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THE ADVOCATE Rockland’s Independent Jewish Community Newspaper Since 1985 •

Vol. 27 No. 18 •

18 Iyar - 5772 May 10- May 17, 2012

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EAST RAMAPO VOTES FOR TRUSTEES, BUDGET MAY 15 For a free subscription to the Advocate

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HATZLACHA GROCERY

GRAND RE-OPENING! SEE PAGE 3 AND BACK PAGE

A very important election is being held in the East Ramapo School District this coming Tuesday the 15th of May. Two items are on the ballot; 1) The budget, 2) Electing 3 school board members.

The proposed budget is approximately 192 million dollars with a proposed tax levy increase of 1.91%. If the budget is defeated a contingency budget would cut a further 2.6 million dollars from the budget. The reason why the E.R.S.D. has no money, is that the unions have refused to renegotiate their contract while most other School Districts in Rockland have renegotiated. The main expense in the budget is salaries and benefits for staff which account for 76% of the budget. This summer the contracts with the unions expires and a new contract will be negotiated with the school board.

RAMAPO VALLEY AMBULANCE APPLIES FOR ADVANCED LIFE SUPPORT A. Tendler

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The town of Ramapo’s first ever ambulance volunteer corps was Ramapo Valley Ambulance Corporation, better known as RVAC. Established in 1947, RVAC has watched as the Town has flourished and changed, and while keeping up with the times, RVAC’s goal has remained the same for the past sixty -five years: to provide the best pre-hospital care possible. RVAC covers the largest area in the state of NY. The New York State thruway and Kakiat State Park, along with the communities of Airmont, Montebello, Suffern, Hillburn, and Wesley Hills are just some of the areas covered. Corresponding to their large coverage area, their population (as of the 2000 census) is 40,142. This accounts for the ever growing amount of calls.

Because RVAC is a not-forprofit, volunteer only organization, they are constantly looking for new members. Positions as EMT-B's, drivers, CPR instructors, and YouthCorp members are always available. RVAC also needs

the community's assistance. To better serve the community they have begun the application process for ALS, or, Advanced Life Support, for medics responding to calls.

Currently a teacher in the E.R.S.D. with 15 years’ experience earns $17,000 a year more than a teacher in Clarkstown earns with similar experience. The principals and assistant principals probably earn the highest salaries in Rockland County, if not in the entire state of NY. In Clarkstown, the employees pay 33-35% towards their health care benefits. In East Ramapo they only contribute about 20%. The unions are bankrupting the district. Jack Lefkowitz, Eliyahu Solomon and Yonah Rothman are running for 3 school board seats. They all pledged to work to keep taxes down, while giv-

ing the best possible education to all students in the district. Opposing them will be, Hiram Rivera, Kim Foskew and JoAnne Thompson. The superintendent Dr. Joel Klein, is working very hard during these trying times to maintain the core academic curriculum. The unions are making it almost impossible to achieve this, with their selfish demands. It is very important that all registered voters come out and vote this Tuesday. 7am-10pm

EXPERT ADVICE ON INFANT SLEEP PATTERNS HEALTH NEWS SPONSORED BY MONSEY FAMILY MEDICAL CENTER Sleep — or lack of it — is probably the most-discussed aspect of baby care. New parents discover its vital importance those first few weeks and months. The quality and quantity of an infant's sleep affects the well-being of everyone in the household. Sleep struggles rarely end with a growing child's move from crib to bed. It simply changes form. Instead of cries, it's pleas or refusals. Instead of a feeding at 3:00 AM, it's a nightmare or request for water. So how do you get your child to bed through the cries, screams, avoidance tactics, and pleas? How should you respond when you're awakened in the middle of the night? And how much sleep is enough for your child? It all depends on a child's age. Charts that list the hours of

sleep likely to be required by an infant or a 2-year-old may cause concern when individual differences aren't considered. These numbers are simply averages reported for large groups of kids of particular ages. Still, sleep is very important to a child’s well-being. The link between a lack of sleep and a child's behavior isn't always obvious. When adults are tired, they can be grumpy or have low energy, but kids can become hyper, disagreeable, and have extremes in behavior. Most children’s sleep requirements fall within a predictable range of hours based on their age, but each child is a unique individual with distinct sleep needs. Here are some approximate numbers based on age, accompanied by age-appropricont. Page 9, HEALTH NEWS section


THE ADVOCATE May 10, AS WE GO TO PRESS

INDUSTRIAL AVERAGE ABOVE 15,000 Apple is the world’s most valuable company. The Dow Jones industrial average is probably the world’s best-known stock index. So don’t they deserve each other? Consider this: If Apple had been added to the Dow in June 2009, the last time there were serious rumors that it would happen, the average would be about 2,500 points higher than it is today and well above its all-time high. Paul Hickey of Bespoke Investment Group, which crunches numbers about the markets, says the Dow would be at 15,360, about 1,200 points above its record of 14,164, set in October 2007. The Dow closed Wednesday at 12,835. Not only would investors be perkier, but everyday Americans watching the Dow set one record after another would probably feel wealthier. That might inspire them to spend more money and help the economy grow faster. But if you think the time is right for an Apple-Dow marriage, don’t check your mailbox for a wedding invitation. Apple, which redefined how people listen to music and reinvented the cellphone, is simply too hot for the Dow. In 2009, when a bankrupt General Motors and a hobbled Citigroup were booted from the Dow and Apple was talked about as one replacement, Apple stock traded at about $144. On Wednesday, it closed at $569. Because of how the Dow is calculated, Apple would dwarf the other stocks in the average and distort the Dow from its purpose — which is to reflect the broad economy, not represent the hottest stocks. A big one-day gain by Apple, like a $50 jump after it reported blockbuster earnings last month, would send the Dow higher by hundreds of points. Similarly, a big drop would suggest the market was in more trouble than it really was.

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• All material in this paper is the exclusive property of THE ADVOCATE and cannot be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. The views and opinions expressed by our columnists do not necessarily reflect the publisher’s. • Any article submitted to the newspaper can be edited at the discretion of the publisher. • The newspaper will not be liable for errors appearing in an advertisement beyond the cost of space occupied by the error. The advertiser assumes the responsibility for errors in telephone orders. • In-house design: All advertisements designed and prepared by The Advocate are the property of the newspaper and cannot be reproduced without consent of the publisher. • The health information articles contained in this publication are for information only and not intended as medical advice. For health care advice and information contact your health care provider. • Editorials related to political endorsements or support are written by an independent committee. They do not represent the views of The Advocate staff. It should not be considered as endorsements or support by this paper.

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Publisher's Desk A Weekly Editorial By:

In East Ramapo, private school families need two vital things from the district – transportation

Mendel Hoffman and special education. Transportation is an issue that emerges regularly, and is often saved from being cut. Services for special needs children are a constant battle, and should be a top priority for the board. There is such a need for these services and if they are cut out of the budget it will be tragic.

Taxpayers in the East Ramapo Central School District are gearing up for a major showdown with the Teacher’s Unions ahead of this Tuesday the 15th for the annual School Board and Budget vote. The rise in school tax on property owners in recent years was drastically lower than in the previous era because the recent Boards cut waste, reduced unneeded staff, and consolidated programs, thus saving millions of dollars annually. The school district is getting ready to put out a budget that is likely to increase taxes, largely due to the massive cuts in education that the governor put forth in the state budget. As a result, the burden falls on local taxpayers across the state to pick up the slack Private school families pay for most of the public school education, and that is an irrefutable fact. This May 15th we all have to ask ourselves this. What is best for the district-Public Schools and Private schools alike.

WRITE TO US The Advocate welcomes Letters to the Editor & the Action Desk about relevant topics and issues. Letters must include the writer’s name, address and phone number, although the name may be withheld from publication at the writer’s request. The Advocate reserves the right to edit for clarity and good taste. To voice your opinion, call: 845-770-1950, Fax: 845-770-1983, or e-mail Editor@AdvocateNews.org

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR To the Editor: On May 15th, at 8:00 pm, the Planning Board of the Town of Ramapo will hold a public hearing at 237 Route 59, Suffern, N.Y., concerning adding antennas to an existing cell tower located in Monsey, N.Y. Until recently, this cell tower was considerably smaller, with hardly any people coming in and out. When Verizon added another tower, bridge and structure, the entire scene changed. The red birds and blue jays stopped visiting us. More than half the trees were cut down. The area was replaced with metal wires, antennas and activity. Strangers with trucks come in and out at any time. Our residential neighborhood now has an unsightly commercial area.

The Town did not alert us to these changes in our environment. We did not receive mail in reference to this. In fact, when a neighborhood representative called the town in April, they were told the current hearing was on May, 31st. Yet on May 7th, it became known that the hearing is actually two weeks sooner. We are very concerned about the long term effects of radiation from these antennas and cell towers. And now, who’s going to buy my property with a cell tower in my backyard? There are unpopulated areas in Rockland County. That’s where these antennas belong. Sincerely, R.M.

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contact the White House between 9am-5pm phone @ 202-456-1414 or fax @ 202-456-2461


THE ADVOCATE May 10, 2012

3

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AKEOUT I&T BY

ME AT S

on i t c ele CON S erb ozen p u S Fr uce a , s g rie Pro d rin e u c t o Fea f Gr Fresh o & BY s DS d O o O G Fo ED H BAK ,

L DE

TAL

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E RUGAL

r e ! m g O en in a g Ba’ p O L d Gran y 1 0 th / Ma

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THE ADVOCATE May 10,

4

2012

21ST ANNUAL JEP BREAKFAST, AT THE ATRIUM, SUNDAY, MAY 13TH HONORING RABBI YEHUDA & BLIMA SCHWAB Plans are well underway for JEP’s 21st Annual Breakfast, to be held this Sunday morning, May 13th, at the Atrium. This highly anticipated event will provide a special opportunity for friends, supporters, and beneficiaries of JEP to celebrate past accomplishments, acknowledge recent achievements, as well as provide a promising glimpse into what the future may hold. Plus, the highlight of this year’s breakfast is to offer special tribute to Rabbi Yehuda and Blima Schwab. It is under Rabbi Schwab’s steady, guiding hand that JEP has grown so magnificently in Rockland County these past 32 years. For more than three decades, JEP has developed and grown under the diligent direction of Rabbi Yehuda Schwab. With heartfelt care and sensitivity, he has been actively involved in reconnecting unaffiliated Jews with their sacred traditions, and in doing so, has also engaged in reconciling the hearts of parents and children within countless Jewish families throughout Rockland County and beyond. JEP - an acronym for Jewish Education Program - began its work in Rockland County over 32 years ago. At that time, without a formal name or address, a handful of concerned Monsey residents (Rabbi Schwab among them) decided to reach out to unaffiliated Jews in the county, by providing a series of lectures and other special events. It was decided that New City was an appropriate place to

begin, and so the first such meeting was held in the Carpenters Union Building in New City, New York, in 1980. Fliers advertising the event were handed out, or pinned to telephone poles, storefront windows, and doorways – wherever there was a concentration of Jews. The turnout, admittedly, was less than enthusiastic, but a concerted effort at genuine outreach had, at least, gotten off the ground. More events took place in the months that followed, regular classes were offered, momentum was building, and in 1981 Rabbi Ezriel Tauber entered the picture, creating an office front-outreach center on Route 59 in Monsey. A link was initially established with the national outreach arm of Agudas Israel, and the organization formally became the Jewish Education Program of Rockland County, providing regular classes, programs, and lectures, on an ongoing basis, to Jewish residents of the county and beyond. Fast forward 32 years: Hundreds of families and thousands of individuals have developed a connection with their sacred heritage by way of JEP’s various programs. Rabbi Schwab at the helm still steers those who come to him to one of JEP’s many learning opportunities. It may be a class or personal learning partner; it may consist of kashering a kitchen, sending a child to the Hebrew School, or summer camp; or it may be a long, one-on-one, heartto-heart exchange behind

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WEEKEND WEATHER

closed doors, but whatever the venue, the one who gets in touch with JEP, comes away enriched and enlightened on account of the experience. At the same time, the Hebrew school – now formally, the JEP-Bobbi Lewis Hebrew School - still flourishes under the direction of Mrs. Greenwald. And for nearly three decades the school has been housed in the Blueberry Hill Shul (Congregation Ohaiv Yisroel). The shul, under the Rabbinic leadership of Rabbi Avraham Cohen, has always served as a welcome source of support and encouragement for the school. In addition to classes, the shul has also provided a regular setting for Shabbaton and Yom Tov gatherings, as well as Bar and Bat Mitzvah celebrations. This momentous, 21st Annual Breakfast, honoring, for the first time, Rabbi Yehuda & Blima Schwab, and highlighting as Guest Speaker, Rabbi Betzalel Rudinsky, Shlita, is truly an event not to be missed. Plus, it is a chance for you, in the community at large, to express your own appreciation and offer vital support for all the important work JEP does.

Top Medicaid-funded hospitals Percentage of total revenue coming from Medicaid for large county-operated hospitals:

City

Facility

Phoenix

Los Angeles Brooklyn, N.Y.

Percentage 53%

Maricopa Medical Center

L.A. County/University of Southern California Medical Center

51

Kings County Hospital Center

44

Jackson Memorial Hospital

Miami

34

Parkland Memorial Hospital

Dallas Chicago Buffalo, N.Y.

32

John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital of Cook County

31

Erie County Medical Center

25

Ben Taub General Hospital

Houston Atlanta Charlotte, N.C.

Grady Memorial Hospital

Carolinas Medical Center

Source: American Hospital Directory Graphic: Dallas Morning News

25 23 18 © 2011 MCT

Mark it on your calendar, or put a note on your refrigerator . . . to attend this year’s Annual JEP breakfast. The breakfast will be held this Sunday morning, May 13th, at the Atrium, beginning at 9:30. For more information about the breakfast, please call the JEP office: (845) 425-7556. Hope to see you there!

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Dr. Bekritsky, Dr. Bloom, and Dr. Gluck, suggest you schedule your Summer Physicals early.

Call 352-6800 today! the Monsey Family Medical Center wishes all our patients and the community a healthy and safe summer.


THE ADVOCATE May 10, 2012

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SUMMER CAMP/PROGRAM PLEASE CALL THE ADVOCATE SALES HOTLINE AT

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Chase Bank: Alternative to Checking Account New York, NY - Chase has launched a prepaid card designed to be an alternative to a checking account as it tries to recoup fees it has lost under recent regulatory changes. The company said Tuesday that the reloadable Chase Liquid card is available at 200 branches now, and will expand it to branches nationwide this summer. Chase said it the cards are being tested in two markets but declined to say where. Banks are looking to prepaid cards and other new products to increase their revenue after regulatory changes have curbed the fees they collect. Consumers will pay a USD 4.95 monthly fee for Chase’s reloadable card. They can use it the same way they do a debit card to make purchases and withdraw cash from ATMs and Chase branches. The company says it is a low-cost alternative to traditional checking accounts. Rules went into effect in 2010 prohibited banks from enrolling customers in overdraft programs without their consent. Overdraft fees, which are often USD 35 or more per violation, were an important revenue stream for banks. Banks also took a hit last summer when new rules limited the fees that they can collect from merchants whenever customers pay with a debit card. In response, banks have cut checking account rewards programs, introduced new accounts with higher fees and rolled out new products such as prepaid cards.

Chase said customers will need to have an initial USD 25 deposit to get the Liquid card but are not required to have a checking or savings account with the bank. There are no fees for withdrawals or customer service support, which it says sets it apart from other prepaid cards that tack on fees for those services. “Chase Liquid is a low-cost alternative to traditional checking accounts, and its terms are clear and simple,” Ryan McInerney, Chase’s CEO of consumer banking, said in a statement. He said consumers could use the cards to pay bill and make purchases without “any surprise charges.” Prepaid cards typically target customers who keep low balances or don’t qualify for checking accounts. People with a history of writing bad checks, for example, can have difficulty getting a checking account. With prepaid cards, customers cannot write checks from the accounts or overdraw them, limiting the processing and other costs for the bank. Additionally, a loophole in the recent regulation allows banks to continue to collect higher fees from merchants when customers pay with a prepaid card versus the limits on fees when they use a debit card.Shares of JPMorgan Chase & Co., based in New York, fell 40 cents, or 1 percent, to close at USD 41.38 Tuesday

10 most common complaints about debt collectors Complaints of Fair Debt Collection Practice Act violations received by the Federal Trade Commission.

Nature of complaint

2010 complaints

Percent increase since ’05

54,147

277%

2 and the claims against them

Failed to send consumers required notice of FDCPA rights

32,477

946

3 of debt

Misrepresented the character, amount or legal status

31,122

9

4 Falsely threatened lawsuits or other actions

27,544

330

5 consumers with alleged debt

Repeatedly called third parties seeking information about

23,758

224

6 Falsely threatened to arrest consumers or seize property

20,256

816

7 Called and used obscene, profane or abusive language

17,532

119

8 Called consumers at work

17,008

306

purported debt to consumersÕ employers, relatives, 9 Disclosed 13,568 children, neighbors or friends

348

12,871

650

1 Called repeatedly or continuously

consumers outside of 8 a.m. and 9 p.m., or other 10 Called inconvenient times

NOTE: A single consumer complaint may allege multiple FDCPA violations; totals shown in this chart may exceed the total number of complaints received by the FTC Graphic: Sharon Okada, Sacramento Bee © 2012 MCT Source: U.S. Federal Trade Commission

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‫דער אדוואקאט אמור‬

A New Frum Adventure Camp By Dvora Lakein A 40-pound backpack doesn’t feel quite so heavy, when you’ve left all your cares behind. At least that’s how Ari Hoffman sees it. The noted wilderness guide has spent much of the last three decades hitting the trails around his Colorado home and across the United States. As a therapist, Hoffman believes that a lot of personal growth happens in the wilderness, away from the stresses of life. As a wilderness enthusiast, Hoffman believes that his work and personal life are bettered because of the time he spends outdoors. And so, he is bringing this passion to the masses, one loaded backpack at a time. Avanim Adventures was founded in 2011 by Hoffman and his colleague Rabbi Elie Ganz. As the only frum authentic outdoor adventure program, Avanim fills a real niche, bringing the observant Jew into the wilderness without leaving Shabbos and kashrus behind. It is an allinclusive program: meals are included and the guides provide hiking and camping gear. Avanim’s premise represents a broader trend in the vacation industry. Many people are looking beyond the typical hotel-based tourist experience, preferring to spend their time in an adventure or volunteer experience. In fact, note wilderness guides, during the current economic recession there has been an upswing in business from Wall Street clientele, who have seen everything hit rock-bottom and are looking “to get in touch with what really matters.” He grew up with horses and spent his adolescence hiking and backpacking throughout the United States. “I just put on a backpack and get teary-eyed,” Rabbi Ganz only half-jokes from his Jerusalem home. “People go on vacation and come home with a photo of themselves standing in front of the Eiffel Tower,” he says. “But after a wilderness trip, it is not only a memory of where you were that you bring home. It is a memory of what it took to get there, what it took to scale that mountain.” It takes a lot of physical stamina to scale that mountain, but it also takes perseverance, courage, and the ability to stir a pot of oatmeal. This is no boutique adventure for people who don’t want to get a little dirty. Participants are taught survival skills and then are expected to make meals, pitch tents, start fires, and read maps. And they love it. Dr. Harry Prizant, an Ottawa-based optometrist, brought his two children to Colorado for a three-day stint in the Rockies. “Ari’s love is to bring people into the back mountain,” says Prizant. “We planned our trip together for six months and it was an adventure my kids will never forget.” The foursome explored the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, enjoying hiking, rock-climbing, whitewater-rafting, and camping. “A trip like this builds physical and emotional strength,” says Prizant. “We were away from all the distractions: it was a great bonding experience.” Hoffman went on his first camping trip at six months old, in the Utah mountains. He has since participated in or led over 100 nature excursions. Combining his love of nature and his background as a therapist, Hoffman is able to help people

see the beauty of Hashem’s creation and recognize their own valuable place in the world. “The perception is that Jewish people sit around and eat chulent for fun,” states Hoffman. “But we have a real precedent of going out into the wilderness as a people. Our original foray into the desert, after leaving the slavery of Egypt, was an essential part of the germination process to developing ourselves, becoming a nation, and entering Eretz Yisrael.” These days, people are mired in schedules, Blackberries, and responsibilities. It takes going into the wilderness, believes Hoffman, “to develop ourselves and find out what we’re really made of both physically and emotionally.” Ganz agrees. “The most obvious way to find connection to the basics and escape the desensitized existence of today is to experience life, even for a little while, in its simpler, more visceral form,” he says. There is a lot of opportunity for that in Avanim’s two upcoming adventures. The first scheduled trip for the Summer 2012 season is a Father-Son trip to the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in Colorado. When participants aren’t hiking, caving, and rafting, they will experience davening on the peaks at sunrise, quiet introspection at Bushnell Lake, and the development of relationships through trust exercises and other challenges. This trip is part of Avanim’s “Avos U’banim” project that is designed to increase cohesion and enjoyment in the father-son relationship. Avi Bulow hired Hoffman to take him to this mountain range last September, “for a change of pace and to get my hands dirty.” They prepared fried chicken on an open fire-pit and listened to the wind howl outside their tent. During the days, they climbed and hiked through the red peaks. “We had an amazing time,” recalls Bulow. “Ari has a wealth of knowledge about the wilderness and the geographic location. You know you’re safe with him and you know you can count on adventure and philosophical discussions.” In August, Avanim is leading an eight-day tour to southeast Alaska. Participants will backpack for five days, spend Shabbos in the wild, and sea-kayak for another two days. The trip places an emphasis on skillbuilding and survival, and of course, the opportunity to see nature wildlife. This southeastern part of Alaska is known for its bald eagles, whales, seals, and the occasional grizzly bear. Avanim currently accepts only men on its trips, but it is developing a women’s division as well. Registration is ongoing for the summer 2012 season and Hoffman and Ganz can design a personalized wilderness experience as well. For more information, please visit avanimadventures.com.


THE ADVOCATE May 10,

6

2012

POSTAL SERVICE TO SCALE BACK The struggling U.S. Postal Service is trying to tamp down concern over its wide-scale cuts, saying it will seek to keep hundreds of rural post offices open with shorter hours. Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe tells a news conference the new plan will save the mail agency half a billion dollars each year while addressing concerns of rural residents most opposed to post office closings. Previously, up to 3,700 low-revenue post offices were slated for closure or consolidation beginning sometime after May 15, many in rural areas. It was part of a multibillion-dollar postal cost-cutting effort to stave off the agency’s bankruptcy. The Postal Service now plans to seek regulatory approval for the new plan and get community input, a process that could

‫דער אדוואקאט אמור‬

‫תשע״ב‬

NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL NEWS UPDATES SAUDIS EMERGE AS KEY U.S. ALLY AGAINST TERRORISTS A decade after hijackers mostly from Saudi Arabia attacked the United States with passenger jets, the Saudis have emerged as the principal ally of the U.S. against alQaida’s spinoff group in Yemen and at least twice have disrupted plots to explode sophisticated bombs aboard airlines. Details emerging about the latest unraveled plot revealed that a Saudi double agent fooled the terror group, known as al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, passing himself off as an eager would-be suicide bomber. Instead, he secretly turned over the group’s most up-to-date underwear bomb to Saudi Arabia, which gave it to the CIA. Before he was whisked to safety, the spy provided intelligence that helped the CIA kill al-Qaida’s senior operations leader, Fahd al-Quso, who died in a drone strike last weekend.

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The contest in three key states How Republican Mitt Romney is doing against Democrat Barack Obama in Florida, Ohio and Pennsylvania. No one has won the White House since 1960 without winning at least two of these states. Obama

Romney

• If the election were held today, you’d vote for: Fla.

Social Security and Medicare

Unless reforms are made, the two biggest U.S. benefit programs will exhaust their trust funds sooner than had previously been projected. New analysis anticipates that the Social Security Trust Fund (surplus) will be depleted by 2033, not 2036; year-end assets, in trillions 3

43% 44

Pa.

Men

Men

Õ30

Õ33

2012-2033 Surplus drawn down to pay benefits

Projected income, in billions Projected expenses

Medicare Trust Fund will be depleted by 2024, as noted last year; projected cash flow for the federal hospital insurance for seniors*

Ohio Women

300

Men

$431

$270

200

Women 10

Õ25

Medicare

Women

0

0.74

Õ12 Õ14 Õ16 Õ18 Õ20

Men back Romney, women favor Obama

Pa.

1.95

0

The gender gap

Fla.

2.46

1

47

39

$2.74 trillion

2

44 42

Ohio

2033 Surplus exhausted; can only pay out what is taken in from taxes

Social Security

20

30

40

100

50

Source: Quinnipiac poll of 1,169 Fla. voters, 1,130 Ohio voters, 1,168 Pa. voters, April 25- May 1, 2012; margin of error:+/-2.9 percentage points Graphic: Judy Treible © 2012 MCT

0

Õ12

Õ13

Õ14

Õ15

Õ16

Õ17

Õ18

Õ19

Õ20

Õ21

© 2012 MCT *Also known as Part A; helps pay for hospital, home health, skilled nursing facility, hospice Source: Social Security Administration, 2012 Annual Report of the Board of Trustees

ALBANY & WASHINGTON NEWS BRIEFS TOP COURT NIXES SENATE MAYOR BLOOMBERG'S REDISTRICTING OFFICE DEFENDS STOPCHALLENGE AND-FRISK POLICY New York’s top court on Thursday rejected a constitutional challenge by state Senate Democrats who claim Republicans improperly used two different formulas to redraw the election map that created a 63rd Senate district upstate. The Court of Appeals, which took the case on an expedited basis, unanimously upheld a trial-level judge who found that using the different formulas to establish voting boundaries was not unconstitutional. The seven judges concluded “consistent application” of one formula is not required, and lawmakers have latitude in carrying out their state constitutional authority to increase Senate districts based on population shifts indicated by the census. “It is not our task to address the wisdom of the methods employed by the Legislature in accomplishing their constitutional mandate,” the court said. “Rather, here, we consider only whether the methods chosen amount to ‘a gross and deliberate violation of the plain intent of the Constitution.”

Bloomberg’s office is defending the police stop-and-frisk practice that critics say has unfairly targeted minorities. Deputy Mayor Howard Wolfson said in a statement Wednesday that the practice has gotten guns off New York City streets and has saved lives. Wolfson said, “We will not continue to be the safest big city in America” if the practice is changed. City public advocate Bill de Blasio and others called on the mayor to reform the practice, saying blacks and Hispanics are being disportionately stopped by police. Under the policy, an officer stops a person based on reasonable suspicion, which is lower than that of probable cause needed to justify an arrest. Last week, the Advance reported that cops on Staten Island’s North Shore were steadily making more arrests and issuing more summonses as a result of the NYPD’s stop-and-frisk tactics.

HIKIND CLARIFIES, SAYS THOMPSON IS NO LOCK FOR ORTHODOX VOTE Earlier this week, Sally Goldenberg of The New York Post had an interesting article describing how former Democratic mayoral nominee Bill Thompson is making inroads in the politically powerful Orthodox Jewish community in Brooklyn. The inroads were noteworthy because, as Ms. Goldenberg notes, much of that vote is expected to go to Scott Stringer, who is the only Jewish candidate in the field, and because Bill de Blasio is a Brooklyn native with strong ties to Jewish areas in the borough. The article quotes Democratic powerbroker and Assemblyman Dov Hikind saying “Thompson’s definitely a favorite in the Jewish community, no question about it.” Today however Mr. Hikind, who endorsed Mr. Thompson in 2009, pushed back, explaining in a blog post that he was misquoted and that the Jewish vote is, in his estimation, still very much up for grabs

GDP

Percent change from previous quarter, seasonally adjusted:

5 ANNUAL 1.7% 3 1 -1 1.1% -3

Õ01

Õ11

3.0%

4 2 0 -2 -4 -6 -8 -10

Õ09

Õ10

Õ11

© 2012 MCT Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis


THE ADVOCATE May 10, 2012 Pick up a FREE copy of the weekly

ADVOCATE

at the following locations:

BUS SHELTERS

Park & Ride - Rt 59 Pathmark Route 306 & Maple Ave - Bus shelter - Monsey Maple Ave & Phyllis Terr. - Bus shelter - Monsey Route 306 & Grove St. - Bus Shelter - Monsey Outside RCDC - 22 Main St – Monsey

TAKEOUTS

Chai Pizza - Rt 59 - Monsey Purple Pear - Rt 59 - Monsey Monsey Barbeque - Rt 59 - Monsey Jerusalem Pizza - Rt 59 - Monsey Pita Land - Rt 59 & College Rd - Monsey Oh Nuts - Rt 59 - Monsey Kosher Castle - Rt 59 - Monsey Zishes Bakery - Main St - Monsey Monsey Takeout - Main St - Monsey Mechels Takeout - Rt 59 - Monsey Ruggalach - Rt 59 - Monsey Sushi Mitzuyan - Saddle Riv Rd. - Airmont Duncan Doughnuts - Rt 59 - Tallman

GROCERIES

AllFresh Grocery - Rt 59 - Monsey Monsey Glatt - Rt 59 - Monsey Shoppers Haven-Entrance & Exit - Monsey Wesley Kosher - Rt 306 - Wesley Hills ShopRite/Walmart - Rt 59 - Tallman Stop and Shop-New City Monsey Kosher Plaza

7

‫תשע״ב‬

‫דער אדוואקאט אמור‬

NEWS AROUND ROCKLAND Aggressive Asian Tiger Mosquito Found In Rockland The aggressive Asian Tiger Mosquito has been found in Rockland County and the public is asked to be proactive and eliminate breeding sites. Residents and business owners should follow the Mosquito Control Program recommended by the county’s Department of Health. Larvicide for use in pools is available from the department. The Asian Tiger is known to be an aggressive daytime biter and can transmit viruses,

such as West Nile, and cause heartworm in dogs and cats. The mosquito’s name comes from its black and white striped appearance and similar to most of the species, the Asian Tiger lays its eggs in standing water. It is necessary to empty any containers that hold standing water in order to prevent mosquitos from breeding and the population from increasing. “Mosquitoes lay eggs in containers

that hold water, so it is important that people regularly toss standing water that accumulates in flower pots, bird baths, garbage cans, tarps and any other containers that are kept outside,” said Legislator Philip Soskin of Monsey, chairman of the Multi Services Committee. “Removal of old tires is especially important. Upwards of 400,000 mosquitoes can develop in the standing water within a tire in a season.” Soskin

added that pool owners need to be mindful to place Mosquito Dunks® in their pools during the months the pools are covered and not in use. Mosquito Dunks®, a biological larvicide manufactured in the shape of a donut, are available to pool owners free of charge from the County Health Department. Additional information about the Mosquito Control 845364-3173.

CLARKSTOWN TO RECEIVE 2012 RECYCLING AWARD Supervisor will accept award on May 6th at Environmental Day (New City, NY) – Supervisor Alex Gromack is proud to announce that the Town of Clarkstown is the recipient of the

2012 Rockland Recycles Award given by the Rockland County Solid Waste Management Authority (RCSWMA) at their annual Environmental Day on Sunday, May 6th in Hillburn, NY. “I am honored to re-

ceive this award on behalf of the town,” said Supervisor Alex Gromack. “I am so proud to be recognized for our efforts as well as our residents’ efforts to reduce waste and recycle. Our recycling program is one aspect of the Town’s environmental leadership.”

tal Control and Code Enforcement Officers. Last year, the Town collected and disposed of, at the RCSWMA facility, approximately 4,428 tons of paper and 3,064

OTHER MONSEY....

Shimon's Barber Shop - Rt 59 Monsey WIC Office - Robert Pitt Dr - Monsey Z-Line Car Wash - Monsey Shoe Tova - Atrium Plaza - Monsey Mazel Cleaners - Rt 59 - Monsey Tuvias - Rt 59 - Monsey Monsey Family Health Center Front Entrance - 40 Robert Pitt Dr. - Monsey Shell Gas Station - Rt 59 - Monsey Getty Gas Station - Rt 59 & Remsen - Monsey Amazing Savings-

SPRING VALLEY:

Finkelstein Library - Spring Valley Holocaust Center - Spring Valley 7-11 Kennedy Drive - Spring Valley Eli's Bagels / Pizza - Maple Ave - Spring Valley Carvel - Eckerson Road & Rt 45 - Spring Valley Shellys Pizza - Maple Ave - Spring Valley

WESLEY HILLS:

Bubbas Bagels / Rite Aid - Wesley Hills Wesley Kosher - Rt 306 - Wesley Hills Shellys Too - Rt 306 - Wesley Hills Mobil Gas Station - Rt 306 - Wesley Hills Eye Candy - Rt 306 - Wesley Hills Continental Barber Shop - Rt 306 - Wesley Hills The Grapevine - Rt 306 - Wesley Hills

SUFFERN:

ShopRite/Walmart - Rt 59 - Tallman Suffern Library Town of Ramapo - Rt 59 - Suffern Good Samaritan Hospital (Chesed Room) Good Samaritan Hospital - Lobby

NEW CITY:

County Clerk/Court House Legislature Building , Chick Peace Challa Fairy Bakery, ShopRite & Stop and Shop

The Town has a proactive garbage and recycling collection program intended to discourage improper disposal of waste. Enforcement is also an important aspect of the code and is enacted through our Department of Environmen-

tons of co-mingled containers recycled annually. A review of all of the Villages and other Towns in the County for the same quarter revealed that Clarkstown was 46% higher for the recycling of paper and 47% higher for the recycling of commingled containers.


THE ADVOCATE May 10,

8

2012

‫תשע״ב‬

‫דער אדוואקאט אמור‬

READ THE ADVOCATE ONLINE - SCAN THIS QR CODE

THE WOMAN’S

in e s i rt e v d ate

A

CARE CENTER

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s.org w e ateN c o v Ad o ES@ L A e inf r S o for m plea

AT MONSEY FAMILY MEDICAL CENTER DR. JOEL W. ALLEN DR. DEBRA KIRSCHNER MELISSA A. CARCO, PA NANCY SOLOMON, CNM,

We care for you through the many stages of your life. • • • • • •

Kallah Counseling Pregnancy Routine exams Surgical Procedures Well-Woman Counseling Midwifery Services

How to avoid BPA

What to look for

Bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical found in plastics used to package food, may be linked to birth defects, reproductive problems, heart disease, breast cancer.

Potentially harmful

OTHER

• Container bottoms marked with 7* or 3 may contain PBA

*New bio-based or combination plastics also marked with numeral 7

• Mimics the hormone estrogen • Found in the urine of 93 percent of the population over age 6; suggests constant exposure to BPA

• BPA can leach into food or beverage if plastic container is heated

Our providers give you the time you need and deserve.

Products, purpose of BPA Baby bottles Makes bottle transparent

• Use glass bottles or plastic bag inserts • BPA-free bottles available

For a consultation or appointment call:

Nondisposable water bottles Makes bottle shatterproof

• Do not wash in dishwasher • Use stainless steel or BPA-free plastic bottles

Canned food lining Prevents corrosion, food contamination

• Choose food packaged in cardboard cartons • Eat fresh produce

Dental sealant, composite Resin contains BPAbased materials

• Amalgam filling; contains 50 percent mercury • Consult dentist to limit risk

845-352-6800 extension 6814

Safer alternatives

• BPA also found in plastic eyeglass lenses, coatings on cash register receipts, CDs, paints, medical equipment, toys

© 2012 MCT Source: AP, Green Guide, BPA Global Group,U.S. Centers for Disease Graphic: Melina Yingling Control and Prevention, American Dental Association


‫רופא חולים‬ Sponsored By Monsey Medical & Dental Center 40 Robert Pitt Drive, Monsey, NY 845-352-6800

PEDIATRIC MEDICINE

Dr. Esther Bekritsky Dr. Paul Bloom Dr. Gerson Gluck

ADULT MEDICINE

Dr. James Israel Dr. Arthur Landau Dr. Debra Grohman Dr. Delatre Lolo Brian Blitz, PA Elana Klein, PA Erick Araujo, PA

FAMILY MEDICINE

Dr. Michael Safran Dr. Jamie Giraldo

OB/GYN

Dr. Joel W. Allen Dr. Debra Kirschner Melissa A. Carco, PA Nancy Solomon, CNM

DENTAL

Dr. Genady Benyaminov Dr. Stacey Lubetsky Dr. Ramin Kashani Dr. Jacklyn Tadros Dr. Sarah Hanna Dr. David Horowitz

SPECIALTY Dr. Harry Baldinger - Podiatry Dr. Stuart Birnbaum - Podiatry Dr. David Schwalb - Urology Dr. Renata Witkowska - Allergy Dr. Samuel Wong - Ophthalmology Dr. Carlos Delrosa-Optometry Dr. Alfred Hellreich - Dermatology Dr. Philip Fried - Dermatology Dr. Yoel Kantor - Endocrinology Hanna Raice - Nutrition Counseling Aaron Muller, Speech Therapy Melech Karp, Speech Therapy

SCHEDULE YOUR APPOINTMENT TODAY: Monsey Family Medical Center 40 Robert Pitt Dr. Monsey, NY 10952

(845) 352-6800

SLEEP ADVICE

FAMILY HEALTH TALK We’re

CONT. FROM FRONT PAGE

ate pro-sleep tactics from the pediatricians at Monsey Family Medical Center. According to pediatrician Dr. Esther Bekritsky, There is no sleep formula for newborns because their internal clocks aren't fully developed yet. “They generally sleep or drowse for 16 to 20 hours a day, divided about equally between night and day.” “Newborns should be awakened every 3 to 4 hours until their weight gain is established, which typically happens within the first couple of weeks,” Dr. Bekritsky explains, “After that, it's OK if a baby sleeps for longer periods of time.” After the first couple of weeks, infants may sleep for as long as 4 or 5 hours — this is about how long their small bellies can go between feedings. “If babies do sleep a good stretch at night, they may want to nurse or get the bottle more frequently during the day,” notes Dr. Paul Bloom, a pediatrician on staff at Monsey Family Medical Center. About 90% of babies this age sleep through the night, meaning 5 to 6 hours in a row. At 6 months, an infant may nap about 3 hours during the day and sleep about 9 to 11 hours at night. “At this age, you can begin to change your response to an infant who awakens and cries during the night”, advises Dr. Bloom. Parents can give babies a little more time to settle down on their own and go back to sleep. If they don't, comfort them without picking them up (talk softly, rub their backs), then leave — unless they appear to be sick. Sick babies need to be picked up and cared for. If your baby doesn't seem sick and continues to cry, you can wait a little longer, then repeat the short cribside visit. Between 6 and 12 months, separation anxiety, a normal developmental phase, comes into play. But the rules for nighttime awakenings are the same through a baby's first birthday: Try not to pick up your baby, turn on the lights, sing, talk, play, or feed your child. All of these activities do not allow your baby to learn to fall asleep on his or her own and encourage repeat awakenings. No matter what your child's age, establish a bedtime routine that encourages good sleep habits. These tips can help kids ease into a good night's sleep: • Include a winding-down period in the routine. • Stick to a bedtime, alerting your child both half an hour and 10 minutes beforehand.

please visit www.cmadc.com for more information.

in

#1 Diabetes Control

C

ommunity Medical & Dental Care, Inc. scored the highest ratings for several benchmarks in quality health care. We scored # 1 in the region in Diabetes Control. Yoel Kantor M.D.- Endocrinologist, Monsey Family Medical Center

Health Center: Community Medical and Dental Care, Inc. Hudson River HealthCare Mount Vernon Neighborhood Health Center Open Door Family Medical Center Inc. Refuah Health Center New York State health centers (AVG.)

City Monsey Peekskill Mount Vernon Ossining New Square (all)

Diabetes control 94.29% 72.26% 71.43% 80.05% 64.29% 73.60%

Hypertension Low birth Childhood Cervical cancer control weight immunization screening 90.00% 2.96% 88.57% 97.14% 60.49% 6.71% 81.43% 41.87% 70.00% 4.68% 85.71% 60.00% 67.65% 2.68% 86.18% 69.50% 75.71% 4.83% 10.71% 47.14% 64.40% 7.18% 70.10% 61.60% Source: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration

Healthy Living

Slimming with soup

Soup and other foods with high water content help you feel full and satisfied when eating a reduced-calorie diet.

When choosing soup

Look for soups that have

• Low fat content

• A substantial amount of vegetables or lugumes, such as peas, carrots, tomatoes, beans • Not too much salt (recommended daily allowance of sodium is 1,600 mg)

© 2012 MCT

Source: Penn State University Nutrition WEE K LY FALibrary M I LYofH E A LT H Department, U.S. National Medicine, Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, MCT Photo Service

TA L K P U L L O U T S E C T I O N


THE ADVOCATE May 10,

10

2012

‫תשע״ב‬

‫דער אדוואקאט אמור‬

Monsey Family Medical Center

announces THE

ALL NEW

STATE OF THE ART DENTAL DEPARTMENT - ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS - DIGITAL X-RAYS

• • • • • •

‫מענער און פרויען דענטיסטס‬ Dr. Genady Benyaminov Dr. David Horowitz Dr. Jacklyn Tadros Dr. Ramin Kashani, Pediatric Dentist Dr. Stacey Lubetsky, Pediatric Dentist Mr. Ismit Shalla, Hygienist EVENING HOURS AVAILABLE

40 ROBERT PITT DRIVE MONSEY, NY 10952

Schedule an appointment today

845-352-6800 ext 6840


THE ADVOCATE May 10, 2012

11

‫תשע״ב‬

AFFLES WEEKLY R T PRIZES! FOR GREA e Drawing Grand Priz 25 on June Tickets to Including 2 isroel! Eretz Y

‫דער אדוואקאט אמור‬

MASMIDEI HASIYUM

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masmidei hasiyum hotline:

U.S. 718.971.5971 Canada 647.847.2257

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SPECIAL LIVE RAFFLE DRAWING • Set Of Shas • 10 Speed Bicycle • Tickets To Siyum HaShas • $200 Gift Certificate & More To be entered into the Special Live Raffle Drawing, learn and enter the following amounts into the phone system between May 10 (Lag B’Omer) and the event:

1st-3rd GRADE: 20 MISHNAYOS

4th GRADE:

35 MISHNAYOS OR 100 LINES OF GEMARA

5th GRADE:

60 MISHNAYOS OR 125 LINES OF GEMARA

6th GRADE:

80 MISHNAYOS OR 165 LINES OF GEMARA

Citicom! (718) 692-0999

7th GRADE:

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‫רופא חולים‬ Sponsored By Monsey Medical & Dental Center 40 Robert Pitt Drive, Monsey, NY 845-352-6800

FAMILY HEALTH TALK

P R O J E C T O H R , D E PA RT M E N T O F B E H AV I O R A L H E A LT H

WHAT IS CHILDHOOD TRAUMA?

By: Esther Rothbaum, LMSW What is trauma? Trauma is defined as an event that is more overwhelming than one would ordinarily encounter in day to day experiences. Such events might include: separation/divorce, illness/ death of a loved one, abuse (verbal, physical) and bullying. Researchers have found that children who experience trauma retain detailed memories of the event for a long period of time. Regardless of how hard they try to rid themselves of these memories, they always remain vivid. These thoughts may impact on school performance and interactions with peers and family. Traumatized children may tend to be unfocused and unable to concentrate in class. Teachers describe them as being in a world of their own. They may have problems forming relationships, being untrusting of others, suspecting that they are being fol-

lowed and may develop irrational fears/phobias; such as, fear of darkness, being alone in a room, noise. They may experience panic attacks, and severe physical symptoms, Some children may become overly aggressive and “act out” as the class bully. At home these children might lash out physically or verbally at parents and siblings. At night they may experience sleep disorders such as inability to fall asleep or having nightmares, as these intrusive thoughts haunt them. Furthermore, some children might experience regression in toileting and start bedwetting or becoming incontinent of urine and bowel. Youngsters who have not gotten treatment or have experienced multiple episodes of trauma/abuse, may produce signs of rage, exploding in violent behaviors either towards themselves or others.

TROUBLE AT SCHOOL?

Play therapy is one method of therapy using sand play, art, games and pretend play to help children ages 4 – 12. It enables children to express emotions, thoughts and fantasies. It also gives children the opportunity to act out traumatic events in a safe, non judgmental environment moving gradually to verbal expression. Play therapy could be used by itself or in conjunction with other therapies such as talk therapy. Occasionally, medication is prescribed in addition to therapy to treat severe cases of Post Traumatic Stress or anxiety.

Schedule a confidential consultation with

Dr. Zvi Weisstuch, Child Psychiatrist Call the Department of Behavioral Health at 352-6800 ext. 6849 today.

We at Project OHR, have licensed therapists specializing in play therapy and EMDR who could help your child deal with PSTD symptoms as well as any other mental health issues . Our therapists are Yiddish and Hebrew speaking. For an appointment call: Project OHR at (845) 352-6800 #6849.

PROJECT OHR Department of Behavioral Health

PSYCHIATRY Seymour Kushnir, MD ADULT PSYCHIATRY Zvi Weisstuch, MD ADULT and CHILD PSYCHIATRY

SOCIAL WORK Individual, Couple Child & Family Therapy Malka Susswein LCSW Chana Simmonds LCSW Gila Zelinger LCSW Gelly Asovski LCSW Play Therapy Rabbi Aryeh Frankel LMSW Naomi Franklin LMSW Yael Kahan LMSW Sharon Kronenberg LMSW Avi Riber LMSW Esther Rothbaum LMSW Play Therapy Toby Spitzer LMSW Tziporah Spira LMSW Aviva Cohen LMSW Mendel Twersky Intern


THE ADVOCATE May 10, 2012

13

‫תשע״ב‬

‫דער אדוואקאט אמור‬

SUMMER AND FUN ON CAPE COD WITH A SHUL AND MINYAN FOR SHABBOS

Summer Vacation on Cape Cod Clean sandy beaches, boating, cruises, fishing, water parks, family fun and much more Congregation Beth Israel of Onset Cape Cod Mr. Burt Parker, President Emeritus A Family Friendly Orthodox Shul Daily and Shabbos July 1 through Labor Day & Rosh Hashonah Nearby cottages and hotels See our website for a brochure listing places to stay and things to do Wendy at 339 364 0063 or whauser@capecodshul.org www.capecodshul.org BETH ISRAEL OF ONSET, CAPE COD, MASSACHUSETTS

In thinking about your upcoming summer vacation, the challenge to the Jewish vacation, of course, is to find a resort location that in addition to being fun, refreshing and attractive, with nice places to stay and things to do, is to find a Shul for Shabbos and daily minyanim. A fantastic summer community, located right here in Boston area, at the beginning of Cape Cod, is Beth Israel of Onset. www.capecodshul.org is our website. The Onset Shul has been open every summer for over 50 years now, and was the summer home for Rav Soloveitchik in the 1950’s and through the 1960’s. The Shul is enchanting, intriguing and delightful, while Onset has many places available for long or short stays, and offers delightful beaches and charming cottages. Onset presents the Orthodox Jewish vacationer an unusual hidden jewel to explore and experience. Onset is a picturesque Victorian village, and offers clean, sandy beaches, chartered fishing boats, Canal Cruises, a Vineyard ferry, street fairs, and, of course, a 4th-of-July fireworks display. In addition to a perfectly relaxing religious environment, it is blessed with clear, crisp ocean breezes, and provides a perfect vacation base for enjoying Cape Cod, Martha’s Vineyard or Nantucket, Plymouth, Woods Hole, Orleans, the National Seashore, Boston and Newport, RI, all within driving distance. The Shul constantly welcomes new visitors, and offers an intimate, friendly and participative service. Visitors include singles to families to retired couples–all are welcome. And, while spending a week on Cape Cod immersed in Main Street Americana, you can celebrate a familiar Shabbos, surrounded by friends. Every Shabbos morning the Shul pro-

vides a small kiddush, giving guests the opportunity to meet and talk, a Pirke Avot class every Shabbos afternoon, and a shiur from a visiting rabbi or scholar between mincha and maariv. For the past 15 years, Mel Greenbaum has been the Shul’s resident Director, managing the daily minyanim and layning. Long-time members return to Onset for their annual vacations from across the US and Canada, as well as the occasional visitor from Europe and Israel. Onset is the quintessential summer Jewish community of friends who spend summer time together once a year, every year. New people discover, old friends return. Many local inns and hotels, directly located on Onset Bay, are within a 5 minute walk of the Shul. There are also a number of cottages for rent. See www. onsetvillage.com and www.shellpointere.com for more info. Major nearby supermarkets carry brand name Kosher products. (The Boston Vaad symbol is KVH. Meat products should be brought from home.) Ask the inn for a small refrigerators or hot plate. Cape Cod has miles of wonderful beaches, snug harbors, charming villages, historic sites, aquariums, golf, tennis, shopping, go-karts, baseball, water parks, kayaking, movies, summer theater, antique shops, bicycle trails, fishing, whale watching, seal watching, and so much more. In Onset, you can enjoy all this along with a delightful, appropriate Shabbos experience. Friday night services begin at 7:30 and Shabbos morning services are at 8:45 am. Daily services are at 8:00 am and 7.30 pm. Contact Wendy Hauser @ whauser@capcodshul.org or visit our website, www.capecodshul.org for more information or a brochure listing places to stay and things to do.

Baker Camp on Lake Sebago OPEN DAILY 9am - 6pm

BOAT RENTALS

ROWBOATS - CANOES - KAYAKS Call for Directions

845-351-4609

20 Min. from MONSEY

BakerCamp.com


THE ADVOCATE May 10,

14

2012

‫תשע״ב‬

‫דער אדוואקאט אמור‬

CONGRESSMAN ELIOT ENGEL ANNIVERSARY OF BIN LADEN’S DEATH Congressman Eliot Engel (D-NY17) released the following statement on the one-year anniversary of Osama bin Laden’s death. Rep. Engel is a senior member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee. “Almost 3,000 people did not return to their families on September 11, and one year ago, Osama bin Laden’s terrible crime caught up to him on May Day. This marked

a new season for people in America, and worldwide, who believe in freedom and denounce terrorism. I applaud President Obama and our men and women in uniform, and our entire intelligence community, for finally ending this monster’s reign of terror. They deserve all of the gratitude our country can offer. “But others are seeking to carry out bin Laden’s objective to destroy our country, and we must remain vigilant as we maintain our security and defend our homeland. However, on this day, I can safely say that the world is a better place without this man a part of it.”

BREAK FREE FRO

M FOOT PAIN!

Healthy Living

Acidic drinks

The more acidic a drink, the more damage it can do to the enamel of your teeth.

A gauge of acidity

pH value of selected beverages; a value of Ò7Ó is considered neutral; lower numbers indicate increased acidity

2.5

2.9

2.8

3.0

3.5

Dr. Harry Baldinger • Dr. Stuart Birnbaum Coca-Cola, Schweppes Schweppes Dry Grape Indian Tonic Water

Fanta Orange

Diet Sprite, 7 UP

Apple juice

For information & appointments:

845-352-6800 x 6824 40 Robert Pitt Dr. Monsey, NY 10952

© 2012 MCT Source: Faculty of Odontology, University of Aarhus, Denmark

RCDC WOMEN’S SENIOR GROUP PROGRAM SCHEDULE:

M O N DAY & W E D N E S DAY

12 : 3 0 p m - 3 : 0 0 p m Nutritious lunch served, stimulating program, & musical entertainment. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 845.352.1400 x 3245 A PROJECT OF OFA OF ROCKLAND COUNTY

FREE T R A N S P O R TAT I O N AV A I L A B L E


THE ADVOCATE May 10, 2012

15

FORECLOSURE COUNSELING

RCDC Housing, Inc. would like to help you...

We have a certified foreclosure counselor on staff who can assist you Call us for more information

(845) 352-1400 ext. 3243

‫תשע״ב‬

‫דער אדוואקאט אמור‬

WEATHERIZATION WORKS! CALL DEPT. OF HOUSING AND WEATHERIZATION FOR INFORMATION

845.352.1400

RCDC HOUSING DEPARTMENT The following information is provided to the community by the RCDC Housing Department as a public service

10 HOME ENERGY EFFICIENT TIPS TO SAVE YOU MONEY Your home is one of the major contributors to where your money is spent monthly. In order to save money, home energy efficiency is crucial and it isn’t hard to learn. From the extra lamp that you leave on in the bedroom to the 20 minute shower each of your family members take, it’s time to start becoming more efficient. Here are 10 home energy efficient tips that will help your family and your wallet. 1.) Take shorter baths and showers: The amount of water a person wastes in the bathroom is the largest contributor of water consumption on your water bill. Fill the tub with less water and don’t want wait until it’s hot before you put the tub stopper in! Reduce your showering time by 40-50% to see marked difference in your water bill. Have all family members do this daily.

2.) Set lawn irrigation timers to shorter time: When watering your lawn conserve water by shortening the time for each zone of your yard. Instead of only relying on your irrigation timer, look at the weather and turn off the sprinkler when it has rained or it is anticipated. Water lawns in the early morning or late afternoon to reduce water evaporation throughout the day. 3.) Turn off extra lights: Every time you leave a room, turn off the light, it is that simple. The reality is, you can only be in one room at a time, so why light the entire house? 4.) Wash your car less often: If you wash your car at your home, try and use less water to wash your car, and wash it less often. Consider paying a car wash facility to wash your car. Most facilities will have water

What’s new in housing???

FIRST TIME HOMEBUYERS SAVINGS CLUB AND CLOSING COST INCENTIVE Are you a first time homebuyer? Would you be interested in joining a homebuyers savings club that will manage and reward your savings to achieve your goal of buying that first home? Contact us at RCDC Housing for further details to help your dream become a reality.

Call RCDC Housing for details: 845.352.1400 ext. 3243

saving features in their equipment and in turn may save you time and energy washing your own car. 5.) Install a tankless water heater: Tankless water heaters only heat water when it is turned on, and will stop when the water is turned off. Therefore, a large pool of water isn’t sitting to be heated and you will never ‘run out’. Tankless water heaters are more expensive than traditional tank water heaters but the long term investment is worth it. 6.) Install energy efficient appliances: Throughout your home appliances consume a large amount of electricity to run them. Consider switching out older models with energy efficient models. Visit appliance stores for discounts on floor models and discontinued models. This will help save you money and get your home new appliances that will save energy. 7.) Turn off computers and electronics daily: Do you leave your laptop and computer always on? Believe it or not they consume a large amount of energy, especially older laptops batteries that are not as earth friendly as newer models. Turn them off daily to conserve electricity and to extend the life of your laptop battery. 8.) Turn off ceiling fans: Similarly to lights, we tend to leave ceiling fans on continuously when we aren’t in the room. Ceiling fans that are

left on for hours on end can consume wasted energy. In the winter months reverse the fan to pull warm air from the ceiling and do the opposite in the summer. This will help you leave your thermostat alone too! 9.) Colder climates – install radiant heat flooring: If your climate is predominantly cold the majority of the year, radiant heat flooring can keep your heating bill down. Flooring has radiant heat cables installed over the concrete floor and under your finish resilient floor. This can save on your energy bill and keep your home warm. 10.) Sunny climates – consider solar panels: If you live in a warm climate that receives sunny conditions the better part of the year, installing solar panels is a good idea. Solar panels convert the sun rays into energy and can be used in numerous applications in your home. From heating the water your home uses to powering electricity. Solar panels will help you harness the suns energy for the better!

-Deck Cleaning (Algae, Moss, Lichen) -Powerwashing -Refinishing -Staining

Contact Avi- 845-641-5540


THE ADVOCATE May 10,

16

2012

NEWS FROM

U.S. SENATOR KIRSTEN GILLIBRAND WIRELESS TECHNOLOGY FUNDS TO BROADEN SNAP BENEFICIARIES’ NUTRITION OPPORTUNITIES, SUPPORT LOCAL ECONOMIES Washington, D.C. – U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, New York’s first member of the Senate Agriculture Committee in four decades, today announced New York State is set to receive $269,446 in federal funding from the USDA to help expand the availability of wireless technology at farmers’ markets that are not currently participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). The funding provides SNAP participants greater access to fresh and healthy food, while supporting New York farmers and local economies. “This is an important investment to increase access to healthy food grown on our own farms to families who need it,” said Senator Gillibrand, who advocated for expanding wireless technology at farmers markets. “Connecting more families with farmers markets is a commonsense step for families to lead healthier lives, and open up new

Jobless rate

business for our state’s farms.” Currently, the majority of SNAP participants are unable to use these benefits at farmers markets because farmers markets typically lack the wired Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) terminals that process SNAP funds. This added another barrier to fresh, nutritious produce for families in need, and farmers lose out on this business at their markets. As a result of this funding provided through the 2012 Agriculture Appropriations bill, states may now provide wireless equipment to currently non-participating farmers’ markets, opening the door for their participation in the program. New York State is home to roughly 520 farmers markets, second only to California. More than 3 million New Yorkers are receiving SNAP benefits as of February 2012.

10 8 6 4 Percent of civilian 2 labor force that 0

is unemployed, by month, seasonally adjusted:

ANNUAL 9.6% 4.0% Õ00

Õ10

9.1%

10 8 6 4 2 0

Sept.

Sept.

Õ10

Õ11

© 2011 MCT Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Dr. Albetter asks;

“Dieting not working out?”

Don’t call it a diet, call it a weigh of life. Help yourself feel better, by eating better.

Schedule a consultation with Hanna Raice. Call the Department of Nutrition at 845-352-6800 today. Monsey Family Medical Center 40 Robert Pitt Dr., Monsey, NY 10952 845.352.6800

Ben Gilman Spring Valley Family Medical Center 175 Rt. 59 Spring Valley, NY 10977 845.426.5800

‫תשע״ב‬

‫דער אדוואקאט אמור‬


THE ADVOCATE May 10, 2012

17

‫תשע״ב‬

‫דער אדוואקאט אמור‬

take my card Heimeshe Handyman Carpentry, Electrical repairs & troubleshooting, Plumbing repairs & troubleshooting, Sheetrock, Ceramic, Painting, Closets, Doors, Windows, Appliance Installations, Much More! 35 Years Experience—Shomer Shabbos

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No Job Too Small

Rons General

845-425-0639

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N.Y. 845-425-6400, N.J. 201-645-1054 EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT SERVICES Educational Consultants

• in-school support • • comprehensive educational evaluations • • individualized instruction • " helping children to help themselves " Eliezer Vilinsky, M.A. Miryam Vilinsky, M.Ed.

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get your buisiness card noticed by over 20,000 potential clients. \advertise with the Advocate. e-mail: Sales@advocateNews.org


THE ADVOCATE May 10,

18

2012

‫תשע״ב‬

CLASSIFIEDS To place a classified ad please call 845.770.1950 • or E-mail

HELP WANTED

Sales@advocateNews.org

HELP WANTED

FOR SALE

Medical Center Seeks several positions ASAP

Doctors: Full time Pediatrican, Full time Internist, PTDermatologist, PT Nutritionist

Support StafF , FULL TIME – Medical

Assistant, PART TIME – CALL ROOM RECEPTIONIST Yiddish or Spanish speaking VERY helpful Please call: 845-352-6800 x 6834, or send resume: Email: RCHealthCenter@Gmail.com Fax: 845-425-1228

‫דער אדוואקאט אמור‬

MONSEY

YBH of Passaic – Due to our increased growth and expansion, the girls division is seeking to hire two experienced and dynamic morohs for September 2012, one for 3rd grade and one for 8th grade. Fax resume to (973) 7779477 or email to bleiner@ybhillel. org.

Help wanted Monsey-FULL TIME Young energetic worker with Go getter attitude Work includes: Driving , Light maintenance Assisting staff with projects

Please call: 845-770-1950 x 6834, or Email: RCHealthCenter@Gmail.com

SENIOR GROUP

HELP WANTED

PROGRAM 12:30 - 3:00PM for a great afternoon, MONDAY & WED. FREE TRANSPORTATION AVAILABLE FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CALL

E-Z WEIGHT LOSS THE HEALTHY WAY- Lose 2-8 pounds weekly.

RCDC WOMEN’S SENIOR GROUP

Increase energy.--800-232 -THIN---Earn $$$ while losing weight!

FOR SALE

845.352.1400 x 3245

POSITION WANTED

M &M DISCOUNT CLEANERS

I AM AVAILABLE DAY OR NIGHT OR 24/7 TO PROVIDE CAREGIVING TO THE ELDERLY. HOUSEKEEPING, DOCTOR'S APPOINTMENTS, MEDS, MEAL PREPERATION, ETC. REFRENCES AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST. CALL ANGELA AT 845-425-6051

PICK UP AND DELIVERY

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845-262-1313 SHOMER SHABBOS

3.99 DRY CLEANERS

CONDOS FOR RENT-SALE

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MASTER BEDROOM SET AND DINETTE SET - LIKE NEW, (3 month old) 845-774-9237

• •

845.352.4440

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can you write? writing intern positions available e-mail editor@advocatenews.org call 845 770 1950

CONDOS FOR RENT-SALE MONSEY BLUEBERRY HILL APARTMENTS FOR RENT

1 Bedroom from $1,140 2 Bedrooms from $1,600 3 Bedrooms from $2,025

NOT TO BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER

CALL BLUEBERRY HILL 845.352.4440

HELP WANTED Looking for male live-in eldercare worker for respectable Yid in Monsey. Must have experience, patience, fine character & must have a car available. References needed. Please call RCDC Employment Counselor Rachel at 845-352-1400.

TAXI AVAILABLE Cheapest In Town Mini Vans Available Pay after Shabbos or Yom Tov 24 hour service Local or Long Distance 425-4411 LA FAMILIA TAXI

HELP WANTED S E L L I N G A D S F O R N E W S PA P E R • flexible hours • good pay • should have experience

call 845-770-1950

To place a classified ad please call 845.770.1950 or E-mail Sales@advocateNews.org


THE ADVOCATE May 10, 2012

19

EDUCATIONAL INSIGHTS

‫תשע״ב‬

‫דער אדוואקאט אמור‬

BREAKOUT OF ANOTHER READING WAR

Eliezer Vilinsky, M.A. Miryam Vilinsky, M.Ed.

EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT SERVICES © 2012 All rights reserved. Permission to print granted to The Advocate We thought that the reading war was declared “over”. Now it looks like we’re all headed toward another reading conflict, at least according to some who are quoted in recent educational literature. The famous reading war of the past centered on which reading approach is best: phonics, sight word, or whole language? Although battle lines are still drawn regarding that debate and diehard proponents of each still abound, mature educators realize that even though one may be dominant, there is a time and place for each of these approaches. None of them are absolute. So, what is the latest tumult about? Curriculum planners and teachers are arguing about pre-reading activities. You see, our government is attempting to dictate core curriculum standards for everyone to adopt universally. Panels of experts have been assembled to recommend levels of knowledge and skill that children should have at various point in their education career. The goal is to organize education in America once and for all so that our kids will learn their most and the United States will no longer lag behind so many other countries educationally. This is a reasonable objective, but debate has emerged about what should or should not be dictated. One of the debatable items is how to prepare children for reading. Before we go into what aspects of reading are being discussed, note that some educators are annoyed by the recommendations of the panel because the understanding was that these new curricular proposals would address what should

be taught, not how it should be taught. The thinking goes that what’s can be listed by committees, but how’s should be left up to individual teachers. Therefore, many educators are offended by the panel’s invasion into their territory. Let’s regard this as an aside and focus on the main issue. As we stated above, pre-reading exercises are the bone of contention. The question was asked, “What should teachers do to prepare students for reading some text before they begin to actually read the text?” Traditionally, teachers would conduct discussions about the topic of reading. Discussions are often complemented with supportive material, including visual displays or concrete demonstrations. All pre-reading activities are conducted in the spirit of setting up the child’s mind for reading with the most comprehension. If he understands in advance what he is going to read about, he will read it better. So goes the pre-reading philosophy. The newly proposed reading standards lean away from this practice. By the way, we are choosing our words carefully, as we don’t want to be caught in the line of fire between the two armies. Much of the hullabaloo is because each side thinks the opposite is presenting an all or nothing position. The curriculum panel is being accused of abolishing pre-reading activities. This is clearly not true. That’s why we said that they are “leaning away” from traditional pre-reading practices. If you review the proposed recommendations you will see that the panel aims to preserve the spontaneity of reading. They prefer that teachers not reveal the meaning of upcoming reading material via preparatory activities, rather let the child discover the meaning on his own via his reading skill. Let the act of reading uncover the information and enable the child to get satisfaction from his reading. Don’t tarnish the satisfaction a child gets out of reading

by preempting it with explanations about what he will be reading. Only do things that will help him read the text for himself. These folks believe that children become too dependent on pre-reading discussions and the like, and they are not maximizing their own reading skills.

CHILDREN SHOULD COMMUNICATE WITH THE WRITTEN WORD. Of course this can happen, but we believe the panel’s position takes the issue too far. By the way, we are not offended by standards that recommend how teachers should teach, as long as they are not required exclusively. Pre-reading activities are very valuable, and they should never be abolished. And yes, there are better and worse ways to prepare children for what they are about to read. All camps would endorse preempting with challenging vocabulary words to help avoid disfluent reading. What about new or difficult concepts? Should teachers spend time dwelling on them in advance of reading? We believe that teachers and parents should conduct pre-reading activities that both set a foundation for comprehension and support clinical reading skills. We do not endorse the language of the government folks who make reading sound only like a clinical skill. The goal is not for a child to crack a printed code, sound out words, and get information from what he reads. The goal should be to help children communicate with the written word. Readers receive communication and express themselves as part of reading. Reading that follows discussion or generates discussion is the best reading because the reading becomes integrated with the surrounding

communication. Reading is part of communication. Turning it into an isolated textual skill is as bad as teaching reading through a phonics-only approach. It is empty and disingenuous. It’s not reading. Teachers and parents should discuss material with children before they read it. They should share pictures and outside knowledge that stirs interest and orients the child with the topic, thus beginning the reading-communication process. The textual reading will be a continuation of that process, just as follow-up discussion and activities are. We read that one professional was alarmed to observe 20 minutes of prereading activity for a six-minute read. First of all, dedicating that amount of time should always be judged by the teacher. Second of all, that was probably a very rich readingcommunication experience. Bravo. Reading is the number one most important academic skill. It makes or breaks learning and communication competencies. Pre-reading activities that explore topics in advance of reading should not give away the farm, but they should be rich with information and personal experience. Well-developed pre-reading activities bear well-developed reading. That’s because helping children to integrate all aspects of their learning and communication is part of “helping children to help themselves.” Eliezer and Miryam Vilinsky are educational consultants in private practice. They provide direct instruction to students, conduct teacher-training seminars and consult with schools and families worldwide. They can be reached at Educational Support Services at 426-3673 and at www.TReaching. com. The weekly edition of Educational Insights is available via subscription. Call for details.

THE ARTHUR HOFFNUNG TORAH LECTURE SERIES JEP’S LADIES LEARNING PROGRAM SPRING Mrs. Esther Bayla Schwarz’s

Sunday morning class in

2012

MRS. ESTHER BAYLA SCHWARZ’S

SEFER TEHILLIM from 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. Ongoing – Sundays

PIRKEI AVOS 1st class: 9:30 a.m. 2nd class: 11:00 a.m. 12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m.

INSIGHTS INTO SEFER MISHLAY Instructor: Rabbi Label Lam There’s nothing like it - anywhere! Rabbi Lam’s unique blend of stories, humor, insight & inspiration is simply indescribable. You just have to come...see...and hear for yourself. Join us once and we think you’ll be here every week after that.

Tuesday mornings: 9:45 a.m.

Relationships & Personal Growth Based on Sefer Tomer Devorah Instructor: Rabbi Doniel Frank Informal, informative, and imminently practical, the focus here is to provide insights and develop skills you can apply in all manner of relationships...at home, in the classroom, workplace, or on the street. Here is a wonderful opportunity to enhance the quality of your own life, and the lives of those around you. Please Note: Class schedules are sometimes subject to change. Therefore, please call in advance to find out if there are any changes in the times listed above. All classes take place at the JEWISH EDUCATION PROGRAM 84 Rt. 59 Monsey, NY 10952 (next to Amazing Savings) For more information, call: (845) 425-7556.


THE ADVOCATE May 10,

20

2012

‫דער אדוואקאט אמור‬

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DATED MATERIAL

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IT’S ABOUT YOU! 80 WEST STREET, CORNER OF MAPLE | SPRING VALLEY ORDERS

FAX 845.425.1529

OPEN DAILY 6:30AM

845.425.9220

EMAIL ORDERS@HSUPERMARKET.COM

E CLOS SUN-TUE 10:30PM, WED 11:30PM, THU 1AM, FRI 2 HRS BEFORE "ZMAN"

EC

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