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Safety Briefing June 2021

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Welcome to the Advance TRS June 2021 Safety Briefing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).................................................................................. 3 Insurances................................................................................................................................... 3 Close Calls................................................................................................................................... 3 Worksafe Procedures.............................................................................................................. 3 Life Saving Rules........................................................................................................................ 4 How to spot signs of drug use in others............................................................................ 5 CIRAS - Confidential reporting for Safety .......................................................................... 6 Mental Health Awareness .....................................................................................................

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COVID information .................................................................................................................. 8 Sun safety information ...........................................................................................................

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Safety bulletins and alerts....................................................................................................... 11 Important Contact Information............................................................................................. 15

Important Numbers Business Hours Emergency Number

01483 361 061 Out of Hours Emergency Number

07930 384 505 CIRAS:

0800 4101 101 2


Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) All persons on or near the line and on the lineside shall wear at least the following PPE:

All contractors must:

High visibility upper body clothing with reflective tape which complies with EN ISO 20471, RIS-3279-TOM.

Wear appropriate PPE as defined by the client.

High visibility lower body clothing to standard EN ISO 20471, RIS-3279-TOM.

Inform Advance TRS of any damage, deterioration or lack of PPE.

A safety helmet which complies with BS EN 397: 2012.

Report any and all PPE that is ill-fitting.

Safety footwear which complies with BS EN ISO 20345: 2011, provides support to the ankle, includes mid-sole protection and has a protective toe cap. Where used, steel or other conductive toe caps shall be covered.

Ensure that all PPE is used, cleaned and stored in accordance with all health and safety guidelines.

Invoke Worksafe procedures for any ill fitting, inadequate or lack of PPE.

Insurances If you do not have the insurances stipulated in your contract already, you can obtain cover with our insurance partner Kingsbridge Contractor Insurance. You can get a quote by calling 01242 808 740 and or by going online to advancetrs.kingsbridge.co.uk.

To understand more about these insurance requirements, please click here.

Close Calls No matter where you work, reporting Close Calls is vital to improving safety. If you see something with the potential to cause harm, raise the alarm on site

and make it safe. If it is not safe to continue work then stop. Once the hazard has been removed or made safe, ensure that you report it.

Worksafe (Refusal to Work)

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Our Lifesaving Rules Safe behaviour is a requirement of working for Network Rail. These Rules are in place to keep us safe and must never be broken. We will all personally intervene if we feel a situation or behaviour might be unsafe.

Working responsibly

Driving

Always be sure the required plans and permits are in place, before you start a job or go on or near the line.

Never use a hand-held or hands-free phone, or programme any other mobile device, while driving.

Always use equipment that is fit for its intended purpose.

Always obey the speed limit and wear a seat belt.

Never undertake any job unless you have been trained and assessed as competent.

Working at height Always use a safety harness when working at height, unless other protection is in place.

Never work or drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

Working with moving equipment Working with electricity Always test before applying earths or straps.

Never enter the agreed exclusion zone, unless directed to by the person in charge.

Never assume equipment is isolated – always test before touch.

We will always comply with our Lifesaving Rules

For more information about our Lifesaving Rules go to safety.networkrail.co.uk/LSR

July 2014

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Spotting signs of drug use in others Excessive intakes of prescription drugs may make a person appear drunk, have slurred speech, droopy eyes and cause him/her to fall asleep at strange times. Look out for hidden medicines in the house. If someone’s taking opiates (such as heroin) they may have pupils that appear like pinpoints, have itchy and scratchy skin, go round asking for money and be either very hyperactive or very lethargic. Physically they may have a red nose and needle marks on their arms, behind the knees or

ankles. They also may be very sick one day with cold symptoms, cramps, diarrhea or an upset stomach and then be perfectly fine the next day.

users constantly sniff, lick their lips and feel very thirsty. Look out for little bags of white powder, crystal-looking residue, glass pipes, needles etc.

Crack and cocaine users tend to have glassy eyes, very large pupils and a nose that is red and raw. There may be marks, scabs, burns in the mouth and/or on the fingers and arms. Behavior can be very erratic and users become anxious and restless with a tendency to rambling conversations in which they jump from one subject to the next. Cocaine

The signs of Marijuana abuse include irritated, bloodshot eyes, an expressionless appearance, dry lips and a strong odour of burnt rope or grass. Users walk around in a daze, they exhibit a lack of emotion, stare out into space and go into fits of laughter when there is nothing to laugh about. Watch out for them washing their clothes immediately

Getting help There are a wide range of advice, treatment and support services for addiction in the UK. Anyone with a substance related problem can have access to such services. Your GP might offer to treat you or might refer you to your local specialist drug service. Most local

community drug units also run drop-in centres which don’t require a referral from a doctor. You should be able to find information about these on the internet or ask at your doctors’ surgery.

Don’t forget you can call Frank to discuss any issues you have confidentially on: 0800 776600.

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Prevent incidents in confidence

Work environment

Training & competence

Rules & procedures

Safety practices

Fatigue

Shift design

Welfare facilities

Equipment

0800 4 101 101 Report textline: 07507 285 887

Freepost: CIRAS www.ciras.org.uk

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Mental Health Awareness Mental Health Awareness Week takes place every year, starting on the second Monday of May. The aim of this week is to raise awareness about mental health with lots of group activities and simple exercises to get people talking about mental health. If you notice a colleague acting out of the ordinary, you

might want to check in to see if they are ok! Most of us commonly reply with ‘I’m ok thanks’ when asked how we are, but it takes just an extra second to double check. For more information on mental health awareness and training, go to: www.mhfaengland.org.

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STAY SAFE IN THE SUN

Protect your skin from harmful ultraviolet radiation from the sun when you’re working. Follow five simple steps to make sure you enjoy the weather, without putting your health at risk.

ULtraviolet UVC

UVB

UVA

3 SEEK SHADE 4 USE SUNSCREEN

Come out of the sun whenever possible during powerful ultraviolet 100 315 the most400 Don’t forget your280 head, face, ears periods (10am–3pm), and and neck – wear a hat, preferably remember to stay in the with a wide brim, and sunglasses shade during breaks with UV protection. If you wear a hard hat, use one fitted with a Legionnaire-style flap. If you wear safety goggles, make sure they have a UV filter

THE UV INDEX

5 BE SKIN SAFE

Use SPF 30 or higher on any exposed skin – apply it half an hour before going outside, put plenty on and reapply it frequently

Report mole changes (size, shape, colour, itching or REMEMBER bleeding) other 700 or any wavelength (nm)to drink plenty of water on concerns about your skin warmer to your doctor as soon as days to avoid possible – don’t put it off, dehydration early treatment is important. Have a look at our simple skin check guide below

UV UV UV UV UV UV UV UV UV UV UV INDEX INDEX INDEX INDEX INDEX INDEX INDEX INDEX INDEX INDEX INDEX

The strength of the sun’s rays isn’t connected to the temperature – check the UV index. You’ll find the index on many weather forecast apps and websites

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11+

FIVE

WORKERS A DAY GET SKIN CANCER *

LOW

Moderate

HIGH

VERY HIGH

(1,2)

(3,4,5)

(6,7)

(8,9,10)

You can safely stay outside

Take care during midday hours and don’t spend too much time in the sun unprotected

Seek shade during midday hours, cover up and wear sunscreen

EXTREME (11+)

Spend time in the shade between 10am and 3pm. Covering up and sunscreen essential

Avoid being outside in midday hours. Covering up and sunscreen essential

Checking for signs of skin cancer is as easy as A, B, C (and D). Be aware of how your skin normally looks – that way, you’ll notice changes that could be signs of skin cancer. - Found a new mole? - Spotted any changes to the size, shape or

melanoma is most likely to occur. Use a mirror or get someone else to help you check.

- Noticed a new growth or sore that

Get any skin problem checked by your GP. There may be nothing to worry about, but if something is wrong, treating it early could stop it getting worse – and even save your life.

POL2724f/160415/ZC

GET TO KNOW YOUR SKIN

ASYMMETRY

BORDER

two halves of a mole look different

the edges of the mole are blurred, jagged or not regular

colour of an existing mole or patch of skin?

-

doesn’t heal? Found a spot, mole or sore that hurts or is itchy? Seen a mole or growth that bleeds, crusts or scabs?

Look at Cancer Research UK’s guide to spotting the signs of skin cancer at sunsmart.org.uk/UV-the-sun-andskin-cancer/spotting-skin-cancer-early

Remember to check your neck and back too if they’ve been exposed – in men, this is where

COLOUR

Working together to beat occupational cancer The Institution of Occupational Safety and Health is campaigning to stop thousands of untimely deaths to work-caused cancer – find out more at www.notimetolose.org.uk

I

Ivory Characteristics Pale skin, light or red hair, prone to freckles. Burns very easily and rarely tans Sun protection At the greatest risk of developing skin cancer. Needs to protect skin, preferably with clothing

II

BEIGE

DIAMETER

the colour of the mole isn’t even, with more than one shade of colour

III

LIGHT BROWN

Characteristics Fair skin, likely to have light hair, blue or brown eyes. Some have dark hair but still have a fair skin. Usually burns but may gradually tan

Characteristics Light olive skin with dark hair and brown or green eyes. Burns with long exposure to the sun but generally tans quite easily

Sun protection At the greatest risk of developing skin cancer. Needs to protect skin, preferably with clothing

Sun protection Should protect themselves in strong sunshine

IV

MEDIUM BROWN Characteristics Brown eyes and dark hair. Burns with very lengthy exposures but always tans easily Sun protection Should protect themselves in strong sunshine

the mole is wider than 6mm (the size of a rubber on top of a pencil)

v

DARK BROWN

*Figure for GB. Mole images courtesy Cancer Research UK

Wear long, loose clothing to keep the sun off your skin

2 PROTECT YOUR HEAD

infrared

VI

VERY DARK BROWN

Characteristics Naturally brown skin, brown eyes and dark hair. Burns only with excessive exposure to the sun. Skin easily darkens further

Characteristics Black skin with dark brown eyes and black hair. Burns only with extreme exposure to the sun. Skin very easily darkens further

Sun protection Should protect themselves when outdoors in the sun for a long time

Sun protection Should protect themselves when outdoors in the sun for a long time

Fitzpatrick skin scale

1 COVER UP

visible

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Contact with Overhead Line Equipment (OLE) – serious injury

Ref:

All Network Rail line managers, safety professionals and accredited contractors NRX21-09

Date:

18/05/2021

Location:

Wolverton, West Coast South NW&C Region

Contact:

Jimmy Pettit, Accident Investigation Manager NW&C Region

Scope:

Overview On the 14 May 2021 at 00:38, a technician working in a mobile elevating work platform (MEWP) basket came into contact with live OLE. He suffered serious injuries and is now in hospital. The MEWP operator also sustained a minor injury requiring hospital treatment and has now been discharged. The team were undertaking routine planned OLE overhead line adjustments for the Central Rail Systems Alliance.

Discussion Points • • • • •

How do you clearly identify / mark the safe working limits of isolations? How do you reach a clear and common understanding with others regarding the safe working limits of the isolation? Is the right equipment available with each group to 'test before touch'? How and where do you test before you touch electrification assets? What do you do if something is different to your understanding?

BTP, ORR and formal industry investigations have started. We are co-operating with them. The investigations are on-going to establish the key facts but in the meantime all staff are reminded to: • •

• •

Know and understand what your task is and how to keep yourself safe. Have a clear understanding of the isolation safe working limits identified on the OLE permit/Form C for the work being undertaken. The Test before Touch lifesaving rule requires that a test be witnessed or performed every time before touching OLE. Retest if you move beyond any inline OLE feature, move to different track or work on a different conductor. Use the guide to electrical lifesaving rules

Part of our group of Safety Bulletins

This message was sent to Liz.Chiariello@networkrail.co.uk. This email is for Network Rail employees only. If you are not a Network Rail employee, you can unsubscribe by emailing

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OFFICIAL

RIDDOR notified contractor accident while using Premier Compact 110 Series Soil Sampling Machine Issued to:

All Network Rail line managers, safety professionals and accredited contractors

Ref :

NRA21-07

Date of issue: 10/05/2021 Location:

Heaton Down Yard Development Site, Newcastle

Contact:

Adam Binney, Group Property, Head of Safety and Sustainable Development

Overview At around 14:00 on the 22nd February during the setup of the Premier Compact 110 Series (a 2.5 metre high, tracked compound soil sampling machine), the carriage and enclosed weight (a 110kg percussive hammer) detached from the guide rails of the mast, swung sideways, and struck the lead driller in the right hand side of his head and f ace. No injuries were sustained, and the driller was able to resume work the next day. An investigation is ongoing, but it is likely that the incident occurred because an essential 'lock bolt' was not inserted or had not been inserted suf ficiently into the guide rod. As a result, the carriage came away from the main body of the drilling rig. This event has subsequently been reported into the Safety Management Intelligence System, and also as a 'RIDDOR DO1 - LIFTING EQUIPMENT - COLLAPSE, OVERTURNING OR FAILURE'.

As part of the ongoing investigation it has been suggested that similar incidents have occurred bef ore, and specifically as a result of incorrect insertion of the 'lock bolt'. While anecdotal (at this time) this points towards a more systemic failure in relation to use of this specific machinery, and not necessarily solely 'operator failure'. Although this activity relates to a specific piece of machinery, please ensure when using any machinery, you undertake the checks below.

Immediate action required • • •

All machinery/equipment must be properly maintained and have evidence of maintenance. Always ensure machinery is set up correctly and pre-use checks have been undertaken. There is a saf e system of work in place and it has been suitably briefed.

• •

Only use machines/equipment you are trained and competent to use. Advise contractors that they must undertake the above checks and be competent if they are to use this machine. Brief the contents of this safety advice to all relevant staff and contractors.

Part of our group of Safety Bulletins

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OFFICIAL

On Track Plant machine / crane controllers Issued to:

All Network Rail line managers, safety professionals and accredited contractors

Ref :

NRA21-08

Date of issue: 11/05/2021 Location:

National

Contact:

Malcolm Miles, Network Technical Head of Plant, Technical Authority

Overview Machine (and crane) controllers are required by the Rule Book to play an important part in supervising the use of on track plant. They are responsible for authorising movements, and checking that permitted speeds are not exceeded and that clearances between machines are maintained. They are also an important check on movements over level crossings, across points etc. Machine controllers should normally discharge their role on f oot, accompanying the item of plant, and must use duplex communications equipment f or open-channel communication with the operator. Some on track plant is equipped with a second seat. That seat may only be used by the machine controller while they are supervising movements if the seat is designed and installed to provide the machine controller with a clear view in the direction of travel. If the second seat does not enable the machine controller to have a view that is at least as clear as the operator, then the machine controller must discharge their role on f oot and not ride on or in the machine.

For Mobile Elevating Work Platforms (MEWPs), the machine controller must never ride in an elevated basket. This is because their role includes emergency rescue using the ground level controls should that be required. In certain circumstances (e.g. when movements are required over long distances), movements using 'send and receive' controls may be implemented where it has been shown to be safe by a risk assessment. Any 'send and receive' movements shall be controlled strictly in accordance with the Rule Book and Infrastructure Plant Manual. Only in these circumstances, where a machine controller is not required to control the movement, can supplementary seats without full visibility of the line ahead be used to convey the machine controller as a passenger. During the COVID pandemic, second seats in constrained, enclosed cabs must not be used as doing so compromises the social distancing requirements.

Immediate action required •

All those with machine controller or crane controller competence must be brief ed by their Sentinel Sponsor on the limitations of not using second seats or riding in MEWP baskets detailed in this Safety Advice. Plant Operations Scheme Representatives must check that on track plant operators and machine/crane controllers understand and are f ollowing the instructions in this Saf ety Advice and the Rule Book.

• •

Site managers should use site safety checks to test that these instructions are f ollowed. Those planning worksites should consider traverse distances to and f rom access points for on track plant to make sure saf e use does not require excessive walking distances for machine/crane controllers.

Part of our group of Safety Bulletins

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Derailment risk following engineering work Issued to:

All Network Rail line managers, safety professionals and accredited contractors

Ref:

NRA21-09

Date of issue: 08/06/2021 Location:

Barnehurst, Kent

Contact:

Geoff Norman, Principal H&S Manager, Southern Capital Delivery

Overview On Monday 7th June 2021, having given up a possession around an engineering train, the train departed Barnehurst when the driver observed an obstruction across an adjacent line. After speaking to the Signaller and blocking the line, the driver identified two sleepers chained and padlocked to the running rails. The actions of the driver prevented a potentially serious passenger train derailment. The sleepers were subsequently removed by a Network Rail response team.

Initial investigations have identified that the sleepers were left down following works within the worksite, and were being used to create a barrier for controlling runaway risk from rail mounted plant leaving the site of work. Controls must be put in place where the risk of runaway has been identified, as detailed in Network Rail standard NR/L2/OHS/019 section 9.2. The Technical Authority will be carrying out a Post Implementation Review (PIR) of Module 5 of NR/L2/OHS/019.

Immediate action required •

In complying with NR/L2/OHS/019, you must not use any immoveable object or derailing device, except where already detailed in the Rule Book, for example Handbook 13 Duties of the Persons in Charge of the Siding Possessions (PICOS).

All Engineering Supervisors must comply with duties to check the line is safe for the passage of trains before handing their worksite back.

Part of our group of Safety Bulletins

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Business Hours Emergency Number:

01483 361061

Out of Hours Emergency Number:

07930 384505

Rail Industry Confidential Reporting:

0800 4 101101

Email: info@advance-trs.com Tel:

+44 (0) 1483 361 061

Fax:

+44 (0) 1483 431 958

Registered Address: Stamford House, 91 Woodbridge Road, Guildford, Surrey, GU1 4QD Website: www.Advance-TRS.com

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