare Church Point 902-769-0832 festivalacadiendeclare.ca

August 17-22 Annapolis Valley Exhibition Lawrencetown 902-584-3339 annapolisvalleyexhibition.com

July 11-19 Paint Peggy’s Cove Area Festival of the Arts Peggy’s Cove 902-823-2530 peggyscoveareafestivalofthearts.com

July 29-August 3 Halifax Busker Festival Halifax 902-429-7205 buskers.ca

August 28-29 Nova Scotia Summer Fest Antigonish 902-835-3661 novascotiasummerfest.ca

July 31-August 1 Louisbourg Crab Fest Louisbourg 902-733-2351 thecrabfest.ca

September 2-6 Wharf Rat Rally Digby 902-245-5924 wharfratrally.com

July 16-26 Halifax Pride Festival Halifax halifaxpride.com

July 31-August 2 25th Riverfront Jubilee New Glasgow 902-752-4800 newglasgowjubilee.ca

September 17-24 Atlantic International Film Festival Halifax 902-322-1530 finfestival.ca

July 17-19 Shelburne Founders Days Shelburne 902-875-2991 ext. 7 shelburnefoundersdays.com

August 6-9 Lunenburg Folk Harbour Festival Lunenburg 902-634-3180 folkharbour.com

September 19-20 Whirligig and Weathervane Festival Shelburne 902-656-2547 whirligigfestival.com

July 23-27 Stan Rogers Festival Canso 902-366-2399 stanfest.com

August 6-12 Digby Scallop Days Digby 902-247-5530 digbyscallopdays.ca

September 20 Gran Fondo Baie Sainte-Marie Saulnierville 902-769-2031 granfondobaiesaintemarie.ca/en

July 16-19 Acoustic Maritime Music Festival Kempt Shore 902-633-2229 kemptshorefestivals.com

Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

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PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

September 24-27 Canadian Deep Roots Music Festival Wolfville 902-542-7668 deeprootsmusic.ca

June-September Indian River Festival Indian River 866-856-3733 indianriverfestival.com

October 9-17 Celtic Colours International Festival Cape Breton 888-355-7744 celtic-colours.com

June 1-August 31 King’s Playhouse Summer Festival Georgetown 888-346-5666 kingsplayhouse.com

October 15-17 Nocturne: Art of the night Halifax nocturnehalifax.ca October 20-25 Devour! The Food Film Fest Wolfville devourfest.com October 21-24 Halifax Pop Explosion Music Festival Halifax 902-719-7679 halifaxpopexplosion.com November 20-22, 28 Sherbrooke Village Old Fashioned Christmas Sherbrooke 888-743-7845 sherbrookevillage.novascotia.ca

June 25-September 20 Victoria Playhouse Festival Victoria 800-925-2025 victoriaplayhouse.com

July 8-August 4 Highland Storm Summerside 877-224-7473 collegeofpiping.com

June 26-July 1 Tignish Irish Moss Festival Tignish 902-882-2414 facebook.com/pg/ TignishIrishMossFestival

July 9-11 Summerside Lobster Carnival Summerside 902-786-7813 summersidelobstercarnival.website

June 1-September 30 Stompin’ Tom Festival Series Skinners Pond 902-882-3214 stompintomfest.com

June 3-September 26 Anne of Green Gables – The Musical Charlottetown 800-565-0278 confederationcentre.com

June 3-September 26 Charlottetown Festival Charlottetown 800-565-0278 confederationcentre.com/whats-on

July-August Highland Storm Summerside 877-224-7473 collegeofpiping.com

June 7-21 Festival of Small Halls Province-wide 877-478-2308 smallhalls.com

July 1-September 30 Harbourfront Theatre Festival Summerside 800-708-6505 harbourfronttheatre.com

June 24-August 29 Watermark Theatre Summer Festival North Rustico 902-963-3963 watermarktheatre.com

July 3-5 35th PEI Bluegrass & Old Time Music Festival Dundas 902-566-2641 peibluegrass.tripod.com

July 9-12 Evangeline Bluegrass & Traditional Music Festival Abram Village 902-854-2324 evangelinebluegrassfestival.ca July 10-12 Cavendish Beach Music Festival Cavendish cavendishbeachmusic.com July 15-19 Potato Blossom Festival O’Leary 902-726-3300 peipotatoblossomfestival.com July 17-19 Rollo Bay Fiddle Festival Rollo Bay bigfieldtraditions@gmail.com rollobayfiddlefest.ca July 25-26 Mermaid Tears of Glass Festival Souris 902-687-2157, ext 0 peiseaglassfestival.com July 26-August 2 PEI Pride Week Charlottetown facebook.com/PridePEI

NOVA SCOTIA ‘SPIRITS’ GETAWAY from $398/couple*

Let the ‘spirits’ move you… in Guysborough Take the road less travelled to Guysborough, and discover a uniquely Nova Scotian coastal experience. Settle in to the DesBarres Manor Inn, then wander over to our Distillery & Brewery for a Tasting Tour – where the best stories usually begin. Let the day unfold naturally – strolling through our oceanside vineyard, or over seafood so fresh it’ll make you blush. We’re just 3 hours from Halifax enroute to Canso. 6

July 29-August 2 Tyne Valley Oyster Festival Tyne Valley 902-439-0779 tvoysterfest.ca July 29-August 2 Island Fringe Festival Charlottetown islandfringe@gmail.com islandfringe.com August 1 Rock the Boat Music Festival Port Hill 902-439-0779 tvoysterfest.ca/rtb-home.html August 14-16 Cloggeroo Folk Festival Georgetown info@cloggeroo.com cloggeroo.com

authenticseacoast.com *Includes 1 night, 5-course Dinner & Breakfast, Spirit Tasting. Plus tax & grat.

Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

August 14-22 Old Home Week Charlottetown 902-629-6623 oldhomeweekpei.com


August 15-16 Abegweit Pow Wow Panmure Island 877-591-3003 ncpei.com August 28-30 Gran Fondo PEI Charlottetown 902-394-1131 granfondo-pei.ca August 28-30 Dundas Plowing Match Dundas 902-583-2723 dundasplowingmatch.com September 2-6 L’Exposition Agricole et le Festival Acadien Abram Village 902-854-3517 expositionfestival.ca September 4-October 4 Fall Flavours Province-wide 866-960-9912 fallflavours.ca September 17-20 PEI Shellfish Festival Island-wide 866-955-2003 peishellfish.com September 19-20 70 Mile Coastal Yard Sale Wood Islands 902-962-3761 woodislands.ca/70-mile-coastalyard-sale October 16-18 Prince Edward Island Marathon Charlottetown 902-316-2299 peimarathon.ca

NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR May-September 25th Gros Morne Theatre Festival Cow Head 877-243-2899 theatrenewfoundland.com June 24-August 31 Perchance Theatre Cupids 709-771-2930 perchancetheatre.com June 25-28 Ochre Fest Ochre Pit Cove 709-685-3307 ochrefest.ca July 3-5 Miawpukek Annual Pow Wow Conne River 866-882-2470 mfngov.ca

Vitamin T: Travel Improves Quality of Life Exotic travel encompasses journeys outside of the Western world and North America. It allows seniors to be active and to enjoy connected living, and provides some impressive benefits spiritually, psychologically, socially, and physically. Craig Travel is a Canadian, family-owned travel company that provides first-class escorted travel adventures (both tours and cruises) to some of the world’s most exciting destinations. With 50 years of expertise and an emphasis on offering the highest quality experience at the best value, the company is a great option for those looking for guided journeys to exotic locations.

Transformative experiences

Why travel to an exotic destination? Experiencing new cultures and ways of life is an enriching way to expand your mind. It can spark the imagination and nourish the soul, providing spiritual and psychological health benefits. Consider a guided tour of Oberammergau, the German town that’s famous for its nearly 400-year tradition of performing Passion Plays, which reenact the passion of Christ from His entry into Jerusalem to the Resurrection. This exceptional cultural and religious event happens only once every 10 years — including in 2020. Exotic travel brings people together as they connect and bond over shared experiences. Craig Travel’s journeys are made up of like-minded Canadian travellers, so people can build relationships with ease and expand their social networks. Guided vacations are also a fun and exciting way to stay active, whether it’s exploring the ruins at Machu Picchu in Peru, riding a camel in Morocco, or going on a safari in East Africa. Travel is a critical component of healthy aging as it keeps your mind, body, and social connections engaged. Experience a new exotic destination of your dreams in 2020 with Craig Travel.

Consider the Benefits of Exotic Travel: Spiritual and psychological health • Travel is good for the soul. Exploring other countries can improve your mood, reduce stress, and challenge your mind. Social connection • With all the heavy lifting done for you through guided vacations, you have more time to engage with like-minded Canadian travellers as well as locals. Physical health • Of course it’s up to you how active you want to be, but travel is an opportunity to take those extra steps, go the extra mile, and push your limits.

www.craigtravel.com/ss

1-800-387-8890 • journeys@craigtravel.com 1092 Mt. Pleasant Road, Toronto, ON M4P 2M6 Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

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Newfoundland and Labrador Tourism

Musical Performance at Roots, Rants & Roars, Elliston, Newfoundland and Labrador.

July 10-12 Newfoundland and Labrador Folk Festival St. John’s 866-576-8508 nlfolk.com July 10-August 9 Stephenville Theatre Festival Stephenville 709-643-4982 stephenvilletheatrefestival.com July 17-18 50 Centuries Heritage Festival Bird Cove 887-247-2011 50centuries.ca July 17-19 Deer Lake Strawberry Festival Deer Lake 709-635-2451 deerlake.ca/deer-lake-strawberryfestival

July 27-August 2 Triton Caplin Cod Festival Triton 709-263-2264 townoftriton.ca July 31-August 2 Smallwood Days Gambo 709-674-4476 townofgambo.com August 7-9 Downtown Busker Festival St. John’s 709-726-8244 downtownstjohns.com

July 22-August 3 Bay Roberts Klondyke Days Bay Roberts 709-786-2126 bayroberts.com

August 7-9 Brigus Blueberry Festival Brigus 709-528-4588 brigus.net

July 24-August 21 Gander Youth Arts Festival Gander 709-256-7529 beyondtheoverpass.ca

August 7-9 Muddy Hole Scuff ‘n Scoff Musgrave Harbour 709-655-2119 facebook.com/events/musgraveharbour/muddy-hole-scuff-and-scofffestival/1089477907917778

July 24-26 Codroy Valley Folk Festival Upper Ferry facebook.com/ groups/247320768628689 July 25-26 Shamrock Festival Ferryland 888-332-2052 ssfac.com

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July 25-August 1 Wicked on Da Wharf Summer Festival Grand Bank 709-832-1596 facebook.com/ groups/428999443847594

August 10-23 Tuckamore Festival St. John’s 709-330-4599 tuckamorefestival.ca August 14-16 Brimstone Head Folk Festival Fogo 709-266-2540 brimstoneheadfestival.com

Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

August 15-16 Great Labrador Canoe Race Happy Valley-Goose Bay 709-896-1076 labradorcanoerace.com

July 8-12 Shediac Lobster Festival Shediac 506-532-1122 shediaclobsterfestival.ca

September 18-19 Roots, Rants and Roars Festival Elliston 709-468-7080 rootsrantsandroars.ca

July 8-12 Festival Western de Saint-Quentin Saint-Quentin 877-898-9342 festivalwesternnb.com

August 18-23 Writers at Woody Point Woody Point 306-308-0036 writersatwoodypoint.com

July 13 National French Fry Day Festival Florenceville-Bristol 506-392-6013 florencevillebristol.ca

September 24-27 Gros Morne Fall Fest Cow Head 709-243-2023 grosmornefallfest.com

July 15-19 Buskers on the Bay Festival Saint John 506-658-3600 marketsquaresj.com

October 9-11 Fogo Island Partridgeberry Harvest Festival Joe Batt’s Arm 709-658-7256 fogoislandpartridgeberryfestival.com

July 16-19 Miramichi Irish Festival Miramichi 506-778-8810 canadasirishfest.com

November 25-January 6 Bay Roberts Festival of Lights Bay Roberts 709-786-2126 bayroberts.com November 28-December 12 Mummers Festival St. John’s 709-728-6824 mummersfestival.ca

NEW BRUNSWICK June 19-21 St. Mary’s (Sitansisk) First Nations Powwow Fredericton 506-458-9511 stmarysfirstnation.com June 30-July 5 Campbellton Salmon Festival Campbellton 506-789-2700 salmon-festival.com July 1-5 Grand Falls Regional Potato Festival Grand Falls 506-475-7760 facebook.com/gfpotatofestival July 2-5 Miramichi Rock ‘n’ Roll Festival Miramichi 866-765-6765 facebook.com/ MiramichiRockNRollFestival

July 17-18 Mosaïq Multicultural Festival Moncton 506-858-9659 mosaiqmoncton.ca July 17-19 Tay Creek Folk Festival Tay Creek 506-367-3133 taycreekfestival.ca July 20-25 Festival Inspire Moncton 506-878-9723 festivalinspire.com July 23-25 Lamèque International Baroque Music Festival Lamèque 506-344-3261 festivalbaroque.com July 24-26 New Brunswick Highland Games Fredericton 888-368-4444 highlandgames.ca August 2-7 Miramichi Folksong Festival Miramichi 506-622-1780 miramichifolksongfestival.com August 5-15 Festival acadien de Caraquet Caraquet 506-727-2787 festivalacadien.ca


August 7-9 Life at the Lakes Festival Cambridge-Narrows 506-488-3971 lifeatthelakesfestival.ca

September 18-20 Campbellton Harvest Festival Campbellton 506-789-2708 campbellton.org

August 17-22 Fundy Fringe Festival Saint John 506-653-7582 fundyfringefestival.com

September 19-20 Charlotte County Fall Fair St. Stephen 506-467-9905 ganongnaturepark.com

August 21-23 Miramichi Scottish Festival Miramichi 506-622-0357 highlandsociety.com/scottish-festival

October 14-18 Indulge Food and Wine Festival Saint Andrews indulgenb.com

September 11-13 Atlantic Balloon Fiesta Sussex 506-432-9444 atlanticballoonfiesta.ca

October 17 Howl-O-Scream Festival Florenceville-Bristol 506-392-6013 florencevillebristol.ca

September 15-20 Harvest Jazz and Blues Festival Fredericton 506-454-2583 harvestjazzandblues.com

November 6-7 World Wine & Food Expo Moncton 506-531-5102 wineexpo.ca

September 18-20 Campbellton Bluegrass Festival Campbellton 506-789-2708 campbellton.org

MAINE

July 29-August 2 Maine Lobster Festival Rockland 800-576-7512 mainelobsterfestival.com

All Year Maine Bicentennial State Wide maine200.org June 21-29 Windjammer Days Boothbay Harbor 207-633-2353 boothbayharborwindjammerdays.org July 2-3 Great Schooner Race Penobscot Bay 800-807-9463 greatschoonerrace.com July 11-12 North Atlantic Blues Festival Rockland 207-596-6055 northatlanticbluesfestival.com July 18 Cape Elizabeth Garden Tour Portland 207-772-6828 portlandmaine.com/events July 24-26 Eliot Antique Tractor and Engine Show Eliot 207-748-3303 raittfarmmuseum.org

August 13-22 Skowhegan State Fair Skowhegan 207-474-2947 skowheganstatefair.com August 14-16 Machias Wild Blueberry Festival Machias 207-255-6665 machiasblueberry.com September 4-7 Boothbay Harbor Fest Boothbay 207-671-7676 boothbayharborfest.com September 10-13 International Seaplane Fly-In Greenville 207-695-6121 seaplanefly-in.org Note: Dates and other event details are subject to change; it’s advisable to call ahead or check website.

ATLANTIC CANADA

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Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

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Riding the Harvest Moon trail The passing of the trains left the Annapolis Valley with great trails to enjoy on foot or bicycle

Story and photography by Jodi DeLong

J

Top: Enjoy cycling on the Harvest Moon Trailway, through towns and agricultural communities. Above: The Trailway runs from Grand-Pré and the National Historic Site.

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Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

ust a few short years ago, I succumbed to the urge to have a bicycle again, in no small part because of the opening of another section of a trail through Nova Scotia’s Annapolis Valley. Now officially named the Harvest Moon Trailway, it’s a 117-km long route from Grand-Pré to Annapolis Royal, following the route that was formerly the train tracks through the Valley’s heartland. The trail is open to bikers, walkers and joggers, equestrians, and, in some spots, motorized recreational vehicles such as snowmobiles and all terrain vehicles. (Not all sections welcome motorized vehicles. Check locally to make sure.) Depending on your locale, you can do the entire trail from one end to the other, or you can break it up into chunks and enter at various trailheads along the route. Living as I do in Wolfville, I routinely take advantage of the trailway, and sometimes go off the beaten path to other locations, again without having to deal with vehicular traffic. While I have yet to complete the whole trail, I have my favourite sections that I do regularly, and have gone as far as Aylesford. Most of the Harvest Moon Trailway is easy, over level terrain, with only a few minor hilly spots. It’s also well-groomed for the most part, with hard-packed and gravelled surfaces, and in at least one community, paving. Depending on your plans for adventure, there are numerous attractions along the trailway, which may prompt you to go exploring. Starting in Grand-Pré, the UNESCO World Heritage Site, you can take in the history of the Acadians at the national historic site, visit the French cross that marks the departure point of the Acadians during the Expulsion, and cycle across the dykes to Evangeline Beach. A visit to Domain de Grand-Pré Winery is a must for those with a fondness for the grape, and you can also drop into Tangled Garden Preserves for treats and a visit to the gardens there. Next on the trail list is Wolfville, where you’ll find numerous places to enjoy local foods and beverages. Be sure to check out Lightfoot and Wolfville Winery, Annapolis Cider Company, The Church Brewing Company and restaurant, terrific Mediterranean and Turkish food at


Left: Info panels about the Landscape of Grand-Pré; above: there is plenty to do and see (and places to park your bike) in the thriving town of Wolfville.

Troy, a wide array of authentic Korean dishes at Danji, and many other great food options. A quick and hilly cycle up University Avenue will take nature lovers to the Harriet Irving Botanical Gardens, a must-visit at any time of the year. The stretch of road between Wolfville and Greenwich is home to no fewer than five farm markets, including the famous Hennigar’s (get your ice cream there), Stirling’s, and Noggins Corner Farm. Here you can check out a huge variety of local, fresh foods—meats, cheeses, breads, produce and beverages from cider to kombucha—perfect spots to load up your knapsack for a picnic or two along your way. Back on the trailway, continue your adventure behind New Minas and into Kentville, where there are an equal number of great attractions and side excursions. You may want to skip over to the Miners Marsh, a wonderful nature preserve which is home to a wide assortment of migratory and native waterfowl and songbirds or check out any number of other biking/hiking trails around the so-called Shire town of the Valley. Next you’ll travel through the agricultural and residential areas of Coldbrook, Cambridge and Waterville before reaching the Apple Capital of the region, Berwick. This town invites pausing to explore, with delightful places for coffee or a full meal, Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

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Brier Island Lodge and Restaurant

Best Whale Watching

www.brierisland.com 1-800-662-8355 Follow us on Facebook www.facebook.com/BrierIslandLodge

Brier Island Whale and Seabird Cruises

Brier Island’s Original and #1 Chosen Whale Watch. Dedicated to Research & Education Since 1986! Join us for an experience you will never forget!

1-800-656-3660 www.brierislandwhalewatch.com PO Box 1199 223 Water St., Westport, Brier Island, Nova Scotia B0V 1H0

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Top: Blomidon from the trail. Left: Annapolis Royal famers' market. Above: Annapolis Royal Historic Gardens.

including North Mountain Coffee Company, Union Street Café, Kellocks restaurant and the Apple Capital Museum. If you’re ambitious (and in better shape than I am), head over the North Mountain to Harbourville and the Bay of Fundy. At Aylesford, you can visit Oaklawn Farm Zoo, a fascinating and family-run facility that is known for having the largest display of big cats (lions, tigers, etc) and primates in our region. Aylesford is an agricultural community, with several cranberry operations, Holmestead Cheese on South Mountain where they make feta and offer many other cheeses and related products, and of course, more fruit farms and farm markets along the way. The sprawling communities of Kingston and Greenwood are known for 14 Wing Greenwood RCAF base, where you’ll discover the Greenwood Military Aviation Museum, a fascinating look back at the history of our flying forces. A large static display of planes outside the museum is always open to visitors. Check out Marie et Guy House Bread in Kingston, a bona fide French bakery, if you’re feeling peckish, or any number of other café and restaurant options along the way. Middleton is known as the Heart of

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the Valley and has a festival by that name every summer. An easy-going community with fascinating shops, it also boasts the Macdonald Museum, located in a former schoolhouse and home to a terrific clock and watch collection along with other exhibits and a research library. Back on the trail, your route will take you through scenic farmland and the communities of Lawrencetown, Paradise, Bridgetown and Granville Centre before you reach Annapolis Royal. Here you’ll find everything from a booming farmers market on Wednesdays and Saturdays, the local Still Fired Distillery, Fort Anne National Historic Site, and the Annapolis Royal Historic Gardens, among other delights. There is a bounty of accommodations and dining options in the town, and from there you can make further day trips off the Harvest Moon Trailway to Bear River, Delaps Cove, Port Royal, and other hidden gems around the region. The Harvest Moon Trailway is part of the larger, provincial Blue Route that criss-crosses Nova Scotia, offering hundreds of kilometres of safer cycling for visitors and residents of the province (and beyond.) Pack a lunch and your bike and get out and explore!


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The perfect picnic— as easy as 1, 2, 3! Timeless yet modern, they beckon visitors to explore Story and photography by Sandra Phinney

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ast year, my husband’s birthday coincided with Thanksgiving. I wanted to do something special, but didn’t want to cook. Knowing there would be a legendary community Thanksgiving dinner in a place called Forties (8 km from New Ross), I lined up a stay on the outskirts of Bridgewater. Then a second brilliant idea floated into view. Instead of taking the 103 from our home in Canaan, we’d go via the 101, stop in Annapolis Royal, then cut cross-country to the south shore. Why, you might ask? So we could take in The Perfect Picnic and visit two Parks Canada historic sites—Fort Anne and Port Royal. The concept for The Perfect Picnic was piloted in Cape Breton Highlands National Park in the summer of 2015. It was so successful, it was rolled out nation-wide. In a nutshell: Parks Canada partners with restaurants in their respective regions, who, in turn provide tasty pick-up-and-go meals in branded picnic totes identified by that telltale Parks Canada beaver. First stop: the German Bakery—Sachen Café & Restaurant, across the street from Fort Anne in Annapolis Royal. I chose bratwurst in a kaiser roll with sauerkraut (the best bratwurst I’ve ever eaten); Barrie had a schnitzel sandwich to which he gave thumbs up. Danish turnovers topped everything rather nicely, chased by a large thermos of coffee. After eating lunch next to a cannon, we ventured inside the museum, formerly the 1797 officers quarters. One of several striking displays is a four-panel tapestry (8x18 ft.) chronicling over 400 years of history in the area. This needle point masterpiece was designed by Kyoko GrenierSago; over 100 volunteers hand-stitched some 3 million points. When Queen Elizabeth visited Halifax in 1994, she added a few stitches to one of the panels, saying that it was the hardest thing she had to do that day. Another marvel of Fort Anne is the Vauban style of fortification. Instead of wooden walls, the star-shaped fort is made of giant mounds of earth, designed not to have any blind spots. The fort was the capital of the province, long before Halifax; it was attacked 13 times and changed hands seven times. Strolling around the property, we passed through the oldest cemetery in Nova Scotia (perhaps Canada). It gave me goosebumps to see a gravestone with the inscription “Here lyes y body of Bathiah Duglass wife to Samuel Duglass who departed this life Octo the 1st 1720 in the 37 year of her age.” The stone carver had inserted and “o” above the DU in their sir names to read Douglass. Not easy to correct mistakes on stone. I wished I had flowers to leave for Bathiah. Later, we drove around to the other side of the harbour to visit Port

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Left, top to bottom: Barrie MacGregor takes a break after strolling around Fort Anne in Annapolis Royal; the striking tapestry on display inside Fort Anne; dining hall at Port Royal. Above: A picnic on the grounds at Fort Anne.

Royal. Also referred as the Habitation, this is where Samuel de Champlain and the boys established the Order of Good Cheer to stave off the winter blues. Barrie was tickled to find a shaving horse called the “shingle bench” in the centre of the compound and had no trouble using it, as it’s similar to one he made at home a few years ago. Another highlight was meeting park interpreter, Joel Doucet who was using a foot-powered spring pole to make a spindle. In the olden days, artisans had to ply their trades for three hours a day, after which they could hunt, fish, and tend to their gardens. In the early 1990s, Joel researched this lathe (known to be used by the Egyptians in 300 BC) and built a miniature prototype which was approved by a Parks Canada historian. Eventually, he and a colleague built a full-sized lathe like the one he was using. Alas, our time ran out; we scooted up to Middleton then down Rt. 10 to the South Shore before dark. En route I

recalled learning about The Perfect Picnic while planning a day trip to Kejimkujik Seaside two years ago. For once, a government agency didn’t complicate things. In fact, Parks Canada sites say it’s as easy as 1, 2, 3, and, true to their word, it’s simple to find their food partners, menus, and phone numbers. After fetching our picnic boxes at Finest Kind Food in Shelburne, we moseyed on to Keji Seaside. We chose the Harbour Rocks Trail, an easy 6 km stroll (return), and saw scads of gorgeous wildflowers, and bushes including mountain holly, wild raisin and huckleberry. Everything had a 3-D quality. Even scrubby spruce trees had a majestic presence. We spread our picnic over low wide boulders bordering a sandy beach and enjoyed a scrumptious lunch which included fresh bread, cheese, smoked fish, sausage, spicy peanuts, fresh coleslaw, fat peanut butter balls, and real lemonade. After lunch we focused our attention on finding Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

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Clockwise from left: scrumptious lunch at Keji Seaside; impressive cannon drill in the parade square at the Halifax Citadel; lunch from the coffee bar in the Cavalier Building in the Citadel; Sandra and Barrie en route to the shore where they'll enjoy another Perfect Picnic.

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Parks Canada’s iconic red chairs. As if on cue, as soon as we sat down, fog rolled in. Although we could barely detect grey blobs (seals) slipping off of grey rocks into grey water melding into the grey sky, it felt surrealistic. I expected Selkies to appear. My most recent picnic experience was solo. As I had a meeting in the city, I decided to tack on a couple of hours to visit the Halifax Citadel and made a beeline for the Coffee Bar in the Cavalier Building. Turns out there actually was a coffee shop here back in the day, to entice the men to linger in the adjacent library in hopes of improving their literacy. Armed with my lunch (which included the biggest date square I’ve ever seen), I headed up the stairs behind the building to the Northwest Demi-bastion, where I picnicked on the fortress rampart. Afterwards, I briefly contemplated having a nap on the grassy hillside, but knew I’d better hustle if I wanted to see members of the 3rd Brigade Royal Artillery demonstrate how to load and fire a small cannon. It was impressive. As I meandered around to different point of interest, I was especially pleased to see that exhibits are not cordoned off. You can actually

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feel and touch things—even lie down on a bed in the barracks. The high point of the visit for me was strolling into the “Storm the Beach D-Day Exhibit.� I felt as if I was actually on the beach at Normandy and involved in the story. It was moving, heart wrenching, and inspiring—all at the same time. Kevin Robins (the curator of The Army Museum on the second floor of the Cavalier Building) was on duty. What a fount of information! Sad to say I didn’t have time to visit the museum, but it’s now top of my list when I return, and Barrie is keen to join me. Also on our “to-do� list, is a trip to Cape Breton Highland National Park where The Perfect Picnic originated. We’ll have lunch at the spectacular Mary Ann Falls. Why, with the 10 perfect picnic places Parks Canada recommends throughout the park, we could picnic our way mornin’, noon and night around the island. Four days should do it. Let’s face it, it’s not everyday that our dining room is an ancient forest, a stunning beach, or an amazing historic site. And you don’t even need to wait until you are on vacation. Check out Parks Canada for The Perfect Picnic near you. www.pc.gc.ca


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Live like an 18th Century Loyalist Making candles and other timeless talents Story and photography by Darcy Rhyno

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s a cicada buzzes in the summer heat, I’m making a candle in the shade beside a young Loyalist-for-a-day. She dips a wick into hot beeswax, then plunges it into cold water to help set the wax. Out it comes again and back into the liquid wax, each time building another layer. It’s important to allow the candle to cool in the water, especially on hot summer days like this, so sometimes kids are asked to take a lap around the table before removing the candle from the water and immersing it into the hot wax again. In no time, the kid’s candle grows to a usable size. Her candle is smooth and uniform compared to my lumpy one shaped more like a pear than a candlestick. “I could do this all day,” says the girl dressed in period Loyalist clothing–a white bonnet, shawl and apron over an ochre coloured, full length dress–living life as if it were the 1780’s when thousands of those who wished to remain loyal to the British crown migrated from the newly independent United States to Shelburne and other parts of what would become Canada. “I know. It’s so zen, isn’t it,” says Greta Mossman, Senior Interpreter at the Ross-Thomson House and Store Museum. The hands-on candle making experience is part of the 18th Century Afternoon that includes, from time to time, activities like butter churning, soap making and construction of a traditional toy called a Jacob’s ladder. “We never have nothing going on,” Mossman says of the museum’s many activities. As we work, she tells us stories, building layers of history as if she’s dipping a candle.

Candles, switchel and yarn Top: Making a candle. It is important to let it cool in the water. Above: Greta Mossman, Senior Interpreter at the Ross-Thomson House and Store Museum.

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“These were time consuming,” Mossman says of the candles we're making. “In the 18th century, your wealth was determined by the


Top: Afternoon 18th century music jam at Ross-Thomson House and Store Museum. Above: Raw wool ready for spinning with spindles.

quality of your fabric and the quantity of your candles. Because they were disposable, if you were burning high quality candles, you were wealthy enough to burn your money, so to speak.” Instantly, I have a new appreciation for my lumpy work because of the time, labour and scarce family resources that must have gone into creating a light source for the household. Mossman continues her interpretative comments with a story from the life of George Washington. “To prove how wonderful the new country of the United States was after the Revolutionary War, all day his entire place would be festooned with the most gorgeous beeswax candles. But at night, as soon as the last visitor left, they’d take the candles

7 Nearby Attractions 1. Black Loyalist Heritage Centre to learn about Black Loyalist history. 2. The Barrel Factory where wooden barrels are still made the traditional way. 3. The Osprey Arts Centre for local music and other performances. 4. Guild Hall for Saturday morning markets and special events. 5. Charlotte Lane Café for dining just steps from the Ross-Thomson House, a former winner of Nova Scotia’s Best Small Restaurant of the Year award. 6. Boxing Rock Taproom to sample Shelburne’s own craft beer. 7. Sandy Point Lighthouse, at the mouth of the harbour, visible from the historic waterfront.

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VISIT THE AWARD WINNING

Yarmouth County

Museum

& Archives ExplorE Yarmouth’s rich historY ...through photographs, documents and artifacts. 22 Collins St., Yarmouth • 902.742.5539

www.yarmouthcountymuseum.ca 20

Above: Visitors helping build a dory at the J.C. Williams Dory Shop Museum. Top right: Volunteer Mike Hartigan at the Muir-Cox Shipyard Saw and Planing Mill 2. Far right: J.C. Williams Dory Shop Museum. Right: Switchel recipe.

shaded garden. While Rod awaits the arrival of other musicians, he joins our hands-on activities. “Washington also used it for his troops,” Rod says. He tells us how he mixes up his own switchel at home as his drink of choice when he’s training for marathons. “If you added rum, it was grog.” “The ingredients were readily available and inexpensive at that time,” Greta says. These include brown sugar, molasses, cider vinegar and ground ginger. Cider vinegar is a replacement for the lime juice added to the original grog, a mix that helped prevent scurvy aboard British Navy ships. Visitors can participate in the preparation of other historical drinks as well to literally get a taste of 18th century history. Greta Mossman and other museum staff brew dandelion root coffee with plants from the museum grounds and mix lemonade from citric acid. “It was called fairground lemonade,” Mossman says. “It was considered the cotton candy of the 18th century. Kids would arrive carrying their own mugs to the fair and get their citric acid

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lemonade, a big treat.” As we sip our switchel, Greta Mossman tells us about an autumn activity she enjoys leading. When families gather on the waterfront at Halloween to carve pumpkins into jack-o’-lanterns, the museum hosts turnip carving for kids. “Pumpkins weren’t a thing that they had at the time,” Mossman says. “So, they used turnips, hollowed them out and made little faces in them. It was so cute. Just so adorable,” she adds, by which she must mean ugly, given that the carved turnip heads would eventually shrivel. “They’re big turnips, but when they dry, they look like little shrunken heads.” After a last sip of switchel, I turn my hand to spinning wool. Greta Mossman holds up a roka, a y-shaped stick also called a distaff, used to spin wool into yarn. She gives it a twirl, magically pulling a string of yarn from a fuzzy ball of wool sheered from local sheep. As she spins, she tells us that yarn got its colours in the 18th century from natural dyes made with things like yarrow and onion skins. “As we spin the wools together, we’re getting


that they had at the time,” Mossman says. “So, they used turnips, hollowed them out and made little faces in them. It was so cute. Just so adorable,” she adds, by which she must mean ugly, given that the carved turnip heads would eventually shrivel. “They’re big turnips, but when they dry, they look like little shrunken heads.” After a last sip of switchel, I turn my hand to spinning wool. Greta Mossman holds up a roka, a y-shaped stick also called a distaff, used to spin wool into yarn. She gives it a twirl, magically pulling a string of yarn from a fuzzy ball of wool sheered from local sheep. As she spins, she tells us that yarn got its colours in the 18th century from natural dyes made with things like yarrow and onion skins. “As we spin the wools together, we’re getting beautiful natural variations of colours.”

Museums by the Sea The Ross-Thomson House and Store Museum is part of Museums by the Sea on Shelburne’s waterfront, a collection of a dozen buildings and inviting green spaces. Sharing back yards with the Ross-Thomson

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Ross-Thomson House and Store Museum.

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House is the Shelburne County Museum, which interprets local history like the lobster fishery and the town’s shipbuilding heritage. It’s also home to Canada’s oldest fire pumper, a 1740 Newsham, equipped with a hand pump, wooden wheels and a leather bucket. Visitors to the J.C. Williams Dory Shop Museum can lend a hand, building an authentic Shelburne-style wooden dory, which served the great schooners that fished the Grand Banks. Leading the work is a master dory builder like those from the past who constructed thousands over a lifetime. Today, visitors can try rowing one of these historic boats in the harbour next to the museum. The Coyle House, painted fire engine red, welcomes visitors inside to Tottie’s Crafts where volunteers sell their own traditional quilts, hooked rugs and giftware, as well as pottery and other works by professional artists. All sales proceeds go to support the museum complex. Recently spruced up for visitors, the Muir-Cox Shipyard Saw and Planing Mill tells the history of Shelburne’s once booming ship building trade. The mill seems precariously balanced on stacks of rough cut granite stone, but it was built by shipwrights, so it’s as solid as any ship’s hull constructed from the lumber milled here. It’s run by volunteers fascinated with its history and the secret workings of the machinery inside. Occasionally, a giant saw blade rips timber into lumber. This and other machinery is brought to life again by a century-old engine that powers all the gears, shafts and huge connecting belts, making the building hum like it did in its heyday. There’s so much to do on Shelburne’s historic waterfront, visitors will need more than a day to try all the hands-on activities and experiences the museums have to offer. The best way for a family to make the most of Museums by the Sea is to time a visit with a special event like Founders Days, held every year in July. Kids will enjoy all the carnival-like fun while getting a chance for a deep immersion into 18th century life. That’s because on such special occasions, the waterfront is often transformed into a re-enactment encampment, complete with canvas tents, cook outs, military drills and even the firing of cannons. At events like this, it’s as if the whole waterfront has slipped 250 years into the past when blacksmiths, British soldiers, carpenters and Indigenous peoples mingled and went about their business. Children and adults alike can join these characters, reimagining 18th century life back into being.


A giant

The sea-to-table lobster adventure Story and photography by Darcy Rhyno

Above: East Coast Outfitters guide Colin Smith with tour participant, taking a break near Lower Prospect. Left: Giant’s pebbles near Lower Prospect.

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esting in our kayaks next to a granite boulder the size of a bus, guide Colin Smith is spinning a creation yarn of mythic proportions. He’s telling our small group of paddlers huddled out of the wind off the open Atlantic how all the hundreds of boulders like the one beside us came to be scattered about the landscape here around Lower Prospect just south of Halifax. “Giants would walk along these nice, pebbly beaches,” Smith explains. Highly trained guides like him lead this Sea-to-Table Lobster Adventure tour for East Coast Outfitters (ECO). “And of course, they’d get pebbles in their shoes. So, they’d take off their shoes and empty the pebbles out. Wherever those pebbles ended up is where we have these nice rocks.” With his woolly beard, primitive-looking piercings (an orbital ring through the middle of each ear and a brown stretch earring in each lobe) and a wooden Greenland style paddle that he carved himself resting on his lap, Smith has the appearance of a Viking fresh off a trans-Atlantic journey. Under his spell, I’m now a believer in giants. The factual story, no less interesting, goes like this, as Smith tells it. Some 20,000 years ago, Nova Scotia was buried deep beneath a kilometre of glacial ice. The creeping behemoth scraped up bits of the ancient granite and carried them along. As the climate warmed again, the glacier dropped these boulder bits on its receding pathway. Smith says the clarity of the water beneath our kayaks, where rockweed in shades of copper and chestnut undulate in the current, is because there is so little sediment in this bay scraped by glaciers. “There’s all sorts of stuff to look

at,” Smith says. He tells us about the different kinds of seaweed and their uses, everything from spa treatments to insulation. “If you keep an eye out, you can spot a lobster.” Right. With all these stories arising from this captivating landscape, I’d forgotten our purpose—to paddle to a lobster feast. We head out again, rounding boulders balanced on the backs of wave-swept bedrock like pebbles shaken from a giant shoe. We scoot across open water where the wind does its best to hold us back from our goal, a tiny narrow bridge at Herring Hole. As I approach, I stop paddling, duck my head and drift into a protected harbour lined by wharves, boats, fishing shacks and a few houses. We follow Smith to the shore where Who Cares is docked at a wharf barely long enough to accommodate this small Cape Sable Island style lobster boat. Captain Lyle Morash and his deckhand and father Louie greet us with big waves and generous welcomes as we pull our kayaks up next to a rainbow of buoys and coiled ropes. We join them beside a heavily worn bait table where we are tutored in the art of lobster banding. The tool used to slip a rubber band over the lobster’s two big claws works like a pair of scissors in reverse, stretching the band when Lyle squeezes the handles. Once its claws are banded so the lobster can’t pinch my fingers or other lobsters in its crate, Lyle measures the carapace or back of the lobster to ensure it’s over minimum legal size. As Lyle explains, “When a lobster is stressed, the first thing they do is drop a claw. But it grows back,” he reassures us. “Not your finger. The claw.” It’s a good thing we’re a small group because when we Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

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Above: Steeped lobster at ECO dock. Right: Captain Lyle Morash.Below left to right: Morel mushrooms and peas. Mussels in butter and smoked dulse. Oyster with lime and hot sauce, accompanied by radish with butter and salt.

Above: Chef Dennis Johnston.

How to steep lobster The idea is to steep the lobsters in hot, flavourful water—not steam, not boil, but steep, like tea. Pour a couple of litres of clean sea water into a pot large enough to hold the number of lobsters you want to cook. Add enough seaweed like rockweed to make a bed for the lobsters. Bring the water to what chef Johnston calls a “screaming boil.” Place the lobsters in the pot on top of the seaweed, pulling some of it over the lobsters. Replace the lid. Turn off the heat. Let the lobsters steep in the pot for half an hour. Cool enough to handle and serve.

all board Who Cares and Louie tosses Lyle a couple of wooden traps for demonstration purposes, we’re near capacity. Louie throws the lines, jumps aboard and Lyle hits the throttle. Steaming among the islands and inlets, Captain Lyle is as aware of the landscape as Colin Smith is, but for different reasons. “This place is full of rocks” Lyle says, studying the sonar screen in front of him for boulders below that might pose a threat to the boat. I ask our captain to name the dangers he fears most out here among the glacial erratics. “The biggest fear is you lose power,” he says. We think about that for a moment, imagining the boat at the mercy of giant forces like waves and wind and bus-size boulders. “Every time you go out, you weigh your options. A lot can happen real fast.” Things lighten up when captain and crew

set their two traps, then swing around and haul them again. We get to see how fishermen spend their day, working the equipment and the sea. Louie invites us to try our hand at gaffing a buoy as the boat drifts by. With the buoy aboard, Louie wraps the attached rope into the hauler, pulling the trap from the bottom back into the boat. The sun is setting. We head back to the ECO dock where we started our kayak tour, all dangers forgotten. We wave a farewell to our new fishermen friends, then turn to greet chef Dennis Johnston who is preparing our lobster feast against a backdrop of kayaks as colourful as all those buoys and ropes at the Who Cares wharf. When I investigate what’s for supper, I spot fish, mussels, seaweeds and oysters. This is going to be a seafood feast to remember. As he works, Johnston tells us about his

history as a top chef. The former founder and chef at Fid Resto in Halifax, he and many of his colleagues were instrumental in Nova Scotia’s introduction to the slow food movement. Special events like ECO’s Sea-to-Table Lobster Adventure keep him busy these days. To whet our appetites, he lifts the cover on a big pot. Steam billows out to reveal bright red lobsters. Johnston explains that he’s cooking the lobsters by steeping rather than boiling them. “If you’ve ever had tough lobster, it’s because it’s been violently boiled for a long time,” Johnston says. “You’ll notice how tender these are. You steep them like tea.” While the lobsters complete their steep, I settle in with our group around a beautifullyset table. Wine is poured. Johnston serves a couple of unusual starters made with fresh, local ingredients. The first is a dish of radishes on whipped butter sprinkled with sea salt. The second features delicate morel mushrooms foraged nearby and mixed with plump, shelled peas. More Nova Scotia delicacies follow. I’m delighted to sample each in turn. Pristine bay oysters come with a choice of homemade mignonette sauce or limes and hot sauce. I try both, but can’t decide which is better. Thin slices of halibut ceviche is flavoured with Johnston’s balsam fir oil, made with the tips of balsam fir tree branches gathered in spring when their flavour is still delicate. Pickled spruce tips are scattered about the plate. Johnston places a steaming bowl of mussels on the table. I spoon a few on my plate, pluck

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Left: Sunset near Peggys Cove. Below left to right: Halibut, spruce tips, fir oil and steamed oysters, part of Sea to Table feast by chef Dennis Johnston.

one of the orange meats from the shell and pop it in my mouth. It’s sweet and smoky. Johnston says he’s opened the mussels in a mix of salt water, butter and smoked dulse, a local purple seaweed. Then the lobsters are loaded on to the table. Those familiar with the local crustacean tear into it by snapping off claws and flipping the meat from the shell. Others new to lobster and untrained in technique get pointers from Johnston and the more experienced around the table. At last, we can eat no more. We give the chef a round of applause for his locavore feast that’s foraged, farmed and fished from these forests, fields and waters. The sun has dipped below the horizon, lighting the clouds with the warmest of colours as if from a fire within. All those erratic boulders in the near and far distance stand in silhouette against the sunset as if some giant passing figure had dropped them like pebbles from a pocket in this welcoming, ruggedly beautiful, sometimes dangerous land of myth and delicious delicacies.

It’s always a great, Jay kind of a day! What’s new at White Point, you ask? Pull up a chair in the dining room and find out. The west winds blew the talented Chef Jay Jackson and his family to our beach, and we couldn’t be more thrilled. Come sample Jay’s additions to our menus. We highly recommend his twist on fresh, local scallops!

Sea’scape getaway for 2 2 nights with meals from $532plus tax whitepoint.com

2020 Play and Stay Packages

Two night stay, three days of unlimited golf with a car Sunday to Wednesday 1 person @ $305 2 People @ $275 per person 3 people @ $250 per person 4 to 6 people @ $225 per person

Thursday to Saturday 1 Person @ $335 2 people @ $305 per person 3 People @ $280 per person 4-6 People @ $260 per person

Sherwood Golf & Country Club, 500 Sherwood Road, Sherwood, NS 902-275-4956 | www.eden.travel/sherwood

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Authenticity is the key Visitors to historic schooner are greeted by the real thing By Emily Sollows

Emily Sollows

Emily Sollows

Tourism Nova Scotia / Acorn Art Photography

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Captions: The Fisheries Museum of the Atlantic and its flagship Theresa E. Connor; Capt. Fred Bennett hoists a string of flags that read Welcome Aboard; retired fishermen Rex Wentzell and Fred Bennett welcome visitors aboard the vessel.

here the shimmering blue harbour meets the bright historic town of Lunenburg, you’ll find the Theresa E. Connor, a wooden Grand Banks fishing schooner built in 1938. In the hazy morning sunlight, Theresa’s caretakers, Fred Bennett and Rex Wentzell stroll casually up the waterfront from the stately red Fisheries Museum of the Atlantic. A fixture of the Lunenburg waterfront, and part of the town’s illustrious skyline, Theresa fished the grueling Grand Banks, off the southeast coast of Newfoundland, until 1966. Theresa is one of the last surviving Banks schooners, and represents a pivotal moment in history when sails were being replaced by engines, and fishing schooners were ousted by large steel-hulled side trawlers. Fred opens one side of the gate on the wharf, Rex the other. They walk with familiarity up the gangway ready to start the day. They are two of the five vessel interpreters who work aboard the museum’s fleet—all of whom are retired fishers. Fred is a former scallop captain who started fishing in 1961 when he was just 16 years old. “We’re all real fishermen that been there, done that. The tourists says, ‘you fellas is the real deal.’ It means a whole lot to them.” In the past, the interpreters were fishermen who had crewed aboard the vessels when they were in operation. Unfortunately, the “old boys”, as they are affectionately known on the Lunenburg waterfront, are vanishing from this story. We board Theresa and approach the wheelhouse toward the stern. Fred opens the painted white door with a shimmy and a delicate punch (he knows exactly what works). He opens a tube of brass polish and starts buffing the brass spokes of the ship’s wheel. “I came up here to Lunenburg for a summer job and never left,” Fred says, cracking a smile that wrinkles his friendly eyes. He points over to the wooden wheelhouse of the Cape North on the wharf beside him. “That’s the one I started on. Spent a year and a half on ’er. She was an old wooden side-dragger built in ’45.” His intonations echo both Newfoundland and old Lunenburg accents; his inflections and expressions bring zest to every conversation, and life to every story. “In January ’63 I jumped to scallopin’. I started at age 16. Most the other boys was 50, 60, 70 years old. I was the kid aboard. The old fellers would give ya a hard time.” Fred fished as captain of his vessel for 27 years before retiring at age 69. “Oh we fished rough—15, 20,

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Tourism Nova Scotia / Acorn Art Photography

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178 Peggy’s Point Road, NS 902-823-2561 souwester@peggys-cove.com www.peggys-cove.com

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25-foot seas. In the wintertime we come up against it a lot.” Fred says, deepening his tone. “Worst bloody wind is nor’east. Pardon my language. It just keeps comin’ at ya.” He explains they would often have to pound ice off the rigging and equipment. “Oh!” Fred exclaims so achingly that my heart jumps, “It’s cold but ya gotta do it, else you’re in trouble.” Four years ago, he saw an advertisement in the paper for the vessel interpreter job at the Fisheries Museum. “I says to the wife, ‘well that wouldn’t be so bad. Get out, talk to people.’ She said, ‘Don’t bother, they’re not gonna take ya!’” Fred says with a musical laugh. Rex climbs up the companionway from down below where he was setting the table in the crew’s quarters. We walk back out on deck, where the men come to the consensus that it’s not too windy to raise the string of signal flags up the masts. The colourful flags read Welcome Aboard in the International Code of Signals—a language few people understand today. They haul up the flags and toss insults, jokes and chuckles back and forth the whole time. Fred heads over to the port side of the schooner to the little red dory on display. Dories were launched from the schooner to trawl for fish. Each one held two fishermen, their catch and fishing gear.

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“This one had 12 dories, 28 men. They would trawl and haul it back to the mothership. They bring the fish back aboard, split ‘em, salt ‘em. They done everything—the whole process,” Fred explains. “They’d start at 3:30, 4 in the mornin’, stop ‘bout 5 in the afternoon. If they had a good haul they’d go ‘til 10, ‘leven o’clock at night.” Fred makes the judgement call that the winds are just light enough to raise the small sail on the dory. He carefully unties it and hauls up the white canvas. Fred’s local charm and colour seep through his every word. His stories are like songs that captivate you from the beginning. His vivid tales and vibrant laughs bring the old wooden schooner to life. Visiting Theresa and speaking with Fred will take you back 100 years when Lunenburg was a hustling fishing port and lively shipbuilding town. A multitude of schooners were built each year and sent away to fish for cod on the Grand Banks. The harbour was peppered with moored schooners, and the wharves were a forest of masts. Lunenburg is still a bustling town with an old-fashioned warmth. It’s a town that cares deeply about its heritage and works hard to preserve it. A former blacksmith shop now hosts the renowned Ironworks Distillery; the old fish plant on the waterfront is now home


Tourism Nova Scotia / James Ingram

Tourism Nova Scotia / James Ingram

Far left: Walking the old boardwalk in front of The Old Fish Factory; Left: Sampling the wares at Ironworks Distillery; Below: Lobster tacos at The Old Fish Factory.

to The Old Fish Factory, a restaurant serving the town’s freshest catch; the architecture remains historic; the waterfront still boasts traditional boats and tall sailing ships; the wharves still bear woodworkers, riggers and shipbuilders. The town’s charismatic art and vibrant culture reflect a sincere pride in their history. Across the wharf from Theresa, you can find crew of the Bluenose II rigging, maintaining and sailing the 161-foot iconic wooden schooner. You can find boatbuilders planking dories at the Dory Shop; and you can find retired fishermen recalling their days at sea, educating visitors from around the world on the booming fishing and shipbuilding village that was Lunenburg. These retired fishermen are part of what make the Lunenburg waterfront such a special place: it is a working waterfront with a living history. The Fisheries Museum and their fleet of vessels offer a unique opportunity to experience the history of the Atlantic fishery, and the profound sentiment towards it that is

still felt strongly in Lunenburg. The museum is a key experience for learning Lunenburg’s story—from the first Indigenous fishers to the industry today. As the strong sun sinks behind the grassy hill of the golf course across the harbour, Fred and Rex get ready to put Theresa to bed for another night. “Jeez, there’s people who come here in the mornin’ and don’t leave ‘til we close up! They find out you’re a retired fisherman and start askin’ all about it,” Fred tells me while Rex nods in agreement. They put all the dishes away at the table below deck and lock up the white doors of the wheelhouse. They carefully take down the sail on the dory and lower the string of signal flags. Theresa, like many other schooners, could have been scrapped, sold or sunk, but she lives to tell a significant story. Fred says with a rare serious tone, “Like I tell people: if they didn’t look after this ship, that’s a lot of history gone. That woulda been it. It takes a lot to keep her going but I’m glad they did.” Looking out at the Lunenburg harbour, you can almost see a young Fred and his crewmates heading out to sea on wooden ships. In this timeless town, you can’t help but imagine what life would have been like century ago.

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Atlantic Canada’s Amazing World Heritage Sites

Distinctly different and well worth visiting

By Dale Dunlop

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hile some may question the effectiveness of the United Nations in maintaining world peace, few would deny the significant role that the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has played in identifying and preserving places of universal value to all mankind. Starting in 1978 UNESCO began designating World Heritage Sites for either their intrinsic cultural value or their natural attributes. Each year thereafter new ones have been added to the list, for a total of 1,121 spread over 167 countries, as of 2020. Only 20 of these are in Canada and of those seven are in Atlantic Canada and an eighth just over the border of New Brunswick in the Gaspé area of Quebec. Here is a short guide to each Atlantic Canadian site.

L’Anse aux Meadows

Gros Morne National Park Designated in 1987, Gros Morne National Park is considered one of the best places in the world to appreciate the effects of plate tectonics or continental drift. The Tablelands is one of the few places on the planet where the earth’s mantle is exposed as a result of being pushed upward as two continents collided. Due to the redness of the rocks and limited

Dale Dunlop

L’Anse aux Meadows was the first cultural site in Canada to become a World Heritage Site, making the list in the very first year along with the Galapagos Islands and Yellowstone Park, among others. It is the site of the only verifiable Viking settlement in North America and as such marks

the oldest attempt by Europeans to establish themselves in the New World. It is located in a very remote area on the very northern tip of the Newfoundland’s Great Northern Peninsula and has been dated to the early 11th century. Archaeologists have excavated and reconstructed eight buildings which correspond very closely with similar timber frame and peat structures found in Iceland and Greenland. In addition to the reconstructed buildings there is an interpretive centre and trails that thread their way through the peat bog to the shores of the nearby cove. While L’Anse aux Meadows won’t blow you away with its natural beauty it will inspire awe when you walk in the same place that Leif Ericson might have done more than 1,100 years ago.

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Above: The Basque Whaling Station in Red Bay, Labrador.

Backcountry hiking, Western Brook Pond Fjord, Gros Morne National Park.

vegetation, people taking the was the existence of these 1.5 hour interpretive walk here voyages proven to be historical have likened it to walking on facts, although unlikely as early Mars. However, the Tablelands as Cabot’s explorations. Red Bay is only one reason Gros Morne is the site of the earliest and largest received its designation. This area on European whaling station ever found in the southwest coast of Newfoundland North America. was substantially altered during the ice For a period of 70 years starting in the Newfoundland and Labrador Tourism ages, leaving a vast freshwater fjord, hanging 16th century, Basque whalers set up summer valleys with cliffs over 1,100 feet (335 metres) high quarters in this remote bay and hunted numerous in places and some of the tallest waterfalls in Canada. species of whales, which then were hauled to the whaling The recreational opportunities at Gros Morne are numerous and cover station where the whale oil that lit the lamps of Europe was rendered. Visitors today can learn about the history of Red Bay at the Parks all four seasons from hiking, sea kayaking, boat tours, cross-country Canada Interpretive Centre, take a boat to nearby Saddle Island where skiing to deep sea fishing as well as exploring the interesting fishing many of the whalers who died here over the years are buried, or hike to villages that dot this coast and sampling the great sea food on offer. the top of Tracy Hill to get a panoramic view of Red Bay. The ultimate Gros Morne challenge is to hike to the top of the mountain of that name and take in a vista that some say is the best in the world.

Red Bay Basque Whaling Station, Labrador Designated in 2013, Red Bay is situated on the shores of Labrador directly across from Newfoundland near the narrow Strait of Belle Isle. For centuries there was rumor and speculation that even before John Cabot landed somewhere in Atlantic Canada in 1497 that European fisherman, in particular the Basques from northern Spain, had made voyages to the Grand Banks and neighboring waters to fish and hunt whales. It was conjectured that the marine riches were so fabulous that the Basques did their best to keep it a secret. Only in the 20th century

Mistaken Point

This is Atlantic Canada’s newest World Heritage Site and one of two in the area that received its designation as a result of the fossils that are found there. It is located on the southeast tip of Newfoundland’s Avalon Peninsula and essentially consists of a 17-kilometre stretch of sea cliffs that contain the world’s largest known repository of Ediacaran fossils. For two billion years, life on earth was restricted to microscopic organisms, until during the Ediacaran period some 600 million years ago “life got big” and what are considered to be the first true animals appeared in the seas. Their fossilized remains can be seen today, but only on guided tours to the area. Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

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Tourism Nova Scotia / Wally hayes

Newfoundland and Labrador Tourism

Above: Exploring Fossils at Mistaken Point Ecological Reserve, on the Avalon Peninsula; Right: Guided tours at Joggins Fossil Cliffs. Centre: Carriage rides around old town Lunenburg.

Visitor Information service available

SHUBENACADIE RIVER Tidal Bore Viewing!

9865 Hwy 236, South Maitland, NS easthants.ca/fundy

Guided tours available!

Walk on the ocean floor where the highest tides in the world happen 45 Faulkner Lane, Burntcoat, NS 902-369-2529 • burntcoatheadpark.ca

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Old Town Lunenburg In 1995 the entirety of the oldest portion of the fishing and ship building port of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia was designated. UNESCO defines it as the best example of a planned British colonial settlement in North America. Long famed as the home of the iconic schooner Bluenose, tourists have been flocking to the town for over a century, drawn by its unique architecture, well preserved waterfront and fine collection of inns and restaurants. It still gets by far the most visits of any World Heritage Sites in Atlantic Canada and for good reason. Taking a tour of Lunenburg harbour on the Bluenose should be on everyone’s bucket list.

Joggins Fossil Cliffs The Joggins Fossil Cliffs represent the finest example of Carboniferous Period fossils found anywhere, in what UNESCO describes as “the coal age Galapagos.” If you want to see

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examples of fossilized trees, early amphibians and the footprints of twenty different species this is the place to do it. Located on the shores of the Bay of Fundy near the former coal mining town of Joggins, visitors start with a tour of the excellent Interpretive Centre where many of the best fossils found here are on display. This is followed by a guided tour of the cliffs where fossils will definitely be found. Each new tide brings the possibility of exposing a never before seen species. It’s happened before. Joggins is a must visit for budding paleontologists.

The Landscape of Grand Pré The final UNESCO World Heritage Site, designated in 2012, is completely different from any of the other six in Atlantic Canada. It preserves a large swath of land that essentially was turned into a manmade landscape reclaimed from the sea by the efforts of the Acadian settlers from France


in the 17th century. It is also associated with one of the most tragic events in Nova Scotia history, the Grand Dérangement, also known as the Deportation of the Acadians. Parks Canada manages much of the site with visits usually starting at the Interpretive Centre in the rural community of Grand Pré, where the history, not only of the Acadians, but the Native Americans who preceded them and the New England Planters who followed them is told as well. This is followed by a visit to the Acadian memorial and the famous statue of Evangeline after which there is a self-guided driving tour to many sites in the vicinity, many of which offer great views of this most bucolic of landscapes. Food and drink can be had at many of the nearby wineries and restaurants, for which the region is justly famous.

Dale Dunlop

Dale Dunlop

The Landscape of Grand Pré includes the Interpretive Centre and the church that was the gathering place for the Grand Dérangement.

Tidal Bay The perfect complement to Nova Scotia seafood or to share with friends. GRANDPREWINES.COM

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Towns of the Tantramar

Prince Edward Island

New Brunswick

TANTRAMAR

FreeVectorFlags.com

Nova Scotia

(and beyond) Straddling two provinces, this unique ecosystem is always worth exploring Story and photography by Jodi DeLong

Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

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ack when my family lived in the Moncton area, we would make regular road trips to Nova Scotia to visit my grandparents in the Valley and on the South Shore. A highlight of these trips, at least to an inquisitive back-seat rider, was the drive from Memramcook, NB to Amherst, NS, through a vast and wonderful area called the Tantramar marshes. There were two attractions to me at the time—the so-called “antenna farm” that was the site of Radio Canada International’s shortwave transmitting station, and the seemingly endless wooden barns on the marshes, where farmers would store their hay from the dyked fields. The RCI site is long since mothballed and dismantled, and there are only a scant few barns dotting the marshes now, but the appeal of that area has broadened for me, and for countless visitors each year. Anchored by the two main towns of Sackville, NB and Amherst, NS, with other communities including Memramcook and Port Elgin, NB as part of the Tantramar region, this is a wonderful part of Atlantic Canada for day trips or extended visits. A little history: The Tantramar region is flanked by two bodies of water—the Northumberland Strait between NB and PEI to the North, and the mighty, tidal Bay of Fundy to the south. Its name is derived from the French Acadian word Tintamarre, which means a loud racket of noise, and speaks to the huge ruckus of sound caused by migratory birds, waterfowl and the wild winds that whip in off the salt water. Much of the area is actually below sea level but protected (usually) from the elements by a wide selection of dykelands, first built by the Acadians in the early 17th century and expanded from then to the current day. Some of the acreage is still prime agricultural, but unique ecosystems including salt marshes led to the preservation and protection of much of the lands. The Sackville Waterfowl Park, located

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This page, from left: Bistro le Chat Bleu, Port Elgin; The Sackville Waterfowl Park. Below: Sackville’s Information Centre has a spectacular local artisan gallery.


Captions

protection of much of the lands. The Sackville Waterfowl Park, located near the town’s Visitor Information Centre and gift shop, is a popular spot for birdwatching as well as walking and learning more about the birds of the area. Sackville is home to Mount Alison University, one of the top-ranked universities in Canada according to Maclean’s magazine. This of course swells the population of the town each year and is in no small part responsible for the thriving commerce and culture of the town. The Sackville Farmers Market runs year round (locations vary with time of year); the town is very walkable and there are a host of delightful shops and venues to visit, including Anointment Natural Skin Care, Blooms plant and florist shop, Cackling Goose Gluten Free Market, Smooth as Silk hand-painted silk wearables and art, and the Campbell Carriage Factory Museum. Amherst, NS was established in 1764 as a place for New England Planters to settle following the expulsion of the Acadians from the region. Well known in the past as a town of industry, with the railway serving as a transportation hub for many local businesses, today the pace is slower but no less welcoming to visitors. The town is not that Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

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Above: The Joggins Fossil Museum; fossils in the museum. Left: Silk artist Marilyn Cook paints a wall hanging. Below, from far left: Repurposed sweaters are made into mittens at the PEDVAC Foundation boutique, Port Elgin; Sackville Farmers Market operates year round. Bottom left: Winegarden Estate Winery and Distillery in Baie Verte, NB.

home to a must-see museum as well as the beach and cliffs. Fort Lawrence and Beaubassin National Historic Site is also nearby, noted for its walking trails, ideal picnicking, and a chance to step back in history. Among the attractions in Amherst town and surroundings are Maritime Mosaic at Dayle’s Grand Market, a stately former department store that now features the work of dozens of local artisans and producers; Birkinshaw’s Tea Room, where you’ll find proper afternoon tea and many, many other culinary delights; Deanne Fitzpatrick Studio, a rug-hooking studio and gallery; and Copper Tree Boutique for terrific footwear and accessories. Outside of town, visit the Amherst Point Bird Sanctuary, a nationally protected habitat with hiking trails and dramatic scenery of forest and marshlands. One of the somewhat hidden gems of the area is the beautiful village of Port Elgin, NB, located on the Northumberland Strait and home to many artisans and other entrepreneurial types. It’s a walkable town, not far from the Fort Gaspereaux National Historic Site. Among the attractions you’ll find in Port Elgin and surroundings are Winegarden Estate in Baie Verte, which features unique wines, liqueurs and schnapps brought by the family from Germany; PEDVAC Foundation, which works with families in need and has an amazing boutique of repurposed and previously loved clothing and other items, and the remarkable Bistro Le Chat Bleu, where the food is simply sublime. Especially, I understand, the carrot cake. (I admit nothing!) Every autumn, the towns of the Tantramar area host Art Across the Marsh, a weekend-long celebration of local artisans featuring 20-plus unique venues and dozens of artists. Pottery, painting, jewellery, silk work, fibre work—all this and more can be explored in the communities around the Tantramar. Some of the artists only open their studios to the public once a year during this weekend—their offerings are available at local shops like the gift shop at the Sackville VIC—and it’s a great chance to see them at work. Join me as I jump in the car and visit the area every few months—you’ll be glad you did!

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Buddha Bear Coffee Roaster. Rogue Coffee Company Co.

Rogue Coffee Company Co.

Top: The range of coffee alternatives is impressive. Above & Left: Rogue Coffee Company, Saint John, NB. Right: Buddha Bear Coffee Roaster & Holy Whale Brewing Co., in Alma, NB.

1. For a cool pairing of a coffee shop and brewery in a converted church, make your way to Buddha Bear Coffee Roaster & Holy Whale Brewing Co., in Alma, NB, a beer/espresso café located at the base of Fundy National Park. They have a coffee roaster as well as a brewery on-site in the former St. Stephen United Church. “We tried our best to re-incorporate every piece of the church that we removed during the transformation of the church-to-café process,” says Jeff Grandy. He says they’ve had three former ministers of St. Stephen United visit and all appeared to approve of the “conversion.” Want a unique offering? Try the Fundy Trail Finish—though you may have to work for it. “If you stop by our café directly after the completion of the ‘Fundy Footpath’—a 61 km slobberknocker of-a-trail—we’ll give you a complimentary beer, espresso shot, pickled egg and a bar of soap, because you will definitely stink.” Grandy says they’ve put a lot of thought and effort into their coffee and take pride in the roasting process followed by their baristas. They also recently took their first coffee purchasing trip to Costa Rica during the harvest season to obtain a contract with a quality farm/processing company. “And we’ll continue to visit other coffee regions in the future.” Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

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The Battery Cafe Andrea Piacquadio

Top: Specialty coffees are popular everywhere.

2. Tucked in an alley in Uptown Saint John, in the historic Bustins Building, which dates to 1881, Rogue Coffee Company is an independent “third wave coffee” shop owned by locals Vanessa and Mike Duncan. They transformed a workshop from a 100-year old furniture store into a modern industrial space, cleverly filling the small space with a hexagon bar, upper and lower seating area, and a garage door that extends the shop outside into an alleyway. The Duncans say the string-lit alley has seating, artwork, flower boxes, and hosts pop-up markets and live music. While in Rogue, do look up. The ceiling beams are charred from a fire. Just how long ago is up for debate, say the Duncans. Some say a fire in the 1950s. Another theory is the “Great La-Z-Boy” fire of 1973. Either way it creates a unique look. Fan faves? That’d be the oat milk lattes, house-made nitro infused cold brew served on tap, and prosecco, also served on tap. Pro tip: Each Saturday a cake is prepared by local restaurant East Coast Bistro and served at Rogue. “Be early or miss out,” advise the Duncans, who attract a diverse clientele from business suits to work boots.  3. The Battery Café, a locally owned café in downtown St. John’s, NL, enjoys an enviable location at the foot of Signal Hill, one of the city’s icons. Expect to find Detour coffee, tea, baked goods, sandwiches, soup and salads. Know too they’ve just expanded their space, they offer live music on Saturday nights, and have a walk-up window for hikers (hello Northhead Trail!) “We are in an historic building situated at the entrance to the Battery neighborhood in East St. John’s, at the foot of Signal Hill, with a beautiful view over St. John’s Harbour,” says Robert Salsman. “We serve great coffee and food, but what people most like us for is our customer service. Our café was a corner store for 120 years before being fully renovated into a warm, woody, welcoming space. Coffee lovers love our Detour coffee. Hikers and

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dog walkers love our walk-up window. Neighbors love our soup in the winter, and tourists love our local ambience and charm. They love the ambience, the view over the harbour, our coffee, our baked goods and our customer service,” he says. “(Prime Minister) Justin Trudeau chose us as his spot to visit when he was in St. John’s  in summer 2019, and several Newfoundland celebrities are regulars.  We serve neighbors, hikers, dog walkers, coffee lovers and tourists. The Battery Café is a great spot to sit with a friend and enjoy a great cup of coffee and a scone!” 4. For a chill spot, with a unique and cozy minimalism vibe, stop into the Black & White Cafe and Bakery in St. Peters, PEI. “We focus on local ingredients, simple, but tasty food, and offer specialty coffees and teas made with love,” says the café’s Jessica Fritz. With offerings inspired by island living and the owners’ European (German) background, she says they want people to come to stay. They offer a small, free (donation based) library, board games to play, a toy and sand box, and free Wi-Fi. She says when outfitting the cabin, the coffee shop is in, they worked with the solid wood panelling and floor and complemented it with black and white accents. All furniture is upcycled, bought second-hand or handcrafted to fit the cafe. Unique art and decoration add interest. Located on the Confederation Trail, close to Greenwich National Park, and on the drive from Charlottetown to Souris (where the ferry to the Îles de la Madeleine docks), the café attracts tourists, happy to find a high-quality spot in such a rural setting, as well as locals. “A coffee shop is your temporary home away from home. It doesn’t matter if you just come for a hot beverage or an easy bite to eat. It’s often enough a place to hang out, work, read or be social. It’s where you meet people and have earnest conversations or simply some board game fun. It’s where you take a break, recharge, refuel. And hope to feel at home.”


Honeybeans Coffee, Tea & Treats Honeybeans Coffee, Tea & Treats

Black & White Cafe & Bakery

Left/centre top: Robert Salsman at work at the Battery Cafe. Above: Honeybeans Coffee, Tea & Treats

5. For caffeine and kindness seven days a week, try Dilly Dally Café in Halifax, NS. “We are a friendly, local neighborhood café, and creating a small-town feel, where our guests feel part of our community, is paramount to our entire team,” says Laura Draege on the full-service café that offers locally roasted Java Blend coffee, and meals and goods baked daily on-site. Not to miss? Their house-made syrups make for fabulous sweet lattes (try the carrot spice latte or their ginger molasses latte) while the kitchen creates breakfast, brunch, lunch and even occasional dinners. Their avocado toast and smoked salmon scramble is a crowd favorite. In warmer months, the licensed patio is popular for a meal or enjoying a craft beer or local wine. From opening day, they’ve made space for local makers within their walls. They’ve created a small retail offering in the café that features only local makers such as Foxhound Collection, Circle & Wick Candle Co., Helen Painter Art, Saucy Face Studios, and Bad Mouth Soap. “This goes back to our core focus on creating that small-town community feel at Dilly Dally,” Ms. Draege says. “My favorite compliment is when our guests tell me how kind and friendly our team is!” 6. A coffee shop that’s like a history book come to life? That’s Samuel’s Coffee Shop in Summerside, PEI, in the former JournalPioneer building. Samuel’s, named after surveyor general Samuel Holland, is steeped in history and owner Moyna Matheson (a sixth-generation descendant of Samuel Holland) says “local or visitor, we want the sense of place, culture and history to be a part of that experience.” Samuel’s is known for its coffee and espresso and must-have goodies like raspberry cream cheese pie, date squares, map maker  sandwiches, and come October, homemade pumpkin spice latte. All the food is made from scratch, in-house. The landmark building dates to the late 1800s and has exposed brick on the interior

Honeybeans has always been known for its cozy ambiance and will be entering a new era, moving down the street to a larger space at 180 Water Street this spring.

and houses a bank vault where guests can have lunch, sip coffee, and of course, spill secrets. Walls are adorned with Samuel Holland maps and memorabilia from Summerside’s earlier days, and they partner with local suppliers and artisans to showcase PEI’s offerings. “What is unique about Samuel’s is that it appeals to all generations and all people. We have young parents in the afternoon and weekends and a work crowd at lunch. Teens will enjoy a late day visit after school. Several self-employed budding entrepreneurs use  Samuel’s  as a creative workspace  and a growing retired crowd brings things alive with their morning meetups. I think that is why people feel comfortable, from young kids to business suits to those looking to read the paper, there is a place for them at Samuel’s,” she says. “Quite simply, they like the way Samuel’s makes them feel, beyond their taste buds...The vibe they get when they walk through the doors, the sense of community and the impression of the sense of history that surrounds them.” 7. Honeybeans Coffee, Tea & Treats, in St. Andrews, NB, is a huge favourite among locals, and right on the main drag on Water St. The cozy cafe specializes in organic and direct trade coffee, lattes, as well as teas, hot chocolates, baked fresh in-house goods and grab-and-go options including gluten free treats. “I believe people love Honeybeans because they know when they walk in the doors they will be greeted like a friend and will leave with the best coffee, tea or treat we can offer. They come for the coffee and stay for the friendship of a community hub,” says co-owner Lauren Naish, who took over the well-loved business in 2018 after managing the shop for many years. “Honeybeans has always been known for its cozy ambiance and will be entering a new era moving down the street to a larger space at 180 Water Street this spring. We will be expanding our seating and ability to serve up new and exciting food and drinks, but we will not be losing our warm atmosphere.  We want all of our customers to feel at home in the new space,” says Ms. Naish. Their signature lattes are fan favourites, but none more so than the Salty Maritimer Latte (a combination of white chocolate, maple and salted caramel), developed by a fan during last year’s latte idol contest. Honeybeans also rocks their scones. “Honeybeans is a great place to start your visit in Saint Andrews: a delicious treat, coffee and a smiling face to send you out to explore our beautiful town.” Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

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Amos Pewter

Amos Pewter

20 cool ideas for souvenir shopping in Atlantic Canada Local and unique are key By Shelley Cameron-McCarron

Amy Donovan Photography

W Top: Mahone Bay based Amos Pewter’s products feature many natural world motifs. Above and right: East Coast Glow.

ant something special to remember your trip to Atlantic Canada, maybe soap made from iceberg water, beach-inspired jewelry, cold, clear gin, or a CD or book from your favourite Atlantic artist? Here are just a few of the many cool things and places to look for souvenirs to take home from your Atlantic Canada travels. 1. For fun and funky gifts, including Labradorite jewelry, locally made soap, art prints and handmade bowties from Midnight Taylor, visit Posie Row, a downtown St. John’s, NL shopping fave since 1995. While they don’t specialize in souvenirs (think unique and hard-tofind items sourced from around the world), they have a good variety of locally sourced/locally significant product. They’ve also expanded and offer rental space to local artisans in Posie Row and Co, giving customers the possibility of shopping for a variety of local items, many directly from the makers, in a preserved heritage building. 2. Fred’s Records is an institution in downtown St. John’s, opening its doors in 1972. It specializes in Newfoundland and Labrador and Irish traditional music, so a great place to satisfy your music needs. (They also host in-house concerts.)

Amy Donovan Photography

3. In Saint John, NB, stop by Slocum & Ferris at the Saint John City Market to pick up some of the province’s famous Grand Manan Island dulse in several forms, including ground to sprinkle on food.

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4. New Brunswick is known for handmade pottery. A great place to buy it is at Botinicals Gift Shop, Studio & Gallery in Fredericton, NB. 5. Definitely anything from Distillerie Fils Du Roy, located on New Brunswick’s Acadian Peninsula, makes a great gift or souvenir. Many items are available in New Brunswick Liquor Commission stores. Their Gin Thuya is an award-winner and very popular with locals.


Donelda’s Puffin Boat Tours What makes our tour different… • See Puffins, Seals, Bald Eagles & more • The largest boat going to Bird Islands • All windows (20) on both sides of the boat open for viewing and picture taking from the comfort of your seats • Spend 1 to 1.5 hours or more if needed at the Islands Distillerie Fils-du-Roy

• Narrated tour with Donelda

Distillerie Fils-du-Roy is located on New Brunswick’s Acadian peninsula.

6. Jewellery lovers will want to pick up a little something, perhaps radiance earrings or the Skye necklace at Amos Pewter, with locations in Nova Scotia on the Halifax waterfront, the Halifax Stanfield International Airport, Mahone Bay, and Peggy’s Cove and in Charlottetown, PEI; or pop into Earth Goddess on Demone Street in Halifax to bring home something made from the in-house jeweller. 7. Chocolate aficionados will want to tuck a few artisanal goodies into their bags, including from Rousseau Chocolatier in Halifax, NS, Appleton Chocolates goodies in Tatamagouche, NS, Newfoundland Chocolate Company, headquartered in St. John’s, NL, and Peace by Chocolate in Antigonish, NS, which comes complete with a lovely backstory. The chocolate company is run by the Hadhad family, formerly chocolate makers in Syria, who came to Antigonish as refugees. Rebuilding their lives and business, they’re continuing the family tradition, now in Canada, selling fine chocolate, including chocolate bars crested with messages of peace and forgiveness. 8. With its classic anchor logo and hometown pride, East Coast Lifestyle, specializing in hoodies, hats and t-shirts, has been a huge hit ever since Alex MacLean started the company as a temporary business for a university entrepreneurship class project.

Grab your own swag to keep the east coast love going. 9. One-of-a-kind finds abound in Bonavista, NL, where among the many neat things shoppers can pick up are beautiful weaved design by Morgaine Parnham at her shop Tree Line Fine Art and Craft, a curated market of fine handmade goods, of which 90 per cent are created in Newfoundland, and the rest from other parts of Atlantic Canada; as well as popular sea salts (even flavoured ones like juniper smoked, green alder and coffee salt) from the Newfoundland Salt Company; and wildcrafted natural skin care, soaps, lotions, and bath bombs made using mineral rich sea salts harvested from the cold, clean waters of Newfoundland and Labrador, pure essential oils, and wildcrafted botanicals at East Coast Glow, a seed-to-skin, pure iceberg water cosmetics company. 10. Consider My Home Mercantile in Moncton, NB a one-stop shop for local goodies Their stock in trade is carrying local and Canadian products, including Moncton’s own Hey Buttercup jewellery, Sweet Soaperie bath bombs from nearby Miramichi, NB, and Nova Scotia’s Lure Caramel Company. Look too for their own clothing line, My Home Apparel (five per cent of profits from every sale of this crested clothing is donated to homelessness initiatives across Canada) as

• Closest tour to Baddeck and Ingonish • Over 200 excellent reviews on Trip Advisor • We do not market with cruise ship excursion companies so more seats available and our schedule is always as advertised

To book your once in a lifetime experience, call or book online

(902) 929-2563 or 1-877-2Puffin donelda@birdisland.ca

www.puffinboattours.ca GPS: N46 15.57-W60 32.387 Exit 12 off the TCH 105 1099 Hwy 312 Englishtown, NS B0C 1H0

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well as a super-charged dressing room where staff have left maps, brochures and their own must-do Moncton recommendations. 11. Find award-winning gin and the popular maple vodka among the products at Steinhart Distillery, in Arisaig, NS, located just outside Antigonish, NS. 12. Be the hero. Arrive home with a travel-ready box of fresh Nova Scotian lobster. It’s available from Clearwater Seafoods at the Halifax Stanfield International Airport and can be checked or carried onto the plane. 12. Nova Scotia wines are making a big name for themselves, perhaps none more so than Tidal Bay, the first wine appellation for the province. It’s described as a crisp, aromatic white wine that pairs well with the region’s seafood. 

Join us on VISIT

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Canada’s Musical Coast

canadasmusicalcoast.com

Above clockwise Moonsnail; Dunes Gallery; Fils-du-Roy. Left: Amos Pewter.

Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

Distillerie Fils-du-Roy

Experience the fiddles, festivals and fun of Western Cape Breton Island.

Amos Pewter

A coastline shaped by music

Amy Donovan Photography

Moonsnail

13. At independent boutique Johnny Ruth on Water Street in St. John’s, look for top sellers including JR silk-screened clothing and local pottery, Saucy Pots.


Amy Donovan Photography

14. Lighters Candle Company, in PEI, is known for their “badass quotes” on each scented soy candle. Foxhound Collection, out of Truro, NS, is also making popular scented soy candles sold across Canada, while New Scotland Candle Company, hand crafted in Nova Scotia’s Annapolis Valley, have a Nova Scotia collection available in wax melt packs, a 25 hour travel tin and their signature mason jars, that come with a piece of Nova Scotia sea glass inside.

Moonsnail

Top: Newfoundland business East Coast Glow uses iceberg water to make their products. Left: Moonsnail Soapworks in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island.

15. The always fabulous Quincy Street Market in Inverness, Cape Breton has a nice selection of local products including gorgeous leather bags crafted in Inverness by Les Hodgkin. 16. With calendars, prints, buttons and cresting clothing as part of her “Love Cape Breton Collection,” items by Miss Brenna are a popular commodity at the Brook Village Grocery Store, Quincy Street Market and Sundays at the Mabou Farmers’ Market. 17. At The Dunes Studio Gallery & Café, a fun and ever-inspiring shop in Brackley Beach, PEI, owner/potter Peter Jansons makes award-winning pottery on site. One item in particular, the “Ikebana” (a Japanese word

for flower arrangement), is a bestseller for tourists and locals alike, all inspired by the property’s extensive gardens. 18. With a tagline of ‘words, whimsy, wonder for all ages,’ it is a delight to pull into author Sheree Fitch’s brightly-hued Mable Murple’s Book Shoppe & Dreamery in rural River John, NS, a seasonal indie bookstore, to stock up on Atlantic reading at a restored granary turned bookstore.    19. Moonsnail Soapworks in Charlottetown, PEI has among its locally crafted goodies selections such as ‘red clay and kelp soap,’ inspired by PEI’s beaches, it’s swirled with red clay and seaweed and scented with lavender, bay and cedar essential oils; and ‘beach feet salt sand and seaweed scrub,’ made with Dead Sea salts, PEI sand, local seaweed and Irish moss with fractionated coconut oil for moisture, and lavender and peppermint essential oils. 20. For a delectable souvenir, treat yourself to a few jars of jams, jellies, sauces and syrups from Prince Edward Island Preserve Co. found by the River Clyde in New Glasgow, PEI.

Hotel North The place to stay while you are away!

y Newly renovated guest rooms y Mariner’s Galley Restaurant on site y Large patio with a spectacular view of the North Sydney Harbour and downtown North Sydney y Closest accommodations to the Marine Atlantic Ferry Terminal y Free Wi-Fi and parking, Guest Laundry Services, Business Center

HOTEL NORTH 39 Forrest St North Sydney, NS B2A 3B1 902-794-8581• 800-561-8585 www.hotelnorth.ca

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Start your journey today by using our Experience Guide and going to


Cabot Trail

Cape Breton Highlands National Park


Harvest Jazz and Blues Festival.

The Fredericton weekender

Above: Picaroons Brewery is a going concern throughout the year. Right: Fredericton shines at night through the summer months with outdoor decks, festivals, markets and more.

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Darcy Rhyno

Darcy Rhyno

A small, eye-pleasing city packed full of opportunities

Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

By Darcy Rhyno


Tourism New Brunswick

Above Craft beer at Graystone. Right: Paddleboarding on the Saint John River.

Tourism New Brunswick

Darcy Rhyno

D

on’t misunderstand. Fredericton’s five (count ’em) farmers markets are absolutely having a moment these days, but they are more an indication of just how vibrant the city is rather than any suggestion of limited opportunities. For a small city, Fredericton has a lot going on, much of it—including many of the best festivals— concentrated in the two-block Historic Garrison District beside the Saint John River. At the heart of this district is Officer’s Square, where military ceremonies still take place daily in summer at 11am and 4pm: it’s worth catching. The heritage stone buildings, green spaces, wrought iron fences and quiet lanes harken back to Fredericton’s early days as a garrison town. Depending on the weather—and your preferences— there are plenty of activities to choose from. At the 700-seat Fredericton Playhouse, see everything from ballet to blues. Across the street, the Beaverbrook Art Gallery surprises many visitors with the number and quality of the works. The star of the show is an enormous and dramatic painting by Salvador Dali called Santiago El Grande, featuring a white stallion rearing up on its hind legs. On the other end of the activity spectrum, the Saint John River is perfect for paddling. Several rental and guide companies in town make it easy to get out on the water. Second Nature Outdoors offers courses and rents kayaks, canoes and stand up paddleboards for fun on the river, as well as bikes for touring the city’s streets. Their “Paddle and a Pint” and “Gears and Beers” are popular tours that combine getting out on the river or riding the streets on

Welcome to the Craft Brewing Capital! Get ready to sip your way through the capital city with our new Fredericton Taproom Trail! Explore our 11 taprooms and score exclusive swag! #FredTapTrail

FredTapTrail.ca

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Tourism New Brunswick

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Darcy Rhyno

Above: Trailway Brewery. Left: Playhouse exterior. Top right: Breakfast at Quartermain House B&B. Right:The Happy Baker in Fredericton.

Darcy Rhyno

Darcy Rhyno

two wheels with stops at some of Fredericton’s great craft breweries and taprooms including Graystone, Picaroons and the James Joyce Pub in the Crowne Plaza Hotel. Here’s what else is having a moment in Fredericton— beer and spirits. The breweries in town brew in signature styles, each at the top of their class. My personal favourite is Trailway for their unfiltered, citrus-hopped beers that are so juicy, you’d swear they’re made from real grapefruits, lemons and limes. But it could be Fredericton’s whisky bar, the Lunar Rogue Pub, that can claim the most astonishing variety and quality of drink in the city. Named by Whiskey Magazine as a “great whiskey bar of the world,” owner Frank Scott has built his inventory to a dizzying selection of some 700 single malts and premium blends. When it comes to dining, the choices seem almost as overwhelming as the whisky and whiskey menu at Lunar Rogue. Whether it’s an El Diablo burger with guacamole and zesty salsa at STUFT Burger Bar and Poutinerie, something tropically warm like Blackened Cajun Ribeye Steak at Caribbean Flavas Restaurant, a hearty Maritimes bowl of seafood chowder at Wolastoq Wharf or creative smoked fishcakes with dill pickle mayo at 540 Kitchen and Bar, it’s all delicious and satisfying.


Fredericton’s top festivals

Darcy Rhyno

Luxurious Slumber

Quartermain B&B.

When it’s finally time to lay head to pillow, there’s no shortage of places to stay, but for total pampering of you and yours, it’s a toss-up between a couple of world class B&Bs that bookend the downtown area. The five-star Quartermain House is an award winner, once named number one B&B in North America. The Gothic Revival heritage property sits across the street from the river within walking distance of the Fredericton Playhouse and the Beaverbrook Art Gallery. Debra Quartermain’s breakfasts are legendary, and no wonder. For starters, it comes in courses. Mine began with braised pears and maple syrup with cinnamon dusted strawberries and moved on to blueberry cake topped with stewed berries and a dollop of whipped cream. On the other side of town, By the River is a new B&B in a lovingly updated 1903 home that should win its own awards soon enough. Like Quartermain House, it sits next to the Saint John River and boasts generous breakfasts of dishes like smoked salmon eggs benny, Chinese dumplings and fiddlehead frittata. Which classy B&B to select? What to have for breakfast? Which festivals, which markets to attend? Beer or whisky? Paddle boarding or kayaking? Art gallery or live performance? They’re all tough choices, but they’re also all win-wins because Fredericton just never fails to please the weekend explorer.

St. Mary’s Pow-Wow, June 19-21 Bard in the Barracks, June 25-July 5 FeelsGood FollyFest, June 26-28 Cultural Expressions, June 27-28 River Jam, July 3 Fredericton Pride Week and Festival, July 6-12 NB Highland Games, July 24-26 Down East Brew Fest, August 1 Acadian Days Celebrations, August 15 Summer Soulsa, September 4-5 Harvest Jazz and Blues Festival, September 15-20 Word Feast: Fredericton’s Literary Festival, September 22-27 Fredericton Fall Craft Show, October 2-4 Silver Wave Film Festival, November 5-8 New Brunswick Spirits Festival, November 17-21

Fredericton Festivals!

Loves

• GoToInsurance.ca Fredericton Marathon: May 9 & 10 • St. Mary’s First Nation Powwow: June 19 – 21 • NB Highland Games Festival: July 24 – 26 • Down East Brew Fest: August 1

• NB Summer Music Festival: August 4 – 15 • Acadian Day: August 15 • Harvest Jazz & Blues Festival: September 15 – 20 • NB Spirits Festival: November 17 – 21

TourismFredericton.ca/Festivals

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Darcy Rhyno

Moncton is the family vacation hub

If the kids are happy on vacation, then you can relax

Story by Darcy Rhyno

Can you imagine your kids pleading with you, “Please, please, oh please, take us for a facial!”

W

Darcy Rhyno

Courtesy of Resurgo

ell, they just might if they find out about treatments like the cotton candy cleanser and the chocolate cream mask at Opal21 Boutique Spa. It’s in the family friendly Delta Beausejour Hotel in downtown Moncton. The upscale French brand Nougatine Paris has put together a tempting line of spa services and products just for kids, and Opal21 is happily spoiling them with these Parisian extravagances. The treatments are all organic, mild and child-friendly, like vanilla strawberry face cream and hydrating caramel flavoured lip treatment. For first timers (and let’s face it, most kids will be) Opal21 offers the Royal Duo Massage for a child and one parent. For the little ones who prefer to act all grown up and go it alone, there’s the Sweet Dreams massage with honey vanilla lotion for the scalp, neck and shoulders or the Perfect Hands manicure that finishes with a nail polish application.

From top: USVA Spa Nordique; Kids of all ages enjoy demos at Resurgo Place; the mighty cliffs at Cape Enrage.

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Moncton’s the place to spoil the kids Sometimes, kids and travel just don’t mix. A parent’s worst fear may be that their little one could turn into that stereotypical whining child traveler of the “are we there yet?” variety. The best way to avoid the transformation of your typically contented child of mild disposition into one you no longer recognize is to design a trip that’s as much for them as it is for you. Go even further and create a family itinerary that will leave the kids feeling pampered and looking forward to the next road trip. Moncton appears to have everything required to do just that. With the kids rejuvenated from their morning spa treatment, it’s time to head out on the town. There’s so much to do at Resurgo Place, a family could spend the whole day there. It’s a science discovery centre, museum, activity zone and visitor’s centre all in one. The interactive exhibits and hands-on experiences will keep even the most active little ones endlessly entertained racing cars, launching rockets, running the miniature railway and building things in the craft room. There’s a giant interactive map of Moncton that kids can walk around on and locate their hotel and other places they’ve visited. Whenever Resurgo Place designers create a new exhibit, they include fun, kid-friendly activities. Watch for family day discounts and special events with names like “Construction Destruction” and “Chemistry Morning.” For those who have even more time, Resurgo Place puts on cool summer camps where kids can really dig into themed topics with activities like building robots.


Darcy Rhyno

Darcy Rhyno

Secret stops in Moncton for everyone FOR KIDS:

incoming tide to witness the free-standing, one-to-two metre high chocolate coloured wave called the tidal bore that travels nearly 30 kilometres upriver to this point from the Bay of Fundy twice a day. Captivate the kids with the story of the surfers who set a world record by surfing the entire length of the bore, and they did it at night.

Darcy Rhyno

Out of town and edge of town

Top to bottom: Briggs Maples; David Briggs demonstration on maple syrup; Walking the sea floor at Hopewell Rocks.

When it’s time for a child’s pick-me-up (otherwise known as an afternoon snack, preferably a sweet one) head across the river from Moncton to the community of Riverview. That’s where David Briggs and his staff at Briggs Maples whips up more sweet things from New Brunswick maple syrup than a kid could ever dream. Sample some of their many grades of maple syrup. See how maple cream and maple butter are made. Try maple sugar cotton candy or maple cream mini cones. Then, really make the children’s day—buy a litre or two of syrup to take home. While you’re there, take a stroll along the Petitcodiac River where interpretive signs tell the natural and human history of the waterway. If possible, time your visit with the

For an even deeper dive into the natural history of the Bay of Fundy, join Anna-Marie Weir of Roads to Sea Guided Tours on a day trip out to the coast. Kids get a club card and Weir encourages them to check off ten things they learn during the trip to earn a prize at the end. “There are two things on our guided tour that kids find most engaging—walking the ocean floor at Hopewell Rocks and hanging out at Cape Enrage,” says Weir. Both are spectacular settings sculpted by the Bay of Fundy, home of the world’s highest tides. At Cape Enrage, Weir sets kids on a fossil hunt. When they find one, an interpreter identifies it and the intrepid explorers can plant it in the “Fossil Garden.” The interpretation centre at Hopewell Rocks and the excellent restaurant at Cape Enrage will please everyone on the trip. If it’s a day at the beach that would most please your crew, take the short drive to the northeast just past Shediac to Parlee Beach Provincial Park. These ocean waters are reputed to be the warmest in Canada and usually very calm compared to more exposed coastal areas. One section of beach is supervised with lots of fun activities like volleyball, sand sculpting and Frisbee. On the way back to Moncton, ask the kids if they want their pictures taken with the world’s largest lobster sculpture. They can climb right into the giant crusher claw. It’s at the entrance to Shediac.

Crèmerie Bennic Dairy Bar for 24 ice cream flavours, cakes, milkshakes, frozen yogurt and more. Butterfly World at Magic Mountain, a small but fun dome filled with butterflies. East Coast Karting for the race car driver in every 10-year-old. FOR PARENTS: A flight of craft beers and wild boar poutine at the Tide & Boar Gastropub. Golf at Royal Oaks, Mountain Woods or the Moncton Golf and Country Club. Live entertainment at the beautiful Capitol Theatre. FOR EVERYONE: Irishtown Nature Park for hiking, wildlife and a museum. Moncton Market for local produce and delicious ready-to-eat foods. Thomas Williams House, a Victorian home and museum for afternoon tea.

With more museums than stoplights

www.sackville.com

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Darcy Rhyno Bigstock/Olia beli art

Courtesy Magnetic Hill Winery

Magnetic Hill Winery.

For kids who just want to play all day long, Moncton offers two choices. The first is Centennial Park, a large urban green space. Open year round, there’s lots to do here for kids of all ages. The little ones will enjoy the playground and splash park while the older kids can shoot baskets, play some tennis or cycle the many trails. The highlight for the most active family members are the aerial adventure courses at TreeGO. Everyone will welcome a swim at the supervised beach on a hot summer day. At Magnetic Hill, you can start with that famous trick of the eye by piling everyone in the car and witnessing it roll uphill. But be warned, the kids will be hard to contain. That’s because they’ll spot the giant waterslides, wave pool, thrilling rides and other fun waiting for them in the “SplashZone” and “FunZone” at the Magic Mountain theme park next door. New this year, the Mountain has added four

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nine-hole mini golf courses and a Bumper Boat feature for older kids and adults. While the kids play in the water park, parents can take shifts checking out the Magnetic Hill Winery just up the hill. It recently opened a state of the art winery in a restored ban on the property where the Everett family create unique wines, some of them with newer varieties of cold-hardy grapes, and others with local fruits like strawberries and blueberries. But these are not the fruit wines your grandfather made in the basement. Their sparkling rhubarb wine closely resembles a crisp Pinot Grigio, and the barrel-aged maple wine is as rich and complex as a cognac.

Full circle Next door to the winery is the perfect place for all family members—weary parents and exhausted kids—to bring the trip full circle. The USVA Spa Nordique is usually a 16 and

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older zone, but on the first Sunday of each month, the spa opens to kids five and up. Children walk around in robes, alternating between hot and cold thermal experiences while shushing their parents to maintain the relaxing ambiance of this mini retreat. For a child and parent, the price is just $50. “Kids like it all,” says Giselle Doiron, Manager at Usva. “To unplug them, phones are off, so no photos, no videos.” Staff take photos before and after at reception for those who want keepsakes. “Teaching them how to relax is very important, as it is for parents to share that with their kids.” There’s no better way to bring a positive end to a great family vacation than with an experience kids and parents can share, especially one that feels grown up to kids and indulgent to parents. Relaxing down time like this is equally restorative for every family member.


For the love of

Celebrating fibre arts throughout Atlantic Canada with festivals, workshops and trails Story and photography by Jodi DeLong Top left: A shawl from Sisterhood Fibres in Tatamagouche, which hosts WoolstockEAST festival each September. Above: Custom painted yarns from Foggy Rock Fibres in Cupids, NL.

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n the past 15 or so years, there has been a massive resurgence of interest in the so-called fibre arts—knitting, weaving, felting, crochet, spinning, rug hooking, quilting, other needlework—and an embrace of the use of natural fibres such as wool, silk, linen, cotton. A cottage industry in local sheep raising and the spinning and dyeing of fibres has also exploded. Gone are the days (for most of us) of working with synthetic fibres. Nor do we work alone if we don’t wish to—there’s a world-wide web of fibre work enthusiasts, all connected by the joys of the Internet and sites such as Ravelry.com. There’s nothing nicer, however, than getting together with other enthusiasts to learn about new techniques, to swap stories and fibre, to add to the ever-growing stash—a collection of yarns, fabrics, and other materials used in creating—that every fibre addict has, and which will never be completely used up in our lifetimes. Throughout Atlantic Canada, there are fibre trails and workshops and dedicated festivals open to the public, offering the perfect way to share the love of the fibre arts with one another and learn new skills. And add to that fibre or fabric stash, of course. One of the longest-running fibre festivals in our region is the Nova Scotia Fibre Arts Festival, held every October in the beautiful town of Amherst, NS. The festival celebrates its 13th year in 2020 and draws in visitors from across North America. The five-day festival includes workshops, quilt shows, and fibre arts exhibits and talks. As Rebecca Taylor of the Fibre Festival explains, “Amherst is a natural mecca for fibre arts as we’re home to many professional fibre artists including Deanne Fitzpatrick, Gwen Dixon, Karen Neary and Brenda Clarke.” For 2020, the festival theme is “Weaving a Story,” which will explore how fibre arts connects all cultures across the world. Of particular interest to many is the ZONTA bazaar, which takes place

on the Saturday of the festival and draws a variety of artisans and fibre suppliers from around the region. Faith Drinnan is excited about all the enthusiasm over fibre arts in our region. As the founder of Sisterhood Fibres in Tatamagouche, where she spends her time creating new yarns, spinning, dyeing and developing new patterns, she was keen to encourage others to develop their skills and get together with fellow fibre lovers. In 2018, she launched three fibre events in Nova Scotia: a Fibre Frolic in Truro and Cole Harbour, and WoolstockEAST, which is, as she describes it, “Eight days of fleece and sisterhood in Tatamagouche.” The events attracted hundreds of people and were a huge boost to local business economies. In 2019 Faith repeated the three events, and WoolstockEAST in particular took off, “from 10 workshops in 2018 to 24 in 2019, with instructors from Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Ontario. More than 600 people attended the Saturday Fibre Village and Market, participating in demonstrations, shopping and community art projects.” People came from as far away as Colorado, and many from Ontario had planned their vacation around the event. Currently, plans are in place for the third annual WoolstockEAST in September, as well as Fibre Frolics in Truro and Stewiacke, NS. On a smaller scale, Becky Williams in Lockeport, NS hosts the Lockie the Lobster knitting festival every autumn. Becky operates the very popular shop Becky’s Knit and Yarn, a fibre lover’s haven (especially for sock lovers) and the festival brings together lovers of knitting for a week of fun and fibres. Now in its fifth year, Becky says people “get very excited about the event—it’s kind of like Christmas, as they plan from one year to the next.” Even with expanding capacity for 2020, the event is Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

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Clockwise from top: the Nova Scotia Fibre Arts Festival’s ZONTA bazaar in Amherst, NS; Participants in the Lockie the Lobster Knitting Festival in Lockeport, NS include Christine LeGrow (left) and Shirley Anne Scott (right), authors of the best-selling books Saltwater Mittens and Saltwater Classics; local vendors at WoolstockEAST market; a felted work of art by Bella McBride at ZONTA bazaar.

sold out with people from across Canada. Becky also operates Woolen M’Ocean, her mobile yarn shop, which she takes to assorted festivals around the province. Every two years, the scenic coastal town of St. Andrews By-the-Sea, NB is host to KnitEast Atlantic Fibre Fest in early October (next happening in 2021). Featuring instructors from across Canada and the US, it’s a jam-packed weekend of workshops, not just for knitters—last year included felting, rug-hooking and spinning sessions—and also offers a three-day marketplace during the event where enthusiasts can enjoy demos as well as shop for fibre and accessories to feed their habits. In Prince Edward Island, the annual PEI Fibre Festival happens in late September in Charlottetown, and features the all-important fibre marketplace, classes and social events including two authentic Maritime Ceilidhs. The island also boasts the PEI Fibre Trail, which is a collective of more than 20 businesses from farms to artisans to wool mills, specializing in all things fibre-related. You can easily spend several days roaming around the island, visiting such iconic places as MacAusland’s Woolen Mills Ltd in Bloomfield, Humming Bird Designs Studio in Souris, and Artisans on Main in Montague. The Maritime Fibre Trail is a network of fibre artists and producers in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, featuring farms where you can do one-stop shopping for fibre of all sorts—alpaca, sheep, goats, rabbits and llamas—depending on the farm you visit. Farms include Brigadoon Fibre Farm in Hoyt, NB, where the Dalton family raise alpacas, to Taproot Fibre Lab in Greenwich, NS, which focuses on long-flax fibre. Nova Scotia boasts two thriving fibre trails in different parts of the province. On the South Shore, the Lunenburg Country Fibre Trail Association has more than two dozen members, featuring yarn

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and fibre shops, spinning and weaving, rug hooking, museums, and workshops. Each year they produce an updated map so you can plan your visits around the county to explore, shop, and learn new skills. The Cape Breton Fibre Trail has participants all across the island, including the fabulous Cape Breton Centre for Craft and Design in Sydney, and Victoria County Creates, based in Baddeck. Although there is no formal fibre trail in Newfoundland and Labrador as yet, there are tremendously active clusters of artisans and marketplaces throughout the province. The hand-knit cottage industry is booming, led in no small part by NONIA, the Newfoundland Outport Nursing and Industrial Association, originally founded to help fund health care in Newfoundland through the sale of knitted garments. Today, it employs about 175 knitters and weavers across the province, and their products can be found online at nonia.com or through their retail shop on Water Street in St. Johns. Another popular local studio is Christine LeGrow’s Spindrift Handknits, which has an online shop as well as providing a variety of knitted goods to shops around Newfoundland and Labrador and beyond. In the whimsically named village of Cupids, Foggy Rock Fibres creates hand-dyed/painted yarns as well as a variety of knitted, felted, and spun natural fibres, needle-felted whimsies such as puffins, gnomes and jelly-bean sheep—to match those houses on Jelly-Bean Row in St. John’s, of course.


Embracing the wild side of Saint John

Outdoor adventures in an otherwise urban setting Story and photography by Darcy Rhyno

Above: Jim Donahue and Pete Lavigne, guides with River Bay Adventures, approaching Partridge Island. Left to Right: The lighthouse on Partridge Island. A little bit of wild in the middle of Saint John.

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im Donahue and Pete Lavigne steady the kayak as I climb into it. I secure the spray skirt, grab the paddle and give the all clear. Donahue and Lavigne give me a push, and off I go, paddling out from the Bay Shore Beach across the railway tracks at the bottom of Sea Street in Saint John, NB, on to the sun-splashed Bay of Fundy. Professional firefighter Lavigne and retired sales agent, Donahue are guides with River Bay Adventures, and excellent paddlers. It’s not long before they’ve launched and caught up to me. We’re heading for Partridge Island, the mysterious wedge of green at the mouth of the harbour. It’s a pleasant paddle on such a calm, sunny day. As we approach the island, we see rocky outcrops plunging into the sea, scrubby woods across the island’s length and manmade structures—a lighthouse, a few ruined buildings and a tall Celtic cross towering over all. We round the outer shores of the island before landing on its far side that faces the city. Once we pull our kayaks far up on the shore, well out of the reach of the water (a sound idea, given that the tides here are some of the highest in the world) Donahue gives me a short history of Partridge Island. Before Europeans arrived, it was called Quak’m’kagan’ik in the Mi’kmaq language, which translates as “piece cut out.” According to indigenous legend, the great god Glooscap destroyed a dam at the reversing rapids near the mouth of the Saint John River, which is nearly visible from where we’re standing. The rushing water carried a piece of the dam into the bay, creating this island.

Today, it’s uninhabited and quickly returning to nature, but it was once Canada’s version of Ellis Island, operating as a quarantine station from 1785 well into the 20th century. That large cross we saw at a distance was erected in 1927 to commemorate the many who died here of typhus in the mid 19th century as refugees fled from the Irish potato famine and other threats. Through many wars, the island served as the first line of defence for the city. Because of so much human activity over the centuries, it’s riddled with underground bunkers, the remains of gun mounts and of buildings that once served as everything from hospitals and schools to radar observation posts and military batteries. It last served as a quarantine station in 1941.

Embracing urban wilderness For a city founded on industry that’s still very much a part of everyday life, Saint John boasts unexpected riches when it comes to outdoor adventure and large, green spaces all around the city core. In fact, the chance to experience the natural side of Saint John in the middle of an urban, even industrial setting makes outings like this even more attractive to outdoor enthusiasts like Lavigne and Donahue. “It’s a beautiful cityscape to me,” Donahue says, looking across the short harbour to the city centre. “It’s beautiful. I can see five church steeples.” We can also see a barge with dredging equipment, working on Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

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deepening the channel. There’s an oil refinery, seaport docks and on the other side of the highway a paper mill. Across the water come the sounds of a busy port—the horn blast of a departing ship, the hum of large machinery, a siren. Donahue admits to having fun with his clients when it comes to interpreting some of what they’re seeing from their kayaks or from here on the island. Of a large Quonset hut on the waterfront, Donahue jokes with some that it’s used to store salt for when tests show the ocean isn’t salty enough. “Instead of embracing what it is,” Lavigne says, “the biggest problem here in Saint John is there’s a form of self loathing, always wishing it could be something else. You have to be willing to enjoy it for what it is.” Sweeping his hand over the scene in front of us to indicate the island beyond this overgrown trail head, Lavigne adds, “I think it’s an amazing little spot.”

Below: Stromatolite fossils in Rockwood Park. Artist Lisa-Ann Scichilone’s tribute to wild salmon, part of Saint John’s public art project. Right: Sculpture in Rockwood Park.

Opportunities for adventure While Saint John boasts larger parks within its urban boundaries than many other cities, in a way, the reverse is also true. The city itself is set entirely within a park, the Stonehammer Geopark, North America’s first UNESCO recognized geopark. It’s a massive 2,500 square kilometre swath of southern New Brunswick of very old geological features,

Top: Fort La Tour. Above: Harbour Passage Trail through downtown Saint John. Learning rock climbing in Rockwood Park.

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dating back half a billion years. Most of the outdoor activities in and around Saint John take place in characteristic Stonehammer landscape. To take advantage of these natural riches, Saint John has an unusually large collection of outdoor adventure companies. SeeSight Tours offers a harbour tour, but it’s their jet boat ride through the reversing rapids that provides the most thrills. It’s a wet and wild high speed ride at the place where Glooscap broke that dam. Twice a day, the water direction here reverses course with the rising and falling tides, forcing the rapids to flow one way, then the other. Other companies offer fishing excursions, zodiac tours, sea cave exploration, ziplining and treetop adventures. Rockwood Park just on the other side of the highway from downtown is within the Stonehammer boundaries and dates back to the 19th century when none other than Calvert Vaux, one of the designers of New York City’s Central Park, was brought in because he saw the need in industrial cities like Saint John for large, open green spaces where people could take their leisure and connect with nature. Like Central Park, Rockwood has a zoo and waterways, but it also offers supervised swimming, hiking, golf, horseback riding and camping. The Inside Out Nature Centre helps people get active in Rockwood Park with paddle board instruction and rentals, guided

kayaking tours of Lily Lake in search of fossils, hiking excursions to explore Stonehammer geological features, rock climbing on ancient outcrops and a guided biking tour that takes in many of the city’s landmarks, lookouts and wild spaces. The three-hour excursion on two wheels starts at Lily Lake Pavilion in Rockwood and includes the newly reconstructed Fort LaTour, the reversing rapids and Moosehead Brewery. There, the group takes a beer break before heading back along Harbour Passage through the Public Gardens to the starting point in Rockwood. Kids can’t get enough of Inside Out’s whackier activities like zorbing and bubble soccer. Both involve climbing into a giant inflated see-through bubble and either rolling around like a hamster in a plastic ball or trying to play soccer and bouncing off opponents instead. Both involve a whole lot of tumbling around harmlessly while laughing very hard. On the edge of town, the 600-acre Irving Nature Park is the destination for those who really want a touch of unspoiled wilderness within city limits. Boardwalks lead to woods, marshes and beaches for some great bird watching and even seal watching. The observation tower on Squirrel Trail is the best vantage point to look out over the trees and to the rocks and mudflats beyond. That’s where the seals hang out and where shore birds gather in the thousands during late summer migration.

Looking back Back on Partridge Island, Lavigne and Donahue lead the way along an overgrown trail, past old foundations—some of them with trees and plants growing out of them— to emerge on a hilltop beside that lighthouse we spotted from the water. The view of the city isn’t bad from up here, but it’s partially blocked by the trees that have grown up over the decades. From here, we can see the radar observation tower. Someone has hung a Canadian flag from the top. We make our way along more paths through the trees and shrubs to the radar tower. From the top, the views are uninterrupted. We can see the breakwater of boulders that has linked the island to the mainland since it was built during World War II for submarine defence. Beyond the Celtic cross and the lighthouse, the city looms and hums in the distance— Donahue’s beautiful cityscape. As Lavigne would have it, we embrace the view for what it is, a part of the city gone wild in an otherwise urban setting. Just then, as if to emphasize the contrast between the two, an enormous cruise ship drifts past, appearing to us as if its equal in size to the island—wilderness and a floating city side by side.

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Gourmet choices in NB A recipe for a great culinary adventure Story and photography by Janet Wallace

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ave you tried the oysters yet?” says a man I recognize as a vendor at the Dieppe Farmers’ Market. “They’re amazing! Just take the first tunnel on your right.” I nod, take a sip of wine and walk towards stone walls patterned with golden lichen. The air is filled with the mixed aromas of lamb stew and woodsmoke. Wind gusts carry the sounds of laughter and voices speaking English and Acadian. All around people are standing in clusters, eating, drinking or gazing at the panorama below—marshland covered with grass tinged rusty-red by frost, the pale water of the Chignecto Bay contrasting against dark hills in the background. I’m at Fort Beauséjour, built in the mid-1700s, near the border of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. This “Eating Heritage” event encapsulates what I love about exploring New Brunswick—delicious food, beautiful scenery, fascinating history and interesting characters blended into a culinary adventure. The event, organized by Red Rock Adventures, features food from the Really Local Food Co-operative prepared by several NB chefs. Fort Beauséjour is home to occasional culinary events, such as oyster and wine tasting. Embarking on a culinary adventure is like planning a meal. You can make a meal from scratch, go to a restaurant, or something in between. With a culinary adventure, you can harvest your own delicacies and cook them yourself, gather ingredients at a farmers’ market, or dine at a restaurant specializing in local food. At all stages, you can add a dash of adventure and discover a new food, experience or beautiful spot. We’ve listed a few examples to inspire you.

Get off the highway Great food can be found in both cities and the countryside but rarely on the side of a major highway. Take the slow roads and you’ll likely get better views and more opportunities to find food fresh from the farm or sea. • Among the rolling hills, cornfields and dairy farms on Route 890 between Petitcodiac and Sussex, you’ll find a three-generation, three-pronged business. Giermindl Farm provides meat for Adolf’s Butcher Shop (open Fridays and at Fredericton’s Boyce Farmers’ Market) and the Old Bavarian Restaurant (open weekends). Nearby, Corn Hill Nursery grows hardy roses, grapes and apple trees. Walk through the gardens and note the outstanding floral displays outside the nursery’s café.

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Clockwise from top left: Candied salmon and pickled fiddleheads at the Indulge Festival; Farm tours allow you to meet growers such as Fundy Farms' Angela MacDougall; Boyce Farmers' Market attracts producers from around the province.

Go to farmers’ markets A visit to a farmers’ market can be an adventure in itself as you meet farmers, bakers and fishermen while buying the fruits of their labour. You can pick up prepared food from a world of cuisines or get local vegetables, cheeses, meat or seafood. • At the Dieppe Farmers’ Market, two Acadian fishermen and their mother sell delicious shellfish (also available from Joe Caissie Seafood shop in Grande-Digue). Buying a bag of oysters, for example, can be a cultural experience as the vendors describe in a thick accent, the risks involved in harvesting oysters between ice floes on a windy winter day. • The Boyce Farmers’ Market in Fredericton has an excellent selection of produce, meats and prepared food; be prepared to line up to get the excellent samosas! • Thursday nights in the summer, sample food from around the world while listening to live music at the Garrison Night Market in Fredericton.

Talk to the producer When you talk to the people who grew, caught or made your food, you discover more about what you’re eating and better appreciate the work behind it. However, it’s important to respect the producers’ time; buying a dozen eggs doesn’t entitle you to a free gardening lesson. Many farms host tours or open farm days, which provide great opportunities to see the farm and ask questions.

Pick your own The drive to the U-pick is part of the adventure followed by a fun outing harvesting fruit or vegetables. • At Verger Belliveau Orchard on the banks of the Petitcodiac River outside Memramcook, NB, pick your own apples and enjoy cider and a snack in their café. The orchard hosts events including apple blossom days, concerts and wagon rides.


Left: An appetitzer at Rossmount featuring local lobster, vegetables and herbs. Above: Lobster boats land at the wharf in Kouchibouguac National Park.

Eat outside Enjoy a view and fresh air when dining outside, whether it be on the deck of a restaurant, a picnic table or sitting on driftwood on a beach. • In Saint Andrews, several restaurants have waterfront decks. At the edge of the main drag, the Niger Reef Tea House nestles among tall trees. The deck of this historic log cabin overlooks Passamaquoddy Bay and the Blockhouse. • In Alma, gather materials for a picnic at the Octopus Garden Café. Pick up organic bread and vegetables, local cheese and meats, along with decadent desserts to enjoy at Fundy National Park. (Or take the easy route and ask for a meal to go.)

Stop for hand-painted signs “Smelts for sale. Fresh samphire greens. Brown eggs; $4. Red, white and blue potatoes...” On backroads, you can find home-made signs announcing the sale of wild foods, like goosetongue greens and blueberries; seafood, such as clams and mackerel; garden produce and herbs (particularly summer savory in Acadian areas). You have the opportunity to meet and support local food producers, get fresh local food and experience the friendly, down-home culture of rural NB.

Try food from other cultures New Brunswick is Canada’s only officially bilingual province. This contributes to cultural diversity in that anglophone New Brunswickers have opportunities to sample Acadian foods. Also, NB attracts immigrants from the world’s francophone nations, including many African countries. • Gulliver’s World Café in Gagetown uses local ingredients in recipes gathered from around the world. The result is an ever-changing menu of multicultural dishes. • Check out multicultural festivals in cities and towns.

• On a guided tour of the Metepenagiag Heritage Park in Red Bank outside Miramichi, explore the site of the 3,000-year-old Aboriginal community, gather tea ingredients and sample fish or game cooked over a campfire with wild rice.

Feast at festivals Food festivals offer ways to sample new dishes and try foods from various chefs. Many incorporate live music and outdoor events. • Some focus on a particular food, such as the Richibucto Scallop Festival, Florenceville-Bristol’s National French Fry Day, Maisonnette’s Festival des Huîtres (oysters), Shediac Lobster Festival, Grand Falls’ Regional Potato Festival and St. Stephen’s Chocolate Fest. • Other festivals celebrate a range of foods. For example, Saint Andrews hosts Flavours New Brunswick and Indulge. • Cities have special events in various restaurants such as Chop Chop Restaurant Week in Saint John or Dine Around Freddy in Fredericton.

Raise a toast Eat local and drink local. NB has seen a huge growth in small breweries, wineries, distilleries and cider houses. • Find a designated driver and tour several microbreweries on a weekend, sampling as you go. • Sample local beers and foods while listening to live music on Fredericton’s walking bridge at Beer on the Bridge. • At Distillerie Fils du Roy in Petit-Paquetville, sip on gin, absinthe or beer while touring the distillery/brewery. Sébastien Roy brings life (and spirit!) to Acadian history as he recounts battles, love affairs, ghost ships and epic adventures while describing the stories behind his drinks and colourful labels. Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

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Market magic in Fredericton Five bustling farmers markets in one small city

Story and photography by John and Sandra Nowlan

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agic tricks are rarely part of a small city weekend market experience, but New Brunswick’s capital city of Fredericton boasts five bustling indoor and outdoor markets that include almost every option possible in a multicultural and casual shopping experience—including magic. In the historic Northside Market, open year-round on Saturdays and Sundays and located just across the river from Government House, not one but two local magicians have booths set up among the fresh produce, meats, baked goods, antique items, local handcrafts and plenty of great ethnic and regional food choices. This includes Rocketburgers, samosas and dim sum. “Grampa George” sells his own brand of homemade pickles and preserves—and “Magic Rik” asks passersby to “pick a card” or “hold this coin” as his sleight of hand amazes and delights kids and adults alike.  Having five farmers’ markets in a city with just 60,000 residents makes the New Brunswick capital unique, so we were keen to visit all of them on a short Thursday to Sunday visit. After checking into our hotel we walked just a block to the Garrison Grounds to witness the colourful Changing of the Guard Ceremony. A dozen young people in bright scarlet uniforms, accompanied by a bagpiper and drummer, re-enacted a marching and gun salute ceremony started in 1853 when the Infantry School Corps was established. The ceremony is repeated several times daily. But this was Thursday and we didn’t want to miss the adjacent Garrison Night Market (4:30 to 9pm). Started just over a year ago after Fredericton’s Tourism Director saw similar night markets in Asia and thought the concept would work well in the capital city, it has now surpassed expectations. Every Thursday in the spring and summer more than 130 food trucks and vendor booths— spread out along Carlton Street and next to the library—sell all manner of traditional and exotic merchandise including fresh fruits and vegetables, microbrews, handcrafts from

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Right: The Fredericton Boyce Farmers Market is always busy regardless of the season. Below: At the Garrison Night Market during summer months, visitors can sample ciders and other delights.

around the province and a wide variety of international culinary offerings reflecting the new sophistication and ethnic background of many residents. Two unusual booths featured Tiffany’s Tipsy Treats (jams, jellies, preserves and pastries made with run, gin, vodka, tequila and whisky) and dairy-free Scottage Cheeze, produced by local resident Margaret Scott and made from almond flour. There’s a climbing wall and members from the Changing of the Guard Ceremony walk through the outdoor market regularly. Buskers are frequently present and

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there are two entertainment stages, offering continuous live music.   Fredericton’s major and long-established market draw is the Boyce Farmers Market, dating from 1951. Located downtown just a couple of blocks from the riverfront, this huge indoor/outdoor marketplace has more than 200 vendors each week selling a wide variety of garden, kitchen and workshop products, all produced within 100 kilometres of Fredericton. Canadian Geographic Travel called it one of the Top 10 markets in Canada and it’s easy to see why. One of the largest


Top: ECO Market co-ordinator Kaity Harquail. ECO stands for Environmentally Conscious Options. Above: Gun Salute. Changing of the Guard.

Some of Tiffany's Tipsy Treats.

outdoor booths is run by a Mennonite community from nearby Woodstock. Their fabulous looking organic produce, grown and harvested “without internal combustion engines” is sold by men in traditional straw hats and suspenders.  Oddly, all purchases are put into plastic bags.  At the new ECO Market, a short drive across the river on Canada Street, everything that vendor Kaity Harquail sells must be “sustainable, ethical and local.” All produce comes from close by and is totally organic. In fact, some of the garden plots are within a few metres of the market stand. Bags to hold purchases of food or handcrafts are

cleverly made from used newspapers. The small market is planning to expand as more consumers demand these kinds of products in their lives. Back downtown, the final weekend market we visited was the unique Cultural Market on Saunders Street in the old YMCA Building. Here, one gets to see (and taste) the amazing cultural and ethnic diversity that makes Fredericton such a special city. Food booths dominate with flavour treats from Syria, Lebanon, Greece, Iran, and India. While we loved the Fredericton markets, we also enjoyed many of the extraordinary amenities of this magical city. We stayed for

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Top: Vendor Mennonite producers with their crops. Left: 11th Mile restaurant features unusual creative cuisine.

Brazilian food at the Cultural Market.

a night in the spacious Bliss Carman Suite at the delightful, newly opened By the River B&B, a 1903 historic home on the Saint John River. It was recently converted into an eight-room bed and breakfast by a Chinese couple. Their young daughter, a talented musician, often plays the zither for guests in the living room. We also had a brief visit with Deborah Quartermain, the genial host at the three bedroom Quartermain House B&B. A few years ago it was listed as the number one bed and breakfast in North America by Booking.com. Great markets usually mean great restaurants and Fredericton has developed a fine culinary scene. We enjoyed outstanding meals at the new Provincial Gastro Lounge and the long established Palate casual restaurant on Queen Street. Our most imaginative meal was at the 11th Mile on York Street, opened just over a year ago by a

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New Brunswick couple who made their mark on the Toronto culinary scene and returned home. The creativity of the food was obviously labour intensive, and it was delicious. Our goal was to visit all the weekend Fredericton markets but there’s so much to see and do in Fredericton that a few days doesn’t do it justice. It’s a great walking city, especially the old railway bridge across the Saint John River that’s now restricted to foot and bicycle traffic. We had a reward on the far side of the bridge at Picaroons craft brewery, the city’s oldest, built in the former railway’s roundhouse, and one of many craft beer breweries in the area. Near the entrance to the walking bridge visitors can’t miss the renowned Beaverbrook Art Gallery. As the curator told us, “A magnificent gallery like this in such a small city is unique.” Along with Salvador Dali’s large masterpiece, Santiago El Grande, the gallery, with its new expansion, features the finest British and Canadian works of art. There’s even Canada’s oldest birch bark canoe. Some imaginative official added stuffed wildlife below several paintings. It’s not at the Beaverbrook, but quirky stuffed wildlife can also be found at the Fredericton Regional Museum at the Garrison Grounds. On display is a preserved frog, discovered near Fredericton in 1885, that became a pet and grew to a massive 42 pounds before “croaking” (sorry). The markets in Fredericton are amazing but city council took the concept a step further by planting 33 varieties of vegetables, herbs and edible flowers in various spots around the city in parks, planter pots and on boulevards. Visitors and locals are encouraged to help themselves to produce.


The unmatched tides of Fundy

No-one ever gets tired of this global phenomenon

Story and photography by Janet Wallace

Low tide along the Fundy shoreline. Inset: Lobster boats at low tide in Alma. They can only enter the harbour for an hour or two before and after high tide.

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houghts of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn fill my head as I look around the cave. It’s larger than my house and features a great view of glistening waves in the distance. After hiking in the sun, the cool air is refreshing. “This would be a great place to camp!” I say to my friend. She laughs and points up. On the roof of the cave, about 10 feet above my head, seaweed hangs. Where we stand, she explains, will be underwater in six hours. Not only that, but the entire cave will be filled with water. This is my introduction to the Bay of Fundy. Later I sit on a tall rock a few feet away from the water’s edge. Mesmerized, I watch row upon row of waves, a bit like a waterfall on its side. Each splash of a wave crash against the land is followed by a muffled drumroll as cobblestones tumble in the undertow. A few minutes later, I realize my perch is surrounded by water more than a foot deep. In the Bay of Fundy, the tide comes in quickly. Having the world’s highest tides isn’t just an issue of bragging rights—it’s an incredible natural event. But you may miss it if you just drive along the coast, stopping only long enough to take selfies at scenic spots. You can better appreciate the tides by staying still. I love, for example, having picnics with friends on rocky shorelines. We consider the tide before laying out our goodies. If the tide is going out, we sit wherever we want. If the tide is coming in, we unpack the food far from the water’s edge. (Hint: Fundy lobster makes a great picnic lunch.) When I have guests from away, they often want to sit right next to the water regardless of which way the tide is going. I suggest they pick out a rocky outcrop several feet from the water’s edge and keep an eye on it. A minute or two later, they express amazement as the rock disappears under water. In inlets and pathways between rocks, the water can come in as fast as 10 metres (33 feet) a minute.

The coastline of the Bay of Fundy is incredibly dynamic. The speed of the tide is just one element of this. Every time I go to the shore, I see something new. Even during one walk, the scenery can change drastically. Miles of rippled sand at low tide can be replaced by whitecaps crashing against the dunes a few hours later. The waves bring treasures. One day you might walk on a sandy beach. The day after, again at low tide, you might find the beach covered in cobblestones, driftwood or shells. Even more remarkable are the huge boulders that appear and then disappear with the tide: proof that we are dealing with a powerful force of nature. People along the coast learn to heed the tides. In Alma, for example, lobster boats can only enter the harbour for an hour or two before and after high tide. If you visit at high tide in lobster season, you’ll see lots of activity. While the boats are floating and water splashing against the top of the wharf, the fishermen have just a short window of time to unload their precious, delicious cargo. Six hours later, you can witness the classic Fundy image of fishing boats sitting in their wooden “cradles” on the muddy seafloor. The Hopewell Rocks also provides a backdrop for the dramatic show. At low tide, you can meander among the base of the “flowerpot rocks.” The rock formations look a bit like potted plants given the few trees on the top of the terracotta-coloured pillars. They are actually tiny islands about the square footage of a small house but four to seven stories high. At high tide, you can kayak among the tops of the rocks at eye level with the pebble-encrusted sandstone that was far above your head several hours before. Humans aren’t the only creatures to appreciate the massive tidal swings. Hundreds of thousands of shorebirds take advantage of the huge expanse of mudflats exposed at low tide to devour invertebrates. After a feeding frenzy of two to three weeks in late summer, they Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

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Nailing down the numbers When planning an excursion by the Bay of Fundy, the following information might help make your trip more enjoyable and safe. • Always check the tide before going out. You can find tide tables at many tourist venues and online at www.waterlevels.gc.ca. • It takes about 6 hours and 13 minutes for the Fundy tide to come in or out; this is the difference between high and low tide. • The magnitude of the tides increases the further you go up the bay and into the tidal rivers. So around Saint Andrews, NB, near the mouth of the bay, the tides are 6 to 8 metres (20-27 feet). At the upper Bay of Fundy, near Hopewell Cape, NB, the tides are 10-15 m (35-49 feet). In Nova Scotia’s Minas Basin, where the tide is squeezed into the inlet, the tides can reach 16 metres (53 feet). That’s the height of a five-storey building! • The tidal phenomenon creates whirlpools and rip tides. For this reason, kayaking on your own can be challenging. Kayak tours are available along the coastline. The operators know when it’s safe to venture out and where to go. • Be sure to keep track of time and your exit route. When walking on a sandbar or among rock formations, you can suddenly find your route to the high tide mark has been cut off by water. Every year, beach walkers either take an unplanned swim to safety or need to be rescued from sandbars or cliffs. Top: Kayaking at Hopewell Rocks. Above: Watching shorebirds at Dorchester. Right: Fundy lobster makes a great picnic lunch.

acquire the energy reserves to fly south, many going non-stop to South America. From observation decks at Dorchester and Mary’s Point, NB, you can watch massive flocks of birds showing off their synchronized flying routines. We hear so much about the high tides of the Bay of Fundy that we might neglect the wonder of the low tides. At low tide, you can walk for miles on sandy beaches that will be under water a few hours later. On rocky beaches, in areas only exposed for an hour or two each day, spiny sculpins dart for cover in tidepools, while hermit crabs seem to frolic in shallow water. One time when I was hiking at Fundy National Park, I met a woman rushing down the trail. She asked me when high tide was. When I explained it was 10 minutes earlier, she wailed.  “I can’t believe I missed it!” She came to a complete stop. “Guess there’s no point of going there now.”

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She had thought that the tide came in as a tsunami-like wave, a wall of water four stories high, at the precise moment of high tide. I think she confused the tidal magnitude with the tidal bore—the leading wave of the tide as it enters estuaries and rivers. I explained that the tide was in, but it was still beautiful. All along the coast of the Bay of Fundy, there are magnificent sights, from cobblestone beaches to sea caves, long stretches of sandy beaches to majestic red sandstone cliffs. The tidal phenomenon is certainly remarkable but, even without that, the area possesses natural beauty well worth exploring. It’s a great place for a quick visit even if you can’t stay for both high and low tides. However, to fully appreciate the tides, put in some time. Pick a beach and return there often to see how it changes. In between visits, you can explore the coastal communities, such as Alma and St. Martins, see the waterfalls at Fundy National Park, and stroll along the shoreline. When planning your trip, check out the list of “50 Amazing Places” at www.fundy-biosphere.ca of the Fundy Biosphere Reserve. The New Brunswick portion of the upper Bay of Fundy has been recognized as a World UNESCO Biosphere site. It has been 25 years since I first entered the sea cave on an isolated cobblestone beach. That was my introduction to the Bay of Fundy and the start of a lifelong love affair with the Fundy coast.


Eat here: Six dishes you must savour in Saint John, NB By Shelley Cameron-McCarron

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nyone familiar with the port city of Saint John, NB, can tell you what a hip culinary destination it is. Here are six great dishes one must try while visiting:

1. THE PLACE: Italian by Night THE DISH: Calamari Fritto – deep-fried calamari, arrabiata sauce, basil oil, and Maldon sea salt flakes

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Chef/co-owner Michelle Hooten says the calamari at Italian by Night—an urban Italian restaurant and bar with a cuisine focused on combining imported Italian ingredients with local seasonal ingredients—has been on the menu since they opened on December 2, 2016. “It was my nemesis! I couldn’t get it right: wrong portion size, too tough, bland. It tasted like so many other calamaris until I changed the crumb. A secret ingredient knocked it out of the park. Instead of grilling it, we deep fry it. Instead of rings the body is fanned causing a beautiful presentation. It is our number one selling antipasti,” she says. On Italian by Night: “In this ever-changing world, we believe delicious simplicity is always current. Our goal is to share our love of Italy by creating an authentic Italian dining experience. The vibe is generous and relaxed. The food is pure and sensual,” she says. “The contemporary industrial turn-of-the-century space is the perfect backdrop for dropping by for a glass of wine and pizza at the bar, sharing platters with friends or colleagues at one of our signature family-style tables or a relaxed, intimate evening n to of dining.” On the Saint John dining scene: “The wonderful thing about Uptown Saint John is the critical mass of great restaurants. You can literally walk to wine bars, micro-brewery pubs, restaurants, both high-end and

mid-range, breakfast spots, cool coffee shops, a scotch bar, art galleries and theatres. Almost all of the restaurants in Uptown are independents, which offers the consumer a unique and diverse choice selection.”    2. THE PLACE: Saint John Ale House THE DISH: Bacon Maple Scallops – Fundy, NB smoked bacon, cocktail sauce, fire grilled dulse. “Our bacon maple scallops have been on the menu since day one. It’s a crowd favourite cause who doesn’t like a bacon wrapped scallop?” says chef/ co-owner Jesse Vergen (who has a small farm outside the city where many of the vegetables, flowers and herbs are grown for the restaurant (check @axilgardens). “What sets them apart is how we use a whole piece of bacon per scallop and after we cook them, they are soaked in heated maple and garlic. The process keeps the juices of the scallop inside it. To finish, we place them on a tangy cocktail sauce and crush fire-grilled dulse (a local seaweed) on top.” On the Saint John Ale House: “(It’s a) progressive pub with a focus on local products from food, beer, to wine. We are located on the historic market slip on the Saint John waterfront, and the building the Saint John Ale House is in has been around since 1886! It’s modern with a touch of Saint John rustic grit, paired with a hip staff and soul/funk numbing to keep the vibe strong.” On the Saint John dining scene: “Saint John became a foodie city because of the residents deciding to draw their line in the sand by not leaving or even deciding to move back! But more importantly deciding to create awesome things in our city instead of looking enviously at other cities. People should visit Saint John for the food, the beer, the vibe, but most importantly the people!”

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3. THE PLACE: VEGolution THE DISH: Veggie Burger – house made patty (brown rice, mushroom) house sauce, lettuce, tomato, onion, pickle, cheddar on a brioche bun.

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“I decided to make the anti-veggie burger, lol,” says chef/owner Keith Broome. “At first, we didn’t have a veggie, but everyone wanted us to have one so I gave in. I figured if I’m going to do one, it would be a burger that held together, had lots of sauce and looked nothing like your everyday veggie burger. Our vegan burger is made mostly from mushrooms, brown rice, onions, spices, house burger sauce and other stuff (top secret), can be made with real cheddar or vegan cheddar.”

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4. THE PLACE: Pomodori Pizzeria THE DISH: Cherry Pom Pesto Pizza – pesto sauce with semi dried cherry tomatoes, fresh mozzarella, basil and cracked pepper.

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“One of our top sellers is our chicken pesto pizza. The cherry pom pesto is the vegetarian equal,” says Janice MacPherson. “We use semi-dried cherry tomatoes that have been marinated in oil on our house made pesto, top it with bocconcini, fresh basil and cracked n rso pepper. The tomatoes char e h just the right amount when cooked in our wood oven for an incredible pop of flavour.” On Pomodori Pizzeria: “We create Neapolitan style, thin crust pizzas, fresh salads and house-made gelato … Over the years, we had dined out a lot and felt there was something missing in the restaurant scene in New Brunswick. With young children, there were no options to give our kids a delicious, but healthy meal choice. At one lunch out we decided we needed to ‘put up or shut up’ so we putup and opened Pomodori.

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Wood fired pizza is truly the original ‘fast food’ and we wanted to show that fast food can also be very good food.” They took their recipe to the World Pizza Championships in Italy in 2009 and took eighth place overall in a tough category, ‘Margherita Pizza.’ “Pomodori is Italian for ‘tomatoes’ as everything started with our sauce,” says MacPherson. “We love being a place for everyone looking for great food, but especially that families can feel comfortable coming here with their little ones.” On the Saint John dining scene: “Our city is beautiful in so many ways—the mix of modern and historical architecture, the bay surrounding us, the mysteriousness of the fog as it rolls in and out of the city and the passion of the residents for our small city has generated a very cool vibe in our Uptown core. There is a great mix of dining options in such a small walkable area. We like to spend evenings choosing single items at multiple restaurants doing our own ‘mini food tour,’ including Pomodori, of course.” Two more great dishes to sample: 5. THE PLACE: Thandi THE DISH: Butter Chicken – boneless chicken simmered in a creamy mild, sweet curry sauce. 6. THE PLACE: East Coast Bistro THE DISH: Sticky Toffee Pudding – with rum toffee sauce and vanilla gelato.


Dear Mainlanders, Fresh seafood with a side of fresh air.

Come find your Island. ExplorePEI.com

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The PEI road trip

Unhurried and easy means total relaxation Story and photography by Shelley Cameron-McCarron

French River is a perfect photo stop with its colourful painted panoramas.

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’m not sure what’s more enticing: waking up in an active lighthouse to the sound of waves caressing PEI’s ruddy shores or the smell of fresh baked cranberry and cinnamon muffins wafting up from the kitchen below. Either way, I’m counting myself lucky to be road-tripping Prince Edward Island: spending a night at the West Point Lighthouse Inn & Museum, rolling down Canada’s oyster coast (do step into a dory with Valley Pearl Oysters), learning about Stompin’ Tom’s legacy in Skinner’s Pond (for all you karaoke singers), falling (once again) under the spell of Cavendish’s jagged cliffs, and sinking into another era with a stay at the ever-elegant Dalvay-by-the-Sea. Here’s a four-day itinerary on how to take the ultimate PEI road trip, exploring the Central Coast and North Cape Coastal Drive.

Day one Road-tripping around PEI is relaxed vacation at its best. Starting in Charlottetown, the island’s genteel capital city, set your sights on Victoria-by-the-Sea, a fishing-village-slash-charming-tourist-meccaslash-storybook-village on the Island’s south shore, where the beaches are redder and the water is warmer than the north shore’s equally enchanting white sand beaches. At low tide, expect to see clam diggers busy. Victoria has that slow down and savour feeling, with galleries, studios, a theatre and a chocolate factory lining its streets. When we arrive, a group of stand-up paddleboarders are working their way across the water and the village’s lanes are full of people wandering into artisan shops, walking the wharf, checking what’s on the playbill at the Victoria Playhouse and making dinner plans. Book reservations at the Landmark Oyster House where you can start your PEI oyster tasting exploits with flourish. Though you’ll be tempted to linger, it’s worth hitting the road for the 90-minute drive west to the small community of West Point to catch the sunset (it’s stunning) at tonight’s accommodations, the West Point Lighthouse  Museum & Inn. The lighthouse, with its black and white stripes, is one of PEI’s most distinctive, and happiness is going to bed with the sound of crashing waves as your background track. All the

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Go to sleep with the windows open and you can drift off to the sound of waves hitting the shore at West Point LIghthouse Inn and Museum.

rooms overlook the Northumberland Strait, with “the Tower” on the second floor of the lighthouse, its most popular room. Leave a window open and let the waves lull you to sleep.

Day two Come morning, you too may wake to the soothing sounds of waves and the aroma of freshly made muffins. After breakfast (my stay included a pleasing breakfast buffet with plenty of fresh, in-season berries) wander into the extensive onsite lighthouse museum (admission is free with a stay), climbing up the light tower, PEI’s tallest at just over 67 feet. Then head out to stroll interpretive trails onsite and wander down to the shoreline to walk the beach. With that constant hypnotic sound of the sea, a slight breeze in the air and the sun coming up, I wonder why anyone would ever leave this place.    After check-out, make the 40-minute drive along Route 14 to Skinners Pond and the toe tappin’ tales at the Stompin’ Tom Centre. The road map of the life of this Canadian icon is fascinating. Immerse yourself in this history, see the one-room schoolhouse he once attended, and sing karaoke (will it be Bud the Spud or Sudbury Saturday Night?) There’s live music daily from 1 to 2 p.m. and it’s recommended to pre-book dinner theatre tickets. It’s popular and does sell out. With a song in your heart, continue the journey, driving to North Cape, PEI’s most northwesterly tip, to discover the colliding of the tides, where the Gulf of St Lawrence and the Northumberland Strait meet. Interestingly, because it borders two waterways, the area has two fishing seasons. Visit North Cape Interpretive Centre which houses a gift shop, marine aquarium, and interpretive centre. The Wind and Reef Restaurant in the centre, serves a satisfying lobster roll: good mussels too. Back in the car, it’s about a 35-minute drive to tonight’s accommodations: Mill River Resort, recently renovated and a popular golf destination, that offers amenities from spa services to a tennis court on site.   Enjoy the property before driving to Alberton, 15 minutes away, for


Day three Oyster fishing hasn’t changed much in 150 years. It’s not a fancy operation, but it’s a real one, and it’s also about the kind of great lifestyle you live. Those are gems you learn along Canada’s oyster coast, from Jeff Noye, co-owner of Valley Pearl Oysters, mayor of Tyne Valley, and former long-time chairman of the Tyne Valley Oyster Festival. Valley Pearl offers tours that take visitors through the process of oyster farming on Prince Edward Island, from touring their production facility, to getting out on Malpeque Bay and coming back to feast on fresh shellfish. It’s all kinds of wonderful. Or order a late lunch at Malpeque Oyster Barn where you can get the freshest oysters possible coupled with even more beautiful views. Spend the afternoon chasing peace, quiet and painted panoramas as you explore

Day four After a memorable dinner and a blissful sleep in historic Dalvay, spend the morning cycling the Gulf Shore Parkway and exploring PEI National Park, relaxing at the beach or simply enjoying the charms of Dalvay’s grounds. Plan to stop at Richard’s Seafood, a well-known fish shack on nearby Covehead Wharf, for a lobster roll or fish and chips (when it closes each season, locals have been known to weep) before making your way back to Charlottetown.

Clockwise from top left: The Cavendish cliffs; Landmark Oyster House, Victoria-by-the-Sea; Green Gables Heritage Place; North Cape Wind Farm; Northport Pier Restaurant.

Celebrating 15 years!

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dinner at Northport Pier Restaurant. Housed in a former boat shop with big airy windows looking out on herons and the wharf beyond, its view is outstanding, letting diners sit and enjoy watching the fishing boats and pleasure craft steam in. Try the crab cakes (snow crab, PEI potatoes, onions and herbs pan fried and topped with roasted red pepper aioli with a choice of side) polished off with a slice of very good coconut cream pie.

the Central Coastal Drive, home to sandstone cliffs and some of PEI’s most incredible ocean vistas. French River offers a great photo opportunities en route to Cavendish where it truly is awe-inspiring to visit the National Park to drink in the world-famous views. Soul replenished, step back to the days of author Lucy Maud Montgomery and what inspired her to write Anne of Green Gables. At Green Gables Heritage Place, visitors step into the house that inspired the work, walk the Haunted Woods and Lovers Lane, dress up in period clothes for selfies, and meet characters from Avonlea skipping along. A new, expanded interpretive centre opened on site last May. Particularly appealing are the visual biography walls that include stages important in Maud’s life. When finished, drive through gorgeous PEI National Park from Cavendish toward Dalveyby-the-Sea, near Stanhope, to check into the Queen Anne revival-style estate turned hotel, a National Historic Site, that wows with period furniture and sandstone fireplace, and was once a summer home owned by an oil tycoon.  A five-minute walk down the pleasing grounds, and across the road, will put you on the beach, listening to the ocean, a symphony that plays to the heart. During my visit I wanted to jump in the waves, but I could not knowing, I must arrive soon at Dalvay’s sweeping MacMillan Dining Room for dinner with friends. Still, I was momentarily powerless, lingering at the shore, listening to the laughs and watching the dewy blue pink of the sky on the horizon.

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Down red lanes and over green fields The hidden hooch makers of PEI Story and photography by Darcy Rhyno

Above: Myriad View display. Right: Captain Eric Wagner, Moth Lane Brewing.

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sing traditions passed down from the days of prohibition, we are the first legal booze operation in the family.” These are the words printed on the back of a growler at Moth Lane Brewing, a place I found at the end of some red dirt road in PEI. The confessional blurb goes on to say, “We sleep a lot more soundly than they did. With both eyes closed.” I’m not exactly sure where I am. The address on the back of the bottle claims I’m in Ellerslie, but there’s no town around here I can see. What I do know is that Captain Eric Wagner composed that little piece of island wit about his own family, and I’m in his former oyster farming equipment shed, which he’s converted into this nifty little brewery. He tells me he can walk (read stumble) home in the dark along a short path to his house. “I built it with my own two hands when I was 19,” adds Captain Eric, as he refers to himself. So, I guess I’m in his back yard. “I’ve been on a boat most of my life,” he says as he pulls me a pint of his pride and joy, a double IPA he calls The Answer. It’s a brew of his own design that finally met all his expectations for what a beer should be—bold and complex in flavour, and packing a punch at eight per cent alcohol content. You name it, he’s fished it or brewed it—tuna, mackerel,

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herring, cod, haddock, lobsters, oysters, stout made with his own oysters, Red Dirt Road Ale, Motorboat’r Blonde, Drag’n Anchor Belgian. Of all those fishing licences, he’s only given up the lobster, just in case the beer business doesn’t work out. Captain Eric looks the part—a stout fisherman’s frame and paws for hands from a lifetime of pulling traps and baiting hooks. His wire rim glasses match his wide, salt and pepper moustache. His stories are told in effortlessly pulled threads that eventually knit themselves into whole cloth. When I ask him to elaborate on prohibition and illegal booze, he starts by telling me about his musician father, a thread that at first seems to belong to a different cloth. “My father played in bands, and he was a party animal. After the gig was over at the Legion or a hall, he’d go somewhere else for an after party. This old guy said to him once, ‘You’re just like a moth. Wherever there’s a light on after one o’clock in the morning, that’s where you’re buzzing around.’” As it turns out, Captain Eric comes from a long line of moths. His grandfather was a fiddler and also played in bands. But it’s the other thing he did at night that brings the story around to answering my question.


Top: The vineyard at Myriad View near Rollo Bay. Left: The distillery room; Above right: Display at Myriad View Distillery.

“Back in 1943, when the summertime came and everybody went to work in the factories or the boats or wherever, they were making $15 a season,” Captain Eric begins. “By the time they were out of the season, they probably owed that. This place is shut down in wintertime.” Out of desperation, his ancestors got creative. “We were shoreline people. Whether it was taking rum in off the boats or making moonshine, it was a bunch of law-abiding people getting by. “Yes, they were rumrunners. There were cops always looking for my grandfather. He never got caught. But there weren’t any guns or anything. When my dad asked why he did it, he answered, ‘You guys need shoes and boots. I can grow everything else, but I can’t grow any shoes and boots. This is how I got the money to put the boots on your feet.’”

A spirit for independent spirits... and beers, ciders and wines Atlantic Canadians have a paradoxical relationship to their history as spirit smugglers. Even today, there’s a hint of shame that otherwise law-abiding people could be engaged in illicit activity to run the demon rum into their province. But now, a century later, there’s also a sense

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Above: Prince Edward Distillery; left: Blueberry stomping time at Rossignol Winery.

of pride for that signature spirit of independence so cleverly put to work out of necessity and opportunity in the face of hapless law enforcement. That proud independence is expressed in every pint of Moth Lane beer, made like Captain Eric’s house with his own hands. It’s to be found in wines, ciders, spirits, meads and beers down other red dirt roads and over green fields across the island. It’s true at the Barnone Brewery and Hop Farm in some out-of-the-way place with the pretty name of Rose Valley. Note how the brewery moniker can be read either as the name of their building or as the expression of the confidence they have in their brews—Barn One or Bar None. As with Captain Eric, that island wit is there in nearly every Barnone beer—Black Eye PA and La Vaca Loca (Crazy Cow) Milk Stout brewed with lactose. It’s not the only brew named for a one-of-a-kind farm animal. Of their Unidonk-Un-Common Pilsner, Barnone says, “Somewhere in the mystical valley of the ‘Rose’ wanders a hop grazing legendary beast. Half donkey, half unicorn, half messed up.” Double Hill’s Nomad Cider is made from wild apples found around their farm in the hills of Caledonia and across eastern PEI, capturing the very essence of half wild, stubbornly hardy Maritimers. With a similar salute to feral flora, the Island Honey Wine Company says of its most beloved beverage, “Drinking Wildflower Mead is a journey through a glass on the back of a bee.” Like pretty well every rural maker of grown-up beverages, PEI’s three wineries, all of them on the eastern end of the island, built their businesses, wineries and farms from the ground up in their own way. John Rossignol of Rossignol Estate Winery is considered a pioneer on

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PEI. He started making fruit and grape wines from his own crops in 1994. Jamie and Heather Matos of Matos Winery and Distillery bring generations of wine making experience from the Azores off Portugal, creating a trans-Atlantic hybrid of vineyard and winemaking practices. If there’s one booze brewer that captures the island’s secret history of untamed hooch makers, it’s Myriad View Distillery. On a rural road near Rollo Bay, the distillery takes its name and the name of its best sellers from the ever changing views of the Northumberland Strait and from the local history of illegal distilling. Backwoods brewers supplied weddings, wakes and weekend parties with moonshine throughout prohibition and beyond. PEI finally eased its liquor laws in 1948, long after every other Canadian province. Co-owners the Berrow and Mill families moved to the island a couple of decades ago and started the distillery in 2006, intent on capturing the spirit of those islanders who continued to operate their own stills. The result is more quaffable booze than the rough, unrefined stuff. While their Strait Shine is 50 per cent alcohol content and their Island Moonshine clocks in at 69 per cent, they are still smoother than their ancestors.

Hashtag Whatever The attitude of fierce and fiery independence in every bottle of shine is the stuff that makes rural, craft distilleries, breweries, cideries and wineries on PEI so good at what they do. When Captain Eric asked his wife if she was on board with him opening the Moth Lane Brewery, she answered, “If I said anything different, you wouldn’t listen anyway.” The anecdote makes everyone in the Captain’s taproom laugh and reminds me of the other half of the message he put on all his bottles. “Grab a pint, grab a growler, ponder life’s tough questions or post crap on social media. You do you. Get lost on the way, find yourself in our beer. #HASHTAGWHATEVER.” Lost is what I am down Moth Lane at the end of some red dirt road in I don’t-know-where PEI. I’m just here, sipping a pint I’ll find nowhere else on Earth, pulling together all those threads Captain Eric tossed in the air, wondering what it’s all about. For a moment, I consider posting a picture of the wisdom printed in white on the back of this brown bottle. I catch myself, put my phone away and instead savour The Answer.


Plenty to occupy three generations in Prince Edward Island! Story and photography by Sandra Phinney

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y eyes aren’t big enough to take it all in: the sheer joy of For our last night at the shore, we had a lobster boil and I counted having three generations of our extended family together for 21 adult brothers and sisters, our collective offspring, and grandkids. a week on Prince Edward Island. We are hunkered down Mind you they kept moving, so I may have missed one or two. But the at A Distant Shores Beachfront Cottages on the South shore. When best part was to come. Barrie and I had made arrangements for Lucy I read on the website: “With the highway over half a mile away, and Ellie to join us as we followed our nose for three more days before the waves, breezes and songbirds sound better than any new age returning home. Space prevents me from waxing poetic about this but relaxation tape,” I was hooked. I’ll try and condense the highlights. At the risk of sounding like a walking billboard for this place, I’ll Before heading to Shaw’s Hotel to hunker down for a couple of simply say there isn’t one thing I would change. The best part (aside nights, we went to the noon performance of The Young Company from the mile-long beach just over a small embankment) is a giant lawn at the outdoor amphitheatre at the Confederation Centre of the Arts the width and breadth of the site. Scattered here and there are saw in Charlottetown. Every noon from Monday to Saturday, 13 young horses, swings, a volleyball & badminton court, along with horseshoe performers put on a free high energy show loaded with songs, stories and sand pits. We could sit on our deck and watch the kids playing on and dance routines. (Tip: it can get searing hot in the sun; wear hats what felt like our own private playground. and bring water.) Bonus: we all enjoyed the Riff Raff Room, a big blue shed that Eventually we found our way to Shaw’s Hotel. What a grand old houses not only a washer and dryer, but also hundreds of movies dame. (Celebrating its 160th anniversary this year!) Although I prefer and books, a great selection of games for all ages, and small sports to have the ocean within feet of where I’m staying, it was no hardship equipment like badminton racquets, soccer balls and volleyballs. Mid week, we pulled ourselves away to visit the MacGregor Old West Town and Petting Farm in Kensington. The owner, Elaine Clarke, is a relative of my husband, Barrie MacGregor but they hadn’t seen each other since they were children! Although Elaine had grown up on the island, she had worked as a nurse in the U.S. most of her adult life. Her dream of coming home has come true and she is operating her rendition of the “Old West,” and has it well-stocked with miniature animals. It’s both educational and entertaining. While Barrie and Elaine caught up on news of the MacGregor clan, our twin seven year-old granddaughters, Lucy and Ellie, were in heaven holding baby rabbits, patting donkeys, and watching the antics of Snorts, one of the miniature pigs. They also had a blast dressing Top: Distant Shores Beachfront Cottages on the south shore offer the typical family-oriented PEI vacation, just far enough away up inside the “Saloon” where they found a trunk from the highway to eliminate traffic noise. Above: The MacGregor Old West Town and Petting Farm in Kensington proves, once full of clothes and accessories. again, that you can’t ever go wrong with kids and animals. Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

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Clockwise from top: Co. of Young Canadians; Greenwich Dunes beach walk; Food at Shaw's Hotel.

for us to take a five-minute walk through the woods to the shore with its stunning beach and what’s touted as the “longest dune system in the western hemisphere.” Later, we headed down the road to Brackley’s Drive-In Theatre. What a hoot. We sat on a wide expanse of ground below the parked cars and filled our bellies with buttered popcorn while watching The Lion King. Ellie and Lucy had seen it before and loved telling us all about the characters, and where the scary parts were, although they were careful not to divulge the ending. I’m not sure how we crammed two major excursions the next day, but we did. At 9am we boarded Top Notch Charters at the Charlottetown waterfront with Captain Mark Jenkins. Joining us were visitors from Japan, California and Western Canada. Mark

is a fount of information about the fishery in general and lobster fishing in particular. He let Ellie and Lucy steer his boat, haul a lobster trap, and get up close and personal with Larry the Lobster, a huge specimen of Homarus americanus. Then, we zoomed out of the city towards Hampshire to visit Island Hill Farm, but not before stopping at Cows Creamery. I’ve always thought the price of Cows Ice Cream was outrageous—but so is the ice cream. Outrageously delicious, that is. Alas, our timing was off to have a tour but we settled for some amazing cones. Arriving at Island Hill Farm, I thought it may be one petting farm too many, but was pleasantly surprised to find a totally different operation. The highlight for Lucy and Ellie was petting newborn bunnies and feeding

baby goats a bottle of milk. Mid afternoon, owner Flory Sanderson showed up, gathered all the children, and mesmerized them by reading a story. We returned to Shaw’s pretty tuckered and discover that there was a special program for kids during supper. Off they went to be entertained with the staff for three hours, while Barrie and had a leisurely meal on our own. I felt quite grown up. For the last leg of our island holiday we headed “Down East” as islanders say, to the Elmira Railways Museum. Think museums are stuffy places for kids? Think again. This one houses one of Atlantic Canada’s largest model train collections. It also offers two rides—a miniature train ride around the property, and another in a work trolley. Both were huge hits with Lucy and Ellie in spite of the train getting derailed the first time ‘round. I especially enjoyed the station master’s office and proceeded to ask a fellow some questions until I realized he was merely a mannequin sitting at a desk. With more energy to burn (the kids that is) we headed to the East Point Lighthouse where they climbed to the top with Barrie. That didn’t wear them out so we headed to Greenwich National Park. Likely due to its remote location, it’s also one of the less populated beaches. The parabolic dunes are worth the short hike into the beach (and there are many trails throughout the property.) This is definitely a “must-return-to” place. Our lodgings for the night were at The Inn at St. Peter’s, a charming place overlooking St. Peter’s Bay. My only regret is that we arrived late that evening and had to leave early the next day to catch the ferry. The next time we’ll simply have to book three days there, as it’s the perfect location to explore “Down East.” Besides, owner Karen Milligan has the best home made ice creams for dessert (move over Cows!) and, if you love flowers and plants as I do, you can feast your eyes on more than 25,000 of them.

4th Annual

Prince Edward Island Lobster Festival June is PEI lobster season! Come getaway to beautiful Souris “By the Sea” Prince Edward Island on Sunday June 28th for the 4th Annual PEI Lobster Festival. Enjoy the lobster roll challenge, lobster eating competition, watch demonstrations, enjoy traditional Island music and take part in our other events that celebrate PEI lobster. Join us that evening for a traditional delicious PEI lobster supper hosted by Island Food Ambassador Chef Michael Smith.

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For tickets, schedule and information please visit PEILobsterFestival.com

peilobster

Hope to see you there!

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Big challenges, big rewards Hiking and biking Gros Morne National Park Story and photography by Darcy Rhyno

Above: The welll named Lookout Trail. Inset: Bakers Brook Falls.

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’m having a hard time keeping up with my informal guide, Peter Thurlow. He’s an experienced mountain biker who enjoys showing visitors around his beloved Gros Morne National Park on Newfoundland’s west coast. We’re cycling the Bakers Brook Falls Trail, which Thurlow knows like the back of his hand and considers an easy to moderate ride. I’ve done a little off road biking, but I’m twice his age, so pumping my legs to climb the short, steep inclines and power over all the roots and rocks is taking its toll. My legs and lungs are burning, so I’m relieved when we hit a flat stretch of bog spanned by a boardwalk. We’ve gained enough altitude to see over the shrubbery clear to the ocean with nothing but a few stumps to interrupt the view. From here on, it’s an easy pedal to the end of the trail where a steady thunder is vibrating in the air around me. We lean our bikes against a fence and follow a short path down slippery stairs to a ledge with a view of a horseshoe shaped waterfall. By now, I shouldn’t be surprised when I come upon such a natural wonder, given that they seem to be around every corner in Gros Morne. Thurlow leads the way to three lookoffs, each with a different perspective on the raging white water, tumbling down a series of rocky ledges before reaching the final Big Falls. We take time at each to marvel at the reward for all that strenuous cycling.

The favourites The Bakers Brook Falls Trail is also a favourite of Rebecca Stone, co-owner with her husband Ian Stone of Tour Gros Morne. They offer guided hiking trips in the park that range from a couple of easy hours of walking to several days of strenuous trekking. Rebecca Stone says the best time to hike Bakers Brook is in spring, and for good reasons. “It’s a 10-kilometre loop trail with boardwalks and takes you through thousands of wild flowers. Then at the end you get to a beautiful waterfall.” This is just one of 20 Gros Morne trails for day hiking, some of which are also suitable for mountain biking. At the top of Stone’s list is a trail called The Big Lookout. “It’s a full eight-hour hike that is unmarked,” Stone says, which means hikers need a guide like her. “It terraces up the rolling hills in the southern portion of the park, starting in Woody Point, then brings you to an elevation of 600 metres.” She says the view from the top is unparalleled. “Here, you get a 360-degree panoramic view of the entire park.” Guests who sign up with Tour Gros Morne really enjoy The Big Lookout. The view is one thing, says Stone, but she adds, “the trail is soft on their feet, which is a plus when they’re hiking with us on a week-long adventure and the majority of the trails are very rocky.” For those who prefer shorter outings, Stone says there’s a smaller version of this hike. It’s marked, so hikers can tackle it alone. “The Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

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Above: One of several waterfalls you'll discover; pause and take in the view; the Tablelands is a remarkable spot to visit.

Above: Hikers enjoying the boat tour on Western Brook Pond.

Little Lookout is roughly two hours return. I consider this one to be the hardest and best short day hikes. It starts in the parking lot of the Discovery Centre just outside Woody Point and gives you a similar 360-degree view of the park.” “We really do have hikes for all abilities,” Stone says. From boardwalks to steep, rocky hikes, there’s something for everyone, even those in wheelchairs. There’s one hike in particular that’s suitable to almost any level of ability, and it tells one of the oldest stories on the planet. The Tablelands Trail crosses a rocky red wedge of the Earth’s mantle—one of the few places on the planet it’s visible—heaved from beneath the crust half a billion years ago when two ancient continents collided.

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As grand as it sounds, the hike is an easy hour or two stroll into a valley carved by glaciers. Strange flora like insectivorous pitcher plants and sundews thrive on the barren rock that’s devoid of nutrients and loaded with naturally toxic metals, preventing most other plants from growing. To make the walk even easier and more rewarding, a phone app and guided tour are available through the Discovery Centre. The Tablelands is the starting point for another signature Gros Morne hiking trail. Green Gardens descends from the barrens of the Tablelands through lush forest and field to a dramatic volcanic coastline of cliffs, beaches, caves and sea stacks. The trail gets its name from the meadows of wildflowers overlooking the sea. Be prepared to fall in love with this gorgeous landscape, and for those who do, primitive campsites are available to stay the night and wake up in a little piece of Newfoundland heaven. The star hike in Gros Morne is to the summit of the mountain that lends its name to the park. It’s the second highest peak on the

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island and the highest in the park. It’s the only day hike rated as difficult, but the rewards for this tough trek are many. The first four kilometres is an easy, gradual ascent to a cluster of small ponds, itself a worthwhile walk for the natural surroundings and the view. From there, hikers can judge the conditions and a final assessment about whether or not to continue on to the steep boulder-strewn gulley that leads to the summit. Children should not try this part of the trail because hikers can be exposed to high winds, hot sun and rapid temperature fluctuations. Rebecca Stone warns hikers not to be fooled by the 10-kilometre length, which to some may seem an easy day. “You start at sea level, hike up to over 800 metres in elevation and back down again, all in roughly six to 10 hours.” Views from the summit are the best in the park and rival anything else on Earth. On a clear day, hikers settle in on a rocky bluff to look out over the Long Range Mountains, Bonne Bay and the inland fjord called Ten Mile Pond. In the arctic alpine environment at


the top, hikers can spot wildlife like caribou, snowshoe hare and rock ptarmigan usually associated with locations much further north.

How to prepare for Gros Morne trails Whatever the trail, Stone says hikers need to understand where they are and take precautions. “People forget or don’t realize our hikes are situated on different geological features of the Appalachian Mountain Chain, the Earth’s mantle and even volcanic rock,” she says. “We suggest bringing durable hiking boots for the hard rocks you’ll be on all day.” “Terrain may be more rugged than folks are used to,” says Katie Broadhurst, co-author with Alexandra Fortin of Hikes of Western Newfoundland. Proper preparation is particularly important when planning a hike in Gros Morne. “As a local guide, people often tell me the trails are rougher, it’s windier and it rains more than they are used to. Newfoundland is called the Rock for a reason. There are bogs and bugs. Come ready to hike with good footwear, good rain gear and a day pack prepared with the 10 essentials.” Those who arrive well prepared to take on this rugged landscape with a good pair of hiking boots or a tough mountain bike—and that pack of essentials—will find hundreds of kilometres of trails, each with its own challenges and big rewards. “You can hike or ride and often see more animals than people, usually have a view of the ocean and get to explore some of the oldest land on the planet,” Broadhurst says.   Back on the Bakers Brook Falls Trail, when Peter Thurlow and I return from its big reward, we come across an interpretive sign entitled “A Broken Cycle” with little cartoon moose all over it. “It looks as though the forest here was smashed by a tornado,” the sign reads. “But it wasn’t beaten—it was eaten.” The sign goes on to explain that this forest was devastated by a little caterpillar that left only a few birch and spruce standing among the devastation. When young trees began to grow again, the exploding moose population browsed on the new growth, preventing the forest from regenerating. Moose are an invasive species here and are changing the very nature of the park, which is a big deal because, among other things, Gros Morne is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Still, the presence of the big herbivore in the park has its benefits as well. I can pause here on this trail that would otherwise be a dark path through the woods and look out over one of the country’s great landscapes.

Add these activities to your Gros Morne to do list. • Take a boat tour on Bonne Bay to see dolphins, whales and seabirds. • Take the boat tour on Western Brook Pond, the park’s great inland fjord, to see its highest waterfalls. • Bust a gut to the hilarity of musical comedy group, the Anchors Aweigh Band at the Ocean View Hotel in Rocky Harbour. • Take the water taxi between Rocky Harbour and Woody Point for the views and to visit both enclave towns. • Take in a show at the lovingly restored Woody Point Heritage Theatre. • Check out the Lobster Cove Head Lighthouse in Rocky Harbour. • Enjoy wild foraged mushrooms with your meal in Chanterelles Restaurant at the Sugar Hill Inn. • See live theatre by the Gros Morne Theatre Festival in Cow Head. • Check out the salt water aquarium and touch tank at the Bonne Bay Marine Station in Norris Point. • Rent a sea kayak from Gros Morne Adventures in Norris Point to get out on the water.

Left: Pitcher plant is the provincial flower for NL. Right: Ferns on the Gros Morne trail.

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Newfoundand’s stunning west coast A perfect weekend in scenic Corner Brook Story and photography by Darcy Rhyno

Above: Captian James Cook looks through his sextant at the Blow Me Down mountains. Right: Preserved railway cars from the Railway Society of Newfoundland.

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aptain James Cook—one of history’s greatest explorers and surveyors—is facing the wrong way. He has his eye to the sextant in his hands, looking through it at the surrounding Blow Me Down mountains with his back to the view of Corner Brook and the Bay of Islands. Of course, unlike me, he’s seen it all before. In 1763, he began a five year assignment—his first official job as surveyor for Britain—mapping the coast of Newfoundland. By the time he arrived here on the west coast to complete his work, he had honed his skills so finely that his charts of Corner Brook and area remained standard for the next century because of their remarkable accuracy. His work here prepared him for his more famous explorations of places like Hawaii and New Zealand. Along with the great explorer’s statue, the Captain James Cook Historic Site has four interpretive panels that tell his story. There’s a brass reproduction of the accurate chart of this area he produced and another commemorating his great accomplishment here in Newfoundland, as the panel puts it, “the first scientific, large scale, hydrographic survey to use precise triangulation to establish land outlines.” This is the perfect location to acknowledge Cook’s historic achievements in Newfoundland because it would be hard to find a better vantage point from which to view the island’s scenic western city and surrounding waters.

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Down into town It’s time to head down into town. Still in the mood for local history, I search out the Railway Society of Newfoundland’s beautifully preserved set of railway cars. They include steam locomotive number 593 and working diesel electric locomotive number 931, a snow plow car and passenger car. When I climb into the dining car, I can almost hear the clatter of cutlery and the clickety-clack of steel wheels on the track. Tables are set with white table clothes and place settings complete


A preserved dining car from the days of rail; The Newfoundland Emporium in Corner Brook; some of the locally-made flotsam and jetsam inside the store.

with vases of flowers, wine glasses and menus. The windows are hung with curtains. The story of the Newfoundland Railway that ran the full length of the island from Port Aux Basques in the west to St. John’s in the east is told on interpretive signs and by engaging hosts. The first track was laid in 1881, but the builders made the mistake of laying narrow gauge rails to cut costs and so the trains could make sharper turns. Later, the track size caused compatibility issues when it came time to link with Canada’s mainland railways. With typical Newfoundland humour the fastest train in the province was nicknamed The Newfie Bullet, but ironically so because it could only reach a top speed of 50 kilometres per hour. The last passenger train ran in 1969, the last freight train in 1988. A brand new street train (basically a truck frame dressed up like a locomotive that pulls a couple of open-air passenger cars) will take riders back temporarily to the age of rail. It was an instant hit when it started running on its loop route around the downtown last summer. Kids especially enjoy the recorded train sounds aboard the street train nicknamed The Mill Whistler. I find my way to the door of the Newfoundland Emporium where I’m greeted by a big bundle of friendliness, the resident Newfoundland dog, sporting a spiffy neckerchief. I give him a pet and head inside to

check out the flotsam and jetsam. I come eye to eye with a life size wooden sculpture of a Viking, chuckle at a couple of mummer dolls, heft a kellick and a set of moose antlers, browse the books and buy a bottle each of cloudberry or lingonberry syrup. Owner Dave Ledrew has even managed to save the whistle from The Newfie Bullet. As I depart, I feel like I’ve just experienced the entire province of Newfoundland and Labrador in a single store. In need of some down time, I search out the bit of quiet wildness in the middle of town on the trails that follow the Corner Brook Stream from City Hall to the Glynmill Inn Pond and beyond. I stop at the Glynmill Inn for dinner. First, I head downstairs for a glass of vino in The Wine Cellar bar with comfy armchairs and a large selection of wines from around the world. Then it’s upstairs for lunch in The Carriage Room with windows that look out onto a lush, tree shaded garden. After a salad made with fresh North Atlantic shrimp, I go for the hearty Cod aux Gratin because, of course, I’m in Newfoundland. It’s rich, creamy and delicious, a real stick-to-your-ribs Newfoundland supper. When my head hits the pillow, I’m instantly dreaming of tall ships and trains.

Go for a walk, Corner Brook style The next morning, I cross the Humber River to hike the Man in the Mountain Trail. It leads to the top of a round, little mountain that’s said to mark the place where treasure is buried on Shellbird Island in the river below. The story brings to mind a new novel I saw in The Newfoundland Emporium entitled Shellbird by Floyd Spracklin about two teens who pursue the legend. The huge rock face is said to resemble that of an old man’s face, but to me, it looks as if the mountain has been cleft in half by a giant hand. The views from the top are well worth the hike on the up-and-back trail, but there’s no sign of treasure, unless it’s Marble Mountain in the distance. In winter, it’s a popular ski destination, boasting the highest Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

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The Glynmill Inn Pond Trail.

vertical drop of any ski slope in Atlantic Canada. In summer, there’s a river to kayak and zip lines to dare. Nearby, there’s golf and salmon fishing in the Humber River. A hike like this works up an appetite, so I double back across the river into town, grab a copy of that novel and head for a restaurant I’ve had my eye on, Newfoundland Sushi. Because Newfoundland is so rich in seafood, a sushi restaurant next to the ocean seems a natural fit. And it is. Everything is fresh and flavourful, and sometimes imaginatively served. Their “Boatload of Sushi” comes in a miniature dory. Liquid accompaniments range from green tea to Japanese saki to local craft beers on tap. It’s back in the car because there’s another wilderness area I want to check out, the Cape Blow Me Down Provincial Park. The name is enticing enough, but it’s the dramatic seaside landscape I’m really interested in. Corner Brook harbour is so long, it takes nearly an hour to drive from the city to the park at the mouth of the harbour. From the parking lot, I hit the James Cook Heritage Trail, named for that great man whose statue I met at the beginning of the trip and who first accurately mapped this peninsula. The lookoffs here are almost as dramatic as the one where Cook’s statue stands, eye to sextant, ever the surveyor of this land. After sampling the trail, I head back into town. The cozy and friendly Bootleg Brew Company has some great craft beer in their taproom, including a coconut lime sour I want to try, and tonight there’s live music. Because they’re small batch, the beers are only available in the Bootleg taproom. I figure a pint or two sipped to the sounds of local Newfoundland tunes will make a perfect ending to this weekender in Corner Brook. Maybe I’ll go for a complete immersion into the culture of The Rock’s western city by bringing along my copy of that book about buried treasure, Shellbird, and crack the cover over a Bootleg Brew.

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Cod au Gratin (Created by Glynmill Inn executive chef Joe Froud) Serves 2 4 oz cod fillet cut into three equal pieces 3 oz 35 per cent whipping cream 2 oz cheddar cheese divided in half Salt and pepper to taste Sauté the cod in a lightly oiled frying pan. Flip the cod, then add the cooking cream. Season with salt and pepper. Reduce the cream for 2 to 3 minutes. Add half the cheddar cheese. Reduce for another 1 to 2 minutes. Place the reduced cream and cod on a plate. Top with the other half of the cheddar cheese and broil.


Road Trip Drive on. Sail off. The best road trips eventually abandon the road. ferries.ca


Cheers to

80 seasons!

Celebrate with us this summer and create your own family memories at sea.

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t’s an exciting anniversary year to celebrate. For 80 seasons, Northumberland Ferries Limited (NFL) has been connecting Prince Edward Island with the rest of Canada, offering a ferry service between Wood Islands, PEI and Caribou, near Pictou, Nova Scotia. No matter which direction you’re travelling, you’ll be able to enjoy relaxing fun and full-service amenities as you sail across the Northumberland Strait. Travel with us on either mv Holiday Island or mv Confederation, adding a little twist of flavour to your Maritime vacation or road trip during our fun-filled 75-minute crossings. As always, we have a complete lineup of activities for your enjoyment throughout the summer months. Because this is our 80th season, we have a special “80 Days of Programming” lined up for you through Seaside Experiences. It’s always a highlight of our season to welcome local vendors on board our vessels. Among the vendors you can expect to meet are Chapel Cove Chocolate, Mrs. MacGregor’s Shortbreads, Hardywares Preserves, Ro Ro’s Hot Sauces, Sunny Cove Honey, Knoydart Farms, Comeau Sea Foods, Copper Bottom Brewing, and other great local purveyors of food and drink. And if sampling isn’t enough to quell your hunger, check out the variety of snacks and meals available at our Salt Water Café on each vessel. We are offering our Music on Deck program again this summer, on select crossings, from the beginning of July until the end of Labour Day weekend. Sit back and relax to the sounds of talented local performers, seven days a week! For the young and young at heart, there is complimentary face painting every Sunday on mv Confederation and every second Sunday on board mv Holiday Island. Looking for inspiration on how to use local products in your kitchen? We’ll have our ever-popular chef demos on selected days throughout the summer; get to know chefs Lisa Clarke, Ilona Daniel, Treena MacLeod and the Kilted Chef, Alain Bossé, as they show off some of the best local delights. One of the special activities planned for this summer is Terminal Day at Wood Islands on July 19, where we’ll have live music performances as well as an appearance of charming goats through Island Hill Farm of Hampshire, PEI. The Museum of Industry in Stellarton, NS will have an interpreter on board mv Confederation on Mondays this summer delivering a presentation about the coal mining industry in Nova Scotia, which has been a staple industry in the province for decades. If you’re looking for a memento of your ferry trip, check out the photo booth on board mv Confederation, which was very popular with our passengers last season. Snap your photo against the fun nautical ferry background and then email the photo to yourself while on the ferry! We’re looking forward to welcoming our guests on board this season. Join us this summer as we celebrate 80 seasons of family vacation traditions.

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Sail the Bay of Fundy with us Travel between Digby, NS and Saint John, NB in less than three hours.

We will be offering live Music Harvest at Sea. Featuring local farmers’ markets on board two days a week.

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lanning a road trip to the Maritimes this summer? Why not take your road trip off the road altogether and enjoy a voyage across the Bay of Fundy on board the Fundy Rose? In just two hours and fifteen minutes, you’ll cross the Bay of Fundy between Saint John, New Brunswick and Digby, Nova Scotia, saving hours of driving time. Get out of the car, stretch your legs and enjoy fresh sea breezes. We have a great lineup of summer activities for passengers who want to experience local talent and sample Maritime products. We will be offering live Music on the Bay six days a week. We’ll have Authors at Sea on board again—featuring local writers sponsored by Nimbus Publishing—and guests will be able to enjoy the feature film Maudie, about renowned local folk artist Maud Lewis, on selected crossings. For our young passengers, our Little Mates children’s programming runs throughout July and August, featuring plenty of arts and crafts plus face painting! Of course, you can also relax on the exterior passenger decks or enjoy family-friendly entertainment in the movie lounge. This summer, the New Brunswick Museum will be joining us for their 16th season. Museum interpreters provide engaging, immersive demonstrations about sea life in and around the Bay of Fundy— suddenly you’ll be spotting birds and animals and observing things you have never seen before. Also, this summer, we’re introducing a new experience for our guests: Harvest at Sea. We will feature local farmers’ markets from Nova Scotia on board two days a week, and you can

on the Bay six days a week

Music on the Bay. Live music every Tuesday - Saturday.

meet some of the terrific producers that live in our Maritimes provinces and sample their wares. Feeling thirsty during your crossing? We have a wide range of great local spirit, beer, and wine producers in our region, and with Seaside Experiences, passengers sample these fine beverages throughout July and August. We also have several options for dining and drinks on board, including breakfast, lunch and dinner, featuring fresh seafood as well as soups, burgers, and other popular items. Our café serves coffees, teas, and a variety of snacks, baked goods, and desserts. When weather permits, join us out at our licensed, on-deck Crow’s Nest venue, where you can enjoy appetizers and adult beverages, play board games, and spend a relaxing time with family and friends accentuated by warm bay breezes. This summer, take your road trip off the road and make unforgettable memories on the Fundy Rose.

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Ferry Service between Yarmouth, NS and Bar Harbor, Maine

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ADVERTISING FEATURE

The CAT’s out of the bag— and faster than ever. S ometimes the road less traveled isn’t a road at all. This summer, get off-road and on board with a seafaring adventure that’ll bring you between Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, and Bar Harbor, Maine, in just three and a half breathtaking hours. Spend less time driving and more time taking in the sights of the Northeastern United States and the Canadian Maritimes from the decks and onboard venues of The CAT high-speed car ferry. From ship to shore, get a taste of East Coast life before you arrive in port with great locally inspired dishes and refreshments, live entertainment, and other onboard delights through our Seaside Experiences program. Through partnerships with local organizations including the Yarmouth and Acadian Shores Tourism Association, Nimbus Publishing, the Atlantic Film Festival, the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, and Digby Area Tourism Association, each passage

aboard The CAT packs a lot of Maritime flavor. This summer’s Music at Sea program features three great options: jazz and blues artist Kim Doolittle will perform on Thursdays; Celtic Rant, our Celtic folk band returns, performing Fridays and Saturdays; and on Sundays, we’re welcoming the easy-listening Leblanc-Kerr duo from Yarmouth. Lovers of the arts will enjoy weekly viewings of Maudie—the award-winning film about renowned Digby County folk artist Maud Lewis—along with written works by popular Maritime writers with our popular Authors on Board showcase at the Scotia Market Gift Shop. More of a foodie? We have three unique dining venues to savour. Grab a cup of jo and a variety of snacks to go at our Sip at Sea Café, take a break from the scenery with breakfast, lunch or dinner at our Scotia Market Cafeteria, and dive into the regional surf and turf at Forchu

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—we’re back, Lounge with a selection of local wines and beers, paired with fresh seafood and locally-sourced ingredients. Life can’t always be fun and games? Of course, it can! With our variety of board games, children’s play area, and daily onboard tours, The CAT is the easiest—and fastest—way to navigate a road trip for all ages that doesn’t include the words: “are we there yet?” Setting sail in late June The CAT now departs Yarmouth, Nova Scotia at a comfortable 9:30am so travellers who need to check in an hour before sailing will be well rested and fueled before boarding. Departing Bar Harbor at 3:00pm Eastern Time you will arrive in Yarmouth just in time to enjoy dinner before settling in for the evening. It’s the best of both worlds—experience land and sea with The CAT. * *Launch date subject to change. Please check the schedule at ferries.ca for updates.

FERRIES.CA Y O U R I N T I M AT E G U I D E T O C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T

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Cook like a chef! Local chefs share some favourite recipes Strawberry Scones with Fresh Berry Compote Chef Treena MacLeod Serves 12 Ingredients 2 cups all-purpose flour ¾ cup granulated sugar, divided 2 tsp baking powder ¼ tsp salt ¹/³ cup cold unsalted butter, coarsely grated ²/³ cup 10% cream, plus more if needed 454g tub strawberries, diced, about 2 ²/³ cups, divided 1 tbsp lemon zest (orange is great as well) Directions PREHEAT oven to 400F. Line a baking sheet with parchment. STIR flour with ½ cup sugar, baking powder and salt in a large bowl. Using a fork, mix in grated butter until mixture is crumbly. Stir in cream and half of berries until dough just comes together. Add more cream, 1 tbsp at a time, if needed. Do not over-mix. SCOOP ¼ cup of mixture for each portion and shape into 1-in.-high round scones. Set on prepared baking sheet. BAKE in centre of oven until tops are golden, 15 to 17 min. Transfer to a rack to cool completely. COMBINE remaining ¼ cup sugar and half of berries with zest in a small saucepan and set over medium-high. Cook, stirring often, until sugar is dissolved, and berries are soft, about 15 min. Serve warm with scones. Note: Blueberries or raspberries can be used in place of strawberries. Clotted cream or Greek yogurt are also a delicious side to serve with the scones.

Baked Crab Stuffed Mushroom Caps The Kilted Chef, Alain Bossé Serves 4 4 portobello mushrooms caps ¼ cup (50 mL) olive oil Rub each cap, inside and out, with 1 tbsp (15 mL) of olive oil, place on a parchment lined baking sheet. Set aside, and assemble stuffing. Stuffing 1 pound (500 g) rock crab, place in strainer and let sit for 5 minutes ¼ cup (50 mL) panko crumbs ¼ cup (50 mL) finely diced yellow peppers ¼ cup (40 mL) finely diced chives 1 tsp (5 mL) Dijon mustard 1 tbsp (15 mL) mayonnaise ½ cup (125 mL) finely grated parmesan cheese Pinch of salt and pepper Lightly mix all ingredients together in a bowl. Divide in four and mound into each mushroom cap—do not press into the cap—then bake in a preheated 350°F (180°C) oven for 35- 40 minutes. Serve with a side salad. That should do the trick. Not tonight, but if I don’t send this now, I’m apt to forget come morning.

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Upstreet Brewery Pilsner Braised Bratwurst and Potatoes Chef Ilona Daniel Serves 4 Ingredients 2 Tbsp Canola Oil 6 Bratwurst sausages or your favourite style of sausages 1 medium yellow onion, halved and thinly sliced 1 bottle Upstreet Craft Brewery Commons Pilsner 1 Tbsp cornstarch 1 ½ cups water 1 ½ lbs mixed baby potatoes, halved 2 Tbsp Whole Grain Mustard 1 Tbsp vinegar 4 Tbsp parsley, chopped Directions Brown sausages in a pan over medium-high heat. Add onions to pan. Soften onions over medium heat for 7 minutes. Add remaining ingredients except for the parsley and mustard and cook over medium heat until potatoes and sausages are cooked through; 15-20 minutes. Once cooked, transfer sausages and potatoes to a serving platter and cover. Reduce the cooking liquid over high heat until 1 cup of liquid remains. Pour sauce over the potatoes and sausages. Garnish with parsley.

Oooey Gooey Good Crock Pot Mac n’ Cheese Chef Ilona Daniel Serves 6-8 Ingredients 4 cups uncooked elbow macaroni 3 cups ADL or Dairy Isle shredded cheddar cheese 1 (8-ounce) brick of cream cheese (don’t use low fat) 2 ½ cups of milk (whole milk is preferred here) 1 can (12 ounces) evaporated milk * ¼ tsp ground nutmeg (optional) Directions Set your crock pot to low and add all of the ingredients into your crock pot. Stir the mixture after 2 hours to check for doneness. Continue cooking for up to 30 minutes more if necessary. Sauce may be thick and cheesy so you might want to add in some more milk or boiling water to even it out. Then put setting on “Keep Warm” until ready to serve. Note: You can use cooked noodles to speed up the process; decrease cooking time to 1½ - 2 hours.


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Saltscapes Food & Travel Guide 2020  

Travel and Food destinations across the provinces Atlantic Canada.

Saltscapes Food & Travel Guide 2020  

Travel and Food destinations across the provinces Atlantic Canada.