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OCTOBER 2018

A NEW DAWN Breathing life into the much-loved Brooklands ParkÂ

ADUR CIVIC CENTRE

HISTORIC FACELIFT

RIVER ADUR REVAMP

RETAINING 100'S OF PRIVATE JOBS

RENOVATING BEDFORD ROW

MULTI-MILLION POUND YACHT CLUB PLANS


CONTENTS 03 04

BROOKLANDSÂ FEATURE

FROM PAGE 04

ADUR; THE LATEST DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS

14 15

PAGE 25 - 27

An intro from Brian Boggis & Kevin Jenkins

ON THE COVER: BROOKLANDS Ten-page Brooklands Park Special featuring Q&A with environment-shaping contractors Chris Blandford Associates

SUSSEX YACHT CLUB More on the multi-million pound revamp

PUBLIC REALM WORTHING A big step forward for bold plans to transform Worthing Town Centre

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WORTHING LOCAL PLAN

17

ADUR CIVIC CENTRE

Blueprint for three protected green spaces

Work is well underway on a new ADC funded office block in Shoreham

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BEDFORD ROW

19

FERRY ROAD, SHOREHAM

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GLOBE SWIMMING POOL

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WORTHING; THE LATEST DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS

WELCOME

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Securing Historic Worthing's future for generations to come

Community delights as Shoreham Beach gateway is completed

Adur Council steps in to support Lancing school swimming pool project

HIGHDOWN GARDENS Preparing the Gardens for the next stage of a Heritage Lottery Fund project.

BUILDINGAW IS PRODUCED BY ADUR & WORTHING COUNCILS.


WELCOME

Brian Boggis, Adur's  Exec member for Regeneration

W

elcome to another edition of Building AW.

Much of the focus in recent months has been on the changes taking place in Shoreham. However, the recent decision of the Planning Committee to approve the New Monks Farm application for 600 new homes and the new IKEA Store as well as the proposed Industrial development on the Airport site promises to move the focus westward in the coming months. This development of a virtually derelict site with no public access and of no agricultural worth is to be turned into an exciting new community, providing badly needed new homes, local jobs, a new country park open to all, as well as additional educational facilities. It’s sure to bring added footfall and prosperity to the Lancing village centre and whilst there are undoubtedly some obstacles to be overcome, I truly believe this to be a “game changing” decision for Adur.

Kevin Jenkins, Worthing's Exec member for Regeneration

W

elcome to the latest edition of Building A&W.

Regeneration is essential to the continued vitality of Worthing. This is not only in terms of housing, our retail offer, and state of the art business parks that we aim to bring forward at Decoy Farm; but also it’s about leisure, health and well-being. It's about what we provide for our residents to enjoy, whatever their age. That is why, working in partnership with colleagues, I am so pleased to see the next stage of the regeneration of Brooklands Park being announced in the proposed master-plan this October. Once delivered it will provide a major leisure attraction for residents and will put Worthing further on the map as a destination of choice for those who live within striking distance of the town. All of which will add to our economy and generate employment within the town.

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A MASTERPLAN TO HERALD IN A NEW DAWN

Worthing Borough Council has released its masterplan for Brooklands Park. Fresh from reviving the lake, the park as a whole now has a plan of action to return it to its status as a jewel-in-the-crown green space. The Council has engaged leading firm Chris Blandford Associates to produce the masterplan after listening to the view of the hundreds of residents who responded to a consultation. Here the company's Adrienne Soudain, a landscape architect with a track record in delivering innovative design solutions, answering BuildingAW's questions...Â

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BAW: TELL US A BIT ABOUT THE COMPANY YOU WORK FOR. Â WHAT SORTS OF PROJECTS HAVE YOU WORKED ON?

A.S: We are a team of talented and creative professionals with a broad range of specialisms including environmental planners, landscape architects, ecologists, heritage consultants, and graphic design, GIS and visualisation specialists. We help our clients create distinctive places for people to live, work and play, using our understanding of the natural and cultural aspects of landscapes to inform the planning, design and delivery of sustainable places - places that contribute to the wellbeing of current and future generations, minimise environmental harm and embrace the past. We often work in multi-disciplinary teams together with Architects, Engineers and Cost Consultants and on this project we are supported by Planning Solutions Ltd (PSC) who provided demographic data and a headline commercial review of the proposals. Our portfolio of projects is truly diverse ranging from the design of local community parks to masterplanning of major urban expansions through to historic park restorations, high-end residential developments, heritage conservation plans and proposals to safeguard World Heritage Sites - we have been working at Stonehenge for over 20 years. Recent projects with particular relevance to Brooklands Park include Northstowe Healthy New Town (SCDC), Streatham Common Playground (LB Streatham), Plashet Park (LB Newham), Bishops Park (LB of Hammersmith & Fulham) and Homefield Park Concept Masterplan (Worthing).

BAW: WHAT WERE YOUR FIRST THOUGHTS ON SEEING BROOKLANDS PARK WHEN YOU BEGAN THE PROJECT IN JANUARY 2018?

A.S: When we first started work on the concept masterplan, it was evident that Brooklands Park is in need of a refresh.

The park offers many facilities expected of an urban park but was looking rather tired and run-down.

"IT WAS CLEAR THAT THE PARK WAS TREASURED AND VALUED BY LOCAL COMMUNITIES"

Works associated with the Rampion Offshore Wind Farm were underway and were causing some disruption and disturbance within the park. It was also clear that the park was treasured and valued by local communities. Although now in need of investment, it had clearly been a focal point for peoples’ lives over a number of generations. The wealth of historic photos of families boating on the lake, picnicking on its shores and generally making use of the park testified to its historic popularity. We wanted to ensure that this atmosphere and love returned. We were intrigued by the fact that Brooklands Park maintains a green gap between the settlements of Worthing and Lancing and forms part of an extended green link between the SouthDowns National Park and the coastline. The park benefits from a varied topography, some mature trees and the lake and provides some key views with glimpses of the surrounding hills and the seaside. It has areas that are more vegetated and secluded while other areas are more expansive and open. The park also has some constraints including soil contamination, risk of flooding and existing underground services. Early in the year, works to rejuvenate the lake were well underway and there were signs of the positive impact the refurbishment of the lake would have on the look and feel of the park. Over this summer we have noticed that the lake and surrounding vegetation have started to come to life, providing attractive views across the lake.

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BAW: HOW DO YOU SET ABOUT BRINGING TOGETHER PLANS FOR SENSITIVE A.S: GREEN SPACES LIKE THIS? WHAT IS YOUR PROCESS?

A.S: An important part of our role is in best aligning the client’s brief and aspirations for the site with the values and needs of the local people . All of this has to be achieved in the context of a place’s inherent sensitivities, character and history.

Any changes to a cherished neighbourhood green space need to be dealt with sensitively - sometimes the change of amenities or features is unavoidable but our role is always to offset these by finding valuable additions to the benefit of all. The process involves understanding the existing space and its surroundings, its users and potential users by visiting the site and learning about it through research on its history, design, ecology, topography and so on. It also is about understanding its future potential through demographic and commercial feasibility studies.

"WE HELP OUR CLIENTS CREATE DISTINCTIVE PLACES FOR PEOPLE TO LIVE, WORK AND PLAY." Engagement with stakeholder and community groups is a vital element in building trust and gaining support for the change. A range of options can be presented to help everyone involved to understand how different proposals will contribute to their landscape, social and ecological context. Often a combination of several ideas and needs leads to the mutual consensus on one option and a final masterplan and report draws the whole process together.

BAW: WERE YOU SURPRISED BY THE LEVEL OF FEEDBACK TO THE CONSULTATION? WHAT DID THAT TELL A.S: YOU ABOUT THE PLACE BROOKLANDS HAS IN THE TOWN?

A.S: The number of responses well exceeded

expectations and underlines the importance that Brooklands Park holds within local communities. The feedback provided us with valuable insight into the features that current visitors enjoy about the park and the improvements that would attract people to visit more often and for longer.

Key suggestions were a new and improved café, interesting walking trails, improved swimming and paddling pool, improved children’s play areas including play for older children, more native trees and flowers, re-introduction of the boats on the lake and improved indoor play facilities. A high proportion of people responded that they were driving to the park with many visitors coming from surrounding areas including Lancing, Coombes and Sompting. It was evident that Brooklands Park is well loved and that people were pleased to see recent investment into the environmental improvement works on the lake.

BAW: WE’VE NOW SEEN YOUR PLANS FOR THE SCIENCE ADVENTURE PARK. FIRST OF, ALL CAN YOU TELL US WHY SCIENCE?

A.S: Brooklands Park has a strong link to science and

renewable energy generation through the nearby presence of the Rampion Offshore Wind Farm, science based industries and a local history of windmills and food growing surrounding the park.

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"ANY CHANGES TO A CHERISHED NEIGHBOURHOOD GREEN SPACE NEED TO BE DEALT CAPTION WITH SENSITIVELY"

Brooklands Park also benefits from a large lake with many opportunities for exploring life in water and for observing natural sciences. This connection inspired us to make science and adventure a theme for the park, to use it as a catalyst for innovative park attractions, fun and learning through play, and to create a memorable regional attraction. For example, the proposals for a ‘gardens of the senses’ and ‘science inspired adventure play trail’ take inspiration from international precedents which offer visitors the opportunity to explore the interaction of their own senses, the surprising phenomenon of physics, and the laws of nature in a playful way. The concept is based on ideas by the educationalist Hugo Kükelhaus. Improved access around the lake, interpretation of nature and science and the sensitive introduction of science inspired land art will offer intriguing variety within the park. We are excited by the prospect of bringing science to life by offering hands-on experiences within a truly innovative regional park experience.

BAW: OK SO NOW GIVE US AN OVERALL IMPRESSION OF WHAT YOU ARE TRYING TO ACHIEVE AND WHY?

A.S: We set out to create a vision for the rejuvenation of Brooklands that would be meaningful to local residents as well as offering a regional destination that would attract visitors from further afield. The local links to science and the creative responses from the stakeholder consultation inspired us to design an adventure park with multiple indoor and outdoor leisure activities for year-round interest. We are passionate about creating opportunities for the local community to come together, get involved and get a real sense of ownership over the park. When people feel a sense of ownership over their surroundings they look after them; they become cherished as an asset to the neighbourhood and a hub of the community. The creation of a regional destination will attract greater visitor numbers and contribute to the long-term viability of the park. Commercial ventures to offset the management costs of the park also offer valuable local employment opportunities.

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BAW: CAN YOU PICK OUT SOME FEATURES THAT YOU THINK WILL EXCITE RESIDENTS?

A.S: The new café, visitor centre and lakeside picnicking areas at the centre of the park will be a great location to meet friends, relax and enjoy the views across the lake. Visitors of all ages and abilities will be able to enjoy the adventurous and exciting outdoor discovery features in the ‘gardens of the senses’ and along the ‘science inspired adventure play trail’. New and enhanced planting throughout the park will make the park visually more diverse and will attract a greater variety of wildlife to be enjoyed throughout the year. The new indoor leisure facility and cafe will offer a range of exciting year-round activities that can be enjoyed irrespective of the weather and in hours of poor light and visitors will be able to enjoy seasonal outdoor events including potentially outdoor cinema.

BAW: WE SEE THAT YOU ARE TRYING TO MAKE A BETTER LINK FROM THE PARK TO A.S:THE SEAFRONT. HOW ARE YOU TRYING TO DO THAT AND WHY DO YOU THINK IT’S IMPORTANT?

A.S: Brooklands Park is located within spitting distance of

the seafront and yet connectivity between the park and the beach is poor. With an increase of concessions along the seafront and planned new facilities within the

park, it makes sense to improve links between the two. The concept masterplan proposes improvements to the existing pedestrian crossing (opposite the go-kart) as well as a potential new crossing on the corner of the Brighton Road with Western Road. At this stage, the additional crossing is indicative only and feasibility will need to be established during the next design stages. The improved existing crossing will also link to a new shared use route (pedestrian and cycle) that is proposed along the western park boundary. This new route will provide improved cycle links from the coastal road, through the Park and towards Sompting and beyond.

"THE CREATION OF A REGIONAL DESTINATION..." page | 08

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BAW: WITH ELEMENTS LIKE ‘CIRCULAR WALKING AND FITNESS TRAILS’, ‘GARDEN SENSES’ AND SHARED CYCLING OF THE A.S: ROUTES THE EMPHASIS ALSO SEEMS TO BE ON ACTIVE AND HEALTHY LIVING. IS THIS AN AIM?

A.S: It certainly is an aim! There is increasing evidence that more physical activity and physical or visual access to green spaces, water and natural light, can have a powerful impact on physical and mental health and wellbeing throughout peoples’ lives. For example, small increases in walking and cycling, fitness trails and play help to tackle obesity and chronic disease. Incorporating the arts within green spaces can inspire people to engage in the outdoors and promote a sense of place and community ownership. Worthing and surrounding areas have an active art and cultural scene which could help to influence the future look and feel of the park. It is envisaged that the proposals will help people to live happier, healthier and more active lives by making a significant contribution to: Encouraging physical activity Providing contact with nature Stimulating positive social interaction Supporting access to an understanding of healthy food options Fostering a positive community identity Creating a low pollution environment and adapting to climate change Promoting health and wellbeing through play and art

BAW: HOW WILL WORK TO THE PARK BE FUNDED? WILL ALL PROPOSALS BE REALISED AT THE SAME TIME?

A.S: Funding for the park rejuvenation will need to

Adrienne Soudain, Landscape Architect at Chris Blandford Associates

BAW: YOU’VE INCREASED CAR PARKING AND COACH DROP OFF SPACE. DO YOU SEE THE NEW BROOKLANDS AS A DESTINATION SITE TO BRING IN PEOPLE FROM OUTSIDE THE AREA?

A.S: We share the Council’s aspiration for the park to

become a regional destination park that serves the needs of the local community as well as attracting visitors from further afield. By providing facilities to attract a wider audience, the park will generate greater income which will secure the long-term management of the park for the community.

BAW: FINALLY, WHAT ARE THE NEXT STEPS? HOW WILL THE CONCEPT MASTERPLAN VISION BECOME A REALITY?

A.S: The concept masterplan and supporting documents

will be submitted in a committee report before the end of the year asking for approval to adopt the plan. If the go-ahead is given, then the hard work begins.

come from a number of sources including Worthing Council, sponsorship, external investment including charities and private investment. Investment into the park will be phased in line with funding becoming available.

Alongside detailed design development and further site investigations, the partners will need to allocate and attract funding from a range of sources. This will enable the design team to develop a phased delivery programme for the works that matches the release of funding with the development of key areas of the park.

The phasing of works will take into consideration the need to minimise disruption to park users while works are taking place.

All of this will be subject to further consultation and engagement with local communities.

It is envisaged that some of the proposed concessions and facilities within the park will generate rental revenue to fund ongoing maintenance and management of the park.

Along the way things will change, ideas will evolve and new, better ideas will emerge. The overall process will take some years to achieve but we are confident that the work will deliver a park that communities can once again be proud of.

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£ 2 Million Boost to community Health & Wellbeing The release of proposals for a £2m revamp of the Brooklands Park marks the next stage of the complete revival of the much-loved green space. Developed by leading environment-shaping company Chris Blandford Associates, the plan envisages a new Science Adventure Park with the emphasis on learning through fun, play and exploration. An option for an indoor leisure activity centre in the south west corner of the park is also outlined. With the lake freshly revived after nine months hard work, the next stage is to move towards a coherent feel for the entire area. Work is still to be done to fund the entire list of features but they include an adventure playground, community gardens, picnic areas, outdoor education and den building area, enhanced planting of shrubs and flowers, pond life exploration, picnic zones and an iconic vertical feature, either a sculpture or wind turbine. A newly-designed lakeside cafe and visitor centre is also proposed. Sponsorship is to be sought from private businesses for some aspects, particularly technology companies given the science-based nature of the proposal Increased car parking spaces and coach drop off areas are envisaged as the Council seeks to make Brooklands a destination place again as well as a green space local residents can be proud of again. The Friends of Brooklands Park have been actively engaged in the process of bringing forward the vision for the park. In a statement the company says the park aimed is to provide ‘stimulation of the senses for people of all ages and abilities through hands-on play and exploration including sensory play equipment, acoustic play and temporary installations which can link to the wider health and wellbeing agenda’. The consultants also want to create better links from the park to the seafront so that people can easily travel between the two. The public has already been given a say on what they think of the park and as many of these views as possible have been incorporated into the plan. The development of the park will take place in stages with the timescale for possible completion depending on the success of attracting funds for some of the individual elements.

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~ Councillor Edward Crouch, Worthing Borough Council’s Exec Member for Digital and Environmental Services

Ben Sharp of Five Rivers with Cllr Ed Crouch at the handover of Brooklands Lake

Through wind & rain, a haven for wildlife emerges The release of the plan to revamp the entire Brooklands Park site comes just 18 months after the first moves were made to breathe new life into the much-loved open space. Responding to residents concerns about the lake itself a plan was developed to first save the waterway and then come forward with proposals for an overall makeover. A Friends of Brooklands Park group was formed which helped guide Worthing Borough Council in its efforts after dozens of residents turned up at a public meeting at the Town Hall last year to find out about plans for the lake. Now, after nine months of hard work through wind, rain and not much shine, the restoration of the eight-acre lake is complete. Five Rivers Environmental Contracting undertook the work which included removing about six Olympic swimming pools worth of silt in the still waters that had been building up over the years from upstream. With a range of wildlife-friendly environments also created, the area has been transformed into a vibrant place for flora and fauna. The centrepiece is a new 105-metre boardwalk which allows visitors to stroll along a reed-lined pathway and get closer to the vast array of wildlife already repopulating the lake. Council leaders have praised the contractors behind the work - and also confirmed that a masterplan for the wider transformation of the park would be revealed in a matter of weeks. Councillor Edward Crouch, Worthing Borough

Council’s Executive Member for Digital and Environmental Services said: “The transformation of Brooklands Lake has been astonishing - it’s been a really important piece of work that was highlighted and done in conjunction with residents. “As a result of the investment, the water quality is much better, the habitat has been improved and we are really making Brooklands fighting fit for the future.”

To avoid similar problems in future Five Rivers have narrowed the Teville stream in Valley Gardens and in front of the Brooklands cafe to increase water flow which means future sediment is deposited in the wider area in front of the café. This ‘sediment trap’, along with the ramped access point from Western Road, will allow easy access when material needs to be removed from the bottom of the lake in future years. Already the quantity and variety of wildlife is on the rise - with cormorants, heron, egrets and swans all happily enjoying their new surroundings. The odd turtle has also been spotted on one of the islands. Ben Sharp, project manager for Five Rivers, said: “We’ve really enjoyed being able to work on restoring Brooklands lake. “It’s been a great project, even though much of it has seen us wading through mud during an extremely cold and wet winter.”

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BROOKLANDS PARK

 CONCEPT MASTERPLAN  | A distinct adventure park providing multiple outdoor leisure activities for year-round interest and opportunities to explore and experience science phenomenon through leisure and play. FEATURES Innovative concept featuring a distinct combination of outdoor leisure activities with playful science exploration Strong links to sciences including STEM subjects and natural environment Potential to attract commercial sponsorship from technology and other companies Stimulation of the senses by people of all ages and abilities through hands-on play and exploration i.e sensory play equipment, acoustic play, temporary installations linking to wider health and well-being agenda Improved gateways and park boundaries for enhanced sense of welcome Provision of an Adventure Playground Iconic vertical feature, i.e. windmill/wind turbine, sculpture or science-inspired raised landform giving identity to the park and referencing local heritage as well as recent development in the area


SCIENCE ADVENTURE PARK

AND INDOOR LEISURE FACILITY KEY


Unanimous backing for multi-million pound riverside revamp Multi-million pound plans to revamp a Shoreham yacht club and open up the riverside to the public have received unanimous backing from councillors. With progress to transform River Adur's Western Harbour Arm moving forward at great pace, Sussex Yacht Club (SYC) applied for permission to create a new premises in Brighton Road. The result will see the riverside opened up to the wider public, flood defences improved and lead to the creation of pedestrian and cycle access along the southern section of the A259 coast road for the first time.

"part of a wider project to revamp the Brighton Road site and surrounding area." Plans were unanimously approved by Adur District Council's planning committee in August subject to a number of conditions being met. The approved plans are part of a wider project to revamp the Brighton Road site and surrounding area.

In recent years, Adur District Council has been driving forward a renaissance of Shoreham Harbour, transforming industrial units into new homes and workspaces with an expansive waterfront promenade. At the same time, the Environment Agency is installing more than seven kilometres of tidal walls defences on the River Adur, reducing the risk of flooding to thousands of residential and business properties in Shoreham and Lancing. However, one of the obstacles in delivering this has been the SYC site, which is regarded as a key weakness. To reduce the risk of flooding to the town and encourage private investment in the area, the Council struck a deal with the club - with the local authority buying some of the land and the proceeds being used by SYC to construct a new clubhouse. The approved proposal will see the current building demolished. The site will then be reconfigured, with the yacht club creating a new headquarters opposite the petrol station. A car park and workshops will be built at the western end. Once the new building is finished, the Council will build new flood defences along with a new cycle and pedestrian route

SUSSEX YACHT CLUB

Proposed new club house for Sussex Yacht Club in Shoreham

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Artist Impression of Public Realm Plans

WORTHING TOWN CENTRE TRANSFORMATION Five million-pound kick start for Public Realm project A bold new plan to transform the look and feel of Worthing town centre is taking a big step forward as proposals to revamp two main streets enter the design phase. Up to ÂŁ5 million has been allocated to redesign South Street and Portland Road to kickstart the Public Realm project. This is led and initially funded by West Sussex County Council and will revitalise public spaces from the station to the seafront. More open continental-style boulevard walkways, pedestrianisation, tree plantings, new contrasting paving designs, courtyards and a new piazza are planned to soften the streetscape of the town. The county council, working in partnership with Worthing Borough Council, decided earlier this year that the most adventurous options for South Street and Portland Road from last year's options appraisal will be pursued and developed further. Now, after initial feedback from stakeholders, detailed design work is taking place with final proposal being presented in the coming months.

Early artwork suggested at the northern end of South Street the clock tower outside the Guildbourne Centre could be moved to the centre of the junction and raised as part of a new piazza adorned with permanent fabric shades. Along South Street itself, buses will be diverted and pedestrians given priority. Tree planting and benches will flow down to the seafront where a wider 'shared-surface' junction is to be created linking the street to the pier and a space for outdoor performances created. On Portland Road, the carriageway width will be reduced south of Shelley Road and a tree-lined avenue cultivated with two shared-surface courtyard squares created. Moving further towards Montague Street more treelined shared space would be created which again prioritises pedestrians. Provision for on-street parking and emergency access will be considered as the designs progress. The plans form part of a Growth Deal agreed by West Sussex County Council and Worthing Borough Council last year.

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Finding balance to ensure the perfect blend of life, work and play Three key green spaces are proposed to be protected as a draft blueprint to guide the future development of Worthing has been revealed. Those behind the Worthing Local Plan have spent the past two years carrying out extensive studies into every parcel of land in the borough as they look to ensure the right mix of places for people to live, work and play in the future. Despite Government figures indicating Worthing needs 13,000 homes over the next 15 years to meet demand, comprehensive evidence has shown there is only enough land to provide 4,000 by 2033. This include the development of major brownfield sites such as Teville Gate, Union Place and Grafton Car Park coming forward. Even with this pressure, the Council has used strong evidence to make an initial commitment to place protected status on three major green spaces on the edge of the borough boundary, These are

Goring Gap (South), Chatsmore Farm ( between the A259 and railway line at Goring) and Brooklands Park. A public consultation on the document is planned for the end of October and will last six weeks. The 15-year Plan will eventually need the approval of a government inspector before being adopted. The document also includes detailed policies on a range of planning issues, such as affordable housing provision, heritage, design, retail and the economy. When adopted, these will be used when making decisions on future applications. Planners will take on board this feedback before creating a final version which will be subject to further consultation before then being presented to a Planning Inspector towards the end of next year. Once approved, the plan would be reviewed after five years in line with government recommendations.

Providing the Local Plan is agreed at a meeting of council leaders, a full public consultation will then begin on October 31 for six weeks. Details of how you can get involved will be released before that date. Sunset on Worthing beach

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FOCUS ON NEW JOBS IN ADUR

Progress at Adur Civic Centre site

COUNCIL-FUNDED OFFICE WILL GENERATE A RETURN FOR THE TAXPAYER AND SEE HUNDREDS OF PRIVATE JOBS RETAINED IN THE AREA. Work is well underway on a new Adur District Councilfunded office block in Shoreham which will generate a return for the taxpayer and see hundreds of private jobs retained in the area. In a bid to boost the local economy, the local authority is creating a new ÂŁ9.5 million development on the former Civic Centre car park in Ham Road. In what is a rare move, the council will then lease the fourstorey building to growing communications company Focus Group, who will relocate from their current base in Southwick. Teams have been busy pushing on with the development in recent months as a steel frame has been completed and cladding is now being installed. When complete, the development will bring back into use

the car park site which has been largely vacant since the Civic Centre closed in 2013. The project, which has been supported by ÂŁ1.8 million of funding from the Coast to Capital Local Enterprise Partnership and is being overseen by Wilmott Dixon, will be complete by early 2019. Focus will then move into the office block, ensuring the retention of 250 jobs in the area while allowing it to continue to grow - with hopes of a further 200 posts created in the first 18 months of occupation. Construction teams are currently using the main civic centre site as a compound. Adur District Council remains committed to creating a mixed-use development on this site and exploring options of selling the site with conditions.

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A FACELIFT FOR BEDFORD ROW

Securing Historic Worthing's future for generations to come A much-loved historic building in the heart of Worthing has received a facelift thanks to Worthing Borough Council. The Gospel Hall has stood in Bedford Row for nearly 170 years and is a landmark building in one of the town’s oldest streets. But, with the privately-owned building standing derelict for more than a decade, the property’s appearance severely deteriorated with chipped and cracked masonry, graffiti and rubbish dumped in the forecourt. That was until the Council’s planning enforcement team stepped in and used various powers to encourage the owner to renovate the facade of the Victorian structure. It forms part of a major push by the Council - in conjunction with the Worthing Society - to spruce up the South Street conservation area and ensure the town’s historic buildings stand tall for years to come.

Built in the early 19th Century, it is one of three significant east-facing bow fronted terraces in the town centre alongside Montague Place and Liverpool Terrace.

“The transformation really is remarkable” ~ Cllr Kevin Jenkins, WBCs Exec Member for Regeneration

But, over the years, the condition of the properties has deteriorated with the exteriors not of the standard with what is expected of a conservation area. As part of a pilot project, the Council is using its powers to encourage freeholders in the street to spruce up their properties for future generations.

Bedford Row, Worthing

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RIVER ROUTE TO DELIVER BIG BOOST FOR BUSINESSES

Adur Ferry Bridge

COMMUNITY DELIGHTS AS SHOREHAM BEACH GATEWAY IS COMPLETED The gateway to Shoreham Beach has received the final finishing touches as the long awaited work to complete the Riverside car park regeneration was recently completed. After starting last month, the work on the southern end of the Adur Ferry Bridge rounds off the route over the river from the town centre to the beach. The work to the cycle path, recreational area and turning point for river access next to Lower Beach Road has lasted approximately five weeks.

Whilst the Adur Ferry Bridge was completed in 2013, the work being carried out by Adur District Council on the Shoreham beach side of the bridge has been delayed as due to access issues as a result of the Environmental Agency's work on the Adur Tidal Walls scheme. Councillor Neil Parkin, Leader of Adur District Council said: “We are delighted that we can finally complete this work. It will not only be a big boost for businesses but mean more people can enjoy the unique environment of the beach.”

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Adur Council steps in to support Lancing school swimming pool project Pupils at a Lancing Primary School will be able to swim all year around after Adur District Council stepped in with a grant to help build a roof over its pool. The Globe School has been given in the region of £30,000 to complete the project after Adur leader Councillor Neil Parkin heard they were struggling to complete their fund-raising efforts and asked officers to investigate. The Council had already contributed £15,000 towards the £128,000 costs of enclosing the pool.

"The Globe is a fine school which does a lot of good work with the children and in the community." With the promise of the extra sum, the school has now reached its target and can start planning to carry out the work. Once complete, the pool will also be made available for

local swimming clubs, other schools and the wider local community. Cllr Parkin said: “I have been very impressed with the energy the school has put into raising this sum to ensure the pool can be used all year round helping the children stay fit, happy and healthy.” “When I heard that a bid for the last bit of cash had fallen through I wanted to help them get over the line. It's the least we can do because The Globe is a fine school which does a lot of good work with the children and in the community.” The council cash comes from a pot paid by Brighton and Hove Albion when the authority gave it permission to build the state-of-the-art training ground and academy at Lancing. Under Government rules developers must make a contribution, called Section 106 money, to community schemes in the area in which they build. Under a formula agreed by the council, Albion contributed £1.35 million to compensate for loss of open space towards improving sports facilities in the district. The money is handed out under the stewardship of the local authority.

Cllr Neil Parkin, Leader of Adur District Council, shaking hands with Ricky Leigh, head of school at The Globe Primary

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JEWEL IN THE CROWN GARDENS BID FOR FUNDING TO PRESERVE FUTURE Work is ongoing to prepare the world-famous Highdown Gardens for the next stage of a Heritage Lottery Fund project. The gardens, internationally important because they are home to hundreds of rare and exotic plants and trees uniquely grown on chalk soil, are visited by tens of thousands of people every year. Worthing Borough Council, which owns and maintains the gardens, has successfully applied for Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) money to develop a long-term survival plan for the landmark which is open free to the public. The Council now had six months to bring together more research and costing for the projects, involve partners and then submit a full second round application for the full cost of the scheme.

The Fund has awarded almost ÂŁ100,000 to the Council to develop a new plan for the 8.5 acre-gardens which will include; Action to preserve plants which could be crucial to stopping extremely rare specimens becoming extinct; The establishment of breeding processes to ensure the survival of the rare plants; The building of a new visitor centre to tell the story of the gardens and its surrounding landscape; Plans to tell the fascinating story of the originator of the gardens, Sir Frederick Stern, and his contribution to worldwide horticulture; Proposals to develop community ownership of the gardens through a full volunteer programme

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UPDATES FROM ADUR

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St ree td ev elo pm en t,

SHOREHAM BEACH GREEN Adur District Council struck a deal last year with internationally-renowned firm Boxpark, working in conjunction with Big Beach Cafe in Hove Lagoon, to create a new community cafe at the derelict toilet block in Shoreham’s Beach Green.

LUXOR The former cinema in the heart of Lancing has been saved after Adur Council worked with developers to preserve the facade of the Art Deco building in South Street. A proposal to convert it into 12 flats and a ground-floor shop was approved by planners in October 2017.

What’s new? An exclusivity agreement has been signed between the local authority and the Boxpark team. Plans are being developed with a consultation in the coming months.

What’s new? Work on the redevelopment is underway with new retail tenants already in place.

CECIL NORRIS

ALBION STREET

The building in Ravens Road, Shoreham, used to be sheltered accomodation until it was decanted two years ago. Adur Homes, Adur District Council’s housing arm, is looking to demolish the site and replace it with 15 one and two bedroom homes

Adur District Council is working with a private company to redevelop a stretch of local authority owned properties in Southwick which are no longer fit for purpose. It will see 53 modern and energy efficient one and twobedroom properties created on the land. 14 of these will be affordable, becoming the first new council homes to be built in Adur for more than 30 years. Underground and ground-level parking will also be provided.

What’s new? A public consultation into the proposal was held last month and a detailed planning application is due to be submitted in the coming months.

What’s new? A planning application has been submitted with a decision due to take place in the coming months.

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ROPETACKLE NORTH Hyde Housing bought the 2.69 hectare site north of the railway bridge along the River Adur in Shoreham in July 2015. Planning permission has been secured for 120 new, high quality homes, a focal point riverside café, a food convenience store and new flood defences along with a river walk.

SUNBEAM The Sunbeam apartments are a collection of 32 modern two and three-bedroom homes in South Street, Lancing. Developer Roffey Homes is behind the plans for the site which used to be the Bell and Sunbeam residential home.

What’s new? Demolition of the current site was completed in 2016 and construction is underway.

What’s new? The concrete frame was completed in Spring and teams are working towards completing the redevelopment in the coming months.

NEW MONKS FARM

ADUR TIDAL WALLS

New Monks Farm Development, a subsidiary of Brighton & Hove Albion FC, is behind plans for 600 homes and IKEA superstore on land near Shoreham Airport. It also includes the provision of a new roundabout on the A27, a country park, land for a primary school, an extension to the Brighton & Hove Albion training ground and a community hub.

The Environment Agency is leading on 7.2km of defences along the River Adur between Shoreham Fort and the A27. Once complete, the scheme will will significantly reduce flood risk to more than 2,300 properties in Shoreham and East Lancing, as well as protecting important local infrastructure including roads, the railway line and Shoreham Airport.

What’s new? Adur District Council's planning committee approved the proposal at a meeting earlier this month.

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What’s new? The scheme is separated into 10 reaches, or lengths of the estuarine bank. Work has started on eight of these sections with recent focus on the stretch near the Shoreham houseboats and airport.


UPDATES FROM WORTHING

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TEVILLE GATE Worthing Borough Council stepped in to demolish the multi-storey and other prominent buildings near Worthing Station as the 1960s car park was proving expensive to operate and nearing the end of its useful life. Demolition is now complete.

What’s new? The Council is looking to re-open part of the area as a temporary car park. Work continues behind the scenes to encourage Mosaique Global Investments, the private owner of the land, to bring forward wider regeneration plans for the whole area, which it is calling Station Square.

UNION PLACE

For years, the prominent town centre site, which used to house a police station, has sat dormant as viable schemes to revamp the area failed to materialise. Worthing Borough Council bought the land in January, adding it wants to bring forward major plans within the next 12 months.

What’s new? The council has joined forces with prestigious government-backed development company LCR to bring a development forward. The land-pooling arrangement will see the council retain ownership of the majority of the land and continue to operate the car park. Detailed plans are being drawn up.

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COLONNADE HOUSE In order to build on the success of Worthing’s town centre creative hub, the Council has developed six-figure plans to expand the complex to also accommodate digital businesses. The flexible office space would be equipped with gigabit broadband and allow small firms to grow.

What’s new? Two neighbouring buildings in High Street have been purchased by the council and works to refurbish them could start next year.

HEALTH HUB In a bid to make best use of its land and improve the quality of care received by patients, Worthing Borough Council is developing a proposal to create a one-stop hub on the town hall car park in Stoke Abbott Road. The £18.5 million investment in public services could see brand new facilities providing primary care, such as GP surgeries, alongside mental health and community services.

What’s new? Work on a detailed planning application is ongoing and is due to be submitted to Worthing Borough Council in 2019.


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GRAFTON CAR PARK

WEST DURRINGTON

Grafton multi-storey car park, which is nearing the end of its useful life, occupies a prominent location between the retail town centre and the historic seafront. Worthing Borough Council has previously marketed the site with outline permission for a broad range of uses,but a viable development has not been delivered.

The West Durrington Consortium – made up of Heron, Taylor Wimpey and Persimmon Homes – is behind the plans for 940 homes along with a community centre and extensions to local medical facilities. A planning application for 240 dwellings (Phase II) was approved last year.

What’s new? The council has applied for funding to progress the redevelopment of this prominent seafront site. Work on a town centre car parking strategy is also underway.

What’s new? Construction on the first phase of 700 homes continues. Plans for a new church on land near Tesco were approved by councillors in June.

DECOY FARM

BUNCE’S, CHAPEL ROAD

The 7.7 hectare site off Dominion Way in east Worthing used to be a landfill site. It is designated for employment use, with the hope of creating space for existing firms within the local area to relocate.

Plans to turn the former hardware shop site into 32 homes were approved by planners last year. Developer Rocco Homes is behind the scheme while Bunce’s has relocated to Portland Road, with a trade counter in East Worthing.

What’s new? The Council has appointed specialist consultants to assess the best strategy to bring the contaminated site back into use and list offsite highway improvements to redevelop the site for industrial purposes. In the short-term the council is helping local businesses in the area to relocate.

What’s new? Work on demolishing the site was completed in the summer and construction is underway

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Building AW - October 2018  

Building AW is a bright, informal 28-page online publication which keeps residents and businesses across both areas up-to-date with all the...

Building AW - October 2018  

Building AW is a bright, informal 28-page online publication which keeps residents and businesses across both areas up-to-date with all the...