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THE MAGAZINE THAT PROMOTES UNION AND COOPERATION OF AFRICANS AROUND THE GLOBE, ENCOURAGING AN INFORMED, THINKING AND QUESTIONING AFRICAN SOCIETY.

ISSUE 21 | MAY/JUN 2011

RACISM IN FOOTBALL: WILL IT EVER END? PAGE 14

EVENT: 2011 MISS CONGO UK PAGE 18

RELATIONSHIP: SURVIVING INFIDELITY PAGE 32

MERON ABEBE

GETTING TO KNOW HER

SPOTLIGHTS

INTERVIEW EXCLUSIVE OLATIDE ADENIYI EMEM ARCHIBONG

TECH: HOT PRODUCTS PAGE 36

HEALTH: TREATING ARTHRITIS PAGE 38

SPECIAL REPORT ISSN 1941-7179

01

FOSTER HERITAGE | IMMIGRATION AND RACE RELATIONS PAGE 34 9 771941 717111 VISIT US ONLINE AT ADUNAGOW.NET


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CONTENTS

W E TA L K A F R I C A N . . .

08

14

Entertainment

ARCHIBONG: 08 EMEM Exclusive Interview | Hotly-Tipped New Album released called “What Is Love?”

Sports

IN FOOTBALL: 14 RACISM Will It Ever End? Read about what African

40

Players experience while playing for European Professional soccer clubs.

Lifestyle

18 Crowning a new queen on Friday July 21st, EVENT: MISS CONGO UK 2011

24

Culture

HERITAGE: 34 FOSTER Immigration and Race Relations.

Tech & Finance

PRODUCTS: 36 HOT The coolest Top 4 latest Electronic Gadgets to have.

Health & Beauty

ARTHRITIS: 38 TREATING Using Apple Cider Vinegar to treat Arthritis.

2011 at the Luxurious IF BAR. Pageants Bio and organization information.

ABEBE: 24 MERON “Getting To Know Her” - Exclusive Interview with the New Hottest Ethiopian Model.

INFIDELITY: 32 SURVIVING How to avoid 3 mistakes most women make which prolong mistrust and misery.

32 ON THE COVER: Meron Abebe

6 [ Editor’s Letter ]

ADUNAGOW MAGAZINE “Reaching Africans Around The Globe” PO BOX 691728 | TULSA, OK | 74169 -1728 | U.S.A.

4

ADUNAGOW MAGAZINE

MAY / JUN 2011

Spotlights

INTERVIEW with: 40 FREATURED OLATIDE ADENIYI

Editalo Designs | Exploring Your Creative Side.

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EDITOR’S COLUMN

By Eric Adunagow |

Mother’s Day –

The Situation about Women and Girls

I

ADUNAGOW MAGAZINE “Reaching Africans Around The Globe”

N THE UNITED STATES, Mother’s Day is an annual holiday celebrated on the second Sunday in May. Mother’s Day recognizes mothers, motherhood and maternal bonds in general, as well the positive contributions that they make to society. Although many Mother’s Day celebrations world-wide have quite different origins and traditions, most have now been influenced by the American traditions. As we celebrate this very special day today for all our mothers in the U.S., let us not forget that there are still many challenges that women are still facing 4,085. in this world that needs our attention: Gender and HIV/AIDS Gender and girls’ education - Nearly a third of all adults living with HIV/ - Over 110 million of the world’s children, AIDS are under the age of 25 and two thirds two thirds of them girls, are not in school. of them are women. - Of the world’s 875 million illiterate adults, - In Sub-Saharan Africa, girls are getting two thirds are women. infected faster and earlier than boys. In the Gender and violence against women and 15 to 24 age group, two girls are infected for girls and child protection issues every boy. - Data shows that at least one in every three woman is a survivor of some form of genderbased violence, most often by some one in her own family. [1999 Johns Hopkins global report] - Girls between 13 and 18 years of age constitute the largest group in the sex industry. It is estimated that around 500,000 girls below 18 are victims of trafficking each year.

MAY / JUN 2011

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Denise Dilmore Meredith Walker Francois Tshimpuki Staff Writer Alain Adunagow MARKETING DIRECTOR: Colombe Adunagow colombe@adunagow.net CONTACT US: editorial@adunagow.net (714) 612-2057 voice URL: http://www.adunagow.net

- More than 80 per cent of the world’s 35 million refugees and displaced people are women and children. - Emergencies puts women at risk of extreme sexual violence and abuse.

- In Sub-Saharan Africa, a woman has a one in three chance of dying in child birth. In industrialized countries, the risk is 1 in ADUNAGOW MAGAZINE

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF: Eric Adunagow eric@adunagow.net

Emergencies

There are plenty more issues affecting women in the world, especially in Africa. Fortunately, there are also many organizations and services dedicated on fighting against these situations - Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) affects by providing special cares and services. l30 million girls and women globally and places 2 million at risk annually. The As we celebrate mother’s day today, we would prevalence of FGM remained stable at levels like to send out a call for action to everyone above 90 per cent in many countries during to remember that together we can help the last decade, with little improvement over provide a better environment and lifestyle for our girls and our women. Mother’s day is the years. not just about sending out cards and showing Gender and the Maternal Mortality Rate appreciation to women, but it is also about (MMR) and other health issues recognizing their troubles and participating - 1,400 women die every day from pregnancy- on finding solutions to them. related causes, 99 per cent of them in Happy Mother’s Day! developing countries.

6

PUBLISHER: Eric ADUNAGOW

Reach Eric directly at Eric@adunagow.net

ADUNAGOW Magazine [ISSN 1941-7179] is published bi-monthly by ADUNAGOW, PO BOX 691728, Tulsa, OK 74169-1728. Telephone: 714.612.2057. Postage is paid at Tulsa, Oklahoma. U.S. ADUNAGOW. NET and ADUNAGOW are trademarks of Eric ADUNAGOW. All contents are copyright © 2011 by ADUNAGOW Magazine. All rights are reserved. Right of reprint is granted only to non-commercial educational institutions such as high schools, colleges and universities. No other grants are given. Send address changes to ADUNAGOW Magazine, PO Box 691728, Tulsa OK 74169-1728. The opinions of our writers do not always reflect those of the publisher and while we make every effort to be as accurate as possible, we cannot and do not assume responsibility for damages due to errors or omissions. LEGAL STATEMENT: All information in this magazine is offered without guarantee as to its accuracy and applicability in all circumstances. Please consult an attorney, business advisor, accountant or other professional to discuss your individual circumstances. Use of the information in this magazine is not intended to replace professional counsel. Use of this information is at your own risk and we assume no liability for its use.

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Entertainment

ENTERTAINMENT | EMEM


EMEM ARCHIBONG “Be your best, forget about trying to be famous and work on being very good and recognition will follow. Make music because you love music; not for fame or money.”

hotly-tipped new album ‘What is Love?’

- EMEM ARCHIBONG

W

HAT IS LOVE? is the exciting debut album from phenomenally talented Gospel and R&B singer Emem Archibong.

Steeped in the classic Soul of legendary artists such as Aretha Franklin and CeCe Winans and influenced by the modern R&B sounds of Alicia Keys, with ‘What is Love?’ Emem looks set to be 2011’s most hotly-tipped Gospel cross-over artist and her mini album heralds the arrival on the British black music scene of a special new talent. Born in Nigeria, Emem grew up in Bradford, England where her remarkably soulful and powerful singing voice was nurtured in her local church’s choir and Gospel music and her strong Christian faith underpin her unique sound. From rousing opener ‘Black and White’ and funky feel-good track ‘Trying to be myself ’ to stand out debut single ‘what is Love?’ and deeply personal anthem ‘Not too Late’ the E.P showcases Emem’s truly outstanding vocal talent and ‘Angel,’ ‘Untold Story’ and ‘Trying to be Myself ’ also announce Emem as a truly captivating new voice on the British music scene. Fresh from being a finalist on ‘Britain’s next urban superstar,’ spot plays and interviews on Kiss FM and performances at London’s Hippodrome, the future looks bright for Emem Archibong and ‘What is Love’ is a powerful statement of intent from an artist whose remarkable voice you should be hearing everywhere in 2011. TO SUBSCRIBE VISIT

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MAY / JUN 2011 A D U N A G O W M A G A Z I N E

9


I N T E R V I E W

E XC LUS I V E AM: Thank you Emem for taking the time to chat with ADUNAGOW Magazine and its worldwide readers. For those who don’t know you yet, can you present yourself ? Emem: I was born in Nigeria and stayed there till I was 11 years old. My family then moved to Bradford, England where I reside now. I have lived in England for 15 years. I am a singer-songwriter and a registered pharmacist. My soulful and powerful singing voice was nurtured in my local church’s choir and Gospel music and my strong Christian faith underpin my unique sound. I was a finalist on a talent show called ‘Britain’s next urban superstar and as a result was interviewed on kiss fm and able to eventually record my first album. I sing at various events in England and write and record songs. I have had my songs played on BCB radio, BBC radio leeds, UCB radio, Premier gospel radio and Choice FM. I have had the Bradford telegraph and argos write a feature piece about me and my music and mentions on cross rhythm, Urban music scene and an African newspaper have written a cover story about my music. AM: “Emem”: What’s the meaning of your name? Emem: Emem means peace. The full name Ememobong means Shalom the peace of God. AM: How many languages do you speak? Emem: I speak Four languages: English, Ibibio, French, and Igbo. AM: Tell us something about you that people will never guess? Emem: I have grown to become a very confident and self-assured woman now but growing up I was very insecure and selfconscious and buried myself in hard work. AM: When you’re not working, what are your favorite things to do? Emem: I love watching movies, dancing, going to church and listening to music [MUSIC] AM: When did you start singing? Emem: I started singing at age 8 in choirs but sang my first solo at age 12. AM: What captivated you to becoming a singer? 10

ADUNAGOW MAGAZINE

MAY / JUN 2011

Emem: My earliest musical memories are when I was in school in music class and I was asked to sing and everyone was amazed at my voice at such a young age, 12. The music teacher later organized a showcase where I sang for the whole school. I also remember at age 8 in Nigeria as part of the children’s choir, I was chosen to sing treble (not many people were chosen to sing treble) and I remembered wanting to sing soprano because I could sing both. At 12, after the showcase I realized that I would always make music. Being from an academic background I knew leaving school to pursue a career in music was not an option so I made up my mind that I would finish school and go to university while actively developing as a singer. I started writing songs at about this time. I remember my dad advising me that my first few songs may not be perfect but if I kept writing I will end up writing some amazing songs. AM: Can you tell us about your breakthrough to the music moment? When and where did it happen? Emem: At age 8, in children’s choir in Nigeria. At age 11, in the choir at abundant life church Bradford at which time I started singing solo at events organized by the church. At age 12, had a keen interest in music and started writing songs. Was a big Mariah Carey and Whitney Houston fan. At age 14, did GCSE music where I learnt about classical music and perfected my music composition skills. Also took up the keyboard. At age 15, formed a girl group called Vision. I Was the lead singer and one of the songwriters for the group. We sang in events organised by the church and events in Bradford including a summer festival hosting over 1000 people. I was performing alongside studying at sixth form subjects, Math, Biology, Chemistry. At age 16, started university, studied pharmacy by which time the group had disassembled due to everyone needing to go to different universities. I studied hard during university while also singing at various events in Bradford including singing for a large audience at the alhambra theatre several times. In 2005, I entered a competition in Birmingham where I represented university of bradford. Out of 100s of demo cds, mine stood out and I was shortlisted to sing live at the event and came 5th place. AM: Tell us. When did you form your

first Band? Emem: In 2007, I formed a band consisting of 4 musicians, 3 backing singers and me as lead. I funded the project with my own money and we played at various Christian events including a Christian event held at the hippodrome in london as well as a live music venue in leeds called the wardrobe. About the same time, I entered a competition called ‘Britain’s next urban superstar’ and was a shortlisted finalist. My audition appeared on flava music channel on sky. I was also interviewed by kiss fm and sang for them. AM: So, did you continue with your education? Emem: Yes. In 2009, I finished my pharmacy degree and qualified as a pharmacist and planned to use my income as a pharmacist to fund the release of my first album. The album is completed and is doing well and getting good reviews. AM: By the way you have a tremendously great and attractive voice. What style of music do you prefer most and why? Emem: I love classic soul and RnB in terms of the melody of this genre of music (i.e artists like Aretha Franklin, Lionel Richie, Celine Dion, Sade) but for musical lyrics I like gospel and worship music such as that from Hillsongs Australia, Kirk Franklin and Cece Winans. AM: Can you tell us what artists have influenced you most in your career? Emem: Whitney Houston, Mariah Carey, Brandy, Michael Jackson, Cece Winans, Yolanda Adams, Kirk Franklin, Jill Scott, Sade, Hillsongs. AM: What can you tell us about “WHAT IS LOVE?” Emem: This question is an age old and universal question. A lot of people have different ideas as to what they think love is and there are different types of love. What do you portray in this title? This title is really intended to make the listener want to hear what I think love is and I conclude the song by letting my audience know that God is love and the overall summary is that love is selfless. AM: Is your family musical? Emem: I was raised in an academic/musical family. My dad was a music competition favorite in his youth and was in choirs, my mum loved dancing and was in the choir while we were growing up, My brother plays several instruments and both my sisters are enthusiastic music lovers with amazing TO SUBSCRIBE VISIT

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voices and we are all in the church choir. There was a lot of music in the house while growing up from Dolly Parton to Whitney Houston, Brandy, Bob Dylan through to music of African and Caribbean origin like Bob Marley and Fela Kuti. AM: Do you get nervous before a performance or a competition? Emem: Yes always, being nervous shows that what you’re about to do is important to you. AM: What advice would you give to beginners who are nervous? Emem: Do your breathing exercises while waiting in the wings to get on stage because this will calm you down and prevent nerves from getting the better of you when on stage. AM: What do you like most about your profession? Emem: being creative with my voice, losing all inhibition and giving a great live performance, telling the story of how the songs were written, interacting with the audience. AM: What do you like least? Emem: sometimes not knowing who to trust as people may try to be my friend for the wrong reason. AM: How has becoming a singer changed your life? Emem: I am a lot more mature than my age and my confidence level has soured. It helps that people actually like my music and that definitely does put a spring in my step. AM: How have you changed? Emem: I find it easier to talk to people that are different from me. I used to be very shy. AM: What’s the first song you ever remember hearing? Emem: Twinkle, Twinkle little star (laughs) AM: What are you listening to lately? Emem: listening to Grenade by Bruno Mars, Someone like you by Adele, Lord of lords by Brooke Fraser, Lead me to the cross by Hillsongs, I gotta believe by Yolanda Adams. AM: What’s your favorite album by another artist? Emem: Kirk Franlin : God’s property. AM: What song of yours are you most proud of ? Emem: Not too late. AM: Why specifically? Emem: I’m especially proud of the lyrics of ‘not too late’ because I was 14 when I wrote that song and the lyrics are still relevant 12

ADUNAGOW MAGAZINE

MAY / JUN 2011

today it speaks of never giving up. AM: Are there any songs you’ve done that you wish you hadn’t? Emem: Yes there are quite a few but what I tend to do is discard them or work on them for a future album. AM: Is this your first album? Emem: Yes the first of many. AM: Had any of you recorded with other groups before forming your band? Emem: My team consists of Backing music by Leroy Johnson; Produced by Leroy Johnson, RJ productions recorded at hall place studios. Recording Engineer Julian Wellington, mixed and mastered with slickhanded productions. Lead vocals Emem Archibong. Backing vocals: Joel Brown, Catherine Adams, Ifiok Archibong. Keys: Mark Walker. drums: Joshua Thompson. Guitars: Joel Hardy, Chris Dawkins. Bass: Leroy Johnson. Mixed at saville and chrome studios, Mark walker was one of the first producers I’ve ever worked with. He is also a favorite keyboard player for a few pop stars including blue and westlife. He played keyboard on the album. Leroy Johnson was the main producer on the album and my main advisor and musical mentor. We were introduced after a gospel concert and he agreed to produce my album. He is a bit of a jack of all trades musically playing multiple instruments as well as being a DJ. AM: What would you be doing if you weren’t a musician? Emem: A full time pharmacist.. [AFRICA] AM: In your opinion, what’s the number one issue to deal with in Africa? Emem: Utilizing Africa’s rich resources to combat poverty. AM: What’s your take (solution) on it? Emem: I believe the solution is education. Educating people so that they can acquire knowledge and skills to make their own wealth. Educating the government on coming up with initiatives to help the less fortunate. AM: About Africa: what will you keep? Emem: Keep the community spirit that makes Africa “Africa.” AM: What will you change? Emem: It’s amazing that in a continent of immense wealth, only a tiny proportion of people enjoy it, I would change this if I could. AM: Do you often visit the motherland?

Emem: I lived there for 11 years and plan to visit in the near future. AM: What’s your favorite summer vacation? Emem: I visited some family in Austin Texas, it was amazing. Texas is extremely warm. AM: Have you been following what happened in Nigeria with the election? Emem: Vaguely AM: What are your thoughts? Emem: I am supporting Goodluck Jonathan because he is Christian and Christian values are so important in the running of anything in particular a nation. [THE MIC IS YOURS] AM: How hard do you push yourself ? Emem: I used to push myself to work very hard but now I have a more balanced view of hard work. I think hard work should always be accompanied by an equivalent amount of fun. AM: When are you completely satisfied with your work? Emem: When I have had good feedback from the most important people in my life. AM: What was the most important day of your life? Emem: The day my first album was completed. It had been a dream of mine for a long time and I was extremely grateful that God brought it to pass. AM: Do you worry about whether people like you for the real you, or because you’re a celebrity? Emem: I try my best to be nice to everyone but I have very few trusted friends. I don’t see myself as a celebrity but as someone who is just doing what God has placed in my heart to do and using all my talents and I hope I can encourage others to do the same. AM: What’s the magic formula for success? Emem: Involve God, work hard, play hard and appreciate everyone that helps in your quest to achieve your goals. AM: Any words of wisdom for all our aspiring singers out there? Emem: Be your best; forget about trying to be famous and work on being very good and recognition will follow. Make music because you love music not for fame or money. Thank you Emem for taking the time to chat with us. We wish you plenty of success and wisdom in your career. AM TO SUBSCRIBE VISIT

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“Involve God, work hard, play hard and appreciate everyone that helps in your quest to achieve your goals.” - EMEM ARCHIBONG


SPORTS

SPORTS | RACISIM IN FOOTBAL

14

ADUNAGOW MAGAZINE

RACISM IN FOOTBALL: WILL IT EVER END?

MAY / JUN 2011

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B

ANANAS flying out of the stands, monkey chants being heard all over the place, unbelievable racial slurs being called out; it’s sad to tell you that these are what our African football brothers are experiencing in the European fields when playing for their professional teams. With blacks making up as much as 15 percent of the players in the top leagues, England has become the leader in the fight against racism in the football arena. Almost every country in Europe is guily of this sin, with racial signs and chants - even violence that target blacks, Jews, and Muslims. It’s understandable to support one’s team against your opponent, but there ought to be limits on the actions taken against each other. Some demonstrators guilty of these stupidities confirm that they only do it to unsettle the opposing team, but there are evidence that this is not just team feud; this is full blown hate and racism. How else can you explain the fact that some of these racism acts have been even conducted by supporters against their own players? Italians fans have been racially taunting their own team’s players. When the French team on the World Cup, a politician openly branded the team “unworthy” due to the facts that they had more black payers than whites in the team. Racism and violence in the football stadiums are still rising, and it’s sad to know that the majority of these acts are being conducted against African players. Here are some incidents that have been documented and talked about. As you will noticed, as much as European federations and teams are proclaiming about trying their best on working out this issue, every year - if not every game - there are incidents still being reported, and FIFA ought to start taking stronger measure against anyone found guilty of racism in the football field.

France

On 18 April 2007, Lyon player Milan Baroš was accused of racially abusing Rennes’ Stéphane M’Bia by implying that M’Bia smelled. On 4 May 2007 Baros was found guilty of the gesture, but found not guilty TO SUBSCRIBE VISIT

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of racism, and was banned for three league matches. On 17 September 2007, Libourne’s Burkinabe player Boubacar Kébé was abused by fans of Bastia; he was red-carded for retaliating. In February 2008, Bastia was again at the center of controversy when their fans unfurled a racist banner, again aimed at Kébé, which delayed the kick-off of the match by three minutes. On 17 February 2008, Abdeslam Ouaddou of Valenciennes was racially abused by a fan from opponents Metz; Metz and the French league announced that they would be suing the fan in question. The match referee did not see the incident, and so booked Ouaddou for challenging the fan. Valenciennes chairman Francis Decourriere later demanded that the match be replayed, “in front of children from Valenciennes and Metz. In March 2008, Bastia’s Frédéric Mendy claimed he had been racially abused by Grenoble’s fans.

Belgium

Oguchi Onyewu, an American of Nigerian descent, has been punched and shouted at by racist fans while playing for Standard Liège. He’s also had incidents with other players, such as Jelle Van Damme, who, according to Onyewu, repeatedly called him a “dirty ape” during the 2008–09 Championship playoff, even after Onyewu relayed the information to the referees. Van Damme denied the accusations following the match, and claimed that Onyewu had called him a “dirty Flemish”. Approximately two weeks later, on June 2, 2009, it was announced by Onyewu’s lawyer that he was suing Van Damme in an effort to end onfield racism in European football. Zola Matumona left FC Brussels after he accused club chairman Johan Vermeersch of making racist remarks towards him during a crisis meeting at the struggling club. He is reported to have told Matumona to “think about other things than trees and bananas.”

Germany

Racism in German football is much more subtle than in other parts of Europe; monkey chants have been replaced with codes, such as the number 88, which stands for ‘HH’ or ‘Heil Hitler’ (‘H’ is the eighth letter of the alphabet in German and English). Some teams, for example Hannover 96, have banned such symbols from their stadiums.

On 25 March 2006, in a match between FC Sachsen Leipzig and Hallescher FC, Leipzig’s Nigerian midfielder Adebowale Ogungbure was spat at and called ‘Nigger’ and ‘ape’ by opposition fans, who later aimed monkey noises at him. In retaliation he placed two fingers above his mouth and saluted at the crowd - a reference to Adolf Hitler.Ogungbure was arrested by German police, as it is illegal to make Nazi gestures for political or abusive purposes, but criminal proceedings were dropped 24 hours later. Ghana-born German international striker Gerald Asamoah has frequently been the target of racist abuse. On 10 September 2006 Hansa Rostock were investigated for racist abuse in a friendly game and were subsequently found guilty; the team was fined $25,000. On 19 August 2007 it was announced that Borussia Dortmund goalkeeper Roman Weidenfeller would be investigated by the German Football Association (DFB) after apparently calling Asamoah a ‘black pig’. Torsten Ziegner was given a five-match ban in October 2008 for racially abusing Nigerian player Kingsley Onuegbu during a match against Eintracht Braunschweig.

Italy

On 27 November 2005, Marco Zoro attempted to stop the Messina-Inter Milan match by leaving the field with the ball, after being tormented by racist taunts from some Inter supporters. He was eventually convinced to keep playing by other players, notably by Inter’s Adriano. On April 2009 Internazionale’s Mario Balotelli, an Italian footballer of Ghanaian descent, was subjected to racial abuse from Juventus fans. They were handed a one game home fan ban as a result.

Lithuania

On 24 March 2007, in a match between France and Lithuania, a racist banner was unfurled by Lithuanian supporters. Directed against France’s black players, it represented a map of Africa, painted with the French flag colors (blue, white and red), with a slogan of “Welcome to Europe”.

Montenegro

In a match between Rangers and FK Zeta, Rangers players DaMarcus Beasley (an African American) and Jean-Claude Darcheville (a black Frenchman) were MAY / JUN 2011 A D U N A G O W M A G A Z I N E

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subjected to racist abuse by FK Zeta players and Zeta were later fined £9,000.

Russia

Cameroonian player André Bikey suffered racism while playing for Lokomotiv in Moscow. As Zenit kicked off their 2006/07 Russian Premier League campaign against visitors Saturn, Brazilian footballer Antonio Geder was received with a chorus of monkey chants at Petrovsky Stadium. In March 2008, black players of French side Marseille - including André Ayew, Ronald Zubar and Charles Kaboré - were targeted by fans of Zenit Saint Petersburg. Later Zenit’s coach Dick Advocaat revealed the club’s supporters were racist. When they attempted to sign Mathieu Valbuena, a Frenchman, many fans asked “Is he a negro?” Also Serge Branco, who played for Krylya Sovetov, accused Zenit’s staff of racism. “Each time I play in St Petersburg I have to listen to racist insults from the stands. Zenit bosses do not do anything about it which makes me think they are racists too.” On 20 August 2010, Odemwingie joined Premier League team West Bromwich

Albion for an undisclosed fee. He signed a 3 year contract and was granted the number 24 shirt. Shortly after signing for West Brom, photographs showed Lokomotiv Moscow fans celebrating the sale of Odemwingie through the use of racist banners targeted at the player. One banner included the image of a banana and read “Thanks West Brom.”

Spain

Aston Villa’s Dalian Atkinson returned from Spain after one season with Real Sociedad, unhappy with the reception he received, and identifying racial abuse as a major factor in his rapid departure from the Spanish club. Felix Dja Ettien suffered racial abuse when he first signed for Levante; he was ignored by the coach due to his inability to speak Spanish, and whenever he fell ill he was accused of having malaria or AIDS. During a training session in 2004, a Spanish TV crew filmed Spanish national team head coach Luis Aragonés trying to motivate José Antonio Reyes by making offensive and racist references to Reyes’ then teammate at Arsenal, Thierry Henry. The phrase used was “Demuestra que eres mejor que ese negro de mierda”, translated as “Show that you’re

better than that black shit”. The incident caused uproar in the British media with calls for Aragonés to be sacked. However these opinions were not widely supported in Spain, with the national football federation declining to take any action, and politicians being slow to denounce the remarks. In February 2005, Samuel Eto’o suffered from racially-driven verbal abuse by some Real Zaragoza spectators during a match for FC Barcelona. The fans began making monkey-like chants whenever Eto’o had possession of the ball and peanuts were hurled onto the pitch. Eto’o threatened to leave the pitch in the middle of the game, but was prevented by the intervention of his team-mates and the referee, who rushed to the pitch to calm him down. His teammate Ronaldinho, who has suffered similar abuses but less intensely, said he was fed up with the sounds and that if Eto’o had left the pitch, he would have done the same. As Barcelona won 4-1, Eto’o danced like a monkey, saying rival fans were treating him as a monkey. Referee Fernando Carmona Mendez did not mention the incidents in his match report, commenting only that the behaviour of the crowd was “normal”. The fans were identified to police by fellow spectators and they were fined and banned from attending sporting events for five months. Eto’o declared in the aftermath that the punishment was insufficient and that La Romareda, Real Zaragoza’s stadium, should have been closed for at least one year. However, Eto’o’s coach, Frank Rijkaard, told him to concentrate on football and to stop talking about the incident. Eto’o has stated that he does not take his children to football matches, due the prevalent racism and has also suggested that players walk off if they become victims of racism. Many other African footballers have also been victims of racial abuse, such as Cameroon’s Idriss Carlos Kameni, who was abused while playing for Espanyol against Atlético Madrid, who were fined €6000.

England

In February 2005, Samuel Eto’o suffered from racially-driven verbal abuse by some Real Zaragoza spectators during a match for FC Barcelona. The fans began making monkey-like chants whenever Eto’o had possession of the ball and peanuts were hurled onto the pitch. 16

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The player Roger Verdi, who is of Indian origin, changed his name from Rajinder Singh Birdi due to racism. In the 1980s, racism in football in England was rampant. Paul Canoville was abused by his own fans when he warmed up for Chelsea before making his début. Garth Crooks was regularly subject to racist chants and banners from opposing fans during his time at Spurs. TO SUBSCRIBE VISIT

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to the problem. Individual advertisers and the advertising industry can be encouraged to take an active stance regarding expressions of racism. This could include language in contracts requiring clubs or arenas to undertake specific measures to combat racism, with ads being pulled if there is nonfulfillment of contract conditions. Media outlets can devote more consistent attention to reporting on violent and racist incidents on the sports field, including detailed reports on follow-up actions, prosecution and disciplinary measures.

What about the African Players?

Felix Dja Ettien suffered racial abuse when he first signed for Levante; he was ignored by the coach due to his inability to speak Spanish, and whenever he fell ill he was accused of having malaria or AIDS.

Cyrille Regis endured monkey chants from Newcastle fans on his away début for West Bromwich Albion and was later sent a bullet in the post following his call up to the England squad. In 1987 John Barnes was pictured back-heeling a banana off the pitch during a match for Liverpool against Everton, whose fans chanted ‘Everton are white’. On 21 April 2004, Ron Atkinson resigned from ITV after he was caught making a racist remark live on air about the black Chelsea F.C. player Marcel Desailly: believing the microphone to be switched off, he said, “...he [Desailly] is what is known in some schools as a fucking lazy thick nigger”. Although transmission in the UK had finished, the microphone gaffe meant that his comment was broadcast to various countries in the Middle East. He also left his job as a columnist for The Guardian “by mutual agreement” as a result of the comment. On 13 January 2007, The FA charged Newcastle player Emre Belözoğlu with “using racially-aggravated abusive and/or insulting words”, referring to an incident during the 3-0 defeat by Everton at Goodison Park on 30 December 2006. Emre was, on 16 February 2007, accused of more racist behaviour, this time against Bolton’s El Hadji Diouf. In November 2008, Middlesbrough’s Egyptian forward Mido was subjected to TO SUBSCRIBE VISIT

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Islamophobic chanting from a small number of Newcastle United fans. Mido had been subjected to similar chants the previous year, again from Newcastle fans. Player John Barnes was targeted by his own team’s fans.

FIFA Against Racism

FIFA (Federation International de Football Association) has been aware of the racism problem for some time but recent events, especially in Europe, have given the need for concerted action an added urgency. While the main emphasis of the practical measures will inevitably remain at national and local level, FIFA has recognized the unique role it has in coordinating opinions and expertise from all corners of the globe to share experiences and to find effective solutions. FIFA has tried to fight back against these acts through fines and bans, yet the issue is still in rise. Are these measures anything more than a glorified advert from FIFA and UEFA to show the world that they are trying to do something? And are they really going to get to the root of the problem? “The solution to this problem, as to any other, lies firstly in identifying it and acknowledging its existence,” says FIFA President Joseph S. Blatter. “Anyone who complacently maintains that racism is impossible in their territory is not only wrong but irresponsible.” Advertisers who have a key role in the European soccer world should be sensitized

Personally, I have stopped watching the club games because of these insulting acts. Yet, lately, I have realized that my action is just justifying - if not encouraging the perpetrators to continue on their endaveours. Walking away is not the solution for fans. Anyone who calls himself a fan of a team ought to stand up against these acts by showing no tolerance of such acts even among friends and families. African players have the right to walk out of the field if they feel subjected to such treatment - especially if coming from their own team’s fans. At one point, they ought to put dignity and pride before money, even if it means losing a contract.

Alternative to European clubs

As the racial slurs and chants continue to rise, and with teams and federations not taking more actions against these acts, African players ought to start considering other markets other than Europe. Maybe this is the time to invest back to Africa? The African Cup of Nations has been attracting more media and advertisement than never before. This is because of the sheer joy and exuberance exhibited by the African players freed from the more restrictive patterns of their European pro teams. The quality of African soccer game has lately drawn attention from big sponsors such as Canon. The world recognizes the talents held by African in the Football sport and African needs to value themselves by not tolerating these racial slurs and chants when they play for their pro teams. AM Reference: DB Racism in European Soccer - for ajc http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Racism_in_association_ football

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SPECIAL EVENT 2 0 1 1

EVENT | MISS CONGO UK 2011

MISS CONGO UK BEAUTY PAGEANT

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he 2011 MISS Congo UK pageant will be held on Friday July the 1st 2011, at the Luxurious IF BAR to celebrate and honor the United Kingdom’s Congolese community accomplished young women as the set the stage for lifetimes of achievement. However most importantly, to raise awareness about the sexual violence perpetuated against females of all ages in the Democratic Republic Congo. Miss Congo UK pageant offers African women an opportunity to become Ambassador of their respective community, to recognise the potential of their beauty and talent and also serves as a platform for raising issues relevant to the creation of a healthy society and for improvement of women’s lives The Miss Congo UK Beauty Pageant is also a community driven organization committed to addressing sexual health and education, two of the leading social issues in every community in the UK, particularly in the Congolese community in the UK. The winner of the official MISS CONGO UK beauty pageant will use her civic platform as an Ambassador of the Congolese community to promote awareness of these issues during her reign. The event will be a locally televised event featuring the exciting competitive format where accomplished young women from Congolese backgrounds seek the honor of representing Congo in the Central Africa pageant. Each participant will display her speaking skills, educational accomplishments, poise, beauty and talent in order to

win the coveted “Miss CONGO UK” title for the coming year. In addition to nationally famous entertainment acts, the pageant will feature a distinguished panel of judges from among renowned community leaders, entertainment celebrities and business leaders who will evaluate each contestant and make the final decision on the winner. Each “Delegate” selected will participate in “Congolese History and Heritage project where she will be part of steering group with the vital role of mentoring young people in her community. The Congolese History and Heritage project encourages the Beauty Queen to be involved in as many ways with her community during her remaining year of service. She should mentor them during the all of the project and also to the young women in the project the attributes of being a future “MISS CONGO UK “ which includes poise, appearance when in public , manners, kindness and service to others. The Beauty Queen as an Ambassador during her reign will also be encourage to participate in as many fundraising events as possible geared towards raising funds to help the people affected by the conflicts and violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo in particular females who are suffering from sexual violence perpetuated against them . These fundraising events will be organised by our partner Peace International, a development organization working for social development and peace in Africa and around the world.


EMILIE ISABELLE KABASU My name is Emilie Isabelle Kabasu Iive in Ilford. I am a full time student at barking and Dagenham College. I am currently studying travel and tourism +Spanish... In the future I would like to expand my knowledge about the travel industry and migrant law. I entered the beauty pageant because I would like to represent my country. I believe that beauty comes from the inner self so I would like to show to people that beauty is not just on the outside but also in the inside. If I win the competition I would like be a mentor or even a teacher for young Congolese girls. I would like to teach and help young girls out there with everyday life problems I.e. tell them to keep faith with everything they are doing or help them succeed in anything they want to do in life. When I was young I had a mentor and she helped me a lot in my life without her I wouldn’t be doing some of the things I am today. I believe every one deserves a help in hand And I want to be that helping hand for young girls today. My target is young Congolese girls because we are vulnerable, the media has portrayed a bad image of our country so everyone around us I.e Nigerians, Jamaicans, Ghanaians think that were not good at anything except for dancing and maybe cooking but no us girls are very intelligent and bright with helping hands we can portray our inner talents to the world.

JENNIFER LITANDA LUTU My name is Jennifer Litanda Lutu, I’m 17yrs old and was born on the 12 of June 1993, I live in South Acton (West). I’m a student in Tower Hamlet College and I’m studying Health and Social Care BTEC Lv2. The reason why I wanted to study Health and Social care its because I’m a person with a very big heart and I love to care and help people, so therefore I wanted to do it so I can become a Mental Health Nurse. The reason why I want to win Miss Congo UK 2011 it’s because first of all I will be known as Miss Congo UK 2011 bt that’s not the point one of the main reasons why I wanted to win its because I want to be a good role model to all the Congolese girls in the UK. I want to be someone they can look up and mostly I wanted try and to something good for my country help the women out there. The experience I look to achieve in this is to be a good model maybe I could actually join the modeling industry and also to know a lot more about my culture

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STACEY KASONGO MUJINGA I am the 21-years-old (born on Dec, 11th) Stacey Kasongo Mujinga. I was born and raised in Belgium but I consider myself as being fully Congolese as both of my parents are from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, my mother is from Kinshasa and my father is from Shaba. Most of the time I can be seen in North London (more specifically Islington) as that is where I live. Although I am currently in my second year of International Relations and Spanish at the University of Westminster, you may find me serving customers as well as a sales assistant during weekends. I have always perceived that there is much more to give than to receive, therefore I am planning to develop my practical skills after my bachelor, this will enable me to be an active asset to any NGO. Thereafter I am planning on becoming a head teacher in a primary or secondary school in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. But my number one goal is to be an aid in the improvement of a person’s life.”

JENNIFER MBUKU

My name is Jennifer Mbuku. I am 16 years old living in east London. I am of Congolese decent but I was born and bred in England. That, however, doesn’t stop me and my siblings accepting and adjusting to various Congolese customs & traditions. I’m a student at St Angelas & St Bonaventures 6th form currently taking 4 A levels - Drama English French & Psychology - aspiring to go on to study Law at university. In my spare time I enjoy singing & dancing but mainly singing. It’s like a day without singing causes me to feel incomplete. I’m also interested in modeling, I like watching shows like America’s next top model. My interest in fashion and modeling led me to apply for Miss Congo beauty pageant. I am hoping to gain a lot from this experience whatever the outcome but it would be a great achievement for me to win.

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GRACE BATOULONGA My name is Grace Batoulonga. I am from Congo from I was originally born in France April 11th 1992. Both my parents are from Congo. Most of my live I have spent it in the UK. I am on my last year (National Diploma Level 3) at Waltham College studying Health and Social Care. I hope to continue on to university and become a midwife. I also work part-time in the field of health organisation. I am a very motivated person with many ambitions. Reason why I am taking part in this pageant. I would like to work with many Congolese people in the UK as well as other ethnic communities. I would like to help within my community especially in looking after their domestic issues and making sure they are well-looked after. I would like to win the Miss Congo 2011 because I believe it comes from my vision and creativity. I am open-minded to what is happening in our society today and I want my voice to be heard. To better my community and speak for them. I want to be a positive role model to many young women. In the world. I am strong and I know my country is strong too but we are fighting amongst each other which is not necessary. I want to represent the coming of togetherness for my country Congo and be given the chance to mention my positive state of mind so that everyone can learn how to build their own communities.

ATHINA BOTO My Name is Athina Boto Im 23 Years old and I live in Bolton Greater Manchester My Congolese Tribe is Musengele Im the manageress of a Beauty/hair Salon in Bolton. Having observed Miss Congo Uk 2010 I was inspired by the celebration of my culture, having lived in England for over 10 years it’s very easy to forget where you come from. Hence I feel that this year offers an opportunity for me to represent my mother land and portrait beauty were people see destructions. Therefor representing my country in Miss Congo Uk 2011 would be the first step for me to getting more positive exposure for my country this is because I feel that I have the right characteristic because I am honest and passionate about my country. Even though poverty and wars is still ongoing I want to show that Congo is a beautiful country with many talents of which I am extremely proud of, it would be one of my greatest achievement. I want to be a role model for young adults in Congo as well as those in England and show them not to be ashamed of where you come from, Congo might not be the most developed of most countries but the spirit of our culture should not be something regarded as shameful. For example the music that uses traditional drums to produce a single beat is strong enough to gather and form congregation. The bold print woven skillfully on clothing sourly represent strength and power of a determine nation. To conclude I will work my hardest to make the most of this experience and opportunity, and even if I don’t win I will still be content with the fact that I managed to bring to life a piece of our tradition and the beauty that still shines through each and every one of us. TO SUBSCRIBE VISIT

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MIBADI DEVINE-DIVA Hi my name is Mibadi Devine-Diva and I was born in Democratic Republic of Congo in the capital city of Kinshasa on 15th August 1988. I am from the tribe of Bandundu (Muteke) and I am 5tf9 and I use my height to my advantage such as modeling which I very much enjoy doing. I have recently moved to London from France so I am very new to the English tradition. However I am picking up the trends quite quickly even though I have not been here long. I speak other languages such as French and Lingala and my English is not very good. I want to win Miss Congo UK 2011 because I love my country and very passionate about our culture. I am still proud of it even through the endless struggles so far however I believe there will be change coming very soon. I want to be a positive role model for everyone from my country and represent those that are in need and demand change especially for young single mothers and young teenage girls. I know I am blessed with beauty and intelligence and want to share that with the world. I have so much love to give and share with the young children that are suffering back in Congo or are homeless with no families. As Miss Congo UK I will try my best to help better for these young children’s education and for their future. I believe it is never too late, all we have to do as a community is rise as one and break down all negative barriers that is depriving our country from achieving and succeeding. I am a determined, nice and sociable person who can take risks. I’m sure that if you give me a chance, you won’t be disappointed. Thankyou.

ASHANTE EKANGA Hi my name is Ashante Ekanga im 22 years old I’m fun , cute, and feisty. I think I should be miss Congo because I’m beautiful young talented and I would make a good ambassador for Congo. As a child I grew up in Congo I left when I was 2 years old I came to the UK and grew up in a Congolese home with my parents and siblings, my father Mr. Ekanga is a proud loyal member of the Congolese community he and fellow Congolese people go around helping expose the cruelty and neglect that is currently taking over Congo my father is very passionate in securing the rights of Congolese people in Congo. So as his daughter I share this passion in restoring Congo so wining Miss Congo will give me that public step up and recognition that will allow me to be a ambassador for Congo. Being a ambassador for Congo is important to me because I personally think i can empower young Congolese women. I can encourage other young people in achieving their goals I have two daughters I study I live alone and I still have the determination to complete and achieve big thinks in life many young women have kids and they are led to believe that they cannot make it in life but I believe having my kids has made me a better person and more ambitious I life .I am currently studying business and administration in Enfield college I plan on getting a job as a accountant in the near future I’m a strong minded young women I know what I want and how to get. Wining Miss Congo would make me so happy because it will be a self accomplishment because iv not always felt pretty and confident but I have learnt to accept who I am and now I see that self acceptance is the best thing you could have because no one can take that away. 22

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About Miss Congo UK

Behind The Scene:

Disk and Jockey Entertainment is an Entertainment Company committed to offering you the best of what the entertainment world has to offer ranging from club nights, Beauty Pageant contest, fashion shows to concerts. The company was established in the summer of 2009 and has since been running effectively well. We have expertise in Event management and promotion, Model management and Artist and talent management. However we also provide DJ’s for parties, female or male models for your, fashion show, music or advertising videos and photographers and hosts for your events or shows. Disk and Jockey Entertainment is also the official organizer of the MISS CONGO UK Beauty pageant competition and has been successfully running it since 2010. As an organization we also provide different trainings such as music production, media, graphic designs, event management and Deejay lessons to youth between the ages of 13-25. These trainings empowers young people with lifetime skills that leads them into the employment ladder and also improves the quality of the entertainment services provided locally and nationally, therefore contributing positively in tackling youth crimes and unemployment. The organisation’s mission is to empower young people ages from 13-25 by providing different training workshops and education opportunities. Our young people will come from different ethnic backgrounds giving them valuable life-time skills.

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Mr. Francois Tshimpuki is the CEO of Disk and Jockey Entertainment and Director of Youth Empowerment LTD. He has over 2 years of entertainment management experience and a Combined Honor Bachelor Degree in International Development and Sport Development from the University of East London (UEL). Francois has a certificate on Entrepreneurship and Business from UEL, and has been working as a Youth Worker for Catch 22 since 2005 and as an Advocacy and Lobbying Officer for Peace international. As a Young Achiever Francois believes education is the key to the freedom of mind and success, therefore encourages others to seek continuous learning

Ms. Nadege Tshiobi is the Disk and Jockey Models manager, pageant trainer for the Miss Congo UK pageant and active member of the Youth Empowerment Project LTD. She has a law degree from Kingston University and was an event organiser for the African Caribbean Society at the university, where she delivered entertainment for students and organised social outings such as AFRIKA AFRIKA at the O2. Nadege has experience of working with young people from different ages ranging from voluntary to community work. She is an existing proud member of a team of young volunteers called evolve. She has received a qualification in Community Sports Leadership where her role was to encourage many young people into getting back into sports. Last year she received an award from Vinspired Young volunteers, for voluntary work in different projects. Mr. Reagan Panzu is Disk and Jockey Entertainment Artists Manager & active member of the Youth Empowerment Project LTD. Reagan has worked for Dagenham Park Church of England School as a Learning mentor and Cover supervisor. Both of these roles involved contact with disaffected young people and those with behaviour issues. He currently works for Barking and Dagenham Tuition Centre which is a referral unit. His job role is a music instructor and an advanced skill teaching assistant. This also involves working with young people with behaviour issues who have been expelled or permanently excluded from mainstream schools. He specialises in Music and has a BA Honours in Popular Music (degree) from Kingston University.

Ebenezer Teferi is an active member of Disk and Jockey as one of the events coordinators. He has an over two years experience in running events. He has done family events, corporate, social, young people and sophisticated events. He has a BA (Hons) degree in informal and community education at Canterbury Christ Church University. He is now in the process of doing a MA in Lifelong learning. Ebenezer is an active member of the community working with Catch22 where he works with hard to reach young people who live in some of the hardest estates in London. He is the MD of Royal-teez Ltd (printing company) where his entrepreneurial spirit has helped the company grow and build a respectable reputation within the industry. Ebenezer is a man of many talents where he is a Host and MC at corporate events and talent shows. His interpersonal skills have made him one of the highly respected individual. MAY / JUN 2011 A D U N A G O W M A G A Z I N E

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Culture

FEATURED STORY | MERON ABEBE

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EX H Y O T

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M E R O N ABEBE “ G E T T I N G T O K N O W H E R” I

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Photo cour tesy of Meron Ab eb e - Photog r apher : Te d Meb ane

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“Being from Africa is part of my identity and it is something I take pride in. I love my culture, tradition, and language. This is something I want to keep and hopefully pass it to my children and their children and for many generations to come.” - MERON ABEBE

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HANK YOU Meron for taking the time to respond to our interview questions.

[PERSONAL] AM: How did you get started in modeling? Meron: I have always loved and followed fashion. When I was about 16 years old my high school counselor thought I would make it as a model and she introduced me to the modeling world. AM: Was this what you dreamt for when growing up? Meron: Modeling was definitely something that I had so much loved for but I never thought I would become a model or be at the stage I am in right now. It’s kind of happened over night for me. AM: So, where are you originally from? Meron: I am originally from Ethiopia. My parents are still in Ethiopia. AM: Tell us about your education? Meron: I am a fourth year college student. I am currently attending Goucher, College, a private liberal art college in Baltimore, MD. AM: What languages do you speak? Meron: I speak two Ethiopian languages (Amharich and Tigrina) and English. AM: Who are your role models in the fashion world? Meron: One of my top role model in the fashion industry is Liya Kebede. Besides the fact that she is from my home country, she is everything I want to be one day. Her philanthropy amazes me: she is a Goodwill Ambassador for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health, has her own foundation, her own design line and she’s an actress. She is a pretty amazing woman. AM: What’s a typical day for you? Meron: School is my priority at the moment but when I have time, I am always shooting. Most of my weekends are dedicated to doing different shows, shoots or working with other photographers by helping them direct models. AM: How do you stay fit in this hectic lifestyle? Meron: well, I try to workout at least five times a week. I try to watch what I eat (not

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always successful) but mainly exercising is what helps me stay fit. AM: When you’re not working, what are your favorite things to do? Meron: I love photography, when I have time, I try to do photo shoots with friends and spend my time editing, watching a movie, or grab a cup of coffee and catch up with friends. AM: Currently, where is home? Where are you located presently? Meron: I was born in Ethiopia, grew up in Denver, Colorado, went to school in Missouri for two years and moved to Baltimore about a year ago. So, I don’t really have a place I call home but I think if I had to choose one, I would say Denver is home for me. [MODELING] AM: Tell us, how can someone get involved in the modeling career? How do you become a model? Meron: To be quite honest, I don’t know how someone becomes a model. But I think the first place to start is to believe in yourself. If you feel like you have what it takes and modeling is something you are very passionate about, start working on your portfolio and send it to different modeling agencies. The modeling industry is a highly competitive industry. You might get rejected at times and you might not get a response, but don’t give up. Keep trying until you find an answer and have confidence in yourself.

AM: What are your goals as a model? Meron: My goal as a model is to start landing jobs that I can earn money to start my own foundation. I have been involved with the Cunningham Foundation which is a nonprofit organization that helps children who have lost their parents to AIDS and children who struggle with the same disease. Since 2005, I have been an active member of this foundation and have taken trips to Ethiopia as a spokeswoman for the foundation. My dream is to build a similar foundation in another part of Ethiopia, and with the help of God expand it all over Africa. AM: How do you see yourself progress in this field? Meron: I work with some of the most amazing photographers, designers, and makeup artist around the DMV area. They have helped me grow as a model thromadus. I am becoming a better model each and every day which have been paving the road to success for me. I do wish to make it to the top one day, but I also take every opportunity as it comes. I don’t know what God has in store for me. AM: What are the pros and cons of the modeling industry? Meron: The pros are that you get to work with amazing people in the fashion industry and you get to do what you love doing. Cons are it consumes a lot of your time, it could be stressful at times, and you constantly have to be working. As a model, you have to try to keep up with what’s going on around you. If not, it’s easy to be forgotten.

“The lack of knowledge of the world outside of the United States and the lack of Global education in the U.S. have created a narrow and uncultured vision of Africa.” - MERON ABEBE

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AM: How did you feel the first time you posed for a photo shoot? Meron: The first time I posed for a photo shoot I was 15 and I didn’t know what I was doing. I remember being so excited and very nervous. But, the photographer I was working with made it really easy for me to relax and shoot. AM: Can you tell us something about you that people would never guess? Meron: I am super shy and very antisocial. [AFRICA] AM: What are some of the misconceptions American college students have about Africa? Meron: One of the biggest misconceptions that most American College students have about Africa is that everyone there is hungry and poor. Majority of the students describe Africa how the media portrays it. When most students think about Africa, they think of disease, hunger, want, deprivation, child soldiers, flies feasting on the living, naked children running around, AIDS, and people sleeping with cows. The lack of knowledge of the world outside of the United States and the lack of Global education in the U.S. have created a narrow and uncultured vision of Africa. Students believe everything they see on the media. I feel like the Western media portrays Africa in a negative way, and the only way to avoid this negative connotation about Africa is global education and us (Africans) try to educate about our countries as much as possible. AM: Are Western celebrities such as Bono really doing much good when they support African causes? Meron: Yes, they are. They are bringing awareness to many Europeans countries. But, they also need to show the good part of Africa. To those of us who claim Africa as our home country, it is emotionally degrading when we see our motherland being degraded and when people have so many misunderstandings about Africa. AM: In your opinion, what’s the number one issue to deal with in Africa? What’s your take (solution) on it? TO SUBSCRIBE VISIT

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Meron: The number one issue in Africa at the moment is AIDS, and the solution for it is Health education. Educated Africans who are currently living in the Western and European countries need to take partial responsibility in educating and helping better Africa. AM: About Africa: what will you keep? What will you change? Meron: Being from Africa is part of my identity and it is something I take pride in. I love my culture, tradition, and language. This is something I want to keep and hopefully pass it to my children and their children and for many generations to come. We, Africans, are known to be late to everything. Our events start 2 hours after the original time and most of us think it’s part of being “African.” But, that’s not true and that’s something I have been working on changing personally. AM: What can Africans do in order to create a strong presence in the America media? What are we lacking? Meron: The one thing we are lacking is unity. We all claim being “African” but most Africans are too busy dividing up where they are from, and identifying about what they don’t like about each other, that we forget to unite ourselves and do something for our motherland. Also, we are behind in technology. Africans can spend a little more time and effort on new technologies. AM: What do you see in the future for Africa? Meron: I see a huge future in Africa. Once countries get caught up with western technologies, Africa will be the fastest growing continent in the world. It already is one of the fastest booming continents alongside Asia right now. [CLOSURE] AM: Tell us, what is the craziest thing you ever done? Meron: The craziest thing I’ve ever done would have to be going to Norway for one day, spend the night at the Norwegian airport and then coming back to America. AM: What are you likes and dislikes? Meron: I love spending time with my parents, photography and shooting nature, hiking, me time, and I like to spend my time volunteering in other countries. I really TO SUBSCRIBE VISIT

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“We all claim being “African” but most Africans are too busy dividing up where they are from, and identifying about what they don’t like about each other,” - MERON ABEBE

don’t like socializing, partying, drinking, or anything that have to do with the nightlife. AM: Other than Fashion world, what other projects are you involved in at the present? Meron: As note before, I work with the Cunningham foundation. A non-profit organization based in Denver Colorado. I go back and forth to Ethiopia conducting a research about possible projects we have coming up. I meet with Ethiopian officials to discuss about current health problems in Ethiopia, and build a better relationship between The Cunningham Foundation and the Ethiopian Government. AM: What are your plans once you retire from modeling? Meron: With God’s help, my ultimate goal is to start my own organization and help children. That would make me the happiest person a live. AM: Romance: Are you currently seeing anyone? Can you tell us? Meron: Yes I am.

“With God’s help, my ultimate goal is to start my own organization and help children. That would make me the happiest person a live.” - MERON ABEBE

AM: Since this is the MAY/JUN issue, what’s the perfect summer vacation gateway for you? Meron: My number one vacation destination would be Africa. It would be an all-inclusive vacation for me. I would love to go on a Safari to Kenya, Tanzania, or Botswana. Stop by at the beach in South Africa, and spend few days in Tanzania and hike at Mount Kilimanjaro. That is an ideal summer gateway. AM: Will you consider acting in the future? In the acting world, who would you want to work with, if you had your choice? Meron: At this point in my life I say anything is possible. I have never thought about acting but then again, I never thought I would become a model. So, I guess we will see. [THE MIC IS YOURS] AM: Any words of wisdom for all our aspiring models out there? Meron: I would say, don’t give up. You will run into a lot of obstacles. You might get rejected by modeling agencies, and you might run across negative people who are consistently trying to tell you “you are not good enough.” But, Learn to ignore those people and believe in yourself and have confidence in what you do. If you believe you can do it, then YOU CAN DO IT. AM: Any last words? Meron: “Be the change you want to see in the world.” Mahatma Gandhi. We all say we want to help in some way, but what are we doing to better the world we live in? Ask yourself that question and help change the world in any way that you can. Thank you Meron for taking the time to chat with us. We wish you plenty of success and wisdom in your career. AM

MAY / JUN 2011 A D U N A G O W M A G A Z I N E

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RELATIONSHIPS |INFIDELITY

SURVIVING INFIDELIT Y: H ow T o A void 3 M istakes M ost W omen M ake W hich P rolong M istrust A nd M isery .

by: Denise A. Dilmore


F

or a couple to survive infidelity, the general theme is the cheater wants to get on with the relationship and quickly move past the affair, while the injured party prolongs the misery and mistrust. And with good reason. It is difficult to “move on” once you have been devastated by an affair. If both you and your husband want to survive the infidelity and rebuild your marriage, realize that it is a process. After the initial shock of the infidelity has settled, it is not so much the “sexual act” which is the most difficult to survive, but the deciet, disrespect, lies and lack of loyalty that has taken place. The lingering feelings of deception and mistrust do not immediately go away once the affair stops. Here are 3 mistakes most women make which prolong the mistrust and misery, and most importantly, how to avoid them: Mistake #1 - Visualizing The Details and Playing It Over And Over Again The number one mistake most women make which prolongs mistrust and misery is visualizing the details of the affair and playing it over and over again in their minds. Envisioning the “what, when, where and how they did things” is destructive to your sanity and will prohibit you from rebuilding your marriage. To survive infidelity you must learn to take control of your mind and stop the negative visualizations. Understand it is natural to doubt your husbands loyalty but unnatural for you to torture yourself with “thoughts of them.” Tips to help rid yourself of unwanted thoughts are: -Be aware of when negative thoughts are taking over so you can learn to change your thought pattern -Become aware of what triggers your negative thoughts and images -Make a conscious decision to stop yourself when these thoughts and images appear -Stop telling yourself and others that you can’t stop thinking this way - because you can -Realize you are in control of your thoughts and need to distract yourself with other people, things and places to keep your mind occupied -Make a written list of 10 things you are grateful for and pull it out and read it every time your negatative thinking begins TO SUBSCRIBE VISIT

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Mistake #2 - Trying To Put The Marriage Back To “The Way It Was” The number two mistake most women make which prolongs mistrust and misery is trying to put the marriage back to “the way it was.” For a couple to survive infidelity, both must realize there was a fault line in the foundation of their marriage for the affair to happen in the first place. Usually feeling underappreciated, misunderstood or a communication break down between the couple has occurred prior to the affair. There are many online resources available for couples willing to repair their marriage and find new ways of communicating. Tips to help you create new ways of communicating are: -Stop yourself from falling into the same communication patterns as were present prior to the affair -Accept the marriage will not be the same as it was prior to the infidelity -Get professional counselling or find online resources to help you develop new ways of communicating -Learn to listen to your partner rather than jumping in with a response Mistake #3 - Focusing on The Affair Rather Than The Marriage The number three mistake most women make which prolongs mistrust and misery is focusing on the affair rather than the marriage. For obvious reasons feelings of anger, rage, hurt, betrayal and disappointment are all natural and must play a part in the healing process. Keep in mind, if you did not care about your husband, none of these feelings would be arising. Therefore, once you have both made the decision to survive the infidelity and save your marriage, focusing on the

affair rather than the marriage is destructive and futile. Tips to help you focus on your marriage again are: -Every day make a list of things he did right -Ask yourself why did you fall in love with him in the first place and does he still have some of those same qualities -Take time away from the everyday routine to spend quality time together -Find new activities and things you are both interested in doing together -Designate specific times to discuss the marital issues and solutions on how to make the marraige stronger Ultimately, your husband carries a large responsibility in trying to help you alleviate your mistrust and misery. It is after all, his indiscretions that created the breakdown of your relationship. Realize that if you are both committed to saving your marriage, there are many ways that you can restore the trust which was lost to the affair. Take responsibility for avoiding the three most common mistakes many women make. If you put in the daily work, you and your husband will be among the many couples that have succeeded in regaining the trust and surviving infidelity. About The Author If you really want to save your marriage and would like to take steps to find out how your marriage can survive infidelity visit http://howtosurviveanaffair.ca Don’t let an affair destroy your life. Get Your Free 21-Step Program at www.marriage-afterinfidelity.info. You have nothing to lose and your marriage to gain. Your happiness and marriage are worth saving. The author invites you to visit: http://www.howtosurviveanaffair.ca MAY / JUN 2011 A D U N A G O W M A G A Z I N E

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IMMIGRATION |RACE RELATIONS

Foster Heritage | Immigration and Race Relations

An olden American-West Indian adjacent relationship that grants safe passage to West Indian inclusion among American white workers By Alain Adunagow

[1] A general integration rule has long shaped the making of the United States as a country. This rule of integration evokes the acceptance of new comers to the United States. They give up their former identities to embrace the American dream, only to realize that the assimilation process often causes certain social views and values to get lost in the Melting Pot. As a result, newbies incur a mobility that may or may not be in alignment with the meaning of the American dream they had in mind. On the one hand, some receive an upgrade of their ethnic and racial identity. On the other hand, others feel that they incur a downgrade as they are automatically associated to the lower rung of the American society, a place where violations of key American values by one person stereotypically default to the collective violations by all (Lamont, 2000). And so, in the attempt to right the imbalances incurred immigrants take it upon themselves to retain their initial cultural and racial identities at the risk of being disliked by concerns of disrespecting the American long-established rule of integration. There is an exception to this observation when we consider West Indian immigrants integration experience. They intentionally reject American cultural 34

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and identity influences in order to sustain their socioeconomic well-being; and yet, they are praised by American white workers on the basis of being hard-working, selfreliant, approachable, always aspiring to move up the ladder, and most importantly “better blacks” (Waters, 2001). Does the West Indian experience bring a new meaning to the nature of the American racial system? Cross-referencing sociologists Michèle Lamont’s The Dignity of Working Men: Morality and the Boundaries of Race, Class, and Immigration (2000) and Mary C. Waters’ Black Identities: West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities (2001), I will argue that the success of West Indian immigrants’ inclusion, despite the trespass of long-established American values in search of an upward mobility, and despite the seemingly working connection with American white workers at the apparent expense of black Americans’ biased racial relations, comes as a result of a foster heritage, an olden adjacent relationship of West Indies with the United States in the time of the British colonial power, whose rulership extended upon both the White Settlers in America and the emancipated

Africans in West Indies during the colonial era. [2] Mary C. Water’s Black Identities provides interesting insights regarding the evolution of the impact of becoming an immigrant in America. Waters argues that the immigration integration experience has dramatically changed from what it used be. Before, you became assimilated into a progressive ethnic status, and then culminated to a successful ethnic American. Today, you become assimilated into a decoupled identity, culture, and economic success. Waters adds that “[s]ome immigrants and their children do better economically by maintaining a strong ethnic identity and culture and by resisting American cultural and identity influences” (Waters, 2001:5). Although agreed by several other authors, this “remaining immigrant- or ethnic-identified” model may not be an easy or consequence-free style to acquire because there is more to it than just branding one’s colors. When put against Michèle Lamont’s The Dignity of Working Men, we see that although white workers draw weaker boundaries than those they raise against blacks (Lamont, 2000:88), the immigrants still incur some moral and racial boundaries. Lamont argues that the attenuated boundaries in this case are mainly attributed to (a) the containment of immigration policies and sector under a ‘subsystem’, which is not fairly exposed to the public (Lamont, 2000:89); and (b) to the general positive attitudes of white workers towards immigrants, which is credited to the role of immigration in the “formation of the country” (Lamont, 2000:90). The caveat in the latter reason is that new comers have to respect the long-established process. They are expected to “give up a good part of their ethnic identity as they embrace the American dream” (Lamont, 2000:90). So, let’s take, for example, the case of Mexicans with the issue of the English language. When they attempt to ‘remain immigrant or ethnic-identified’ by not learning the English language, clearly showing a breach in the integration rule, and hoping for an upward mobility, moral and racial boundaries get raised by white workers. Breaking the integration rule is viewed as a violation of American values, which means the violators can be disliked by concerns of deteriorating American values, that in turn, includes the self-discipline in TO SUBSCRIBE VISIT

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following established rules. Lamont stresses that “[t]he issue of language is sensitive because it symbolizes the downfall of the American nation” (Lamont, 2000:91). Does this mean that the “remaining immigrantor ethnic-identified” model would never work consequence-free for any immigrant group? How can immigrants who unjustly incurred a downward mobility at the point of assimilation sustain their socioeconomic status in the new world? [3] Our case with West Indian immigrants makes them eligible candidates of trying the “remaining immigrant- or ethnic-identified” model for the obvious reason that when they become assimilated, they turn into not just Americans but Black Americans (Waters, 2001:5). This means a downward mobility for the West Indian immigrant who, in his/her former culture holds a more fluid racial identity. The good news with West Indian immigrants is that they do fit the “remaining immigrant- or ethnic-identified” model and they have the legacy advantage as their history adjacently connects them to the United States as foster recipients of the British cultural influence during the colonial era, and make them collectively centurylong experts in racial relations. In other words, they are capable of remaining ethnicidentified without upsetting the incumbent dominant groups policing for any breach of the integration rule by new comers. [4] Waters describes West Indian immigrants as having the advantage of language and skills, and most importantly better understanding of the racial relations (Waters, 2001:7). The high turn-over rate of colonial powers ruling over their islands is also another indication of their being well-versed in diversity, change management, and inter-continental service relations. When West Indians come to the U.S., they are prepared to be immigrants in a multicultural society (Waters, 2001:23). In their culture, race, and ethnicity are taken separately for one does not know of which class a black West Indian, for example, may belong to. Moreover, their classification of race is more salient and carries little emphasis than what they experience when they arrive in the United States. They have dealt with colonial powers assuming high-level roles in running their respective islands without close supervision of the imperial rule. West Indian blacks enjoyed a level of self-government and control that blacks in America never got to enjoy (Waters, 2001:26); not only are they different from African Americans TO SUBSCRIBE VISIT

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in identity and culture, they are also different from European immigrants (Waters, 2001:6-7). Their unfortunate dilemma is to constantly having to make the plausible claim of differentiation due to people always defaulting to phenotypic criteria. In America, race and ethnicity are interchangeable for black Americans. It is, unfortunately, the “master status defining the person to others” (Waters, 2001:5); Hence, the need for West Indians to keep their former ethnicity to show that they are different. So, what do we say of claims by black Americans who think that West Indians are too naïve and that given time, their safe passage of inclusion in the white workers’ world will end? Let’s address the dynamics that claim West Indian immigrants are getting a “break” from white workers because they seem to exude a better performance and are ready to accept low-paying wages for what they’re actually worth, act of which may seem to portray some sort of naïveté from West Indian immigrants. [5] The dilemma that West Indian immigrants face is not having challenges in working with white workers. In fact, they are seen as “hard-working in implicit or even explicit contrast to American blacks who do not last long on the job,” Waters reports (Waters, 2001:138). It is normal to grow wary when facing numerous accounts of racial inequalities; nevertheless, the final report by Waters claims that “the overall ways in which West Indian blacks and American whites interact generally produce better outcomes for West Indians than black Americans. Whites expect West Indians to be ‘better blacks’; they find common ground in the West Indians’ immigrant experiences” (Waters, 2001:190). Here again, we see another confirmation that the foster heritage bestowed unto these two groups, centuries ago, by the British colonial influence brings them together and help them overcome racial clash. The claim made by these white workers shows that there is hope to further attenuate the moral and racial boundaries in America. [6] Lamont reports interesting insights in the evolution and dynamics of race. She claims that the last twenty years have generated a new form of racism, which is often called “symbolic racism”, “subtle racism”, “aversive racism” or “modern racism” (Lamont, 2000:71). It simply means: X values Y as key values of X’s and Z’s world. But X believes

that Z violates Y. Thus, X dislikes Z by a concern of Y values. These Y values are more universalistic and include individualism, self-reliance, work ethic, obedience, and discipline. The problem we continue to see is that the use of universalistic principles by some white workers leverage against racial groups (especially blacks) solely based on a collective gauge is a major contributor of the formation of racial inequality (Lamont, 2000: 68). The key opportunity is to stop gauging all violations as a collective perpetration. These violations should be gauged in the measure they empirically posit themselves. In the instance of dealing with West Indian immigrants, the fact that they ensure they have distanced themselves from black Americans or any other black immigrants such as African’s Nigerians or South Africans who also like them speak English, by remaining ethnic-identified gives West Indian immigrants to minimize the application of a collective judgment as done with black Americans. Removing the apparent defaulting phenotypic criteria allows white workers to adjust the size and criteria qualifications, which in turn will leave them to use moral gauge as opposed to an automatic racial gauge resulting in a much better critique of West Indian immigrants. So, instead of looking for ways to internally dissociate white workers’ intertwined views of moral and racial boundaries, perhaps following the West Indian immigrants model will help attenuate racial boundaries and allow moral boundaries to be used so that each group is fairly treated without incurring an automatic downward social mobility. Clearly, we could learn something constructive from the West Indian immigrants’ foster heritage and help improve racial relations skills of those groups in need. - First Published as Academic Paper in Anthropology Studies: Race in the Americas (Course taught by Prof. James Herron, Harvard University) on Mar 6, 2011. Re-Edited for broad publication. Reference(s): . Lamont, Michèle. 2000. The Dignity of Working Men: Morality and the Boundaries of Race, Class, and Immigration. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. . Waters, C. Mary. 2001. Black identities: West Indian immigrant dreams and American realities. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

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HEALTH | ARTHRITIS

HEALTH

arthritis. If you need to find out about apple cider vinegar and exactly how it can help your arthritis, have a look at http://www. ArthritisNaturalRemedies.com/ArthritisApple-Cider-Vinegar.

Treating Arthritis -

Using Apple Cider Vinegar to Treat Arthritis By Meredith Walker

A

rthritis is amongst the most prevalent ailments today, affecting literally millions around the globe. There are actually over a hundred kinds of arthritis, with the common signs and symptoms of joint pain and inflammation. This causes great discomfort, and often those with arthritis experience it to a degree that it can take over their lives. For this reason, people with arthritis often try to find remedies that will provide effective, long-term relief, in order to enjoy life as normally as possible. Arthritis apple cider vinegar treatments are one of many methods people consider. It’s been in use for many centuries, and has been proven to relieve the inflammation and pain caused by arthritis. It has actually been utilized for other conditions as well. Being full of minerals and vitamins, it allows the body to fight illnesses effectively. One arthritis apple cider vinegar remedy uses a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar mixed to a glass of water. Honey or even some spice may be added to this mixture to improve the taste; honey is even thought to enhance the strength of the solution. This mixture is then taken in the morning and 38

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before going to bed at nighttime, to provide relief from arthritis symptoms. An additional way to use apple cider vinegar is to apply it as a liniment, using it straight to afflicted joints. It is almost always warmed, then applied through the use of a clean washcloth. It can then either be massaged in or simply applied to provide immediate respite from the pain. Many people believe in the effectiveness of apple cider vinegar for arthritis. Nevertheless, whenever employing an alternative form of treatment, it’s always best to check with your medical doctor to avoid any possible complications. Apple cider vinegar is available in supermarkets, and even on the web. In purchasing this vinegar you need to also look at the quality so it will be more effective for the management of diseases. Organic vinegars are believed more potent, specially those with the mother-of-vinegar still included. Apple cider vinegar is one of the techniques that arthritis has been treated through the years, and it has been considered effective and safe - important points for those with

What Are the Symptoms of Arthritis? Joint pain and progressive stiffness without noticeable swelling, chills, or fever during normal activities probably indicates the gradual onset of osteoarthritis. Painful swelling, inflammation, and stiffness in the fingers, arms, legs, and wrists occurring in the same joints on both sides of the body, especially on awakening, may be signs of rheumatoid arthritis. Fever, joint inflammation, tenderness, and sharp pain, sometimes accompanied by chills and associated with an injury or another illness, may indicate infectious arthritis. In children, intermittent fever, loss of appetite, weight loss, and anemia, or blotchy rash on the arms and legs may signal the onset of some types of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Other forms of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis are associated with joint stiffness, a limp, or joint swelling. Call Your Doctor About Arthritis If: The pain and stiffness come on quickly, whether from an injury or an unknown cause; you may be experiencing the onset of rheumatoid arthritis. The pain is accompanied by fever; you may have infectious arthritis. The pain develops quickly and is associated with redness and extreme tenderness of the joint; this may be the onset of gout. You notice pain and stiffness in your arms, legs, or back after sitting for short periods or after a night’s sleep; you may be developing osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or another arthritic condition. A child develops pain or a rash on armpits, knees, wrists, and ankles, or has fever swings, poor appetite, and weight loss; the child may have juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. AM About The Author Meredith Walker is an authority on arthritis and related joint diseases, and the natural methods to treat them.

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EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW | OLATIDE ADENIYI

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OLATIDE

ADENIYI

EDITALO DESIGNS| EXPLORING YOUR CREATIVE SIDE Photos cour tesy of E dit a l o D es i g ns .

Olatide (Tide) Adeniyi was born in Washington D.C. where she spent her childhood. She moved to Lagos, Nigeria during her teenage years and acquired an appreciation and passion for the arts while attending high school. In 2002, she returned to the Washington D.C. area to attend university. She holds a Bachelor degree in Economics and currently works as a full-time Analyst as she explore her creative side. Her inspiration for Fashion Design came in 2007 as a sporatic thought to make her own dress for an event because she could not find a dress that had the perfect fit. The idea seemed laughable to her at the time as she had no prior design or sewing experience, until she purchased her first sewing machine and began bringin her first sketch to life. The garment was a success; so she began designing and sewing as a hobby, making it apparent that this should be her next business venture. Syling hair is another natural trait that Tide possesses. In the early 90’s, her mother sought her own passion and graduated from the Dudley School of Cosmetology to become a part-time Esthetician and Hair Stylist. Although she did not directly train Tide, the exposure had an impact on her at such a young age.

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I N T E R V I E W

E XC LUS I V E Thank you Olatide for taking the time to respond to our interview questions. [PERSONAL] AM: Please tell us a little bit about yourself. Olatide: Well, my full name is Olatidé Adéniyi but most people call me Tidé. I am from Nigeria but was born in Washington D.C. where I spent most of my childhood. I am a graduate from the University of Maryland where I got my Bachelor’s degree in Economics and I work currently as a Financial Analyst while also building my fashion line. AM: How many brothers and sisters do you have? Olatide: I have only 1 sister. AM: Where are you from originally? Olatide: My state of origin is Osun State which is in the western part of Nigeria. AM: Who are your role models? Olatide: My biggest role model is my mother. She’s an extremely hardworking and independent woman who has thought my sister and I how to be self-sufficient in all aspects of life. She is very supportive in anything I choose to do and I love her for that. Another role model of mine is Beyoncé Knowles; there is just something about her presence on stage. To me she is the best female performer in today’s music industry and over the years, haven been to her concerts and seen her about 5 times, I can sense the passion and dedication she has for and puts into her craft and I admire her for that. It acts as a reference for me and my view on my craft. AM: When you’re not working, what are your favorite things to do? Olatide: I enjoy going to the movies, traveling and spending time with friends and loved ones. AM: Currently, where is home? Where are you located presently? Olatide: Home is the United States. Silver Spring, Maryland to be precise. AM: Can you tell us something about you that people would never guess? Olatide: Perhaps that I’m a self-taught TO SUBSCRIBE VISIT

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seamstress/designer. AM: Favorite sport/hobby? Why? Olatide: My favorite hobby apart from sewing would have to my contemporary dance class. I love it because dance is another one of my passions. [PROFESSION] AM: How did you get started in the Clothing Design business? Olatide: It was quite unintentional. In 2008 I began sewing for myself as a hobby, then for my friends, then for friends of my friends. A year later I decided to turn it into a business, so I launched Editalo Designs in July 2009 and began making custom dresses for fans of my designs. AM: Was this what you dreamt for when growing up? Olatide: Not at all. Actually when I was a child I dreamt of becoming an international singer. It was always just that, a dream lol. I think it was highly influenced by the pop icons I loved in the 80s and 90s. People like Janet Jackson, Paula Abdul, En vogue etc. AM: Is there a meaning to the name EDITALO? Olatide: The name Editalo is my first name spelt backwards (Olatide - editalO). I chose to call my label this since I viewed my line as a reflection of my style. I can sincerely say every piece I make I would wear myself. I do not create looks that are catered to the public but it’s flattering to see my designs are being received well. AM: Your design clothes are extremely gorgeous; do you design male clothing as well? Olatide: Thank you very much! As to designing male clothing, unfortunately at this present time I do not. But it’s definitely something that’s in the works. AM: Where do you get your design inspiration? Do you target a particular market with your designs? Olatide: My design inspirations usually come from what I see around me and what I think a sophisticated young lady would like to wear. AM: What is the best perk in being a designer? Olatide: Making your very own clothes of

course! When preparing for an event every woman has a vision of what they would want to look like so to be able to have that vision and actually be able to literarily produce it is a huge perk! AM: What is the most difficult aspect of running your own label versus i.e. design, production, sales, finance, and advertising? Olatide: Balancing every aspect of it. That is the production, promotion, shipping, emails. It gets a bit overwhelming sometimes. AM: What do you wish people should understand about working in the fashion industry? Olatide: That its passion driven and takes patience. AM: Any quick tips for our readers on How to pick up what to wear (for both men and woman)? Olatide: Never think your fashion sense should conform to what is already out there. Be comfortable and reflect you in what you wear. AM: Do you think clothing affect people’s attitude toward a person? Olatide: Definitely. I believe everyone should dress the way they would like to be perceived or treated. Because before people get to know you, they see you. [AFRICA] AM: In your opinion, what’s the number one issue to deal with in Africa? What’s your take (solution) on it? Olatide: I think generally the number one issue in Africa is our lack of commitment to change. I think as a people we are set in our ways and unlike the westerners we fear change. Prayer is my proposed solution. We should all continue to pray that one day our great continent and leaders will utilize our resources both natural and human towards a more productive and forward driven goal. AM: About Africa: what will you keep? What will you change? Olatide: I will keep our culture, our respect for elders, and our appreciation for education. I will change our local business ethics, our healthcare system and our lack of commitment to change in order to build a better Africa. AM: What need to be done in the US in order to strengthen the African community voice? MAY / JUN 2011 A D U N A G O W M A G A Z I N E

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Olatide: Investment in African television and radio stations in the US could strengthen this cause. Personally I would love to tune into a Nigerian radio station on my way to work every morning and hear recent music, news and causes in my country. With time other nationalities including Americans might take interest in what is happening cross-borders and accept the entertainment and fashion industry as equals or better. AM: Do you think African clothing designs can make it into the Western market? Olatide: Yes I do and they have already. African fabrics and African designers clothing have been seen on red carpets recently and in mainstream photo shoots in the US. I believe we are entering a new era for Africa and fashion. [CLOSURE] AM: Tell us, what is the craziest thing you ever done? Olatide: If I gave an answer to this question I would probably be lying so I’ll pass. (laughs) AM: Is marriage, starting a family in your busy schedule at all? Olatide: No, not at this moment. AM: In your opinion, is it harder to be a mother or to be a wife? Olatide: I would say it’s harder to be a wife. I believe maternal instincts come naturally and the love for ones child and vice versa is inevitable. Whereas a wife (or husband) from time to time has to put in a little more 44

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effort to maintain their love for one another and for a commitment such as marriage to indeed last forever.

personality since most of my designs are colorful and playful.

AM: Any last words? Olatide: I would like to thank ADUNAGOW MAGAZINE for featuring me in this month’s issue. It truly means a lot. I would also like to personally invite your Nigeria based readers to join me May 21st in Lagos as Editalo Designs celebrates its West Africa Launch. It will be at The Scarlet Lodge in Victoria Island from 4-7pm. Also look out for Editalo Designs at this year’s Africa Fashion Week in New York. I will be [THE MIC IS YOURS] showcasing my 2011 Fall/Winter collection! AM: What one piece of advice would you Thanks again. give to someone wanting to start a career in fashion? Thank you Olatide for taking the time to chat Olatide: I would tell them to be diligent with us. We wish you plenty of success and yet patient and stay focus on your long wisdom in your career. term goal. The fashion industry can be very fast paced so it’s important that with every Contact info: opportunity given you put your best foot Email: olatideeditalo@aol.com (work) forward because that could be the big Website: www.editalo.net moment in your career. However you need Facebook: to stay focused on your goal because there www.facebook.com/editalodesigns will also be many demands/opportunities Twitter: that are tempting but sidetrack you from www.twitter.com/editalodesigns your initial objective. Photo credits: AM: If a young girl’s dream is to one day Photographer:Wale Photos be, one of your models, what would your www.walephotos.com choice of models be based on? Make-up Artist: Amaka Consultants Olatide: It would be based on confidence www.amakacare.com of the model’s walk/poses. Also they don’t Hair Stylist: Editalo Designs necessarily have to be young but they have www.editalo.net to appear fresh and vibrant exuding a fun AM: What’s your favorite summer destination? Olatide: By a landslide it would be Miami! I have been there 3 times and each time was extremely fun and relaxing. I think it surpasses most summer destinations when it comes to the beach, food, and the nightlife. There is just something about that Miami culture that I love so much.

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“Be diligent ,yet patient. Stay focus on your long term goal.” - OLATIDE ADENIYI


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THE MAGAZINE THAT PROMOTES UNION AND COOPERATION OF AFRICANS AROUND THE GLOBE, ENCOURAGING AN INFORMED, THINKING AND QUESTIONING AFRICAN SOCIETY.

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