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Safety Briefing October 2020


Welcome to the Advance TRS October 2020 Safety Briefing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).................................................................................. 3 Insurances................................................................................................................................... 3 Close Calls................................................................................................................................... 3 Worksafe Procedures.............................................................................................................. 3 Life Saving Rules........................................................................................................................ 4 CIRAS - Confidential reporting for Safety .......................................................................... 5 How to spot signs of drug use in others............................................................................

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Know the limits on drink driving .......................................................................................... 6 Mental Health Awareness ..................................................................................................... 8 Safety Bulletins and alerts....................................................................................................... 10 Important Contact Information............................................................................................. 15

Important Numbers Business Hours Emergency Number

01483 361 061 Out of Hours Emergency Number

07930 384 505 CIRAS:

0800 4101 101 2


Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) All persons on or near the line and on the lineside shall wear at least the following PPE:

All contractors must:

Wear appropriate PPE as defined by the client.

Inform Advance TRS of any damage, deterioration or lack of PPE.

High visibility upper body clothing with reflective tape which complies with BS EN ISO 20471: 2013 and Railway Group Standard GO/RT3279.

High visibility lower body clothing to BS EN ISO 20471:2013 and Railway Group Standard GO/RT3279.

Report any and all PPE that is ill-fitting.

A safety helmet which complies with BS EN 397: 2012.

Safety footwear which complies with BS EN ISO 20345: 2011, provides support to the ankle, includes mid-sole protection and has a protective toe cap. Where used, steel or other conductive toe caps shall be covered.

Ensure that all PPE is used, cleaned and stored in accordance with all health and safety guidelines.

Invoke Worksafe procedures for any ill fitting, inadequate or lack of PPE.

Insurances If you do not have the insurances stipulated in your contract already, you can obtain cover with our insurance partner Kingsbridge Contractor Insurance. You can get a quote by calling 01242 808 740 and or by going online to advancetrs.kingsbridge.co.uk.

To understand more about these insurance requirements, please click here.

Close Calls No matter where you work, reporting Close Calls is vital to improving safety. If you see something with the potential to cause harm, raise the alarm on site

and make it safe. If it is not safe to continue work then stop. Once the hazard has been removed or made safe, ensure that you report it.

Worksafe (Refusal to Work)

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Our Lifesaving Rules Safe behaviour is a requirement of working for Network Rail. These Rules are in place to keep us safe and must never be broken. We will all personally intervene if we feel a situation or behaviour might be unsafe.

Working responsibly

Driving

Always be sure the required plans and permits are in place, before you start a job or go on or near the line.

Never use a hand-held or hands-free phone, or programme any other mobile device, while driving.

Always use equipment that is fit for its intended purpose.

Always obey the speed limit and wear a seat belt.

Never undertake any job unless you have been trained and assessed as competent.

Working at height Always use a safety harness when working at height, unless other protection is in place.

Never work or drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

Working with moving equipment Working with electricity Always test before applying earths or straps.

Never enter the agreed exclusion zone, unless directed to by the person in charge.

Never assume equipment is isolated – always test before touch.

We will always comply with our Lifesaving Rules

For more information about our Lifesaving Rules go to safety.networkrail.co.uk/LSR

July 2014

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CIRAS - Confidential reporting for Safety When it comes to safety, those of you out on site are often most likely to spot ‘accidents waiting to happen’. Fortunately, we have procedures for you to report issues to us, and most of the time this will be the best way for you to tell us what’s concerning you. But what if you want to report something and you are worried about how your manager or workmates might react? Or you’re working on another company site and the concern is about them, but you don’t have access to their reporting channels? Whatever the reason for it, an unreported issue could lead to an incident carrying a high price tag – human and financial. So, we have signed up to CIRAS, a

confidential reporting line which allows you to report health and safety concerns in complete confidence. We want to make sure you always have a way to tell us what’s concerning you – even if you don’t want us to know who you are. Although it operates independently, CIRAS is an important part of our safety system because it provides us with a ‘safety net’. If you want to use CIRAS, all you need to do is contact them directly and they will talk through your concern with you. They will write a report – minus any information that could identify you – and send it to us. CIRAS doesn’t investigate or make recommendations - it just brings the concern to light so we can

look into it. We respond directly to them and they share this with you. CIRAS will take reports on any health and safety concern. Common issues people report about include fatigue and rostering, unsafe working practices and issues with equipment. If in doubt, just get in touch. If it’s something they can’t help you with, they will advise you on how to deal with it. Report hotline: 0800 4101 101 Report Textline: 07507 285887 Freepost CIRAS www.ciras.org.uk

Spotting signs of drug use in others Excessive intakes of prescription drugs may make a person appear drunk, have slurred speech, droopy eyes and cause him/her to fall asleep at strange times. Look out for hidden medicines in the house. If someone’s taking opiates (such as heroin) they may have pupils that appear like pinpoints, have itchy and scratchy skin, go round asking for money and be either very hyperactive or very lethargic. Physically they may have a red nose and needle marks on their arms, behind the knees or ankles. They also may be very sick

one day with cold symptoms, cramps, diarrhea or an upset stomach and then be perfectly fine the next day. Crack and cocaine users tend to have glassy eyes, very large pupils and a nose that is red and raw. There may be marks, scabs, burns in the mouth and/or on the fingers and arms. Behavior can be very erratic and users become anxious and restless with a tendency to rambling conversations in which they jump from one subject to the next. Cocaine users constantly sniff, lick their lips and feel very thirsty. Look out for little

bags of white powder, crystal-looking residue, glass pipes, needles etc. The signs of Marijuana abuse include irritated, bloodshot eyes, an expressionless appearance, dry lips and a strong odour of burnt rope or grass. Users walk around in a daze, they exhibit a lack of emotion, stare out into space and go into fits of laughter when there is nothing to laugh about. Watch out for them washing their clothes immediately upon coming home or taking a quick shower before being around others.

Getting help There are a wide range of advice, treatment and support services for addiction in the UK. Anyone with a substance related problem can have access to such services. Your GP might offer to treat you or might refer you to your local specialist drug service. Most local

community drug units also run drop-in centres which don’t require a referral from a doctor. You should be able to find information about these on the internet or ask at your doctors’ surgery.

Don’t forget you can call Frank to discuss any issues you have confidentially on: 0800 776600.

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Know the limits Most of us have had days where we’ve felt the effects of the night before, but one extra pint on a night out can have serious consequences the next day. If alcohol is still in your system the morning after, think about the impact that could have when driving your colleagues to site or taking your children to school.

Safety tips

Did you know? Network Rail’s alcohol limit is one third of the England and Wales drink drive limit.

To help reduce the risk, and to enjoy alcohol responsibly: • Remember that the Network Rail policy and our Lifesaving Rules state that you must never be under the influence of drugs or alcohol while at work, or when travelling to and from work. • When taking prescription drugs, always ask your GP about any possible side effects. If in doubt contact the medication enquiry service via our occupational health provider. Plus, it is helpful to share information about your prescription drugs (and their side effects) with your line manager.

Look out for each other this winter

www.iamroadsmart.com

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As we are fast approaching the end of Autumn and going into the Winter months, it’s important to stay safe and be aware of the seasonal changes. We want to ensure that we all stay safe and get home safely every day. Here are some top tips to help you through the winter months, accessed by Track Safety Alliance (TSA) Staying safe consists of being prepared for the various weather conditions: Correct clothing and PPE • Wear layers of clothing under your PPE to stay warm • Keep your hands warm as cold hands will affect dexterity Site preparation • Be aware of underfoot conditions • Check equipment is safe • Does the new ballast have anti-icer? • Are the water pipes suitably lagged? • Have you spread rock salt at access points and SAC cabins wherever possible that isn’t on the rails? Welfare and Fatigue • Make sure teams have access to hot food and drinks • Colder temperatures exacerbate tiredness and increase fatigue, avoid standing around whilst waiting to access the track Winter Driving • Make sure you drive with due care and attention • Top up your windscreen wash • Pack de-icer and an ice scraper in your vehicle • Pack spare clothes/blanket and food/drink for emergencies • Make sure you have sufficient fuel for your journey and emergencies Did you know? Seasonal Affective Disorder is a type of depression that comes and goes in a seasonal pattern and is currently estimated to affect up to 2 million people in the UK. You can find out more and seek help through the charity Mind.

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Mental Health Awareness Mental Health Awareness Week takes place every year, starting on the second Monday of May. The aim of this week is to raise awareness about mental health with lots of group activities and simple exercises to get people talking about mental health. If you notice a colleague acting out of the ordinary, you

might want to check in to see if they are ok! Most of us commonly reply with ‘I’m ok thanks’ when asked how we are, but it takes just an extra second to double check. For more information on mental health awareness and training, go to: www.mhfaengland.org.

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Coronavirus

Wash your hands more often for 20 seconds Use soap and water or a hand sanitiser when you: • Get home or into work • Blow your nose, sneeze or cough • Eat or handle food

CORONAVIRUS

PROTECT For more information and the Government’s Action Plan go to nhs.uk/coronavirus

YOURSELF & OTHERS

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Audience: Siemens Mobility Limited

EHS Guidance

Subject: On–Site Drug & Alcohol screening during COVID-19 Version 1. Issue date 02/07/20 Introduction Returning our business to full operational capacity without compromising our robust assurance processes presents us with many new challenges as we consider what the new Normal might look like. For many of our site teams the first step in that assurance process is the site induction and the accompanying Drug and Alcohol indicative screening process. This EHS Guidance therefore provides an outline induction methodology that can be adopted/adjusted to suit the needs of particular project environments where indicative Drug and Alcohol screening forms part of the standard induction process. The guiding principals given below should be applied at all times. Personal Hygiene Hand washing facilities should be in close proximity to the induction room and used prior to the induction. Social Distancing The standard 2 metre separation must be maintained at all times when carrying out all aspects of the site induction including the standard indicative Drugs and Alcohol screening test. Equipment Drug and Alcohol screening will be undertaken using our standard issue digital alcometers and saliva swabs Location Each project will provide a suitable induction environment of sufficient size to accommodate social distancing during the induction process. Record Keeping Project induction forms will be laid out in advance of the induction onto a cleaned surface/desk and completed by the inductees during the induction. Following the induction the completed forms are left face up on the desk. The inductor then takes digital photographs of the forms and uploads them to the project file. Once all photographs have been taken the inductees place the forms into a project supplied paper shredder. PPE The inductor will wear Nitrile gloves and a Surgical/FFP2 face mask throughout the Drug and Alcohol screening process.

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Audience: Siemens Mobility Limited

EHS Guidance

Subject: On–Site Drug & Alcohol screening during COVID-19

Denotes action by inductor

Denotes action by inductee

Version 1. Issue date 02/07/20

Prepare the room

The Induction room is prepared in advance with appropriate social distancing measures applied and communicated

Carry out visual check of pre-packed saliva swabs

Pre-packed D&A kits are checked in advance of the induction. Any with broken seals are disposed of and not used

Retrieve D&A testing kit from desk

Pre-packed D&A kits are checked in advance of the induction. Any with broken seals are disposed of and not used

Retrieve D&A testing kit from desk

Label D&A testing kit with your personal identifier using the marker pen provided

Self administer the D&A test

The test is self administered by the inductee under the guidance of the inductor

Complete induction documentation

Leave completed documentation on the desk face up ready to be photographed

Enter into project file

Upload digital records of induction into the project file

Dispose of used equipment

Paper records are shredded in the induction room – used D&A kits are placed in a refuse sac ready for disposal

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RAAS (UK) LTD ISSUE 79

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: 1. General Information 2. General Information 3. General Information 4. Changes to RGS 5. Changes to RGS 6. Changes to RGS 7. Changes to RGS 8. Changes to RGS 9. Changes to NRS 10. Changes to NRS 11. Changes to NRS 12. Changes to NRS 13. Changes to M&EE COP’s 14. Changes to M&EE COP’s 15. H&S Information 16. H&S Information 17. Environmental Information 18. Environmental Information 19. Environmental Information 20. Contact Information & Attachments

SEPTEMBER 2020

Britain’s water pipes are so leaky that we could run out of water altogether within 20 years, MPs are warning. A report from the House of Commons public accounts committee today says that all the bodies responsible for the UK’s water supply – Defra, Ofwat and the Environment Agency – have “taken their eye off the ball” and must take urgent action. Otherwise our water supply will simply dry up. “It is wholly unacceptable that over 3 billion litres are wasted every day through leakage, with no improvement in the last 20 years,” the report says. “From a high of over 4.5 billion litres a day in the early 1990s, daily losses through leakage fell to around 3 billion at the turn of the century. However, this reduction was followed by over a decade of complacency and inaction, which has meant water leakage is now a hugely pressing problem.” It continues: “No one organisation has got a thorough grip on dealing with this issue and driving the change necessary. The Department [for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs] urged water companies in 2016 to make tackling leakage a much higher priority. However, there has still been little progress.” The committee acknowledged that some action was now being taken but remained “unconvinced” it was enough. “The Department has belatedly set annual targets for water companies and longerterm targets to reduce leakage by a third by 2030 and by half by 2050,” the report says. “Ofwat assures us that companies are exposed to substantial penalties if they do not meet their targets over the next five years and is confident that the worst performing companies are now starting to get their act together. Ofwat now expects leakage to fall by 16% between 2020 and 2025, which would result in 561 million litres of water a day being saved. However, meeting the targets relies on unknown and untested approaches. We are unconvinced by Ofwat’s hope that water companies will ‘surprise themselves’ at what they can achieve, and call on the Department and Ofwat to be more proactive in ensuring companies meet leakage targets.” Public accounts committee chair Meg Hillier MP said: “It is very hard to imagine, in this country, turning the tap and not having enough clean, drinkable water come out - but that is exactly what we now face. Continued inaction by the water industry means we continue to lose one fifth of our daily supply to leaks. “Empty words on climate commitments and unfunded public information campaigns will get us where we’ve got the last 20 years: nowhere. Defra has failed to lead and water companies have failed to act: we look now to the Department to step up, make up for lost time and see we get action before it’s too

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A new study has suggested that motorists' driving standards slipped when the roads were quieter during lockdown. Research found that more than half of the motorists surveyed admitted they had broken the speed limit, while more than 20% said they had been less careful about checking mirrors. Despite 47% of motorists believing the roads have been safer recently due to the lower levels of traffic, 52% of those surveyed admitted they have broken the speed limit since the lockdown was imposed. Thirty-eight per cent of drivers confessed they were less strict about signalling. The survey of just over 2000 drivers found a fifth of drivers drove a car during lockdown despite there being an unresolved safety problem with the vehicle, such as a faulty brake light, headlight or running out of wiper fluid, while 19% admitted using a mobile phone behind the wheel while the roads have been quieter.

As the lockdown continues to ease and furloughed employees return to work. With large groups of individuals not having driven significantly for many weeks and the road network scheduled to get busy, organisations should consider how the driving risks that their workers face may have changed as a result of the pandemic, and what measures they should take. This is important because for many businesses, driving is one of the most significant safety risks they face, and the rates of people killed or seriously injured on UK roads has increased in recent years.

Increased Road Users. With the government currently advising people to avoid public transport to enable social distancing, employees who typically use trains, tubes and buses to get to work may start driving for all or part of their journey. The increased road use could result in higher levels of congestion and air pollution, and potentially a rise in road accidents and fatalities. Risk does not operate in a vacuum and the well-intentioned advice to avoid public transport, could have unintended consequences. For example, in the 12 months following 9/11, the understandable fear of flying led to a 20% decline in US airline passengers as many Americans opted to drive. The switch to roads resulted in an estimated 1,600 additional road deaths in the following year. Given that surveys indicate that many UK workers are planning to follow the advice and avoid public transport, more people driving on busier roads may result in employees working longer days and increase levels of fatigue. Organisations should therefore consider the direct and indirect impact of such developments and how occupational road safety policies and fatigue management programmes may need to adapt.

Getting Employees Ready. Over the coming weeks, many employees who have been working from home for several months or on furlough will resume driving for work, while others will go back to their daily commute. This will see many employees getting back behind the wheel after several months of limited driving. Whether employees are driving for work or commuting, as they return to the workplace, many will need to relearn many of the tacit skills, habits and behaviours that keep them safe behind the wheel. Organisations should consider providing refresher training and guidance on safe driving techniques within their return to work training, particularly for employees whose work involves driving. This could include inspecting and checking vehicles that may not have been used for many weeks.

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Rail industry wants passengers to be ÔconÞdentÕ as more trains run. Timetables on many lines are being increased to around 90 per cent of pre-pandemic levels from today, as children return to school and more commuters are set to travel to offices again, at least on some days each week. One priority is to maintain social distancing on board trains, so units are being lengthened where possible said the Rail Delivery Group, whose train operator members are also anxious to maintain recent improvements in punctuality. The operators have worked closely with schools and other education providers to identify potentially busy stations or trains. Not only will trains be lengthened where possible, but staff will also be on hand to explain to older children the rules on wearing a face covering and maintaining social distancing. National Rail’s 'Alert me by Messenger' service flags up busy trains, and it is now sending more than a million message a month to 100,000 passengers. Rail Delivery Group chief operating officer Jacqueline Starr said: ‘We want people to feel confident taking the train as they get back to school and adding services back into the timetable where they’re most needed will support that. Rail companies are doing everything they can to ensure people start the term with a smooth journey, including boosting cleaning, providing sanitiser at stations and offering better information about busy services. Some train times will change so we’re asking people to check before they travel and plan their journeys for quieter times if possible.’

Work starts to clear wreckage from Carmont derailment WORK to clear the line and restore train services through the site of the fatal derailment at Carmont near Stonehaven in north-east Scotland last month is beginning this week. Network Rail said a 600tonne crawler crane is being used to remove the derailed vehicles, but this could only be done after a ‘massive amount of work’. Network Rail and its contractors have built a 900-metre road and temporary bridges over farmland so that the crane could be brought to the site. The job of removing the wrecked HST, in which driver Brett McCullough, conductor Donald Dinnie and passenger Christopher Stuchbury lost their lives on 12 August after the train had collided with a landslip, is being described as ‘delicate’. Scotland’s Railway managing director Alex Hynes said: ‘August 12 was a devastating day with the loss of Brett, Donald and Christopher in this tragic accident. ‘While we will now begin the process of recovering the carriages and repairing the railway, we do so with a heavy heart. ‘We will continue to work closely with the Rail Accident Investigation Branch throughout this recovery process so we can learn from this terrible event and help prevent similar accidents.’ For the time being trains are running between Aberdeen and Stonehaven, calling at Portlethen. Replacement buses are being provided between Stonehaven and Dundee, and also between Aberdeen and Edinburgh. Meanwhile hundreds of higher-risk trackside slopes have been inspected, while Network Rail has also launched two taskforces, led by independent experts, as part of its long-term response to climate change and the challenge of maintaining thousands of embankments and cuttings, many of which date from the Victorian era.

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Railway Group Standards Document Number

Title

Issue

Replaces

GERT8000-HB12

Duties of the engineering supervisor (ES) or safe work leader (SWL) in a possession

Iss 8

Iss 7

Purpose:-The module is required if you carry out the duties of ES or SWL in a possession Change:-Section 3.2 has been revised to facilitate the introduction of the flexible train arrival point (FTAP) into the Rule Book. Section 10.3 has been revised to include arrangements for giving up a work site with an engineering train or on-track machine standing within it. The changes are intended to allow work to be undertaken for a greater proportion of the available time within a possession. A new section 11 has been added to facilitate the introduction of high output protection zones into the Rule Book. The introduction of high output protection zones into the Rule Book is intended to improve track worker safety by removing the need for possession support staff to go trackside to place standard possession protection, and to result in improved productivity on each occasion that a high output train is used. Compliance Date:- 05/12/2020 Personnel Requiring Awareness Briefing All operatives that hold ES or SWL

Document Number

Title

Issue

Replaces

GERT8000-HB1

General duties and track safety for track workers

Iss 5

Iss 4

Purpose:- This handbook is for those personnel who need to go on the operational railway to carry out their duties, with the exception of a train driver, guard, shunter, signaller, crossing keeper or designated person (DP). Change:- Section 2.4 has been revised to support the implementation of RIS-3783-TOM, ‘Issue and Management of Cab Passes’. The intent is to provide transport operators with the opportunity to access the benefits associated with standardisation, through the definition of a common approach to managing access to driving cab Compliance Date:- 05/12/2020 Personnel Requiring Awareness Briefing All operatives that go onto the operational railway

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Railway Group Standards

Document Number

Title

Issue

GERT8000-HB19

Work on signalling equipment - duties of the Iss 4 signalling technician

Replaces Iss 3

Purpose:-You will need this handbook if you carry out the duties of a signalling technician. Change:- Section 1.5 has been revised to facilitate the introduction of high output protection zones into the Rule Book. The introduction of high output protection zones into the Rule Book is intended to improve track worker safety by removing the need for possession support staff to go trackside to place standard possession protection, and to result in improved productivity on each occasion that a high output train is used. Compliance Date:- 05/12/2020 Personnel Requiring Awareness Briefing All operatives that are Signalling technicians

Document Number

Title

Issue

Replaces

GERT8000-HB11

Duties of the person in charge of the possession (PICOP)

Iss 8

Iss 7

Purpose:- You will need this handbook if you carry out the duties of a signalling technician. Change:-Section 4.2 has been revised to facilitate the introduction of the flexible train arrival point (FTAP) into the Rule Book. Section 12.1 has been revised to include arrangements for giving up a work site with an engineering train or on-track machine standing within it. The changes are intended to allow work to be undertaken for a greater proportion of the available time within a possession Compliance Date:- 05/12/2020 Personnel Requiring Awareness Briefing All operatives that hold PICOP Competence

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Railway Group Standards Document Number

Title

Issue

Replaces

GERT8000-HB7

General duties of a controller of site safety (COSS)

Iss 7

Iss 6

Purpose:-You will need this handbook if you carry out the duties of a COSS. Change:-New instructions have been added at section 2.3 to facilitate the introduction of the crossing the line procedure into the Rule Book. The changes are intended to streamline the procedure for crossing the line leading to reduced workload for signaller/SWL/COSS/ IWA, reduced need for staff to be waiting unproductively trackside ,and crossing the line at locations that have already been assessed as suitable. Sections 3.3 and 4.4 have been revised to facilitate the introduction of high output protection zones into the Rule Book. The introduction of high output protection zones into the Rule Book is intended to improve track worker safety by removing the need for possession support staff to go trackside to place standard possession protection, and to result in improved productivity on each occasion that a high output train is used Compliance Date:- 05/12/2020 Personnel Requiring Awareness Briefing All operatives that hold COSS Competence

Document Number

Title

Issue

Replaces

GERT8000-HB20

General duties of a safe work leader (SWL) working outside a possession

Iss 3

Iss 2

Purpose:- You will need this handbook if you carry out the duties of a SWL working outside a possession. Change:-New instructions have been added at section 2.3 to facilitate the introduction of the crossing the line procedure into the Rule Book. The changes are intended to streamline the procedure for crossing the line leading to reduced workload for signaller/SWL/COSS/ IWA, reduced need for staff to be waiting unproductively trackside ,and crossing the line at locations that have already been assessed as suitable Compliance Date:- 05/12/2020 Personnel Requiring Awareness Briefing All operatives that hold SWL Competence

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Railway Group Standards Document Number

Title

Issue

Replaces

GERT8000-HB6

General duties of an individual working alone (IWA)

Iss 6

Iss 5

Purpose:-You will need this handbook if you carry out the duties of a IWA. Change:-New instructions have been added at section 2.5 to facilitate the introduction of the crossing the line procedure into the Rule Book. The changes are intended to streamline the procedure for crossing the line leading to reduced workload for signaller/SWL/COSS/ IWA, reduced need for staff to be waiting unproductively trackside ,and crossing the line at locations that have already been assessed as suitable. Section 3.2 has been revised to facilitate the introduction of high output protection zones into the Rule Book. The introduction of high output protection zones into the Rule Book is intended to improve track worker safety by removing the need for possession support staff to go trackside to place standard possession protection, and to result in improved productivity on each occasion that a high output train is used Compliance Date:- 05/12/2020 Personnel Requiring Awareness Briefing All operatives that hold IWA Competence

Document Number

Title

Issue

Replaces

GERT8000-Issue HB

Rulebook Handbook Issue History

Iss 12

Iss 11

Purpose:- This document contains updates to align with changes to Rule Book Handbook issues (GERT8000) Change:This document has been updated to incorporate changes to handbooks published in September 2020. Compliance Date:- 05/12/2020 Personnel Requiring Awareness Briefing Any operative involved in the document control.

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Railway Group Standards Document Number

Title

Issue

Replaces

GERM/8000

Track Workers Manual

Iss 7

Iss 6

Purpose:- The Rule Book manuals have been produced to provide end-users with access to the content of the Rule Book that is relevant to their roles, e.g. driver, signaller etc Change:-All changes to Rule Book modules published in September 2020 (in-force December 2020) are incorporated in this updated manual. Compliance Date:- 05/12/2020 Personnel Requiring Awareness Briefing All operatives involved in the management of Rule book modules.

Document Number

Title

Issue

RIS-1700-PLT

Rail Industry Standard for Safe Use of Plant Iss 3 for Infrastructure Work

Replaces N/A

Purpose:-This document details requirements for the safe use of plant (as defined in this document) on, or that could affect, Network Rail controlled infrastructure, used for all infrastructure related activities, including (but not limited to) maintaining, inspecting, measuring, renewing and installing infrastructure and its components. This document is particularly relevant to situations where plant has the potential to infringe running line clearances or where plant is used adjacent to an open running line Change:- Withdrawn following 5-year review: Based on the impacts it is concluded that RIS-1700-PLT is no longer fit for purpose, as it no longer reflects industry arrangements and legal obligations Compliance Date:- 05/09/2020 Personnel Requiring Awareness Briefing All person involved in Safe Use of Plant

Note. Please Review the changes to the standards detailed above against your company controlled document list. Details of any changes are in the RGS September 2020 attached to this newsletter

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Network Rail Standards New / Replaced Network Rail Standards in issue 117 Document Reference

Title

Issue

Compliance Date

NR/L2/CIV/003

Engineering and Architectural Assurance of Building and Civil Engineering Works

6

05/12/2020

NR/L2/CIV/150

Station WayĂžnding, Design & Assurance Procedure

1

05/12/2020

NR/L3/CIV/066

Managing the Risks to the Railway from LandĂžll Operations

1

05/09/2020

NR/L3/CIV/00012

Road Vehicle Incursions: Risk Assessment of Public and Non-Public Bridge and Neighbouring Sites

2

05/12/2020

NR/L3/CIV/185

Management of Reports of Safety Related Geotechnical Incidents

3

05/09/2020

NR/L2/ELP/27311

Engineering Assurance Requirements for Design and Implementation of Electrical Power

6

05/12/2020

NR/L3/ELP/27237

Overhead Line Work Instruction

20

31/03/2021

NR/L3/ELP/27240

Distribution Work Instructions

10

05/09/2020

NR/L1/INF/02200

Digital Preservation Policy

1

05/12/2020

NR/GN/MTC/089

Guidance for the exchange of asset data and the continuing maintenance of assets undergoing change

1

05/12/2020

NR/L2/MTC/PL0175

Infrastructure Maintenance Planning Handbook

7

05/12/2020

NR/L3/MTC/MG0176

Ellipse Work Management Handbook

6

05/12/2020

NR/L3/MTC/MG0213

Index of Standard Maintenance Forms

16

05/12/2020

NR/L3/MTC/SE0220

Planning and Delivering Safe Working at Height

2

05/03/2021

NR/L3/XNG/308

Risk Assessing Level Crossings

1

05/09/2020

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Network Rail Standards New / Replaced Network Rail Standards in issue 117 Document Reference

Title

Issue

Compliance Date

NR/L3/MTC/RCS0216

Risk Control Manual

18

05/12/2020

NR/L2/OHS/00112

Worksafe Procedure

3

05/09/2020

NR/L3/OPS/021

Weather Management Index

5

05/12/2020

NR/L3/OPS/045

National Operating Procedures Index

11

05/12/2020

NR/L2/RMVP/27035

Specifications for Depot Personnel Protection system

2

05/12/2020

NR/L2/RMVP/27176

Controlled Emission Toilet servicing installation

3

05/12/2020

NR/L3/SCO/313

On-Track Machines (OTMs) Driver and Operations Standards manual

8

05/12/2020

NR/L3/SCO/320

Supplier Quality Assurance (SQA)

2

05/12/2020

NR/GN/SIG/50015

Methodology for the demonstration of electrical compatibility with reed FDM systems on the AC and DC railways

3

N/A

NR/L2/SIG/11774

Clamp Lock Handbook

4

05/12/2020

NR/L2/TEL/30135

Video Surveillance Systems (VSS)

5

05/12/2020

NR/L3/TEL/30181

Telecommunications Maintenance Work Instructions Handbook

4

06/03/2021

NR/L3/TEL/40047

Process for the Management of Safety Related Reports for Telecoms Failures

3

05/12/2020

NR/L2/TRK/4239

Track Bed Investigation, Design and Installation

2

05/12/2020

NR/L3/XNG/309

Risk Assessing Level Crossings

1

05/09/2020

NR/L3/XNG/207

Level Crossing Manager Competence Framework

1 05/09/20

Note. Please Review the changes to the standards detailed above against your company controlled document list. Details of any changes are in the Network Rail briefing report attached to this newsletter

22


Network Rail Standards Document Number

Title

Issue

Replaces

NR/L3/ELP/27237

OLE Work Instruction

Iss 20

Iss19

Purpose:-Outlines the control measures when work on OLE Change:-Module NR/OLE F06 details the approach and the control measures during an OLE incident. The proposed change is due to the key issue of accessing/egressing a stranded train, which may be disabled with damaged OLE which needs to be removed prior to the train been removed from site. This Module applies to all OLE incidents carried out by Network Rail Maintenance staff. The Module aligns with NR standards NR/L2/OHS/022 for when working at height where a risk-based approach is adopted. The Module details this approach and the control measures to be taken into account to protect the safety of OLE staff are proportionate to the risks involved when working at height on the OLE. To define a safe method of working for safe access/egress from the roof of the train and to define accountabilities of NR and the TOCs. Compliance Date:- 31/05/2021 Personnel Requiring Awareness Briefing All operatives involved in OLE work.

23


Network Rail Standards Document Number

Title

Issue

Replaces

Iss 6 Iss 5 Engineering and Architectural Assurance of Building and Civil Engineering Works Purpose:-The purpose of this standard is to define the engineering assurance requirements for the Design and Construction of Works undertaken on Building and Civil Engineering infrastructure NR/L2/CIV/003

︎

Changes:The changes are targeted where clarification is required following the publication of Issue 5. In summary the changes are: 1. Removing the need for ITPs as part of the GRIP 5 deliverables; 2. Time-bound requirement for ITPs to be submitted prior to testing; 3. Altering situations where Architectural and layout acceptance is mandatory; 4. Reference to further guidance on when Design Advisory Panel input is required; 5. Reference to the revised Mining Manual and where additional GRIP deliverables may be required. 6. Clarification on Temporary Works situations that do not require F002 submission; 7. Confirmation that post-installed anchors in concrete or masonry meet the requirements in BS 8539. 8. Revision to definition of temporary works to align with BS 5975:2018. 9. Change in Check Category for under-track crossings to align with NR/L3/CIV/044; 10. Guidance that Diversity Impact Assessments should be undertaken and continually reviewed or revised throughout the project’s lifecycle; 11. Reference to endorsed F001 within F002. 12. Amendment to F001, F002, F003 and F005 to reflect changes above. 13. Inclusion of a combined Form 001 and Form 002, for use where permitted by the standard. The changes have been made in response to comments received since the implementation of Issue 5 in December 2018, covered by the post-implementation review process within the Standards and Controls framework. Compliance Date:- 05/12/2020 Personnel Requiring Awareness Briefing Any organisation involvedDesign and Construction of Works undertaken on Building and Civil Engineering infrastructure

24


M&EE Codes of Practice Document Number

Title

Issue

Replaces

COP 44

Code of Practice for Re-railing Kirow Cranes using Outriggers

1

N/A

Purpose:-This Code of Practice provides guidance in the re-railing of Kirow cranes utilising the crane’s outriggers Change:-N/A Compliance Date:- 05/09/2020 Personnel Requiring Awareness Briefing All operatives involved in Re-railing Kirow Cranes Document Number

Title

Issue

COP 26

Code of Practice for flailing Operations using 3 OTP

Replaces 2

Purpose:-This Code of Practice details the actions to be taken, when planning for, and undertaking flailing operations using OTP.

︎

Changes:Reviewed, amended and re-issued Compliance Date:- 05/09/2020 Personnel Requiring Awareness Briefing All operatives involved in flailing operations using OTP Document Number

Title

Issue

COP 18

Code of Practice for flailing Operations using OTP

6

Replaces 5

Purpose:This Code of Practice details the use and some aspects of the design and maintenance of rail mounted manually propelled equipment to prevent uncontrolled movements. Change:-Restructure of the document, maintenance now a new section, Rule book reference changed to Infrastructure managers rules, Min of 2 persons required for pushing and removal of type testing appendix B Compliance Date:- 05/09/2020 Personnel Requiring Awareness Briefing All operatives involved inflating operations

25


M&EE Codes of Practice Document Number

Title

Issue Replaces

Poster L1

RCI Motion Cut

2

1

Poster L8

OTP Mechanical Movement Limiting Device Awareness

2

1

Poster L3

Crane Controller Competence for Twin Jib Cranes

2

1

Poster L7

Rated Capacity Indicator (RCI) Status Indicator Lights

3

2

Poster L12

Securing of Loads

2

1

Poster L2

OTP Tandem Lift

2

1

Poster L9

Rail Handling – Rail Turner Awareness

2

1

Poster L6

Lifting Accessories Misuse

2

1

Poster 14

OTP Speeds

2

1

Poster 11

Riding on OTP

2

1

Compliance Date:- 05/09/2020 Personnel Requiring Awareness Briefing All operatives involved OTP operations Note. Please Review the changes to the standards detailed above against your company controlled document list. Details of any changes are in the RGS September 2020 attached to this newsletter

26


Health & Safety Information HSE issues a safety alert over non-compliant face masks. The Health and Safety Executive issued a safety alert over a substantial number of face masks that do not comply with the current standards. Some filtering facepiece respirators originating from China claiming to be of KN95 standards, provide an inadequate level of protection and are likely to be of poor quality, and accompanied by fake or fraudulent paperwork. KN95 is a performance rating under the Chinese standard GB26:2006, which is broadly the same as the European standard BSEN149:2001+A1:2009 for FFP2 masks. However, there is no independent certification to ensure compliance and quality, and those products manufactured to the KN95 rating are declared compliant by the manufacturer. All personal protective equipment (PPE) must also be CE marked to be sold or marketed in the UK. Due to the fact that the compliance and quality cannot be assured, masks KN95 must not be used as PPE, and those that are not CE marked must be removed from supply immediately. If any of the masks are CE marked, the supplier must be able to demonstrate that the documentation and the marking is genuine.

OfĂžce of Rail and Road issue warning after 25% incident rise. The Office of Rail and Road (ORR) are urging people to act safely around railways after reporting showed a spike of incidents, both near-miss and trespass, on the railway. Railway trespassing is illegal and highly dangerous and incidents can prove fatal. In just over a month between 23 March and 26 April Network Rail recorded 1,024 incidents involving disruption caused by trespassers, this equates to an average of 34 incidents every day, up 25% on the previous years' figures. Many times it is believed that an error in judgement is the overriding factor in these cases but the ORR, Network Rail and the British Transport Police are working together to discourage people from taking risks around the railway. They want to educate the public and challenge anything that appears to condone unsafe behaviour around the railways. The rail industry's safety campaign 'You Vs Train' continues to highlight the dangers of trespassing on railways. The campaign has proved successful, particularly with behaviour change in young people, which has been shown in declines in youth trespass incidents of up to 30% at previous high incident locations. However, their work continues to ensure everyone takes the dangers posed by railways seriously and acts in a responsible manner. Head of public and passenger safety for Network Rail, Allan Spence, commented: ''As well as putting themselves at risk of serious harm, trespass directly affects passengers as many trains will be delayed. As train service levels increase and things start to return to a new normal, it is more important than ever for everyone to stay off the tracks and stay safe.'

27


Health & Safety Information UN warns UK might be breaking international law over unsafe cladding. The United Nations has warned the UK Government that failure to remove flammable cladding panels on high-rise buildings may be a breach of international law. The UN's special rapporteur on adequate housing, Leilani Farha, wrote to the Government with "serious concern about allegations of multiple violations of the human right to adequate housing, of which safety is a key component - contrary to the international human rights law.” Three years after the Grenfell Tower fire disaster, there are still 300 high-rise buildings in England which are covered with similar unsafe aluminium composite cladding that lead to the rapid spread of fire on the outside of the building. The UN argues that the UK breached an international covenant on economic, social and cultural rights, which gives the "right of everyone to an adequate standard of living ... including housing ... with adequate space and protecting them from cold, damp, heat, rain, wind or other threats to health", which includes protection from fire. This covenant was ratified by the UK in 1976, and the country must show that "every effort has been made to use a maximum of available resources on an effort to discharge obligations”. Currently, MPs are launching an investigation into why the Government has spent less than a quarter of a £600 million fund to replace dangerous cladding on high-rise buildings. Currently, less than £140 million has been spent to fix the unsafe buildings. Residents and leaseholders of the buildings which still have unsafe cladding speak of anger and stress due to the fact that they cannot sell their property, as no one would like to buy a flat in an unsafe building. Banks are also refusing to give mortgages on flats that present such fire risks. In addition to other complications, certain housing companies do not want to carry out the maintenance work as they are not legally obliged to fix the problem themselves.

Building Safety Fund launched The Government have announced a new building safety fund designed to meet the cost for unsafe non-ACM cladding on residential buildings that are 18 metres and over, and don't comply with building regulations. Three years since the Grenfell Tower fire tragically claimed the lives of 72 people, over 300 residential blocks in England still have the same style ACM cladding used on Grenfell Tower. A further 1700 buildings have another form of dangerous cladding on them. The Government is already providing £600 million for the replacement of ACM cladding systems, with critics saying that this amount was not enough. This new £1 billion fund seeks to provide more help for buildings with dangerous cladding. The building safety fund is targeted at supporting leaseholders in the private sector who are being faced with significant bills for the removal of dangerous cladding from their buildings. Leaseholders in social sector buildings will have funding provided for by the Government to meet the costs that would have otherwise been borne by leaseholders The Government have announced a new building safety fund designed to meet the cost for unsafe non-ACM cladding on residential buildings that are 18 metres and over, and don't comply with building regulations.

28


Environmental Information £40 million fund for green jobs announced. The UK Government has unveiled a new £40 million Green Recovery Challenge Fund to create jobs in nature recovery and conservation to "kick start the nation's green recovery from the coronavirus pandemic" in England. The fund aims to help charities and environmental organisations carry out work on projects across England to restore nature, tackle climate change as well as create 3000 jobs and safeguard up to 2000 others in areas such as: protecting species; • finding nature-based solutions to tackle climate change; and • supporting conservation rangers connecting people with the outdoors. • • The money for the Green Recovery Challenge fund will be provided by the Nature Recovery Fund with £10 million, and £30 million will come from the Nature for Climate Fund. It is envisaged that this support will create a broad range of long and short-term jobs, such as ecologists, surveyors, nature reserve staff and education workers in environmental organisations, as well as support their suppliers in agricultural engineering, horticulture, equipment and seed supply. The Government is inviting organisations to bid for the fund and details will be published in due course. Environment Secretary George Eustice said: "Our ambitious green recovery package will deliver a steady stream of shovel-ready environmental projects, protecting nature at the same time as creating and retaining thousands of new jobs. "Many of us have become even more appreciative of nature during lockdown and our Green Recovery Challenge Fund will help charities and other organisations employ more people to work on tree-planting, nature restoration and helping the public enjoy the outdoors.

Tech Þrm's recycling blunder pays for mass tree-planting A computer support company in Brentford that broke recycling law has paid money to charity to help fund several thousand new trees in Ilford, London. EMC Computer Systems (UK) Ltd failed to register the packaging waste it produced between 2002 and 2003, and from 2008 to 2015. Companies with a turnover above £2 million, handling more than 50 tonnes of packaging in the previous calendar year, must register with an accredited compliance scheme, and recover and recycle packaging waste. EMC paid £8,579.31 to Trees for Cities, which works across the UK and overseas to improve lives by planting trees in cities The Environment Agency dealt with EMC's failure to comply with the law through a civil sanction called an enforcement undertaking, instead of prosecution. To qualify, offenders must improve practices to avoid similar breaches, while making a financial contribution to a relevant project. Nikki Collins, a senior waste operations officer for the Environment Agency said: "Enforcement undertakings ensure that those who commit offences stop offending, come into compliance and take steps to prevent a recurrence”. "Offenders should be prepared to take responsibility for their actions and put things right, resulting in a direct benefit to the environment and local communities"

29


Environmental Information Human contribution to climate change is clear A new study carried out by a team of climate scientists and led by the UK Met Office has set out evidence of the fact that human contributions to greenhouse gases are now beginning to show a real difference in climate. The study focused on the recent record-breaking heatwave seen in Siberia where temperatures were more than 5 degrees above average between January and June this year. That part of the Arctic circle does naturally experience higher temperatures through parts of the year but the temperatures seen this year have been unprecedented. For instance, Verkhoyansk in Russia, recorded a temperature of 38 degrees in June, which is the highest temperature ever recorded north of the Arctic circle. Russian President Vladimir Putin had to declare a state of emergency in June because of the heatwave, which has led to natural and human disasters, including vast wild fires which have contributed an estimated 56 megatonnes of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere in June alone. It has also resulted in the widespread melting of permafrost, all contributing to a rather grim environmental scene. The new research has found that these temperatures are likely to happen naturally less than once in every 80,000 years. It is not therefore a common occurrence and has been described as "almost impossible" by the researchers had the planet not been warmed by greenhouse gases. The findings are "unequivocal evidence of the impact of climate change on the planet", the scientists claim, which is a statement given in the strongest possible terms and should serve as a warning that things must change, and quickly. It is not just Siberia that will be affected by uncontrolled humaninfluenced climate change. The UK is impacted by six weather systems, four of which are driven by conditions in the Arctic according to Dr Katharine Hendry from Bristol University and one of the lead authors on the research. Dr Hendry has said that extreme weather events in the UK can be linked to the climate changes in the Arctic, including the so-called 'beast from the east' that hit the UK in winter 2018, bringing around £1 billion of damage and which claimed 10 lives. However, the ways in which the warming of the Arctic will impact on the world is unknown. Dr Hendry explained, "Looking at the geological record, we don't think we've had CO2 levels as high for about five million years. So we really don't know what to expect into the future." She added that we're in "uncharted territory.” Aside from global weather conditions, it is also unknown how this will affect biodiversity and ecosystems, or even humans, as the weather conditions in the new climate era we are entering haven't been endured before. Even the smallest impact on local ecosystems can have a profound effect for other life on the planet, including humans. It is clear we are at a crucial point in our history!!!!!

Plan B launches legal challenge against UK's green recovery plan. A charity, Plan B. Earth, has launched a legal challenge against the Government's plans for green recovery, claiming that they are "clearly unlawful" and inadequate in light of the ratification of the agreements to reduce emissions.They believe that the Government is on course to miss the opportunity to avoid an environmental catastrophe. Earlier this month, the chancellor Rishi Sunak announced a £3 billion investment package, which focused on improving energy efficiency in homes and public buildings. That plan was widely criticised by campaigners, where significantly larger sums of available funding were provided to car makers and airlines as well as funding for fossil fuels in the COVID relief scheme, which could top £67 billion. That sum was also seen as a fraction of the funds provided for green recovery in other European countries.

30


Environmental Information PM announces 350 million pounds of funding to boost green recovery In July the UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced that £350 million is being made available to cut emissions from heavy industry and drive economic recovery from the COVID pandemic. The investment is seen by the Government as the package to drive forward progress in the UK's target to reach net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, through decarbonising heavy industry, construction, space and transport sectors and to "secure the UK's place at the forefront of green innovation”. The projects receiving a cash injection will work on the development of new technologies to improve energy efficiency for production, as well as support the creation of new green jobs by driving innovation and growth in UK industries. The package includes: • • • • • •

£139 million to support the transition of heavy industry from natural gas to hydrogen power and scaling up carbon capture and storage; £149 million to drive the use of innovative materials in heavy industry, including re-use of materials and improved waste recycling, including recyclable steel; £26 million to support energy-efficient building techniques to reduce building cost and cut emissions; £10 million to improve construction productivity and building quality, such as re-usable roofs and walls and "digital clones" of buildings that analyse data in real-time; launching a new National Space Innovation Programme boosted by initial £15 million from the UK Space Agency; and opening up bids in research and development for a further £10 million in the automotive sector, including more efficient electric motors or more powerful batteries.

This additional funding was announced a day after an environmental charity Plan B. Earth launched a legal challenge against the green recovery plans made by the Government earlier, where the funding is deemed insufficient in light of the national and international commitments on greenhouse gas emissions. The initial green recovery package consisted of £3 billion, which focuses mainly on the improvements in energy efficiency in homes and public buildings.

Beaver families win right to remain. Fifteen families of beavers have been granted permanent rights to remain in their new homes on the River Otter in East Devon. These are the first beavers to live in the wild in England for centuries after they were introduced as part of a trial carried out by Devon Wildlife Trust. In 2013 a family of beavers were found to be living on the River Otter and were originally threatened with removal, but Devon Wildlife Trust along with the help of community groups sought to protect them and got a licence for a five year trial to allow the beavers to remain. How this family of beavers got there initially still remains a mystery, however their reintroduction has been a success with the trial showing that their presence increased fish biomass and water quality in the river. The dams built by the beavers also worked as natural flood defences which helped to reduce the risk of flooding further downstream. The project sought to get local people and farmers involved, explaining to them the benefits of beavers in the local habitat, and offering support when needed. Landowners were initially concerned after localised flooding occurred in some farm land due to dams, but the reintroduction team provided them with support to resolve any issues.

31


Contact Information & Attachments RAAS (UK) Ltd were established by 3 former major IMC contracting and Renewals Company staff. We specialise in the development and enhancement of business systems specific to the UK Rail Industry. All our staff hold professional Engineering qualifications, and recognised Industry Safety and Lead Assessor qualifications. With over 70 years Rail Industry experience we can provide a tailor made combined Business and Safety Management System to meet the requirements of the RISQS and Network Rail Modules and your business, focusing specifically on current relevant Health & Safety legislation and Quality Processes applicable to the UK Rail Industry. RAAS has wide-ranging experience of business system requirements for disciplines such as Labour Supply, Safety, Plant, Road Rail and Rail Mounted Plant, Rail Vehicles, Civil Engineering and Electrical Engineering. We can provide advise on current legislation requirements, specifically industry requirements needed to operate successfully in the UK Rail Industry, and modification of business systems to meet the ever evolving requirements of current industry standard business system audit requirements, including those needed for the RISQS scheme.

Infrastructure Group Safety Bulletins Note These are not included within this newsletter as they are sent out via e-mail to all Sentinel registered companies and they can be down loaded from www.safety.networkrail.co.uk/InformationCentre/Infrastructure-Group-Safety-Bulletins

Sentinel Bulletins None

Attachments in this Issue :-

Changes to RGS September 2020 NRS Briefing Report September 2020 (Issue 117) NRS Changes September 2020 GERT8000 HB Issue 12 Index

32


Failure of a tree with symptoms of ash die back disease Issued to:

All Network Rail line managers, safety professionals and accredited contractors.

Ref:

NRB20-10

Date of issue: 29/09/2020 Location:

National

Contact:

Graham Owen - Senior Engineer (Lineside)

Overview On the 7th September during a routine inspection a mature ash tree showing signs of die back was found in a condition that posed an immediate risk of falling onto the railway line. The team was able to undertake immediate action to safeguard the railway and the tree was made safe.

As ash trees decline, they will become more susceptible to failure, increasing the risk of safety related incidents. Where mature trees have declined, additional and intensive risk controls and work methods will be required to make ash trees safe.

Ash die back is a disease of ash trees that causes leaf loss and crown die back which can lead to the death of the tree in a relatively short space of time. The disease has spread throughout the UK and will lead to the decline and death of many ash trees alongside our railway.

Discussion Points • •

Are trees being checked during site visits and inspections? Do you and your teams know how to report hazardous trees, including reporting faults and dealing with incidents to protect the safety of the line? It is important to report hazardous trees and not assume they are being dealt with by off-track teams.

Do you have access to inspection teams that can identify ash trees and the signs of ash die back? This information is important to collect information to assess the extent of the problem. How is this done and where? Do you have access to a resource to undertake work on trees? Specialist work methods and equipment might be required to deal with trees in poor health.

Part of our group of Safety Bulletins

33


OFFICIAL

Restricted access to 25KV ABB FSKII SMOS sites with SADTEM VTs Issued to:

All Network Rail line managers, safety professionals and accredited contractors

Ref:

NRA20-11

Date of issue: 15/09/2020 Location:

National

Contact:

Felix Langley, Professional Head of Power Distribution

Overview There have been a number of failures of SADTEM Voltage Transformer (VT) over the past 6 months. The two notable incidents are: •

•

On Saturday 5th September 2020 a 25kV SADTEM BBY2 Voltage Transformer (VT) catastrophically failed at Finnieston Mid-point Traction Switching Location (MPTSL). On Wednesday 12th August 2020 a 25kV SADTEM YE7 Voltage Transformer (VT) catastrophically failed at Filton Mid-point Auto Transformer Site Location MPATS.

In both incidents debris from the exploded VTs were found inside the compound and some minor debris found outside adjacent to the compound. While these failures are being investigated with the manufacturer, access to traction distribution sites with 25kV ABB FSKII Structure Mounted Outdoor Switchgear (SMOS) with SADTEM VT, is now restricted.

Immediate action required Access to any 25kV ABB FSKII SMOS sites with SADTEM VTs, whether by Network Rail staff or Contractors, shall require the site to be established as safe by carrying out the actions specified in NR/SIN/194.

This temporary change applies until further notice, until this instruction is withdrawn or superseded.

Actions specified in NR/SIN/194 shall be completed and must be submitted to and endorsed by a Route Asset Manager (E&P) / Regional Asset Manager (E&P) or delegates, or Designated Project Engineer (DPE) in advance of accessing a site.

Part of our group of Safety Bulletins

34


OFFICIAL

Morlais Junction derailment and fire Scope:

All Network Rail line managers, safety professionals and accredited contractors

Ref:

NREB20-07

Date:

17/09/2020

Location:

Morlais Junction, Wales

Contact:

Sustainable Development Team

Overview A significant derailment occurred on Wednesday 26th August at Morlais Junction, Llangennech with a large fire and a CAT 1 Environmental incident ensuing. The Freight train derailed carrying substantial quantities of dangerous goods (diesel and gas-oil) in a location that is a Special Area of Conservation (SAC) and a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). As a result of the derailment several wagons began to leak and caught on fire impacting air quality in the local area. To date the totality of the spill is unknown but is estimated that approximately 270,000 litres of diesel and gas-oil have escaped into the surrounding environment. Initial efforts to contain the diesel at the source were limited by the fire and prevention of access. The priority at the time was to extinguish the fire, however some mitigation was put in place, at a safe distance at the scene to try and minimise the release of diesel into the Loughor Estuary.

This is a very significant spill of diesel and gas-oil which has the potential to have serious, major, persistent and extensive impacts on the local environment and has therefore been classified as a category 1 environmental incident. A level three industry investigation, led by Network Rail is underway to determine the causes of the incident. A Safety Bulletin will be issued when more information is known. Learning points Please always consider the potential for diesel escape following a derailment and the potential environmental impact that may occur in the immediacy of an incident. In the event of a derailment, if you suspect diesel may be leaking, Route Operational Control should be informed and an Emergency Response Contractor should be called immediately to assess the situation and contain the spill.

Part of our group of Environment Communications

35


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07930 384505

Rail Industry Confidential Reporting:

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Fax:

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Registered Address: Stamford House, 91 Woodbridge Road, Guildford, Surrey, GU1 4QD Website: www.Advance-TRS.com

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