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Ad ri an D efaz Design Portfolio


ABOUT a: 3605 Campbell St. Rolling Meadows, IL 60008 p: 847.630.0581 e: adriandefaz@yahoo.com University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois Fourth Year Undergraduate Student


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N OPEN TO LANDSCAPE

5

9

25

31

Glass and Corrugated Glass Curtain Wall

PREVIEW OF CONTENTS CLOSED (PRIVATE) TO STREET S

13

21

L I B R A R Y


SOPHOMORE YEAR

C A S A

l

4 WEEK PROJECT

E X P U E S T A A single unit house as an exercise to explore spatial understanding through the use of a tartan grid. Shifts in the tartan grid create transition and circulation spaces. The design pays special attention to functional relationships, site typology, and structural logic and site restrictions as well as materiality.

1


FACADE ANALYSIS

SPACE CONFIGURATION

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

NATURAL LIGHT FIXTURE Voids = Circulation

Glass, concrete, and steel were used in conjunction to convey an exposure of all materials and their simplicity as well as to emphasize the importance of natural light through designed openings.

Mass = Occupied Spaces

C ASA

EX PUESTA

l

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N OPEN TO LANDSCAPE

Glass and Corrugated Glass Curtain Wall

CLOSED (PRIVATE) TO STREET S

3


C ASA

EX PUESTA

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4


UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS ALLERTON PARK

JUNIOR YEAR l 2 WEEK PROJECT

E C O L O G I C A L

R E S T

A R E A

An ecological rest center that leverages ecology as a design imperative to evaluate and display natural formations and manmade interventions. The design should examine potentials in construction and innovative material combinations that are sensitive to the site and embody the principles of ecological design.

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0’ 10’ 20’

E C O LO G IC AL

REST

40’

AREA

80’

l

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The tensile fabric canopy provides shading to visitors on bright days. In rainy conditions, the fabric serves as a water collection system that directs water to an opening on its center, further carrying it down into the ground.

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Fiberglass tensile frabric with cable pocket

Corner Plate

Tieback Cable

Mast & Base

The materials of the rest area are designed together as a tensile structure system to be light, simple, and efficient. Thus, the rest area sits softly within the landscape, careful not to disrupt the natural environment while providing an open invitation to visitors as they travel through Allerton Park.

E C O LO G IC AL

REST

AREA

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JUNIOR YEAR

l

4 WEEK PROJECT

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS ALLERTON PARK

SPACE FOR PERFORMANCE A design greatly influenced by the “black box” theater form, its purpose is to integrate the building and the landscape as a single coherent design proposal. Inter-scale relationships between site and building, building and environment, materials and building, and structure and form were investigated to provide a performance space for music, dance, theater, and other types of performance for U of I students, faculty, and others.

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ORGANIZED CORE SPACES

ASSEMBLY OF SPACES

HIERARCHY OF SPACES


service storage

w dress room

performance Area outdoor performance area

green room

m dress room

w

m

entrance

0’

S PA C E

FO R

25’

50’

100’

PERFO RM AN C E

200’

l

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11


Brass Color Transition

Brass Railing Assembly

glow transition contrast of day and night colored light wells behind the brass railings distribute light throughout the facade as they reflect off the rail, providing a colorful backdrop for night performances and events. hierarchy of spaces through materiality at DAY

concrete wall

hierarchy of spaces through materiality and light at DAY

metal framing

brass railings

S PA C E

FO R

PERFO RM AN C E

l

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JUNIOR YEAR

l

6 WEEK PROJECT

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS ALLERTON PARK

SUMMER INSTITUTE FOR THE ARTS Intended to draw students from U of I and across the nation and the world, the summer institute for the arts is designed to create a strong programmatic connection between facilities at the park and academic and everyday life on the U of I campus as it offers living, learning, and performing spaces. Careful attention was given to tectonics, ecology, and sustainability through environmentally sound landscape and building design.

13

Parti Organization


0’

25’

50’

100’

200’

Order to Chaos

Facility Enclosement

wind

light

Filtration System

circulation

The facility follows the organic scattered tree form of the landscape. The living and administrative, symbolizing an organized order of life, slowly progress to a scattered, chaotic order, representing the nature of the academia. As they progress, the rectilinear form creates a powerful contrast with the organic forms of the landscape. The academic areas sit lightly on the landscape as simple steel and glass frames while the living and performing spaces serve as boundaries through heavy materials such as concrete. Finally, the disconnection of the buildings provide a filtration system for environmental factors such as wind, light, and circulation.

S U MM E R

I N S T ITUTE

FO R

TH E

ARTS

l

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T H E P E RFO RM IN G

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0’

S U MM E R

I N S T ITUTE

FO R

5’

10’

TH E

20’

ARTS

40’

l

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T H E L E A RNING AND TEACHING

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

0’

5’

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

17

10’

20’

40’


T H E LIVING 0’ 2’ 4’

8’

16’

aa accesible dorm

bb standard room

aa

bb

S U MM E R

I N S T ITUTE

FO R

TH E

ARTS

l

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19


S U MM E R

I N S T ITUTE

FO R

TH E

ARTS

l

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CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

U R B A N

JUNIOR YEAR l 3 WEEK PROJECT

B L O C K

The project investigates the neighborhood scale with interventions occurring at a block scale. Encompassing multiple programs and building types, the design should respond according to basic urban design principles and develop clear formal strategies. A developing understanding of preservation, program organization, building types, and floor plates & sections is a key objective.

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N. ORLEANS ST.

N. SEDGEWICK ST.

W. HURON ST.

0’

25’

50’

100’

200’

URB AN

B LO C K

l

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Program Site Location Program Configuration

rce

il &

Reta

me Com

tality

pi Hos

y

denc

Resi 23

1

2

3

4

5


DIVERSITY The design offers an opportunity to have essential elements of the city (commercial, hospitality, and residency) intertwine and coexist together within one block and one building to maximize everyday life and efficiency. The result is a diverse unit that provides a versatile and flexible use to the public.

Section Perspective

URB AN

B LO C K

l

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JUNIOR YEAR

l 8 WEEK PROJECT

LINCOLN PARK, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

LIBRARY Choosing a site near a public space (the “L” CTA station), the library must incorporate, reject, or respond to various layers of the city such as human influx and transportation systems. The project iterates relationships between architecture and the city while emphasizing and advertising a cultural building to maximize and encourage public use, productivity, and advancement. Preservation is seen through the library as it reuses recycled CTA train tracks for façade materiality as well as for multiple interior space configurations.

L I B R A R Y

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N. SHEFFIELD AVE. N. SHEFFIELD AVE.

W. FULLERTON AVE.

0’

20’

40’

80’

160’

LIB RARY

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0’

5’

10’

20’

40’

Egress System

FOURTH FLOOR PLAN BUILDING CIRCULATION

Library Space

THIRD FLOOR PLAN 27

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

FIRST FLOOR PLAN Floor Programs: 1 - Entrance Lobby Service

2 - Children’s 3 - Computer 4-6 - Reading Area Data Area Study Areas

7 - Offices & Terrace


Customizable Spaces

Metal Cap Flashing

Brise Soleil Anatomy and Light Dispersion

Wood Blocking

Insulation Column

Leisure Brise Soleil Tieback

Wood Slats

Suspended Ceiling

Shading Configuration

Insulating Glass Unit

Reading/Study

Finished Flooring

Concrete Brise Soleil

Group Work Spaces

Drip Edge

Concrete Foundation

LIB RARY

l

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LIBRARY

29

0’

5’

10’

20’

40’


Interior View Stacks

Double Glaze Curtain Wall

Periodicals

Air Pocket

.

N

TO

FU

ER LL

E AV

LIB RARY

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CHAMPAIGN, ILLINOIS

SENIOR YEAR l 14 WEEK PROJECT

INSTITUTE OF ADVANCED GL ASS STUDIES An exhibit and research institute for glass located Champaign, Illinois. The site is located on the corner of Neil and Washington Street, across the nearby Children’s Museum. The new facility’s main attraction feature is Dale Chihuly’s Sun glass sculpture which will be in display in the main exhibit space. The facility’s main goal is the advancement of glass materials in today’s world of emerging technologies. Through research, education, and technology exchanged of academic, industrial, and government forces, the institute is an essential driving force in emerging glass technologies and engineering.

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Base Program

Exhibit Space Extrusion

WASHINGTON ST.

NEIL ST.

3

Exhibit Configuration to Orpheum & Site

4 2 1

0’ 10’ 20’

40’

80’

Private Space Isolation

1. bioswale 2. exterior gallery 3. service area 4. orpheum

The design recognizes and faces the Children’s Orpheum, suggesting a future connection to share information and exhibit material. Thus, the space separating both buildings becomes a crucial component of the site, open to integration. I N S T I T U T E

O F

A DVAN C ED

G LAS S

STUDIES

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FIRST FLOOR PLAN

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

BB

janitor’s closet

staff toilet

BB

equipment room mechanical room

storage

service area HVAC equipment

kitchenette

library

storage

office space

work room

AA

orientation room

AA

w

elev./ mech

m

w

m

director/assistant office

gift shop

coffee shop administration office exhibit/display space

lobby/entrance

observation space

exhibition space

CC

CC

0’

33

5’

10’

20’

40’


Suggested Integration

Site extention to Orpheum private

Expansion of exterior gallery and circulation spaces public

Oprheum and Institute Open Interaction

Site access and egress

21

25

16

17

20

27

20’ - 0”

12’ - 0”

12’ - 0”

12

2-3

12’ - 0”

6

7

27

12’ - 0”

I N S T I T U T E

O F

12’ - 0”

A DVA N C ED

GLAS S

STUDIES

l

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20’- 0”

30’- 0”

16’- 0”

22’- 0”

30’- 0”

20’- 0”

30’- 0”

16’- 0”

24 - 0” 12’ - 0” 18’ - 0”

18’ - 0”

12’ - 0”

24 - 0”

24’- 0”

30’- 0”

24’- 0”

22’- 0”

SECOND FLOOR FRAMING PLAN

BOILER

VAV5

ZONE 4

ROOF FRAMING PLAN

CHILLER

ZONE 1

ZONE 1

AHU2 VAV5

MECHANICAL ROOM

ZONE 4

AHU1

VAV1

VAV1

COOLING TOWER

COOLING TOWER

VAV4

VAV4

VAV3

VAV3

VAV2

VAV2

ZONE 3

ZONE 3

ZONE 2

ZONE 2

FIRST FLOOR HVAC PLAN

SECOND FLOOR HVAC PLAN

LEGEND:

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SUPPLY

RETURN

RADIATORS

SUPPLY DIFFUSER

RETURN DIFFUSER

VAV BOX

0’

5’

10’

20’

40’


FIRST FLOOR HVAC LAYOUT

SECOND FLOOR HVAC LAYOUT

I N S T I T U T E

O F

A DVAN C ED

GLAS S

STUDIES

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3:

4:

Angle Anchor 20” deep steel I-beam 1/4” Anodized sheet-aluminum sunscreen louvre Steel Bolt Tube Connection 4’ Aluminum Sunscreen fin

Metal Parapet Flashing Blocking Rigid insulation 1/4” Sheet Aluminum Panel 8” steel I-beam EPDM rubber roof membrane Roof Insulation 4” Metal roof decking 20” steel I-beam

CC 0’

4

2: 3” Metal floor decking 12” Deep steel I-beam

3

Grated Cap Cover Double glazing curtain wall Post and rail facade; aluminum sections Angle Anchors Spandrel Glass Drywall ceiling

2

1: 4’ Sunscreen sail/fin clad with sheet aluminum 5” Aluminum Tube Steel Frame Grating Electric Pivoting Motor

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1

2’

4’

8’

16’


I N S T I T U T E

O F

A DVAN C ED

G LAS S

STUDIES

l

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OTHER

DETAIL HAND DRAWING BUILDING RESEARCH CENTER CHAMPAIGN, ILLINOIS


JUNIOR YEAR l 6 WEEK GROUP PROJECT PARTNERS: ALEX CHINDERLE, JP HARMON, DORIAN SOSA

OBSERVATION TOWER

.

The objective of this structural project was to integrate design concepts and the mechanics of loads and materiality through calculations. Triangles, known to be strong structural shapes, were manipulated accurately to create a unique structure overlooking a cliff. The result is an observation tower meant to function structurally and aesthetically for visitors. OBSERVATION

STRUCTURE

P

-M

P

EXPLODED AXON


STAIR DETAIL

B2 W10x15

B3 W10x19

UPPER LEVEL STRUCTURAL PLAN

B2 W10x15

B1 W8x13

LOWER LEVEL STRUCTURAL PLAN

G1 W24x68

1-1

DETAIL 7-1

DETAIL 1-1

WEST ELEVATION

DETAIL 1-2

1-2

SOUTH ELEVATION


HABITABLE SPACE A sophomore year project highlighting design composition, sketching, rendering, and basic hand-drafting skills to create a habitable space using a wall plane strategy.


SECOND FLOOR PLAN

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

WEST ELEVATION

WEST SECTION


PAVILION A sophomore year project that observes form, composition, hierarchies, organizational and ordering principles along with proportion concepts relating to both spatial development and faรงade design.


FIRST FLOOR PLAN

WEST ELEVATION

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

SECTION


Undergraduate Portfolio