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26 – 29 June 2012 Wexford Opera House, Ireland

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Letter of Welcome

CONTENTS Letter of Welcome

1

Workshop Programme

2

Poster Exhibition

5

Registration

5

Social Programme

7

Field Trips

8

The Conference Organising Committee has worked hard to provide an outstanding programme of speakers and presentations, which we hope will give rise to a stimulating, informative and sociable Workshop.

General Information

9

Local Information

10

Travel Information

10

Poster Exhibition Numbers

11

We are confident that the Workshop will provide an opportunity for delegates to meet each other, build collaboration through friendship and discuss new developments in policy relevant nitrogen science.

Short Oral Presentations

18

Sponsors

19

Dear Workshop Delegates and Friends, It is our pleasure to extend to you a hundred thousand welcomes, Céad míle fáilte. You are all very welcome to Wexford in the heart of the sunny southeast for the 17th International Nitrogen Workshop.

For the first time the Nitrogen Workshop will be using a remote controlled voting system for all delegates to give their opinions/perceptions/recommendations to various Nitrogen related research questions that have been devised to assist in providing policy related research advice. I encourage all workshop participants to embrace the system, ensure that they always have their controllers and to participate fully in the short electronic surveys. Above all the Organising Committee would like all participants to enjoy their time in Wexford and savour the wonderful food and drink from the region. Should you have queries or require assistance please talk to one of the Workshop Assistants in the white conference shirts or at the registrations desk. Finally we would like to thank all our sponsors for all their support, without which the Workshop would not have been possible. We look forward to your contribution. With kind regards,

Karl Richards Karl Richards 17th International Nitrogen Workshop – Chair

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CONFERENCE SECRETARIAT 17th International Nitrogen Workshop Conference Organisers 3 The Courtyard Castle Street, Dalkey, Co. Dublin, Ireland T: +353-1- 285 9033 E: info@conferenceorganisers.ie www.conferenceorganisers.ie www.nitrogenworkshop.com


Workshop Programme Tuesday 26th June 17:00-19:00

Registration

Whites Hotel Foyer

19:00-21:00

Conference Opening and Welcome Reception Paddy Browne, Teagasc Brian Ervine, Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, Northern Ireland Bill Callanan, Department of Agriculture Food and Marine Karl Richards, Owen Fenton & Catherine Watson - Nitrogen and Irish agriculture

Whites Hotel - McLure Suite

Wednesday 27th June 08:00-18:00

Registration & Information Desk

Wexford Opera House Foyer

08:30-09:00 Welcome & Opening Session

Wexford Opera House Auditorium

09:00-09:30 Food security and protection of the environment from excess reactive nitrogen – views from the EU Michael Hamell, DG Environment

Wexford Opera House Auditorium

09:30-09:45 Introduction to OECD Co-operative Research Programme Dr John Sadler US Department of Agriculture

Wexford Opera House Auditorium

Advances in Understanding N-flows and transformations Central question: Where is the missing nitrogen? 09:45-10:05 10:05-10:25

Nitrogen transformations and balances – gaps and research pathways? Christoph Müller, University Giessen, Germany and Tim Clough, Lincoln University, New Zealand Can molecular analyses provide new understanding of past, present, and future soil nitrogen dynamics? Mary Firestone, University of California, Berkeley, USA

10:25-10:55

Tea/Coffee Break and Poster Viewing

10:55-11:10

Tracing of N Transformation in Soil and Gas Phases Using Isotopes and FTIR Spectroscopy Avi Shaviv, CEE, Technion-IIT, Haifa, Israel Soil nitrogen transformations and N2/N2O emissions after application of slurry to Irish grassland soils, as affected by the nitrification inhibitor DCD Maria Ernfors, Teagasc Johnstown Castle & AFBI, Ireland and N Ireland The fate of urine nitrogen with use of a nitrification inhibitor Diana Selbie, Teagasc, Ireland & Lincoln University, New Zealand

11:10-11:25

11:25-11:40

Wexford Opera House Auditorium CHAIR: Karl Richards, Teagasc

11:55-12:30

Short Oral Presentations Search for the missing N: Excess N2 in groundwater and streams Rebecca Fox, University of Maryland, USA Characterising dissolved organic matter flux in UK freshwaters: Sources, Transport and Delivery Christopher Yates, Reading University, UK Investigating the efficacy of soil nitrogen tests to predict soil nitrogen supply across a range of Irish soil types under controlled environmental conditions Noeleen McDonald, Teagasc, Johnstown Castle & AFBI, Ireland and N. Ireland Panel Discussion

12:30-13:30

Lunch

Wexford Opera House

12:30-14:30

Poster Session 1

Wexford Opera House Stage

11:40-11: 45 11: 45-11:50 11:50-11:55

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A Holistic Approach to Understanding Impacts of Nitrogen on the Environment Central question: Which mitigation measures are synergystic/environmentally optimal? 14:30-14:50 14:50-15:10

15:10-15:25 15:25-15:40 15:40-15:55

15:55-16:00 16:00-16:05 16:05-16:10

A holistic approach to understanding impacts of nitrogen on the environment Mark Sutton, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Scotland (Invited) Integration of measures to mitigate reactive nitrogen loss to the environment Cecile de Klein, Ag Research, New Zealand (Invited)

Wexford Opera House Auditorium CHAIR: Michael Hamell, DG Environment

Economic Cost of Nitrogen Management Oene Oenema, Waginengen, The Netherlands Beer, bread and other opportunities for innovation in nitrogen use Roger Sylvester-Bradley, ADAS, UK Using NDVI to define optimal N rate: an application on durum wheat Francesco Morari, Università di Padova, Italy Short Oral Presentations Processes of nitrate-N loss to streamflow from intensive cereal crop catchments in Ireland Alice Melland, Teagasc, Ireland GHG balance of bioenergy cropping systems under the environmental conditions of northern Germany Sandra Claus, Kiel, Germany Animal delivery of the nitrification inhibitor DCD as a new effective method for reducing nitrogen losses from grazed pastures Stewart Ledgard, Ag Research, New Zealand

16:10-16:40

Panel Discussion

16:40-18:00

Poster Session 2 with Refreshments

Wexford Opera House Stage

19:30-22:30

Conference Gala Dinner

Whites Hotel

Thursday 28th June Global Perspectives on Nitrogen and Food Security Central question: Will the cost of nitrogen threaten food security in the post-oil era? 08:30-08:50 08:50-09:10

09:10-09:25 09:25-09:40

09:40-09:45 09:45-09:50 09:50-09:55

The Challenges of Feeding 9-10 Billion People - Sustainably & Equitably by 2050 Charles Godfray, Oxford University, UK (Invited) Nitrogen and food security in the EU from a global perspective Hans van Grinsven, PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, The Netherlands (Invited)

Wexford Opera House Auditorium CHAIR: Catherine Watson, AFBI

The Nitrogen footprint of European food production Jan Peter Lesschen, Wageningen, The Netherlands The product carbon footprint of milk from pasture and confinementbased dairy farming Ralf Loges, Kiel, Germany Short Oral Presentations The effect of nitrogen fertiliser application rate on nitrous oxide emission intensities of arable crop products Rachel Thorman, ADAS, UK Carbon footprint of Irish milk production: can white clover make a difference? Mingjia Yan, UCD, China/Ireland Integrated assessment of nutrient management options in the food chain of China Lin Ma, Wageningen, The Netherlands

09:55-10:15

Panel Discussion

10:15-11:15

Poster Session 3 with Tea/Coffee

Wexford Opera House Stage

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Knowledge Transfer Central question: How can we bridge the gap between ever-more-detailed and narrow research and the knowledge requirements of our stakeholders? 11:15-11:35 11:35-11:55 11:55-12:10

12:15-12:30

Effective stakeholder communication: together we stand, divided we fall! Frans Aarts, Plant Research International, Wageningen, The Netherlands (invited) Extension & Knowledge Transfer; Effective Partnerships for Timely Impact Quirine Ketterings, Cornell University, New York, USA (Invited) A framework for designing and evaluating nitrogen-efficient farming systems at the catchment scale by combining process studies, agrohydrological integrated modelling and participatory approach into an iterative process Patrick Durand, INRA, France Estimating the effect of mitigation methods on multiple environmental pollutants Paul Newell Price, ADAS, UK

12:45-13:00

Short Oral Presentations Strategies to reduce N losses to water from agriculture: experiences from on-farm case studies in the N-TOOLBOX project Julia Cooper, Newcastle University, UK NITIRSOIL: a new N-model to estimate monthly nitrogen soil balance in irrigated agriculture Jose Miguel de Paz, Centro para el Desarrollo de Agricultura Sostenible, Spain Achieving good water quality status in intensive animal production areas: a LIFE+ project Elena Bortolazzo, CRPA, Italy Panel Discussion

13:00

Packed Lunch distributed for Coach Journeys

12:30-12:35 12:35-12:40 12:40-12:45

Wexford Opera House Auditorium CHAIR: Paddy Browne, Teagasc

Wexford Opera House

Field Trips

13:00-18:30 13:15 13:15 13:20 13:30

Field Field Field Field

Trip Trip Trip Trip

1. EU Dairyman 2. Waterford wetlands 3. Agricultural Catchments 4 & 5. Johnstown Castle and modelling

18:15

Bus pick up at Whites Hotel to the National Heritage Park for any delegates not attending the field trips.

18:30

Viking Barbeque with guided Heritage Tour

Bus pick up at Whites Hotel

National Heritage Park

Friday 29th June 09:00-11:00

Please go to the Workshop that corresponds to the colour sticker on your badge

WORKSHOP 1 (GREEN STICKER): Advances in Understanding N-flows and transformations - Central question: Where is the missing nitrogen? WORKSHOP 2 (BLUE STICKER): A Holistic Approach to Understanding Impacts of Nitrogen on the Environment- Central question: Which mitigation measures are synergistic/environmentally optimal? WORKSHOP 3 (YELLOW STICKER): Global Perspectives on Nitrogen and Food Security - Central question: Will the cost of nitrogen threaten food security in the post-oil era?  WORKSHOP 4 (PINK STICKER): Knowledge Transfer - Central question: How can we bridge the gap between ever-more-detailed and narrow research and the knowledge requirements of our stakeholders?

Wexford Opera House Auditorium, Jerome Hynes; Whites Hotel McLure Suite 1 and McCarthy Suite 1 & 2

11:00-11:30

Tea/Coffee Break (Posters to be removed by 11.30)

Opera House Foyers

11:30-11:45

OECD-CRP Wrap-up Session Dr John Sadler USDA

Opera House Auditorium

11:45-12:45

Closing Plenary Session

Opera House Auditorium

12:45-14:00

Lunch

Wexford Opera House

14.10 - 16.15

Supplementary Workshop: Mitigation of nitrogen emissions using urease and nitrification inhibitors

Whites Hotel McCarthy Suite 1 & 2

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POSTER EXHIBITION The Poster Exhibition will take place on the Stage of the Wexford Opera House. The poster boards will be numbered and the number of your poster is listed at the end of this programme. POSTER SET-UP The Stage of the Wexford Opera House will be open on Tuesday 26th June from 16:00-18:30 – if possible, your poster should be mounted by 18:30. Posters should be up no later than 08.30 on Wednesday 27th June as there will be no access to the stage area during the Opening Ceremony and Plenary Sessions. POSTER SESSIONS Posters will be on display for the duration of the workshop. Authors should be beside their posters at the times indicated below. This is to ensure that participants can meet the poster presenter. The times for each poster session and when poster authors should be at their posters in shown in the table below. Poster Session

Time

Day

Date

Authors at their posters

1

13:30-14:30

Wednesday

27th June

Session 1 authors

2

16:40-18:00

Wednesday

27th June

Session 2 authors

3

10:15-11:15

Thursday

28th June

Session 3 & 4 authors

POSTER DISMANTLING Your poster should remain mounted and available for viewing until 13:00 on Thursday 28th June. It must be removed by 11:30 on Friday 29th June. Posters not removed will be discarded. Please note that power outlets are not available in the poster area.

REGISTRATION The Registration Desk is located in the McLure Suite Foyer of Whites Hotel and will be open on: Tuesday 26th June

17:00 – 19:00

The Registration Desk is located in the Foyer of the Wexford Opera House and will be open on: Wednesday 27th June

08:00 – 18:00

Thursday 28 June

08:00 – 14:00

Friday 29 June

08:00 – 12:00

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th

INTERACTIVE RESPONSE CARD Your feedback and participation is important to us so we have provided you with a response card, please do not remove it from the Lanyard during the course of the event.  To participate in the conference just select your answer by pressing your choice of button firmly on your response card. You do not need to switch it on. Please wear your lanyard around your neck at all times as you may need your response card during breakout sessions as well.  During breakout sessions you may be asked to change the “Channel” on your Response Card to connect to the current session.  If asked to do so, please select “CH” then enter the channel number that you will be given and press “CH” again.  A light will turn green to show you have changed your channel successfully.  There will be a member of staff available if you require support with this. The Response Card is your responsibility for the duration of the event and must be handed in at the end of the event.  Failure to hand it back will result in the delegate being charged €40. 

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PROGRESS

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PARTNERSHIP

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Through

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SOCIAL PROGRAMME OPENING CEREMONY AND WELCOME RECEPTION – WHITES HOTEL Tuesday 26th June 2012 19:00-21:00 The Opening Ceremony and Welcome Reception will take place in the McLure Suite of Whites Hotel. A welcome drink and finger food will be served with ambient music.

GALA DINNER – WHITES HOTEL Wednesday 27th June 2012 19:30-22:30 The Gala Dinner will take place in the McLure Suite of Whites Hotel. Entertainment will include a traditional Irish band with ceili dancers. Delegates are encouraged to participate in the dancing and will be taught some steps by the professionals.

VIKING BARBEQUE – NATIONAL HERITAGE PARK Thursday 28th June 2012 18:30-21:30 The Viking BBQ, being held in the National Heritage Park, begins with a glass of mead on arrival. There will be a mini tour of the park, including a fulacht fiadh demonstration - a prehistoric method of cooking. Your visit will include demonstrations of swords, chainmail and daily life in the 10th century and storytelling by the fire. The BBQ menu is extensive and fit for a King. Field Trip Coaches will drop delegates directly to the National Heritage Park. Delegates not participating in a Field Trip will be collected at Whites Hotel at 18.15

ACCOMPANYING PERSON TOUR – DUNBRODY FAMINE SHIP This tour has had to be cancelled due to insufficient numbers. Advice on self arranged tours can be provided at the reception desk or the Tourist Office at the south end of Wexford Quay. Further information on tours of Wexford and the surrounding area is available on the Visit Wexford website www.visitwexford.ie

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FIELD TRIPS Field trip 1. EU Dairyman Project Farm Visit This field trip will visit one of the commercial dairy pilot farms participating in the EU Dairyman Project. The farming system and project will be described by the farmer, and an advisor and research scientist working on the project. Dairyman aims to strengthen rural communities in the regions of North West Europe (NWE) where dairy farming is a main economic activity and a vital form of land use. This project also aims lead to a more competitive dairy sector, stronger regional economies and an improved ecological performance with the rural area. Location: Kilkenny Time Travel to Location: 1.5 hours Coach departure: from Whites Hotel at 13:15

Field trip 2. Waterford Wetlands Project Visit This field trip will visit the Waterford Integrated Constructed Wetlands Project where the concept, design, application and performance will be described by the lead scientist and a local landowner. This approach incorporates water quality management with “landscape fit� and biodiversity along with social and economic considerations that help facilitate the required larger land areas used in ICW design compared with those generally used in other surface flow constructed wetlands. Additionally this field trip will finish with a stop-off for a beach walk on the copper coast Location: Anne Valley, Waterford Time Travel to Location: 1.5 hours Coach departure: from Whites Hotel at 13:15

Field trip 3. Agricultural Catchment Visit This field trip will visit an Agricultural Catchment that is being intensively studies as part of Irelands Nitrates Directive monitoring programme. The catchment programme and monitoring equipment will be described by the research and advisory team and farmers from the catchment Additionally this field trip will include a visit to a local farm and agricultural museum. Location: Ballycanew, Co Wexford Time Travel to Location: 1 hour Coach departure: from Whites Hotel at 13:20

Field trip 4 & 5. Teagasc Environment, Soils and Land Use Research Centre Visit and Modelling Demonstration This field trip will visit the Teagasc, Environment, Soils and Land Use Research Centre at Johnstown Castle. This field trip will feature a demonstration by Teagasc researchers of the Agri-environmental research being conducted and research facilities at this centre. This field trip also includes a demonstration of field research equipment by suppliers/manufacturers. Additionally this field trip will include a visit to Johnstown Castle Estate gardens and agricultural museum. Location: Johnstown Castle, Demonstration Village Time Travel to Location: 15 minutes Coach departure: from Whites Hotel at 13:30

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GENERAL INFORMATION ACCOMMODATION All changes to accommodation reservations must be made through the conference secretariat located at the registration desk in Wexford Opera House. Delegates must settle any extra charges, i.e. room service, directly with the hotel on departure.

INSURANCE The Irish Organising Committee, or its agents, will not be responsible for any medical expenses, loss, damages or accidents during the event. We recommend that delegates insure themselves for medical and cancellation charges.

CERTIFICATES OF ATTENDANCE Certificates of Attendance have been included in each registered delegate’s onsite documents.

INTERNET FACILITIES Wireless Internet access is available throughout the Wexford Opera House. The password is – operawexford

COFFEE BREAKS Coffee and tea will be served, during the scheduled breaks, in the Poster Exhibition Area and Main Foyer of the Wexford Opera House.

MOBILE PHONES Delegates must switch off their mobile phones in all meeting rooms during sessions. WORKSHOP LANGUAGE The official language of the workshop is English. Simultaneous translation will not be available.

LUNCH Lunch will be served in the Sky Cafe, Festival Foyer, the Founders Lobby and Jerome Hynes Lobby. Lunch stations are clearly sign posted and Workshop Assistants will also provide guidance. Do check out the Sky Café with views across Wexford town.

AUDIO RECORDERS AND CAMERAS The use of personal recorders and cameras is not permitted during sessions.

SPEAKER PREVIEW AREA The Speaker Preview Area is located at the back of the main Auditorium in the Wexford Opera House during the Workshop. A technician will also be available beside the registration desk in Whites Hotel on Tuesday 26th June during registration. Where delegates exceed the general rule of 1 slide per minute this will be pointed out to them as they risk being cut off when they reach the end of their allotted time. Tuesday, 26th June:

17:00 – 19:00

McLure Suite Foyer, Whites Hotel

Wednesday 27th June:

07:30 – 18:00

O’Reilly Auditorium, Wexford Opera House

Thursday 28th June:

07:30 – 13:30

O’Reilly Auditorium, Wexford Opera House

Friday 29th June:

08:30 – 11:30

O’Reilly Auditorium, Wexford Opera House

All speakers should make contact with the Audio Visual Aids technician as soon as possible after registration and no later than 2 hours before their presentation.

1. Wexford Opera House 2. Whites Hotel 3. Talbot Hotel 4. Riverbank House Hotel 5. Auburn Guesthouse 6. The National Heritage Park

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LOCAL INFORMATION CURRENCY The unit of currency is the Euro. For visitors outside of the EU, Euro can be purchased at any foreign exchange department, at your local bank or at any bank in Ireland.

TIPPING In restaurants and taxis it is customary to add a gratuity of approximately 10% to the bill. In some restaurants Service Charge is already included in the bill as presented to the customer.

BANKING Most banks open from Monday to Friday between the hours of 10:00 – 16:00. Each bank has one late opening day per week and all have bureau de change. ATM machines are available and most credit cards are widely accepted particularly Visa and MasterCard, as well as Cirrus and Maestro.

SHOPPING There are a variety of shops in Wexford Town and further information is contained in the tourist literature available on registration. Further Tourist advice is available from the Tourist Centre which is located on the south end of the Quay in Wexford town

ELECTRICITY The electrical supply throughout Ireland is 230 volts (50 cycles). Plugs are 3-pin flat. Adapters are therefore required for 2-pin appliances. En-suite bathroom shaving points normally have 110 and 240 volt outlets for shaving appliances.

WEATHER There is a reason Ireland is so green! Influenced by the Gulf Stream, Ireland has a mild temperate climate with summer temperatures generally ranging from 14 to 16 ⁰C (60-70 degree Fahrenheit). Rain can be expected at any time (even when sunny) so please have your poncho provided or your own water proof clothing available at all times.

TRAVEL INFORMATION BUS: WEXFORD TO DUBLIN AIRPORT (Wexford BUs) Su X

Su X

Wexford (Redmond Sq)

01.30

03.30

05.00

06.15

07.30

11.30

13.30

15.30

17.30

19.30

Arklow (Old Dublin Road)

02.40

04.40

06.05

07.20

08.30 10.45

11.45

12.45

14.45

16.45

18.45

20.35

UCD

06.55

08.20

09.30 11.40

12.40

13.40

15.40

17.30

19.30

21.30

Clare Street (National Gallery)

07.05

08.35

09.50 11.50

12.50

13.50

15.50

17.40

19.45

21.45

O2 Arena (Clarion Hotel)

07.15

08.45

10.00

12.00

13.00

14.00

16.00

17.50

19.55

21.55

07.30

09.15

10.15

12.15

13.15

14.15

16.15

18.20

20.15

22.15

Dublin Airport (Coach Park)

04.00

06.00

09.30 10.30

Su X = This service does not operate on Sundays or Bank Holidays. Timetable is subject to change. Please confirm 48 hours prior to travel date. All journey times are approximate and are dependent on traffic and road conditions at time of travel. Wexford Bus does not accept responsibility for passengers who miss their flights.

Bus: Wexford to Dublin/Waterford (Bus Éireann) Bus Éireann provide services to County Wexford from Dublin and Waterford. For further information on bus services visit www.buseireann.ie.

train: WEXFORD (O Hanrahan) TO DUBLIN (Connolly) Date Friday, 29 June 2012 Dept. Dept. Dept. Dept.

05:59 - Arrive: 08:45 07:43 - Arrive: 10:15 13.20 - Arrive: 15.45 18.20 - Arrive: 20.44

train: DUBLIN/ROsslare to WEXFORD The Dublin/Rosslare line serves County Wexford with stations at Gorey, Enniscorty, Wexford, Rosslare Strand and Rosslare Europort. For further information on rail services visit www.irishrail.ie. 10


POSTER EXHIBiTION NUMBERS Session 1: Advances in Understanding N-flows and Transformations No.

Surname

Name

Poster Title

1

Alfaro

Marta

Role of soil organic matter content on nitrogen dynamics in volcanic ash soils

2

Almadni

Mftah

Using bromide as tracer to study the horizontal and vertical movement of nitrate under field conditions

3

Arbaciauskas

Jonas

Prediction of mineral nitrogen content in deeper layers of soil in Lithuania based on its concentration in surface layers

4

Balint

Agnes

Influence of fertilisation practice on gas and grain yield production

5

Barrett

Maria

N2O and N2 production and quantification of denitrifying populations in various aquifer systems

6

Bertora

Chiara

Comparing strategies for implementing soil organic matter and nitrogen use in two contrasting soils

7

Bittman

Shabtai

Evidence of nitrate leaching hotspots over a vulnerable aquifer due to dry deposition of ammonia from poultry houses

8

Bittman

Shabtai

Response of corn (Zea mays L.) to precision injected dairy slurry with focus on nitrogen

9

Brennan

James

The effect of crop establishment system on the nitrogen use efficiency of cereal grain crops in Ireland

10

Brito

Luis Miguel

Physicochemical changes and nitrogen losses during composting of Acacia longifolia and Acacia melanoxylon

11

Cardenas

Laura

Potential for N2O emissions from volcanic grassland soils

12

Carswell

Alison

Nitrogen losses from buffer zones: interactions with soil structure and hydrological pathways

13

Castaldelli

Giuseppe

Nitrogen mass balance in a coastal lowland declared vulnerable to nitrate (WFD 2000/60/EC): the relevance of secondary canals in excess nitrogen removal

14

Cavalli

Daniele

Carbon and nitrogen residual effects after repeated manure applications

15

Černý

Jindřich

The effect of mineral N fertiliser dose on nitrogen efficiency of silage maize

16

Chadwick

Dave

Methodology for the selection of the geographic location of new experimental sites and treatments to generate new N2O emission factors and data for model validation in the UK: the prioritisation phase of the InveN2Ory project

17

Cichota

Rogerio

Modelling the effects of temporal overlap of urine patches on nitrogen leaching

18

Cocco

Elisa

Does groundwater level determine GHGs emissions from fertilized soil?

19

Cohan

Jean-Pierre

A new approach for measuring ammonia volatilization in the field: First results of the French research project “VOLAT’NH3”

20

Cordovil

Claudia

Dynamics of in situ nitrogen mineralization from five organic fertilizers

21

Cordovil

Claudia

Malting industry effluents as a source of nitrogen to soils

22

Dahlin

Sigrun

Ley management effects on N2 fixation, crop N dynamics and residual N

23

de Ruijter

Frank

Ammonia volatilization from crop residues - contribution to total ammonia volatilization at national scale

24

Delin

Sofia

Nitrate leaching after cattle slurry application to ley in autumn

25

Deppe

Marianna

Impact of point injection of ammonium fertilizer on nitrous oxide fluxes and nitrogen dynamics in soil

26

Engström

Lena

Optimising the spring N fertilisation rate to winter oilseed rape

27

Engström

Lena

Site, preceding crop and N management effects on yield of organic winter oil seed rape

28

Fangueiro

David

Assessment of the potential N mineralization/immobilization of pig slurry fractions obtained using different techniques

11


Session 1: Advances in Understanding N-flows and Transformations (cont.) No.

Surname

Name

Poster Title

29

Fangueiro

David

Influence of tree canopies on nitrogen dynamics in Montado - a Portuguese Cork Oak Savanna

30

Ferrara

Rossana Monica

Dynamic of ammonia emission from urea spreading in Po Valley (Italy): relationship with nitrogen compounds in the soil

31

Ferrara

Rossana Monica

Gap filling of missing data for calculating the cumulated ammonia emission in a fertilized bare soil: a case study in Lombardia region (Italy)

32

Fiorentino

Nunzio

Assessing N availability from municipal solid waste compost during two consecutive lettuce cycles in Italy

33

Frøseth

Randi Berland

Improving N efficiency in barley through green manure management and biogas slurry

34

Gabriel

Jose Luis

Do cover crops affect leaching and soil accumulation of salt and mineral N?

35

Garcia

Sonia

N2O emission from a maize cropping system influenced by replacing fallow with cover crops and its subsequent incorporation into the soil.

36

GascuelOdoux

Chantal

The complexity of the recharge processes and their effect on the seasonal variations of nitrate concentration in shallow groundwater and streams: observations and modelling

37

Gebremikael

Mesfin

Interactions between Free-living Soil Nematodes and Ryegrass and Effects on Nitrogen Mineralization

38

Giacomini

Sandro

Nitrous oxide emissions during the decomposition of summer cover crop residue under no-till

39

Giacomini

Sandro

Strategies to reduce nitrous oxide emissions after spread of pig slurry in no-till corn and wheat

40

Gómez Muñoz

Beatriz

Effect of fertiliser type, rate and method of application on nitrogen leaching in organic olive oil farming

41

Grant

Cynthia

Canola Response to N Fertilization as Affected by Preceding Crop and Location

42

Greta

Roth

Impact of two different types of grassland-to-field-conversion on nitrous oxide emission and nitrate leaching

43

Guzman Bustamante

Ivan

Effect of nitrogen fertilizer amount and a nitrification inhibitor on the N2O emissions from a loamy soil cropped with winter wheat

44

Hackett

Richie

Effects of overwinter vegetation cover on soil nitrogen supply to spring barley in Ireland

45

Harrison-Kirk

Tina

Influence of soil water status and compaction on N2O and N2 emissions from 15N-labelled synthetic urine.

46

Herrmann

Antje

Nitrogen dynamics in maize based cropping systems for biogas production

47

Higgins

Suzanne

Antecedent effect of lime on denitrification in grassland soils

48

Hofmeier

Maximilian

Nitrogen mineralization potentials in rice-wheat systems in southeastern China

49

Ibrahim

Tristan

Managing nitrogen losses in shallow glacial aquifers: denitrifying bioreactors as a potential mitigation measure

50

Ina

Koerner

Generation of N-balances to describe N-flows and N-transformations - The example of composting

51

Jahangir

M Mofizur Rahman

Terrestrial carbon and nitrogen losses and indirect greenhouse gas emissions via groundwater

52

Jahangir

M Mofizur Rahman

The effect of a mustard cover crop on groundwater denitrification

53

Krijger

Anna-Karin

Winter wheat nitrogen demand under different soil conditions

54

Kuzmanovski

Vladimir

Synergetic leaching model based on pathway and pressure factors

55

Laini

Alex

Nitrogen sources and sinks in a heavily impacted watershed (Oglio River, Northern Italy)

56

Lassaletta

Luis

Nitrogen dynamics in agricultural Mediterranean catchments vs. temperate ones: Ebro, Oglio, Seine and Scheldt comparisons

12


Session 1: Advances in Understanding N-flows and Transformations (cont.) No.

Surname

Name

Poster Title

57

Lebender

Ulrike

Regulatory effect of soil properties on N2O emission from wheat-growing season in five soils: field and pot experiment

58

Loges

Ralf

Effect of soil compaction and nitrogen fertilization on nitrous oxide emission from highly productive grassland

59

Louro López

Aránzazu

Nitrous oxide emissions from two maize crop seasons in Northwestern Spain

60

Louro López

Aránzazu

Seasonal variation of nitrous oxide emissions from grazed and fertilized grasslands in Galicia (Spain)

61

Marchetti

Rosa

Nitrogen mineralization potential of soil amended with biochar from pig-slurry solids

62

McGeough

Karen

The effect of dicyandiamide addition to cattle slurry on rates of nitrification at a grassland site in Northern Ireland.

63

Mellander

Per-Erik

Spatiotemporal variation in groundwater nitrate-N concentrations in two agricultural catchments

64

Monteagudo Diz

Ana Belen

Forage yield and nitrogen utilization of forage maize hybrids in Organic Farming

65

Mori

Akinori

Nitrous oxide emissions from grassland treated with different types of manure: comparison between slurry plus fertilizer plots and farmyard manure plus fertilizer plots

66

Murphy

Conor

Soil Organic Matter Priming: effect of labile C on N mineralisation in Irish grassland soils

67

Nett

Leif

Influence of soil amendment history on decomposition of recently applied organic amendments

68

Ni

Kang

Effects of urea fertilization with urease and nitrification inhibitors on ammonia volatilization and winter wheat yield

69

Oenema

oene

Emissions of ammonia and nitrous oxide from liquid and solid fractions of treated pig slurry

70

Pacholski

Andreas

Ammonia volatilization after field application of biogas residues: model based scenario analysis of crop specific emissions

71

Perego

Alessia

Model estimation of nitrogen leaching under derogation measures on organic nitrogen fertilization in Lombardia (northern Italy)

72

Recous

Sylvie

Impact of quality of residue mulches and their decomposition on N dynamics in soil in conservation agriculture

73

Rémi

Dupas

Estimating nitrate emissions to surface water: comparison of methods using detailed regional data and national-wide databases

74

Rochette

Philippe

Ammonia volatilization from banded urea: Impact of incorporation depth and rate of application

75

Rodrigues

Manuel

Comparing N recovery from legumes grown as green manures in olive orchards

76

Rodrigues

Manuel

Self-reseeding annual legume species as cover crops for rainfed olive orchards

77

Rohe

Lena

Differentiation between fungi and bacteria as a source of N2O formation in soil

78

Rufat

Josep

Fertigation management of high density olive trees in calcareous soils

79

Ruser

Reiner

Effect of N-fertilizer amount and nitrification inhibitor on N2O emissions from a sandy and a loamy soil under vegetable production

80

Ruser

Reiner

Long-term effect of a nitrification inhibitor on N2O fluxes from a loamy soil

81

Rutkowska

Agnieszka

Efficacy of 15N nitrogen in fertilization of cereals – peas mixtures

82

Sabahi

Hossein

Polyphenol and cellulose act as a nitrification inhibitor by different mechanisms

83

Saia

Sergio

Can arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi enhance plant nitrogen capture from organic matter added to soil?

84

Saia

Sergio

Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis on the nitrogen uptake of three durum wheat genotypes from two different organic sources

13


Session 1: Advances in Understanding N-flows and Transformations (cont.) No.

Surname

Name

Poster Title

85

Saia

Sergio

Effects of soil inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant growth and nutrient uptake of some Mediterranean species grown under rainfed field conditions

86

Sanchez

Laura

Influence of N deposition and atmospheric O3 concentration on N2O and NO emissions from Mediterranean pastures.

87

Sanchez

Laura

Study of the key factors which influence N2O and CO2 emissions in a fertigation cropping system under Mediterranean climate

88

Sanz-Cobeña

Alberto

Can an urease inhibitor mitigate N2O and NO emissions from urea fertilized Mediterranean agrosystems?

89

Senbayram

Mehmet

Soil pH, and NO3- concentrations regulates the N2O and N2 emission from soil under anoxia

90

Shah

Ghulam Mustafa

Effects of storage method on N disappearance and herbage N recovery from solid cattle manure

91

Shah

Ghulam Mustafa

First-year’s and residual herbage N recovery from fresh and composted solid cattle manures

92

Sørensen

Peter

Effects of anaerobic digestion of organic manures on N turnover and N utilization

93

Stavridou

Eleftheria

Effects of new catch crop and tillage systems on nitrogen management in sugar beet production

94

Stenberg

Maria

Nitrous oxide emissions from a clay soil under mouldboard ploughing or tine cultivation

95

Szabó

Éva

The interactions among the nitrogen supply and the physiological parameters and yield of winter wheat genotypes

96

Techow

Anna

Nitrous oxide emission from biogas production systems on a coastal marsh soil

97

Tellez

Angela

Effect of long-term conservation and conventional tillage system on N2O emissions under rainfed Mediterranean agro-ecosystem.

98

Thompson

Rodney

Sensitivity of crop reflectance to crop N status of a melon crop

99

Thompson

Rodney

Sensitivity of the ratio leaf chlorophyll to leaf flavonoles measured with optical sensors to crop N status of melon

100

Vallejo

Antonio

Maize stover incorporation increased N2O emissions twofold during a barley crop

101

Van Dijk

Wim

N fertiliser replacement value of reversed osmosis liquid fractions on arable land

102

Van Overtveld

Koen

Determination of denitrification capacity of small headwater catchments in Flanders.

103

Vári

Enikő

The impact of crop rotation and N fertilization on the growth and yield of winter wheat

104

Ventura

Maurizio

Biochar reduces nitrate leaching in an apple orchard

105

Vermue

Anthony

Effects of integrated weed management in cropping systems on soils, microbial activity and N2O fluxes

106

Villar

Josep M.

Evaluation of nitrogen fertilisation and irrigation strategies to optimize yield, quality and benefit in peach trees

107

Villar

Josep M.

Nitrogen removal by fruits, leaves and pruning wood in a peach orchard

108

Vitale

Luca

Soil N2O emission as affected by 3,5-Dimethilphirazolphosphate, an nitrification inhibitor, applied on different soil types in Southern Italy

109

Vogeler

Iris

Comparison of APSIM and DNDC for simulating nitrogen transformation and N2O emissions from urine patches

110

Weymann

Daniel

Evaluation of a closed tunnel for field-scale measurements of N2O fluxes at the soil-atmosphere interface

111

Willekens

Koen

N availability from pre-treated chicken and goat manure in an organic cropping system

112

Willekens

Koen

N dynamics and priming effect in horticultural fields as influenced by application of mineral fertilizer N

14


Session 2: A Holistic Approach to Understanding Impacts of Nitrogen on the Environment No.

Surname

Name

Poster Title

113

Bailey

John

Replacing lime with gypsum as fertiliser filler in calcium ammonium nitrate (CAN): a strategy for minimising nitrogen losses to the environment

114

Barrena

Iskander

N2O emissions from Radiata Pine, Douglas fir and Beech forest stands in the Basque Country

115

Blažinkov

Mihaela

Characterization of indigenous rhizobial strains isolated from faba bean (Vicia faba L.) nodules

116

Børgesen

Christen Duus

The effect of measures implemented from 2003 to 2007 to reduce Nitrogen leaching from agricultural land in Denmark

117

Brennan

Raymond

Use of chemical amendment of dairy cattle slurry to reduce phosphorus losses from dairy cattle slurry while allowing land spreading of slurry to meet nitrogen requirements.

118

Calleja Cervantes

Maria Erendira

Consequences of long-term application of alternative N sources on gaseous emissions.

119

Carranca

Corina

Influence of agricultural practices and climate changes in Portuguese rice production

120

Castelli

Fabio

Influence of inter tillage on nitrate content in soil during tobacco crop growth

121

Daatselaar

Co

Relations between management, economics and environmental quality on Dutch arable farms

122

Dale

Andrew

Response of a range of forage swards to slurry nitrogen

123

Dalgaard

Tommy

Farm N balances in European landscapes and the effect of measures to reduce N-losses

124

Delin

Sofia

Effect of nitrogen fertilization on nitrate leaching in relation to grain yield response in Sweden

125

Di

Hong J

A synergistic mitigation technology for nitrate leaching and nitrous oxide emissions for pastoral agriculture

126

Dias

Fabio L. T.

N fertilization and diazotrophic bacteria inoculation in sugarcane for bioenergy production

127

Durand

Patrick

Evaluating innovative farming systems to limit nitrogen diffuse pollution in catchments: development and application of the CASIMOD’N model

128

Fangueiro

David

Nitrogen dynamics in soil amended with acidified and non acidified cattle slurry and derived liquid fraction

129

Feichtinger

Franz

Nitrate leaching to the groundwater investigated for different management practices of organic farming and wine growing

130

Fenech

Cecilia

Differentiating sewage and manure derived nitrate within surface waters

131

Fuccella

Roberto

Determination of nitrogen concentration in pig slurries using NIR spectroscopy

132

Gallejones

Patricia

Modelling the effect of nitrogen management on nitrogen losses, net energy balance and plant quality in a wheat-rapeseed rotation

133

Greene

Sheila

The Environmental Virtual Observatory (EVO): can cloud-based modelling provide new understanding of nutrient cycling processes from catchment to national scale?

134

Harrington

Rory

The use of Integrated Constructed Wetlands (ICW) in the management of nitrogen (N) enriched effluents.

135

Khalil

Mohammad I

Prediction of nitrous oxide emissions from Irish arable lands using the ECOSSE model

136

Li

Frank

Tools to improve N cycle models

137

Maes

Sofie

Impact of the application of nitrogen from livestock manure on agricultural parcels on water quality: derogation in Flanders

138

Marchetti

Rosa

Nitrogen use efficiency improvement in heavy-pig production in Northern Italy

139

Martinez

Maite

Impact of timing of nitrogen fertilization at tillering stage on rice plant growth in intermittent water management.

15


Session 2: A Holistic Approach to Understanding Impacts of Nitrogen on the Environment No.

Surname

Name

Poster Title

140

Menendez

Sergio

DMPP reduces N2O losses and maintains wheat yield under humid Mediterranean conditions

141

Mihailescu

Elena

Nitrogen use efficiency on dairy farms

142

Murphy

Paul

Nitrogen leaching and nitrous oxide emissions from grassland soils receiving dairy soiled water

143

Necpalova

Magdalena

Effect of non-fertilized winter grazing dairy production on soil N balances and soil N dynamics in a clay-loam soil

144

Necpalova

Magdalena

Effect of non-fertilized winter grazing dairy production system based on a clay-loam soil on N leaching to groundwater

145

Necpalova

Magdalena

Effect of ploughing and reseeding of permanent grassland on N leaching to groundwater and nitrous oxide emissions from a clay-loam soil

146

Nicolas

Pugeaux

Coupling long term database with SWAT and STICS models for testing models and simulating nitrogen management scenarios

147

Nylinder

Josefine

Nitrous oxide emission determining factors for a clay soil in Sweden

148

Olasolo

Leticia

Using the Eurotate_N crop model to optimize nitrogen fertilization in potato crop

149

Pappa

Valentini

Can leguminous crops reduce nitrous oxide emissions?

150

Quemada

Miguel

Comparison between grass, leguminous and crucifer species used as cover crops

151

Rochford

Nicola

Ammonia emissions from bovine slurries during storage

152

Rollett

Alison

Food-based digestate quality and fertiliser value

153

Ruza

Antons

Performance of nitrogen fertilizer rates for winter oilseed rape

154

Samborski

Stanislaw

Improvement of sensor based N application approach in winter wheat by incorporation of soil and terrain properties

155

Shah

Ghulam Abbas

Bedding additives reduce ammonia emissions during storage and after application of cattle straw manure, and improve N utilization by grassland

156

Sharp

Joanna

Use of a systems model to estimate the impact of management decisions on nitrate leaching under intensive cropping

157

Soares

Johnny

Ammonia volatilization losses from NBPT-treated urea stored under different conditions

158

Spiess

Ernst

Nitrogen balances of Swiss agriculture from 1975 to 2009

159

Techen

Anja-K

Reducing N inputs and surpluses in baking wheat production by modifying the valuation system – an assessment of feasibility and potential in Germany

160

Tedd

Katie

Assessment of national scale groundwater nitrate monitoring data as a basis for evaluating mitigation measures

161

ten Berge

Hein

Differentiation of N application standards: does it help reconcile economy and environment?

162

Thomas

Steve

Irrigation and nitrogen fertiliser management effects on nitrate leaching losses from crop rotations

163

Tits

Mia

Factors influencing the nitrate residue levels in Flemish agricultural soils: a statistical analysis of 8 years of nitrate measurements

164

Van der Weerden

Tony

Mitigating ammonia emissions from stored dairy cow manure.

165

Viguria

Maialen

Ammonia emission after on-farm application of additives in pig slurry lagoons

166

Villar

Nerea

Temporal dynamics of soil N mineralization during an oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) growth cycle in one season´s growth under humid Mediterranean conditions

167

Vinther

Finn

Agricultural measures has reduced the nitrogen surplus by almost 50% in Denmark

16


Session 3: Global Perspectives on Nitrogen and Food Security No.

Surname

Name

Poster Title

168

Efretuei

Arit

Effect of nitrogen fertilizer application timing on yield of winter wheat in Ireland

169

Hartmann

Tobias

Reducing Nitrogen in a High-Input Chinese Double-Cropping System – Effects on Yield, Soil Nitrogen and Mineralisation

170

John

Verhoeven

Soilless cultivation of vegetables in The Netherlands to reduce nitrogen emissions

171

Louro López

Aránzazu

Influence of different nitrogen fertilizers on forage maize yield an quality

172

Peklova

Lucie

The influence of locally injected nitrogen fertilizer (CULTAN) on seed yield of winter rape and grain yield of spring barley in the Czech Republic

173

Philipp

Schönbach

How does sheep grazing affect the greenhouse gas balance of a grazed steppe ecosystem?

174

Podetta

Nadia

Nitrate metabolism in leaves of lettuce plants grown in floating system with different nitrate concentrations

175

Refaie

Eman

Effect of Organic and Inorganic Nitrogen fertilizer and Plant Densities on Yield and Quality of Sugar beet

176

Yan

Mingjia

Carbon footprint of Irish milk production

Session 4: Knowledge Transfer No.

Surname

Name

Poster Title

177

Antille

Diogenes

Comparing the efficiency of CAN, urea and urea + agrotain (n-butyl thiophosphoric triamide) as N fertiliser in grassland

178

Biau

anna

Soil quality as affected by organic and mineral N fertilization in maize

179

Català

M. M.

The rice crop response to pig slurry fertilization in Ebro Delta area (Catalonia, Spain): four seasons studied (2008-2011).

180

Damay

Nathalie

“Reliquat Virtuel” : a new decision support tool to predict the soil inorganic N pool

181

Dinuccio

Elio

Effect of a green compost extract added to rabbit feed on nitrogen balance and ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions from stored slurry

182

Feriel

Fen Abdallah

Potential indicators based on leaf flavonoids content for the evaluation of potato crop nitrogen status

183

Filipović

Adrijana

Plant analytical tool for nitrogen N detection status in potato crop

184

Finzi

Alberto

Effect of pretreatment on estimation of slurry composition by NIR spectroscopy with different probes

185

Fuertes Mendizabal

Teresa

Ammonium nutrition affects the accumulation of winter wheat glutenins

186

Gonzalez

Jon

Effect of nitrogen fertilizer rate on wheat flour extensibility

187

Jean-Pierre

Goffart

Satellite data potential for assessing potato crop nitrogen status at a specific field scale

188

Kanazawa

Kenji

Quantitative evaluation of hot water extractable organic matter of organic farm soils in Japan by measurement of chemical oxygen demand with inexpensive chemicals and equipment

189

Kindred

Daniel

Automating fertiliser N management

190

Mantovi

Paolo

Fertigation techniques to increase the nitrogen use efficiency of slurries

191

Mathers

George

Online Farm Nutrient Management Calculators

192

McCollum

Graham

Enhanced biological nitrogen fixation in grassland swards for soil Nitrogen management

193

Mechan

Sarah

Using data management systems to facilitate better nutrient management planning on Irish farms

194

Pascual

Miquel

Effect of grapevine canopy management on petiole nitrogen and must amino acids contents of dryland Chardonnay grapes

195

Van Evert

Frits K.

Using canopy reflectance to determine appropriate rate of topdress N in potatoes

196

Virginie

Parnaudeau

Sharing scientists’ and stakeholders’ knowledge in a DSS to reduce nitrogen losses in cropping systems

17


Short Oral Presentations No.

Surname

Name

Title

197

Bortolazzo

Elena

Achieving good water quality status in intensive animal production areas: a LIFE+ project

198

Claus

Sandra

GHG balance of bioenergy cropping systems under the environmental conditions of northern Germany

199

Cooper

Julia

Strategies to reduce N losses to water from agriculture: experiences from onfarm case studies in the N-TOOLBOX project

200

de Paz

Jose Miguel

NITIRSOIL: a new N-model to estimate monthly nitrogen soil balance in irrigated agriculture

201

Fox

Rebecca

Search for the missing N: Excess N2 in groundwater and streams

202

Ledgard

Stewart

Animal delivery of the nitrification inhibitor DCD as a new effective method for reducing nitrogen losses from grazed pastures

203

Ma

Lin

Integrated assessment of nutrient management options in the food chain of China

204

McDonald

Noeleen

Investigating the efficacy of soil nitrogen tests to predict soil nitrogen supply across a range of Irish soil types under controlled environmental conditions

205

Melland

Alice

Processes of nitrate-N loss to streamflow from intensive cereal crop catchments in Ireland

206

Thorman

Rachel

The effect of nitrogen fertiliser application rate on nitrous oxide emission intensities of arable crop products

207

Yan

Mingjia

Carbon footprint of Irish milk production: can white clover make a difference?

208

Yates

Christopher

Characterising dissolved organic matter flux in UK freshwaters: Sources, Transport and Delivery

18


SPONSORSHIP AND SUPPORT The 17th International Nitrogen Workshop is sponsored by the OECD’s Co-operative Research Programme on Biological Resource Management for Sustainable Agricultural Systems

Financial support is also gratefully acknowledged from the following organisations:

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17th International Nitrogen Workshop