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move Session two: make the switch

bottom line: Serving isn’t about you­—It’s about who. introduction Causes are everywhere. On TV , on social media, at school, and definitely at church. It seems there are a million ways to help people. So why does it seem so hard to get and stay involved? James, the brother of Jesus, had a lot to say about helping others, possibly because he saw the way his Brother lived. Through his words we find that it actually may be more simple than we think. That when we choose to focus on God and others, and less on ourselves, serving becomes much less complicated.

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Chief EXECUTIVE Officer Reggie Joiner

XP3 Director Ben Crawshaw

XP3 STUDENTS Team Sarah Anderson Steve Underwood Crystal Chiang USER AGREEMENT The reThink Group, Inc. gladly grants permission to churches, schools and other licensees to tailor XP3TM materials to fit their unique leadership requirements, locale and format preferences. However, if you wish to edit the content substantively, including teaching scripts, small group dialog and any other content in which biblical principles and concepts are presented, you are obligated to do so within the doctrinal guidelines we’ve expressed in our Statement of Faith (see page 2). These resources are intended to be downloaded and printed for use by the subscribing entity only and may not be electronically transferred to or duplicated by other non-subscribing entities. Any unauthorized reproduction of this material or incorporation into a new work—including podcasts or video of this content—is a direct violation of U.S. copyright laws. © 2013 The reThink Group, Inc. All rights reserved. XP3 and the XP3 logo are trademarks of The reThink Group, Inc.

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUM

GRAPHICS & VIDEO Taylor Cox Intentuous

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© 2013 The reThink Group, Inc. All rights reserved.


statement of faith

ABOUT GOD God is the one and only true God, yet He exists in three persons: God the Father, God the Son and God the Holy Spirit. God is the Creator, so everything belongs to Him and is under His control. God is holy, so He is righteous, majestic and loving. God is all knowing and purposeful, so He’s at work to bring about His will. No person, thing or idea compares to God. ABOUT THE SCRIPTURES God reveals Himself to us through the Bible, and it is 100% accurate, reliable and authoritative. ABOUT PEOPLE People are made in God’s image and for His pleasure. But everybody falls short of God’s intention, or ideal, for people. In other words, everyone has sinned. As a result, we are all separated from Him, even though He wants an intimate relationship with each of us. ABOUT SALVATION That’s why Jesus, God’s Son, came and lived on this earth, died and rose again. God offers His free gift of salvation to all who believe in Jesus and accept Him as Savior, the only way to be forgiven and reconciled to God. Anyone who accepts this gift is adopted as a son or daughter into God’s family and will live with Him forever in heaven.

Scripture marked “NIV” is taken from the HOLY BIBLE, NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION®. Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984 by International Bible Society. Used by permission of Zondervan Publishing House. All rights reserved. HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUM

© 2013 The reThink Group, Inc. All rights reserved.


move Session Two:

teaching outline

Make The Switch

bottom line: Serving isn’t about you­—It’s about who. INTRODUCTION What comes to mind when you hear the word “movement?” We said last week that a movement is more than a single event. It’s about a lifestyle, a constant state of motion for the sake of others. TENSION It starts with one simple question: What am I going to get out of it? When it comes to a movement, we often want to be the focus. Asking ourselves what we get out of serving others is the wrong question entirely. And it’s a question that’s holding us back from leaving the impact on the world that we want to have. TRUTH Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world. (James 1:27 NIV) Taking care of the poor, hurting, and sick that made the followers of Jesus so unique. What’s should be the point of our service? The people we’re serving and the movement of God. APPLICATION If we want to be a part of a successful movement, we have to open our eyes to the fact that we may be caring about the wrong things. A movement focused on who we’re serving and in whose name we serve is a movement that could change the world. LANDING No matter what it is—start moving. Just remember that you’re moving for the sake of others and for the God who called you to that service. They are point.

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUM

© 2013 The reThink Group, Inc. All rights reserved.


move SessioN two:

teaching script

make the switch

Pg. 1

bottom line: Serving isn’t about you­—It’s about who. GOAL OF SMALL GROUP serving is most effective when they stay focused on God and others. Introduction What comes to mind when you hear the word “movement?” The word has more than a dozen meanings when you look it up. It can refer to music, a development in a story, a change in position, or, the one we’re dealing with in this series, “an effort by many to achieve or change something.” We said last week that a movement is more than a single event. It’s not just doing one thing one time and then hitting the off-switch. It’s about a lifestyle, a constant state of motion for the sake of others. If we as a generation want to see true change take place, we have to define our lives by consistent service to others. TENSION As part of “Generation Y,” the generation known for its willingness to take up the causes of others, you may find yourself coming up against many different kinds of obstacles as you strive for movement. Tonight I want to talk about one of those obstacle that we might face as we try to live our lives in service to others. And it starts with one simple question: What am I going to get out of it? Have you ever caught yourself asking something like that before getting involved with a service opportunity? Of course—we all have! If it’s a mission trip, you think: “Where are we going? Is it some place exotic and exciting?” Or for a school service day, you ask: “What will we be doing? Is it going to be hard?” If you’re going to be a part of a service event, you wonder: “Will I get to do something interesting or important?” Listen, we’ve all asked questions like that. In fact, some of you are sitting there now thinking “Yeah, and that’s why I don’t serve.” You’d never say it out loud, but you know you’re too lazy or feel too busy or are even simply uninterested in taking part in serving others. You tell yourself, “That’s just not my thing,” or, “I’ve already gotten my community service hours for school this year,” or “I don’t really have an important job at that event so it doesn’t matter if I go or not.” Even those of us who serve on a regular basis can identify with this on some level. We’ve all been there. Let me give you an example. My friend, Jenna, joined a club to help tutor younger students at her school. Just a few weeks into it, she decided to quit. When I asked her why, she replied: “I just wasn’t getting much out of it.” You see, when we say that a movement is an effort to “achieve or change something,” often times—whether we realize it or not—we want that something to be us. We expect to be the ones changed. We want to achieve something. Suddenly, we’ve made our betterment the end goal of a movement rather than the betterment of the cause or people it represents. In other words, when it comes to a movement, we often want to be the focus. Whether you want to admit it or not, this is a pretty common obstacle to your willingness to be a part of a movement that serves others. Sometimes you choose not to get involved in a movement because you think your role is too small. With such a small part, your participation couldn’t possibly affect change, right? You HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUM

© 2013 The reThink Group, Inc. All rights reserved.


move SESSION two:

teaching script

make the switch

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probably wouldn’t even be missed. Or maybe you have an idea to contribute to the movement, but you hesitate because it doesn’t seem cool or important enough. You want your idea to be the next big thing, the thing everyone is talking about, and if you think it won’t be, you just decide not to pursue it. In all of these reasons or excuses not to serve, there is one common thread: You. You’re thinking about yourself, and it’s creating a huge obstacle to movement. Asking ourselves what we get out of serving others is the wrong question entirely. And it’s a question that’s holding us back from leaving the impact on the world that we want to have. Have you ever stopped to consider that you and I aren’t the point at all? We’re supposed to be living life in constant motion, adopting a lifestyle of service that achieves and effects change. But have you ever considered that the point of all that change and achievement isn’t you? Some of you are probably wondering, “Well, if it’s not me, what is it all about?” Tonight, we’re going to look at a passage from the Bible that I think will give us a clue. TRUTH Our scripture today is found in the book of James. Before we dive in, let me tell you something kind of interesting about this book. Even if you don’t know a ton about the Bible, you may know that it’s divided into two parts: the Old Testament and the New Testament. It is in the New Testament that we are first introduced to Jesus. The first four books tell us about the life of Jesus, and following those come letters written by the most influential people in the Christian faith at that time. There is just one book written by James, but his story might be the most interesting of all. James didn’t know Jesus like others did. He wasn’t simply a friend of Jesus or someone who followed Him solely because he believed in His message. James was Jesus’ brother. Okay, let’s stop here for a second. I want you to think about your own brother or sister. Think about what they are like first thing in the morning when the alarm goes off for school. Think about what they’re like when they find out you borrowed their iPad and cracked the screen. Think about how annoying they can be when it comes to hogging the television, how they take up way too much room in the backseat on a car trip, or how they never take out the trash when they’re supposed to and you end up having to do it. And then I want you to imagine that same sibling looking you in the eye and telling you with a completely straight face: “I am the Son of God.” Crazy, right? I mean, how would you even respond to that? You’d probably start laughing and wonder if they really were crazy. But James believed in Jesus. He was Jesus’ brother—the same as your brother or sister is to you—and he was able to say, “Jesus is who He says He is. My brother really is the Savior of the world.” James’ story is unique because He knew Jesus in a way that no one else did, and he believed that Jesus was the real deal. I think that makes him a pretty credible source. So, let’s look at what James has to say.

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUM

© 2013 The reThink Group, Inc. All rights reserved.


move Session two:

teaching script

make the switch

Pg. 3

Essentially, the question James is asking throughout his entire book is this: How should we be living? If we’re followers of Christ, how should we live our lives? And how should our lives look different than the lives of those who don’t follow Him? Here’s what he says:

“Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world.” (James 1:27 NIV) To Write Love On Her Arms, Tom’s Shoes, Livestrong, Habitat for Humanity, End It Movement—all these great social justice movements and causes we talked about last week may seem like new ideas or fads. But according to James, what’s at the root of each of these movements—taking care of people in need—has been a priority for the Christian faith since its beginning. James is telling us outright that serving others is supposed to be the forefront of Christianity. So what’s the point serving others? Those who can’t take care of themselves, the ones who don’t have advocates, the people who are alone or that no one else is looking to help—according to James, they are the point. The people you are serving are the point of your service. But they aren’t the only ones. James knew that in his culture, he and his friends were the representatives of Jesus and His movement. And he also knew that the best way they could spread the name of Jesus and further the movement of God was to take care of the people who couldn’t take care of themselves. In fact, it was taking care of the poor, hurting, and sick that made the followers of Jesus so unique. They were different, and it was because they did what no else was doing—got their hands dirty helping the helpless. In doing that, they spread Jesus’ name and made a big deal of God in their culture. You see, their service didn’t just impact those being served—it impacted those who saw them serving as well. I think if we were to ask James what the point of his movement was, he would probably say two things: to take care of the people who can’t take care of themselves and represent God while he did it. This still holds true for us today. What’s should be the point of our service? The people we’re serving and the movement of God. APPLICATION If we want to be a part of a successful movement, we have to open our eyes to the fact that we may be caring about the wrong things. It doesn’t matter if… we start a movement or join one that already exists. It doesn’t matter if… we create something with a huge group or all by ourselves. It doesn’t matter… how big the movement or how small our part.

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUM

© 2013 The reThink Group, Inc. All rights reserved.


move Session two: make the switch

teaching script

Pg. 4

It doesn’t matter… how interesting or hard the work we’re asked to do is. It doesn’t matter… who else is going or who thinks it’s cool. It doesn’t matter… how many hours we get credit for or how good it looks on a college application. These things aren’t the point. Serving isn’t about you—it’s about who. Who are you trying to help? And who are you representing while you do it? The people you are serving and the God in whose name you serve—that’s the point. Jesus had a heart for the broken and the poor, and He actively moved to meet their needs at great cost and no benefit to Himself. If we as a generation could embrace this same heart, it would change our entire outlook in regards to serving others. It changes the question from, “What do I get out of this?” to “Who do I get to serve?” If we’re going to be the generation that moves into the darkest places of our world, steps into the most broken of situations, or works to stop the worst evils around us, we have to make the switch from you to who. Serving isn’t about you—it’s about who! A movement focused on who we’re serving and in whose name we serve is a movement that could change the world. landing So as we move to small group, think about how to take the next step. Sign up for a mission trip. Start volunteering at your church on a regular basis. Get involved with a project at your school. Find a local charity in your community and offer them your time. No matter what it is—start moving. Just remember that you’re moving for the sake of others and for the God who called you to that service. They are point. They are purpose. When you make changing the lives of others the point, you may just find your own life changed in the process. [transition into small groups]

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUM

© 2013 The reThink Group, Inc. All rights reserved.


Xp3 move hsscript s2