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ADRIENNE ANGELUCCI

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE UNDERGRADUATE PORTFOLIO

adrienne.angelucci@gmail.com 209 west woodview rd. west grove , pa 19390 610.656.2785


52007

30

Various technological advancements such as solar panels, wind turbines, porous pavement, green roofs, etc., are components of such goals. In the past few decades, the city of Pittsburgh has made large strides in the reclamation of their landscape, which was so badly damaged during its reign as a the City of Steel. Perched on The Hill in Pittsburgh’s central district, the Connelley Center will be a state of the art research and promotional facility. Innovative in its design and use, the center will serve as a sustainability guide for Pittsburgh and its surroundings.

2010

the Connelley Center concept: on the edge. The inclusion of visually and physically accessible green roofs encompass the concept of on the edge in that they allow students and visitors to remain both physically and technologically on the leading edge.

views

While numerous green technologies are already in the Connelley Center plans, the inclusion of green roof technology can be expanded upon for both research and experiential purposes.

connelley center facilities

BEDFOR

plant material growing medium filter layer drainage layer protection layer

types

View of downtown Pittsburgh.

The two types of green roofs are extensive and intensive green roofs.

waterproofing layer

Extensive green roofs involve minimal growing

View across Allegheny River.

connelley center green roofs

medium and are not intended for human use. Extensive green roofs provide the environmental and aesthetic benefits of green roofs.

insulation

Intensive green roofs require additional growing medium for the support of a wider range of plant communities and activities. Intensive green roofs allow for human interaction and often become places of recreation and leisure.

vapor barrier plywood membrane

intensive

extensive

01-17

01 URBAN DESIGN

Pittsburgh encompasses hundreds of buildings. In 2007, only five buildings within the city employed green roof strategies. Since then, twenty-five have been implemented and the technology continues to be adapted. As a research and display facility, Connelley Center is the perfect place for green roof implementation. Contrary to most green roofs in Pittsburgh, however, the Connelley Center should adapt both extensive and intensive green roof technology in order to promote both the environmental and experiential benefits. Connelley should push the bar, allowing its green roofs to be both seen and personally explored.

important and desired in cities, the implementation of green roofs will grow.

benefits

• Green roofs mitigate the loss of green space by turning unused rooftop space into a functioning landscape and ecosystem. • Mitigate and eliminate water runoff. • Improve water quality by filtering particulate matter. • Purifies air by sequestering carbon dioxide and other pollutants. • Results in energy and cost savings due to cooling effects. • Extends life of roof by protecting roof membrane. • Positive physical and mental impact on green roof users.

D AVEN

UE

EXTENSIVE With the perfect southeastern orientation, the sawtooths of the Connelley Center are ideal for green roof technology and plant production. Intending to expand upon the educational and research purposes of the Connelley Center, the extensive green roof is composed of a series of test plots. The research plots will facilitate both plant and growing medium research. The plots and their respective growing medium and plant palette will be randomized so as to produce the most accurate research despite various conditions resulting from plot location on the roof.

plant palette Intending to promote sustainability beyond green roof technology, the extensive green roof not only aims to expand upon current green roof research, but also aims to contribute urban farming and the idea of resilience. Therefore, plantings of the extensive green roof will include common green roof plants as well as various herbs that can later be harvested and either used in the on-site eco-cafe or sold for profit.

growing medium

Specifications for green roof medium composition suggest that 75-85% of the medium is inorganic and 20-25% is organic. Maintaining concepts of sustainability in all aspects, all growing medium components are locally available.

02 PLANNING

25% Organic materials will include leaf litter or food wastes obtained from within the city.

75% Inorganic materials will include black

locust chips, rockwool, fired clay pebbles, and ground brick chips.

INTENSIVE

black locust decking

Despite the widespread implementation of green roofs, the majority are physically inaccessible to people. As a result, many people are unaware of the environmental and experiential benefits that green roofs offer. Through the combination of extensive and intensive green roofs, the Connelley Center will contribute to the expansion of green roof awareness, use, and future implementation. Intensive green roofs allow for the actual experience and exploration of an often unexplored world. The Connelley Center will feature two intensive green roofs.

The “Overlook” green roof is located on the southwestern side of the Connelley Center and sits above the proposed entry corridor. Extending from established building lines and focusing on views of downtown Pittsburgh, the design is simple and modern. Featuring black locust decking and an analogous plant palette, the design calls attention to both green roof technology, benefits, and the city’s surrounding views. Allium schoenoprasum Baptisia tinctoria Carex pensylvanica Delosperma nubigenum

bluestone chips wind screen

tool storage birch & mixed oak northern hardwoods

overhang

bluestone path

elevator: piezoelectric battery

black locust decking

glass railing

Pteridium aquilinum Sedum reflexum Sedum spurium, “Summer Glory” Veronica officinalis

xeric grasses & low grow mesic meadow

succulents & mesic meadow

doorway

vertical extension

“Vertical Extension” is located on the northern most roof of the Connelley Center. While the roof is currently pitched, plans include the vertical extension and flatting of the existing roof for the accommodation of a second intensive green roof. With a larger area, vertical extension is a more involved green roof in numerous ways. In addition to vertically extending the roof, this design intends to expand Pennsylvania ecosystems and the surrounding slope ecosystem upward. Andorpogon scoparius Anthemis tinctoria Aster linariifolius Baptisia tinctoria Campanula rotundifolia Carex annectens Carex pensylvanica Centaurea cyanus Chrysamthemum leucanthemum Deschampsia caespitosa “Northern Lights” Dianthus deltoides Festuca glauca Liatris spicata Pennisetum alopecuroides Phlox subulata Sedum acre Sedum floriferum Sphaeralcea coccinea Stachys byzantina Teucrium chamaedrys Veronica officinalis

adrienne angelucci

penn state university


“If we e wa an nt to to enc ncoura ncou oura ou r ag ge e cari riing g iin n Pe Penn n sylvan an nia ia, we e ne eed ed pla lace lace es to to carre a ab bou utt” ”T om Th omas omas as H Hil ilton il to on

SOUTHERN LUZERNE BRANDING B RANDING A T TOURISM OURISM D DESTINATION ESTINATION Since the 1960s agricultural based

18-31

communities like Hazleton and the larger Luzerne County have been experiencing a shift from a predominately agricultural landscape to one marked by

03 INFORMATION DESIGN

residential and

commericial development.

SOUTHERN LUZERNE

32-36

“ THINKING PHYSICALLY AND GEOGRAPHICALLY ABOUT CHANGE FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE”- Krista Synder


ON THE EDGE

RIVOLUZIONE

15-17 location & opportunity

52007

30 2010

The push towards sustainability has become a global trend. Cities around the world are striving to become greener in both design and lifestyle. Various technological advancements such as solar panels, wind turbines, porous pavement, green roofs, etc., are components of such goals. In the past few decades, the city of Pittsburgh has made large strides in the reclamation of their landscape, which was so badly damaged during its reign as a the City of Steel. Perched on The Hill in Pittsburgh’s central district, the Connelley Center will be a state of the art research and promotional facility. Innovative in its design and use, the center will serve as a sustainability guide for Pittsburgh and its surroundings.

concept

views

While numerous green technologies are already in the Connelley Center plans, the inclusion of green roof technology can be expanded upon for both research and experiential purposes. Pittsburgh encompasses hundreds of buildings. In 2007, only five buildings within the city employed green roof strategies. Since then, twenty-five have been implemented and the technology continues to be adapted. As a research and display facility, Connelley Center is the perfect place for green roof implementation. Contrary to most green roofs in Pittsburgh, however, the Connelley Center should adapt both extensive and intensive green roof technology in order to promote both the environmental and experiential benefits. Connelley should push the bar, allowing its green roofs to be both seen and personally explored.

connelley center facilities

View of downtown Pittsburgh.

BEDFOR

View across Allegheny River.

connelley center green roofs

green roof techn plant material

benefits

• Green roofs mitigate the loss of green space by turning unused rooftop space into a functioning landscape and ecosystem. • Mitigate and eliminate water runoff. • Improve water quality by filtering particulate matter. • Purifies air by sequestering carbon dioxide and other pollutants. • Results in energy and cost savings due to cooling effects. • Extends life of roof by protecting roof membrane. • Positive physical and mental impact on green roof users.

growing medium filter layer drainage layer protection layer

types

The two types of green roofs are extensive and intensive green roofs.

waterproofing layer

medium and are not intended for human use. Extensive green roofs provide the environmental and aesthetic benefits of green roofs.

insulation

Intensive green roofs require additional growing medium for the support of a wider range of plant communities and activities. Intensive green roofs allow for human interaction and often become places of recreation and leisure.

vapor barrier

plywood membrane

extensive

UE

EXTENSIVE With the perfect southeastern orientation, the sawtooths of the Connelley Center are ideal for green roof technology and plant production. Intending to expand upon the educational and research purposes of the Connelley Center, the extensive green roof is composed of a series of test plots. The research plots will facilitate both plant and growing medium research. The plots and their respective growing medium and plant palette will be randomized so as to produce the most accurate research despite various conditions resulting from plot location on the roof.

plant palette Intending to promote sustainability beyond green roof technology, the extensive green roof not only aims to expand upon current green roof research, but also aims to contribute urban farming and the idea of resilience. Therefore, plantings of the extensive green roof will include common green roof plants as well as various herbs that can later be harvested and either used in the on-site eco-cafe or sold for profit.

Specifications for green roof medium composition suggest that 75-85% of the medium is inorganic and 20-25% is organic. Maintaining concepts of sustainability in all aspects, all growing medium components are locally available.

25% Organic materials will include leaf litter or food wastes obtained from within the city.

75% Inorganic materials will include black

locust chips, rockwool, fired clay pebbles, and ground brick chips.

Despite the widespread implementation of green roofs, the majority are physically inaccessible to people. As a result, many people are unaware of the

Green roofs provide important environmental benefits by mimicking the natural landscape on top of a roof. As green space becomes increasingly important and desired in cities, the implementation of green roofs will grow.

URBAN DESIGN

D AVEN

INTENSIVE

green roofs

Extensive green roofs involve minimal growing

growing medium

01

PHYSICALLY & TECHNOLOG

Spectacular views of downtown Pittsburgh and the desire to become an innovative technology and educational center are the two components behind the Connelley Center concept: on the edge. The inclusion of visually and physically accessible green roofs encompass the concept of on the edge in that they allow students and visitors to remain both physically and technologically on the leading edge.

09-12

04 ON THE EDGE

03 LA PASSEGGIATA DI

02 VIA CORONARI

01 VACANCY AS A RESOURCE

02-08

13-14

black locust decking bluestone chips

intensive


URBAN CONNECTIONS

BUILDINGS

MULFORD ST.

PRODUCTIVE PLACES

STREET NETWORK ROSEDALE BLOCK CLUSTER CAMPUS GA

The next steps... N

AV

1

FOOD

SUSQ

UE

LOCAL MARKETS

PRODUCTIVE PLACES

ECOSYSTEMS

concept design

public presentation & comment

HA

NN

Vacant Lot Planning

A ST .

site inventory

public workshop

master plan refinement

public input

master plan draft

community approval

needs assessment

planning

schematic design

lot acquisition

public use approval

construction

lot clean up

funding

PUBLIC USE

LIGHTING IMPLEMENTATION

SIDEWALK IMPROVEMENT

A A’

VACANT LOT EXTENSION

LOT EXTENSION

ST. GA TIO

STREET SECTION

COMMUNITY AREA With a new facade and an outdoor tent structure, this space will transform into a useful, flexible space for a variety of community events.

2

ROSEDALE BLOCK CLUSTER community. TheLOTS allocation Lots are currently ofthat revenue generators maintained and is essential asowned finances by Rosedale Cluster supportBlock and promote Inc. While plans for some community development. lots are in progress, other afford opportunity for further neighborhood development.

Vacant Lot Development

FRONT

SIDE

Homewood is full of artists who are anxious to make their mark on the community. While art is generally confined by the idea of indoor museums, this designs aims to merge art with the outdoors through the creation of a flexible, outdoor art gallery. Constructed of steel beams and tension wire, art installations may be displayed and easy adjusted. While some art boards will display the artwork of professional, others will be left blank so as to invite amateur artists and children to expand their skills and imagination. Due to this adaptability, the space can serve as a large gathering area or as a series of smaller spaces.

URBAN ECOSYSTEM

DRIVING LANE

PARKING LANE

PEDESTRIAN WALK

PARKING LANE

TENT STRUCTURE

THREE RIVERS SPRAY PARK Constructed of recycled rubber, Three Rivers Spray park mimics the topography and hydrology of both Homewood and the larger Pittsburgh area. With topography, labels, and playful water features, the park is intended to be both educational and experiential.

PEDESTRIAN WALK

A RESIDENCY

While some connector lots may feature native ecosystems, sculpture gardens, playgrounds, gardens, and more, the steel jazz lot attempts to celebrate Homewood’s past while simultaneously embracing its future. While the steel jazz mural commemorates pieces of the community’s past, the lot features a meadow ecosystem that is representative of Homewood’s present and future commitment to their natural, physical environment. Overall, the steel jazz mural serves as the backdrop to the present activities of the lot, representing how Homewood’s history has and continues to impact the community.

STORMWATER TREATMENT

ART GALLERY

MARKET While indoor market space will be available for rent, outdoor market space may be utilized for more temporary and seasonal sales and events.

STEEL JAZZ LIVELY STREETS Streets should be safe, well connected, and creative landscapes that are both CURRENT LOT NETWORK functional and aesthetic. Homewood‘s urban landscape It is hopeful thatwith through is currently marked the creation of a safe, abandoned buildings as well as walkable, and authentic maintained and unmaintained landscape that the street vacant lots. While these will transcend its commonly conditions currently divide the perceived function and neighborhood, withfull planning, become of life. they will become a unifying network.

meet & greet

E.

PRODUCTIVE PLACES Finance is an essential aspect of the success of a

LOT CONDITIONS

ST.

ST.

The Rosedale Block Cluster plays a key role within the community. While its headquarters serve its present needs, it is likely that the organization and its responsibilities will expand in the future. In addition to active recreation elements such as a basketball court, four square, and hopscotch, the campus development includes expansion of building facilities, a children’s urban farm, an adaptive art gallery/gathering spaces, and a naturalistic play area. The plan also includes BR the development of Alex Hager & Sons US HT Garage. O

STREET TREES

Physical street regeneration will not only ALimprove the functioning and physical SA appeal CE of streets, but will also rejuvenate the healthy STstreet life that should occur in urban settings. .While Hamilton Avenue serves as the economic backbone of Homewood, the development of Tioga Street would serve as a residential backbone linking east and west Homewood. Overall, the plan includes the implementation of storm water management basins, urban tree plantings, and traffic calming practices.

The design of the market includes building restoration and improvement, as well as extension of the market into the outdoors HAMIL through the construction of a translucent, permanent tent structure. The inclusion ofTO this N AV E. outdoor space will not only offer a pleasant outdoor environment for the sale of goods, but will also serve as a flexible space for a range of community activities.

TIO

PLAYFUL/PRODUCTIVE PLACES

TRAFFIC CALMING/ PEDESTRIAN HIERARCHY

SED ALE

LIVELY STREETS Streets serve as the backbone of urban settings. They affect how people move and are the settings for many community activities. Current streets in Homewood are dominated by the vehicle, are poorly maintained, and are unsafe in terms of crime, drugs, and lighting. Sidewalks are cracked or covered with unmaintained vegetation overflowing from vacant lots and abandoned homes making pedestrian movement difficult.

RO

The Three Rivers Spray Park is methodically located at the conjunction of Hamilton, Oakwood, and Mulford streets. This site is not only ideal due to its shape and topography, but is also situated in close proximity to other communities, suggesting that this facility and experience could be shared between the Homewood community and its neighbors.

LOCAL MARKET With few markets, stores, and restaurants in Homewood, residents are forced to find resources elsewhere. Currently abandoned and located in close proximity to the future urban farm and Hamilton St., the old post office buildings affords much opportunity. Suggested by its size, location, and community members, this building and location is ideal for the Brushton Avenue Market. Artists, farmers, tradesmen, chefs, and so forth will have the ability to rent space within the building and market their servers. This market will therefore provide a variety of goods and services to residents and visitors in just one stop.

E.

ST.

PASSIVE RECREATION

URBAN FARM

GA

ART

PLAYFUL SPACES

TIO

REDEVELOPMENT

Connectivity and walkability are key to successful urban neighborhoods. In fact, the success of urban destinations is inherently linked to accessibility. It is important to create VACANT LOTS a network of both Includes lots destinations that are physically (playful spaces maintained, yetecosystems) unused by and & urban either private owners or lot connectors in the order to ensure connectivity public.and a true sense of unity.

URBAN ECOSYSTEMS

Includes lots that are overgrown and/or littered with garbage. LOT CONNECTORS

visitors

CONNECTIONS

DEMOLITION PROPERTIES URBAN ECOSYSTEMS Any building currently included in Despite common Pittsburgh’s demolition plan. perception, natural ecosystems are even more important in urban landscapes. The inclusion of ecosystems within urban contexts not only provides obvious environmental values, but also benefits both animal and human users. UNMAINTAINED LOTS

investors ACTIVE RECREATION

elderly

PLAYFUL SPACES Outdoor spaces within the urban landscape be aim to inspire EXISTING LOTshould CONDITIONS physical activity as well ABANDONED BUILDINGS as creativity and healthy social perceived interaction.as Playful Any building spaces should serve abandoned due to appearance as a range ofstructurally users and provide well as buildings deemed for acategorized variety of activities. unsalvageable are as Adaptability is a key aspect abandoned. to the success of playful spaces.

LOT CONNECTORS

families

SPRAY PARK PLAYFUL SPACES Spray parks within urban contexts are gaining popularity across the nation. In fact, the city of Pittsburgh is presently planning for the implementation of a number of spray parks throughout the city. A spray park within Homewood would not only fulfill the requests of young residents, but would also serve as a destination and attraction for those visiting the community.

ST.

STREETSCAPE

HOMEWOOD

PROGRAMMING children

TOPOGRAPHY

WELL

OD

In addition to preliminary studies, the creation of a vacant lot network was based on 8 community identified principles as well as community wants and needs. Five components of community design were established. These five components were intended to comprehensively represent essential aspects of well-rounded, successful communities and development.

TOTAL LOTS AVAILABLE FOR...

DEVELOPMENT FACTORS

PRODUCTIVE PLACES

connected family oriented

WO

414

LOT CONNECTORS

authentic

OAK

The project was broken into two phases, the first involved the identification and programming of every vacant lot within the identified study area. The second phase included 5 detailed designs that encompass 30 vacant lots and the reuse of the community’s abandoned post office.

HOMEWOOD GUESTS URBAN ECOSYSTEMS

walkable

AV

HOMEWOOD RESIDENTS

VACANT

LOT CONNECTORS Connectivity within urban settings is essential to both functionality and experience. While streets are a major component of urban connectivity, vacant lots provide opportunities to not only improve connectivity but also to create experiential places. Throughout Homewood, a variety of lots are programmed as connector lots. ROUNDED DEVELOPMENT While their design and aesthetic components may vary, their overall purpose is to ensure easy movement throughout the community for all residents and visitors. Connector lots should be small vacant lots that are centrally located within a lot in order to reduce unnecessary travel distance and time.

ON

PLAYFUL SPACES

healthy

US HT

magnetic

UNMAINTAINED

BR

LIVELY STREETS

ST.

safe

RD

sustainable

ABANDONED

MUL FO

88 Vacancy as a Resource... 45 281

EXPANSION

Like many urban cities, the community of Homewood South has undergone significant political, cultural, and social change. As a result, the community has physically evolved and is currently marked by scattered vacancy. While commonly perceived as marks of failure, vacancy can serve as a resource in that vacant spaces provide the opportunity to develop and improve both the physical and social networks of a particular place. The development was influenced by community input and charrette sessions and encompasses 414 vacant lots within the community of Homewood South.

A’

HOMEWOOD VACANT LOTS

HOMEWOOD VACANT LOTS

HOMEWOOD VACANT LOTS BACK

HOMEWOOD VACANT LOTS

HOMEWOOD VACANT LOTS

HOMEWOOD VACANT LOTS HOMEWOOD VACANT LOTS HOMEWOOD VACANT LOTS

The 5 detail designs include the development of a connector lot prototype, the implementation of a functional streetscape network, the planning of a community campus for the Rosedale BlockCluster, the establishment of an indoor/outdoor market, and the design of an urban spray park. course: The Pittsburgh Studio Fall 2011 media: ArcGIS, AutoCAD, Adobe Photoshop & InDesign, Sketchup, Rhino

01

VACANCY AS A RESOURCE

pittsburgh, pennsylvania

02


01 CONNECTOR LOTS

03

02 STREETSCAPE

03 ROS


SEDALE CAMPUS

04 COMMUNITY MARKET

05 SPRAY PARK

04


While some connector lots may feature native ecosystems, sculpture gardens, playgrounds, gardens, and more, the steel jazz lot attempts to celebrate Homewood’s past while simultaneously embracing its future. While the steel jazz mural commemorates pieces of the community’s past, the lot features a meadow ecosystem that is representative of Homewood’s present and future commitment to their natural, physical environment. Overall, the steel jazz mural serves as the backdrop to the present activities of the lot, representing how Homewood’s history has and continues to impact the community.

05


02

Homewood is full of artists who are anxious to make their mark on the community. While art is generally confined by the idea of indoor museums, this designs aims to merge art with the outdoors through the creation of a flexible, outdoor art gallery. Constructed of steel beams and tension wire, art installations may be displayed and easy adjusted. While some art boards will display the artwork of professional, others will be left blank so as to invite amateur artists and children to expand their skills and imagination. Due to this adaptability, the space can serve as a large gathering area or as a series of smaller spaces.

06


Structure Study Models

04

With few markets, stores, and restaurants in Homewood, residents are forced to find resources elsewhere. Currently abandoned and located in close proximity to the future urban farm and Hamilton St., the old post office buildings affords much opportunity. Suggested by its size, location, and community members, this building and location is ideal for the Brushton Avenue Market. Artists, farmers, tradesmen, chefs, and so forth will have the ability to rent space within the building and market their servers. This market will therefore provide a variety of goods and services to residents and visitors in just one stop.

07

The design of the market included building restoration and improvement, as well as extension of the market into the outdoors through the construction of a translucent, permanent tent structure. The inclusion of this outdoor space will not only offer a pleasant outdoor environment for the sale of goods, but will also serve as a flexible space for a range of community activities.


05

Spray parks within urban contexts are gaining popularity across the nation. In fact, the city of Pittsburgh is presently planning for the implementation of a number of spray parks throughout the city. A spray park within Homewood would not only fulfill the requests of young residents, but would also serve as a destination and attraction for those visiting the community. Constructed of recycled rubber, Three Rivers Spray park mimics the topography and hydrology of both Homewood and the larger Pittsburgh area. With topography, labels, and playful water features, the park is intended to be both educational and experiential.

08


The city of Rome has a history over 2,000 years long. Consequently, the story of Rome is one composed of many layers and is constantly evolving. Via Coronari, previously named the Via Recta, is a Medieval corridor that was created by Pope Sixtus IV for traveling pilgrims. While the road still maintains a quaint character and is lined with restaurants, shops, and small piazzas, this portion of central Rome is in need of more efficient and sustainable planning. This concept aims to reconsider and expand upon the natural evolution of the site. It unifies the site’s historic ties to the Tiber River and its present use. The concept considers the past and simultaneously redefines the present through the creation of a more functional and exciting pedestrian area.

course: Urban Design Studio Fall 2011 media: AutoCAD, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe InDesign, & Google SketchUp

VIA CORONARI 09

02

rome, italy


10


11


12


Italian unity was accomplished over decades of war, foreign occupancy, and political agenda. The Thorp Prize design competition was aimed at commemorating and celebrating both the fight for unity and the accomplishment of 100 years of unification as a country. La Passeggiata di Rivoluzione is a designed space aimed at creating a pedestrian experience while revealing the past and commemorating this movement in Italian History. Spanning from the Colosseum, a symbol of Italy’s foundation, to Piazza Venenzia, a space that represents Italy’s current state and government, the design serves as a literal and representative time line. Along the path, a series of platforms and lighting features physically mimics periods of peace and turmoil throughout the fight for unification. What begins as a peaceful and physically easy journey becomes rather chaotic. Finally, as Italian Unification is reached within the time line, visitors find themselves in Piazza Venenzia where a large, single light feature stands at the middle of a shallow reflection pool as a representation of North and South Italy’s unification as one. A series of stone seating walls mimic a seam, moving in and out, which is also representative of the unification. A chaotic pattern of diagonal lines is etched into the pavement, representing the fact that the country remembers the shadows and turmoil of its past, but has moved forward to a new and unified country. Light Progression

LA PASSEGGIATA DI RIVOLUZIONE rome, itlay 13

03 -x -y


Site Plan

Enlarged Site Plan

Design Views

14


ON THE

The push towards sustainability has become a global trend. Cities are striving to become greener in both design and lifestyle. Various technological advancements such as solar panels and green roofs are components of such goals. Recently, the city of Pittsburgh has made large strides in the reclamation of their landscape. Perched on The Hill in Pittsburgh’s central district, the Connelley Center will be a state of the art research and promotional facility that will serve as a guide for Pittsburgh and its surroundings. While numerous green technologies are already included in the Connelley Center plans, the inclusion of green roof technology can be expanded upon for both research and experiential purposes.

Pittsburgh encompasses hundreds of buildings. In 2007, only five buildings within the city employed green roof strategies. Since then, twenty-five have been implemented. As a research and display facility, the Connelley Center is the ideal place for green roof implementation. Unlike most greenroofs in Pittsburgh, the Connelley Center should include implement both extensive and intensive roof technology Spectacular views of downtown Pittsburgh and the desire to become an innovative technology and educational center are the two components behind the Connelley Center concept: on the edge. The inclusion of visually and physically accessible green roofs encompass the concept of on the edge in that they allow students and visitors to remain both physically and technological on the edge. course: The Pittsburgh Studio, Fall 2011 media: AutoCAD, Adobe Photoshop & InDesign, Sketchup

ON THE EDGE

15

04

pittsburgh, pennsylvania

52007

30 2010


Green Roof View

The design for the Connelley Center includes both extensive and intensive green roofs.

Maintenance View

With a southeastern orientation, the sawtooths of the Connelley Center are ideal for green roof technology and plant production. Expanding upon the education and research purposes of the Connelley Center, the extensive green roof is composed of a series of test plots. The research plots facilitate both plant and growth medium research. Researchers access the roof through an elevator located on one of the intensive roofs. Maintenance is facilitated through a series of rolling, grate, staircases. Despite the widespread implementation of greenroofs, the majority are physically inaccessible to people. As a result, many people are unaware of the environmental and experiential benefits that green roofs offer. Two intensive roofs (The Overlook and Vertical Extension) offer exceptional views of Pittsburgh and extend Pittsburgh ecosystems and inhabitants into the sky.

Vertical Extension & Sawtooth View

16


Overlook Plan

17 Overlook View


22-26 27-28

05 MOTHER NATURE’S GALLERY

04 TRANSPORTATION IN AFRICAN VILLAGES

BRANDING SOUTHERN LUZERNE

21-22

03

SPRING CREEK CANYON GREENWAY

19-20

02

01 THE LANDINGS

29-31

PLANNING

18


Centre County, especially the areas surrounding Penn State University, is continuously growing due to the beautiful landscape, the availability of resources and opportunities, and etc. The Landings is a community development project aimed at planning for such growth in a more sustainable and experiential way. The primary goal of this design is to develop an interconnected network that not only promotes connectivity for various modes of transit (vehicular, public transit, bicycle, & pedestrian), but provides a unique identity. By ensuring a range of connections between given stipulations such as Native American burial grounds, sports complexes, natural recreation areas, water features, and a vibrant, mixed-use downtown center, the neighborhood exudes a unique identity and serves as a destination for both neighborhood and local community residents. Overall, the design’s identity is fostered by the unique combination of urban-like, mixed-used, high density neighborhoods amongst natural features and usable recreational facilities. The Landings features 426 units of housing designed for a range of users and budgets, which are surrounded by 77 acres of open space.

course: Community Design Studio Fall 2009 media: AutoCAD, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe InDesign, & Google SketchUp

THE LANDINGS 19

01

state college, pennsylvania


Streetscape

Community Center

20


The Spring Creek Canyon regional analysis studio prompted the investigation of the impact of both human and natural occurrences on a macro-scale. The coarse specifically examined how natural settlement and accelerated changes in human development impacted the Spring Creek Canyon and how these factors gave rise to the canyon of today. The extensive research and mapping of this studio ultimately resulted in a thirty page document charting the evolution of the canyon lands. It was only in the final stages of the project that a honed understanding of ecological variables, history, stakeholders, and community was used to design and develop a sustainability sensitive solution. This project mirrors the layered functionality that shaped the valley, expressed programmatically as; conservation, recreation, and education.

Proximity Study

Canyon Parcels

More specifically, this project aims to develop a regional greenway system throughout Centre County. The design considers the feasibility and function of such systems and is based on the proximity to home, work, and play as well as the distance people are actually willing to travel.

SPRING CREEK CANYON GREENWAY 21

02

centre county, pennsylvania

Amenities Study


Greenway Development

Belle Bell lefonte efonte efon efont e fontte te H

H H

* *

H

H

Pleasant P l Gap Gap

H

B

B

SStat State St t e College C eg g H

B

H

Boalsburg Play Hom me m Work k

Pin P iine Grove G M illss

Fishiing

Mid-State Trail

H

Histo oric Building

B

Bus A Access Park king Furnace Acce ess Point

22


Throughout the past decade the community of Southern Luzerne has undergone physical, economic, cultural, and communal changes. While technological advancements have resulted in an easier and more convenient lifestyle for many, the advent of modern technology has made its mark on both the landscape and humanity’s connection with it. Since the 1960s, agriculturalbased areas like Southern Luzerne have been experiencing this phenomenon and community members are now recognizing the need to “think physically and geographically about change” (Snyder 2010).

“If we e wa an nt to to enc ncoura ncou oura ou r ag ge e cari riing g iin n Pe Penn n sylvan an nia ia, we e ne eed ed pla lace lace es to to carre a ab bou utt” ”T om Th omas omas as H Hil ilton il to on

agricultural based communities like Hazleton and the larger Luzerne County have been experiencing a shift from a predominately agricultural landscape to one marked by

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SOUTHERN LUZERNE

“ THINKING PHYSICALLY AND GEOGRAPHICALLY ABOUT CHANGE FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE”- Krista Synder

BRANDING SOUTHERN LUZERNE 5 Components

03

hazleton , pennsylvania

residential and

commericial development.

course: 414 Regional Studio Fall 2010 media: ArcGIS, AutoCAD, Adobe Photoshop & InDesign, Sketchup

BRANDING SOUTHERN LUZERNE

BRANDING B RANDING A T TOURISM OURISM D DESTINATION ESTINATION Since the 1960s

Attempting to think more sustainably and to consider the environmental, economic, and societal impacts of planning and design, an agrarian approach dedicated to reviving people’s connection to the land and inherently reviving southern Luzerne’s sense of place and community will be implemented. This projects aims to make Southern Luzerne a true destination with the hope that it will facilitate economic and communal growth. This project brands Southern Luzerne as a tourism destination with the goal of reinvigorating of Southern Luzerne’s sense of place and community. The project can be divided amongst 5 separate yet cohesive components: defining edges through signage, the design of a website, vehicular, pedestrian, and bicycle scenic routes, downtown revitalization, and a visitor center and gateway park.

SOUTHERN LUZERNE

WEB SITE

-

DEFINING EDGES: SIGNAGE

SCENIC ROUTES

REVITALIZATION: DOWNTOWN STREETSCAPE

TIME + FUNDS + RESOURCES

THE GATEWAY: PARK & WELCOMING CENTER

+


CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA MESIC FOREST CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA MESIC FOREST

EXISTING VEGETATION

XERIC LIMESTONE PRAIRIE

AM STRE

EXISTING MEADOW D ROA RAIL

XERIC LIMESTONE PRAIRIE

XERIC LIMESTONE PRAIRIE VISITOR CENTER

I-81

EXISTING VEGETATION

RIDGE & VALLEY MESIC FOREST

EXISTING MEADOW RIDGE & VALLEY MESIC FOREST

Rt. 924

Y

ROCK MOUNDS

MINE SITE

EXISTING VEGETATION

ENTRANCE EXISTING MEADOW

Located on a reclaimed anthracite coal mine, The Gateway serves as a welcoming center and park for the Southern Luzerne community. In both its landscape and architecture, the design aims to call attention to Southern Luzerne’s agricultural and mining past. Rather than completely transforming the site and erasing the marks of history, the design preserves the site and its historic uses and initiates a new use as a park.

The Gateway takes advantage of the natural landscape of the site and the remains of the mining industry. The landscape serves as a backdrop to a series of art pieces and installations that are intended to call attention to the natural beauty of the site and the community’s agricultural and mining past.

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25


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Located in the fertile Kilombero Valley, the village of Tundu is sandwiched between the Udzungwa Mountains National Park, the Kilombero Sugar Plantations and the Selous Game Reserve. Issues in regard to land use and planning exist and in its present state, development in the village is irregular and unplanned. As the area continues to experience population growth, controlled and planned expansion should be integrated in order to promote a more balanced relationship between people and the landscape. The commonly accepted organizational system of roads is non-existent within Tundu, as is frequent in many Tanzanian villages. Buildings define the spatial character of the village and property boundary delineation is not present. Therefore, official circulation routes are ill-defined and there is no real organizational system of the landscape, contributing to the free and unorganized movement of people and products. As a result, inter- and intra-village economies and communication are negatively affected, hampering Tundu’s ability to compete within local, national, and global markets. This also complicates the need and desire to design for sustainable population growth. This project evaluates the possible locations and feasibility for the implementation of a local road network. Existing conditions, as well as community destinations serve as the basis to 8 route alternative. The implementation of such a network that will not only aid in the every day circulation of people and goods, but also helps to mitigate the current conflict between the community and conservation initiatives. course: Community Design Summer 2010 media: ArcGIS, AutoCAD, Adobe Photoshop & InDesign

TRANSPORTATION IN AFRICAN VILLAGES 27

04

tundu, tanzania


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MOTHER NATURE’S GALLERY 29

05

state college, pennsylvania


Situated in the Arts & Architecture area of Penn State’s main campus, Mother Nature’s Gallery is an art based garden that aims to expand the boundaries of the galley into the outdoors and to provide both an educational and explorative experience for children or all ages. Seasonal plantings with art related characteristics such as color, sculptural form, and texture. are combined with both student and local artists’ work. While certain art pieces are emphasized through the use of certain plant palettes and lighting, the intention is that the garden will call attention to nature’s art in both plant and landscape form. The garden is divided into four main ecosystems (forest, meadow, ridge, and wetland), each of which contains a various plant palette. Climbing obstacles are provided for younger children, while an additional layer of ecosystem education is provided for older children through interactive signage and a series of informational programs.

course: Planting Studio Spring 2010 media: AutoCAD, Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, & InDesign

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Site Section

31


04 DEFINING DESIGN GUIDELINES

03 OPPORTUNITY PROXIMITY

02 CRIME, AGE & OWNERSHIP CORRELATION

PIAZZA NAVONA ACTIVITIES GAUGE

36

“If we e wa an nt to to enc ncoura ncou oura ou r ag ge e cari riing g iin n Pe Penn n sylvan an nia ia, we e ne eed ed pla lace lace es to to carre a ab bou utt” ”T om Th omas omas as H Hil ilton il to on

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SOUTHERN LUZERNE BRANDING B RANDING A T TOURISM OURISM D DESTINATION ESTINATION Since the 1960s agricultural based communities like Hazleton and the larger Luzerne County have been experiencing a shift

INFORMATION DESIGN from a predominately

agricultural landscape to one marked

by

residential and

commericial development.

SOUTHERN LUZERNE

“ THINKING PHYSICALLY AND GEOGRAPHICALLY ABOUT CHANGE FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE”- Krista Synder

01

33

34

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PIAZZA NAVONA ACTIVITIES GAUGE 33

Study of uses and activities within the Pantheon’s Piazza Navona. Different size and colored dots represent various activities and degree of activity.

01

rome, italy


Study into the correspondence between age, ownership, and reported crimes within State College. Study results shows that there is a correspondence between rental properties, reported crime, and age.

CRIME, AGE & OWNERSHIP

02

state college, pennsylvania

CRIME INCIDENTS

COLLEGE WEST GREEN TREE HIGHLANDS HOLMES-FOSTER NORTHERN HIGHLANDS ORCHARD PARK STATE COLLEGE SOUTH TUSSEYVIEW VALLAMONT 1-5 6 - 10 10 - 15 15 - 20 20 - 25 25 -50 50 - 100 100 - 200 200 - 400 400 - 600 BUILDINGS

RENTER + 18-21

NEIGHBORHOODS

COLLEGE HEIGHTS

<1 1-5 5 - 10 10 - 15 15 - 20 20 - 25 25 - 30


OPPORTUNITY PROXIMITY

03

hazleton, pennsylvania

Portrayal of Souther Luzerne Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s advantageous location. Luzerneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proximity to larger cities is an influential aspect in the planned branding initiative.

200 mi 175 mi 150 mi 125 mi 100 mi 75 mi 50 mi 25 mi

*

25 mi 50 mi 75 mi 100 mi 125 mi 150 mi 175 mi 200 mi

97 miles to Philadelphia 124 miles to New York City 197 miles to Washington D.C. 253 miles to Pittsburgh

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Community Principles

sustainable Design Components

safe

lively streets

magnetic

playful spaces

healthy

urban ecosystems

walkable

hazleton

lot connectors

authentic

productive places

connected family oriented

DEFINING DESIGN GUIDELINES

04

homewood south, pennsylvania

The redevelopment of Homewood was guided by community defined principles, which then evolved into design components that guided the design and reestablishment of Homewood as a functional community and a popular destination.

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ADRIENNE ANGELUCCI

adrienne.angelucci@gmail.com 209 west woodview rd. west grove , pa 19390 610.656.2785


Undergraduate Landscape Architecture Portfolio