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JORDAN EBERLE Canadian Hockey Hero

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ADRENALINE Regina Sports Dec/Jan. 2009-10


TABLE OF CONTENTS

December/January 5 Gear up to...

Features

Whether you drive out to Mission Ridge for the day or head to the mountains for a week, be properly outfitted in the latest and greatest snowboard gear.

04 Welcome

Hit the slopes

06 Cougar Women`s Basketball

16 Jordan Eberle

Jordan Eberle has grown his hockey career here in Regina, now collecting goals and victories with the Regina Pats. He`s been drafted to the Edmonton Oilers, but this Christmas he`ll be going for gold with Team Canada at the World Junior Hockey Tournament on home ice.

08 In Regina...

Skate Saskatchewan

10 Get to Know... David Haines

12 Back to the Field 14 Sports Personality

20 Forever & Today

Brent Bobyck

George Reed

One of Saskatchewan`s greatest legends has returned. George Reed, forever tied to the Saskatchewan Roughriders, has moved back from Calgary to what has become his hometown.

18 Focus On... Roller Derby

22 Event Calendar www.adrenalinereginasports.com

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FROM THE EDITOR Adrenaline: Regina Sports Issue 4: December/January 2009-2010 Published by: Adrenaline Regina Sports Editor-in-Chief: Julie Folk Administration Manager: Allie Folk Sales & Marketing: Juan Sanchez Contributors: Christeen Jesse, Maurice Laprairie, Collin Stumpf Printing: Impact Printers

Happy Holidays!

Distribution: Canada Post ISSN: 1920-4698

The team of Adrenaline: Regina Sports wishes you a wonderful holiday season. The football season ended in heartbreak, but we celebrate the successes of the Saskatchewan Roughriders and look forward to next season. Now is an exciting time in the city. For hockey fans, one of the most anticipated competitions of the year begins on Boxing Day – the World Junior Hockey Championship. This year, it’s taking place right in our home province.

To advertise: advertise@adrenalinereginasports.com

Jordan Eberle played a huge role in last year’s Canadian win. This year his hometown fans will cheer him on.

Website: www.adrenalinereginasports.com

As the snow falls, there are many other sporting opportunities out there – head to Mission Ridge to ski or snowboard, or pack up and drive to the mountains of Alberta or B.C. Pull out the cross-country skis, snow shoes, or snow skis, or try out snow skating, as David Haines tells us about this month.

Cover photo: Jay Roach/AdSpark

Take it inside to curl, figure skate, play hockey or broomball. Or stay outside to speed skate or have fun on an outdoor rink. Sport doesn’t always have to be organized – it can be anyone getting out, being physically active, and enjoying the day. This is our December/January issue to leisurely enjoy in between your busy holiday activities. We’ll be back in February with even more exciting sports, teams, athletes, and events. Should you miss us, don’t forget we’re always updating our website at www.adrenalinereginasports.com, where you can find the latest scores, schedules, and sports news. Cheer hard, Julie Folk Editor

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Contact: Adrenaline: Regina Sports (306) 751-0787 info@adrenalinereginasports.com

ADRENALINE Regina Sports Dec/Jan. 2009-10

Creative Direction : Jay Roach/AdSpark Copyright covers all contents of this magazine. No part of the publication may be re-used or copied without the expressed written consent of Adrenaline: Regina Sports. GET YOUR COPY OF ADRENALINE Western Cycle J & J Sports River City Sports Track & Trail/Sunshine & Ski West Soccer Rugby Shop University of Regina Java Express, Stone’s Throw, Second Cup Southland Mall Victoria Square Mall Major Medical Centres 1 YEAR SUBSCRIPTION JUST $20/year! Email: info@adrenalinereginasports.com


GEARING UP

Gear up to … Hit the Slopes It’s December, the snow is beginning to fall and the temperatures are dropping; snowboarding season is here. With the help of Doug Elder, owner of Off Axis Boardshop, we have created a guide to the latest, freshest, and most stylish snowboard accessories of the season. Don’t get left in the cold -- check it out.

ANON REALM goggles

Put an end to foggy goggles with the new technology of the Anon Realm. These goggles feature the unique Air Mesh ventilation system: a removable strip on top of the goggles that lets in air and eliminates fog. The thick foam face padding and crystal clear lenses provide total comfort and clarity.

BURTON: COMMAND

ladies’ jacket

This super-stylish 3-in-1 ladies jacket includes a weatherproof shell and a fleece hoodie; zip them together for -40 degree temperatures or wear them as separates on milder days. The Command features a removable waist gaiter to keep snow out and warmth in. The “Pit Zips” maintain ventilation, and the loose fit will ensure comfort without bulkiness.

SPECIAL BLEND: BEACON men’s jacket

The Beacon jacket by Special Blend fits loose in the body, enabling snowboarders to perform tricks without being restricted. It features an attached hood, under-arm ventilation, and a built in glove-holder. Its bold pattern is sure to be noticed on the slopes.

By Christeen Jesse

BURTON CARTEL EST bindings

Cartel EST bindings create ultimate snowboard control by providing unlimited stance options and by enhancing board flex and board feel. Intense cushioning in the hi-back forms to fit your leg, supplying comfort all day long.

BURTON CUSTOM V-ROCKER snowboard

Snowboarders love the V-Rocker for tricks and for riding terrain. The new rocker technology brings snowboard tips and tails off the snow, providing a loose, free ride while eliminating edge catch.

THIRTYTWO: LASHED boots

These boots provide comfort and cushion as well as a strong heel hold. They feature a 3-D Molded Tongue, which creates additional comfort for the foot and shin. Lashed boots are lightweight, flexible and appealing to all snowboarders.

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Cougar’s culture Hard work, dedication, and success

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here is a pattern on the University of Regina Cougar women’s basketball team roster. Look down the list of players. Almost every hometown reads “Regina, Saskatchewan.” There’s an ongoing trend of quality in Regina basketball as the Cougars continue to succeed with a team of homegrown players. “We have a Regina-based team with some extra individuals who add awesome talent to our team,” said fifth-year player Becky Schmidt, as 11 of the 13 players are from the Regina area – something highly unusual for anywhere but here. Local talent means head coach Dave Taylor doesn’t have to look far when it comes to recruiting. He knows the Cougar program of excellence can continue based on the strong development in the city.

programs and worked with kids. Kids in Regina get a lot of opportunities to play basketball and start at a young age.” Looking back at the Cougars’ national title team in 2001, the roster again was made up of Southern Saskatchewan players. Last year’s silver medalists were the same. It’s becoming the norm as players in the city aspire to play for the green and gold. “The basketball community is so close-knit here,” said Stacy Walker of the Cougars. “You grow up watching the Cougars and get inspired in that way… the kids end up knowing us, so it seems realistic for them to have that dream of playing for the team….Why,

“The big reason is RCBA, the community basketball program,” said Taylor. “It does a great job, and Regina was ahead of the curve… That flows into the high schools and we have very competitive high school leagues. On top of that, there have been a number of individuals who started club

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ADRENALINE Regina Sports Dec/Jan. 2009-10

if I could play for one of the best teams in the country, would I even look at going anywhere else?” “As kids, you grow up wanting to be a part of the Cougars,” added Schmidt. “I believe (the team) is one of the most successful, and you grow up wanting to play with them and achieve that status, so you work hard for it…. You look at the Cougars and they’re your role models and heroes.” Many Cougar athletes give back into


the community, either while they are playing or afterwards, working or coaching in Regina. Taylor said the players are the best recruiters, as kids in Regina have many Cougar memories. “We’re really cognizant of wanting to build locally,” said Taylor. “We get more fan support, we get more community support, and that helps us become even more successful. If we’re going to get kids from outside Regina, it’s to fill a specific need that we’re missing.” The Cougars have a large fan base to watch local players, and that fan backing creates an attractive program for Regina girls. “Because of the support in terms of fans and fundraising, we can compete with almost any team in the country in terms of what we do and how we prepare,” said Taylor. “We have phenomenal support.” It’s a continuing circle that means success in the league, which was evident at the CIS national championships in Regina last year. “We obviously had the talent and the effort to get to nationals,” said player Carmen Stewart, “but I think having that (sold-out) home crowd advantage was huge for us to keep us going and battling.” “We honestly have the best fans in the country for women’s games,” added Walker. “We always have

people here – not just our parents – who actually want to see us play and it’s a great feeling.” The Cougars are a different team this year after graduating seven players. Last year they were the deepest team in the league while this year they have a smaller margin of error. But Taylor said it’s easy to bring the group together when not only are they familiar with each other, but coming in the coaches know the attitude and characters of the players. “We are already accustomed to how each other plays, as we’ve played against each other and together on Team Sask,” said Stewart. Once on the Cougars, the tight group bonds together and welcomes in the few from outside the city. “The Cougars have always had a culture of hard work, dedication, and success,” said Schmidt. “It’s been in the culture as long as I can remember, and it’s something that keeps cycling through.”

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IN REGINA

Skating Saskatchewan

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ring all of the top figure skaters of Saskatchewan together, and there’s a rink full of talent, competition, and friendship. The 2010 BMO Skate Canada Saskatchewan Sectional Championships, held in Regina on November 13, 14, and 15, was just that, as the provincial championships showed off the best of Saskatchewan. The competition moves around the province each year, and Regina showcased its own skaters while hosting an excellent field of competitors. Regina skater Garrett Gosselin, who won his age category for the sixth time, enjoyed the chance to skate his program and see his friends. “I really like this (competition) because all the skaters from Saskatchewan are brought together, and I get to see how everyone’s doing and watch all of my friends,” said Gosselin. “It’s kind of nerve-wracking hoping that my friends will skate well and qualify to the next round with me.” Gosselin didn’t have any competition in the Junior Men category, and so automatically moved to the next round, the West Divisionals in Mississauga, Ontario, from which 14 skaters move to the national competition. But that doesn’t mean he doesn’t deserve his spot. Gosselin placed second in junior nationals last year, and has set high goals for himself. “I hope to receive what’s called an international assignment… and skate at Junior Grand Prix all over the world,” he said. “And then through the next few years, I hope to move up to seniors eventually – the highest level. And one day become the Canadian champion and make it to the Olympics.”

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A road like this isn’t always the easiest to take. Gosselin, in Grade 12, lives in Saskatoon as that’s where his coach, Sylvie Wandzura lives. Next year he will most likely move to Barrie, Ontario. But this is where it all started, in Saskatchewan. “I can use this (competition) to my advantage when I don’t have any additional pressure on me and I can just skate the programs,” he said. “But I like competitions where there are other skaters and higher competitors and I get energy from them. I get a rush of adrenaline when I’m competing against them, and I like that and I like learning how to control that. Here the goal is to skate my best.” Skate Saskatchewan is an event that all skaters in the province look forward to as a goal they hope to achieve. Technical representative Margie Sanderson, who ensures the event runs smoothly and on time, said this competition pushes all figure skaters in the sport that draws athletes from all over Saskatchewan. “For a child growing up on the prairies, a great amount of our time is winter, and this is a sport that they can take part in very small towns and have instructors,” she said. The competition features skaters of all levels, from national champions – such as senior pairs provincial champions Paige Lawrence and Rudi Swiegers of Wawota – to beginner pre-novice skaters. For some skaters, the provincial championships are the perfect place to perform and try the high level of competition. Novice skater Christine Laprairie of Regina skated in her first provincial championships this year, and was excited for the event.

ADRENALINE Regina Sports Dec/Jan. 2009-10


“I just wanted to go out there and do what I practice every day, and skate my best,” said Laprairie. “I was in ballet for about 12 years, and I like to perform.” Laprairie had several additions to her program, and upped her difficulty for higher points, as in the competitive stream there is a different marking system. “She’s a sponge for information, and I think she’s going to find she’s very strong at performance and a very good jumper… she’s looking forward to great things in the future,” said Barb Roberts, who coaches Laprairie with Cathy Wright. “Her best feature is her work ethic. She’s a great role model for the club (Skate Regina) for how hard she works and trains. She’s a joy to work with.” Ice dancing pair Jaden Duong and Kaytlyn McKay were also skating in their first provincial championships together, although they’ve skated individually before. It’s also the first of any type of competition the dance partners have skated in together, as they formed their partnership only one month ago when Jaden’s partner retired from skating. “It took a little bit, but it came together really fast,” said Duong; “It was a challenge at some times, but we just worked together,” added McKay. They skated their compulsory and free dances well, and won the silver medal at provincials. As a team they helped each other out and supported each other and are now looking towards the Saskatchewan Winter Games in February and the Canada Games next year. “They have done an amazing amount of work in a very, very short period of time,” said their coach Cathy Wright. “Usually training like this would be a year prior to this competition, and they’ve done it in less than two months.” That’s the spirit of Saskatchewan and of the Skate Saskatchewan provincial event – competing hard and coming together in friendship and support.

Photos: Opposite page, from left: Kaytlyn McKay & Jaden Duong, Garrett Gosselin; Photos by Julie Folk. Rudi Swiegers & Paige Lawrence; photo by Maurice Laprairie. Above: Christine Laprairie. Photo by Maurice Laprairie.

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GET TO KNOW

David Haines S

nowskating is a growing sport, and David Haines is moving right up with it. The 17-year-old from LeBoldus High School discovered snowskating with his friends, Mitch Serbu and Austin Welter, and they’ve gone from playing with a toy to sponsored riders. Haines is sponsored by Icon, one of the two major snowskate companies. Haines talked to us about the sport in general, as well as his ambitions. Adrenaline: Regina Sports: How exactly would you describe snowskating?

DH: One of the Icon riders was at the Yedi Jam this year. He saw us and talked to the owner, who is a rider himself. The rider said something to him about the three of us, and he got me to send him a video at the end of that year. ARS: Do you skateboard quite a bit too?

David Haines: It’s skateboarding on snow. We go to the skateboard park or do stair sets or find unique features. You can do a lot of things in snowskating you can’t do on a skateboard. Say on a skateboard there’s grass leading to a stair set – you can’t do it. Whereas on a snowskate it’s possible.

DH: Yeah, and I do a lot on my snowskate in the summer, just learning new things and getting a better feel of a new board.

ARS: How did you first get involved and progress?

ARS: What type of rider would you say you are?

DH: I had a buddy who had a snowskate in grade 7 that we used on backyard hills. Then Austin bought a wood performance deck. We heard about a competition (Yedi Jam) in Whitefish, Montana. We went that year and Mitch placed second, then it just went from there. We all got sponsored last spring.

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ARS: You’re sponsored by Icon. How did that come about?

ADRENALINE Regina Sports Dec/Jan. 2009-10

ARS: How do you learn new things? DH: We really learn our stuff from the riders who have been around since 1998 and have been with the sport. We learn a lot from videos.

DH: I have a lot of creativity on stair sets. That’s mostly what we have in Regina. ARS: Have you had any big wipeouts? DH: At the new skate plaza in Regina, there’s a down-flat-down rail, and no one would try it. I went for it, and the second time I bruised my hip pretty bad. I didn’t snowskate for two weeks after


because I was too sore. But I went back and landed it there weeks later. ARS: When is the best time to snow skate? DH: At night, when we light up a spot. It reminds you of the competition. In the winter, Austin, Mitch, and I go pretty much every day if we can. Late in the year when it’s really cold, we go if we don’t have a lot of footage, but it’s not that fun. ARS: Do you videotape most of what you do? DH: All of it. ARS: How long does it take to land or master a new trick?

Next up for Haines is the Yedi Jam competition in Whitefish, Montana in February. He’s also doing a team trip with his other Icon team members, and may go to Rhode Island for his company’s Icon Classic. For more information on David and Icon, see www.iconsnowskates.com.

DH: I’d like to say first try, but it takes a few times, depending on what it is. On average, five or six times. On the first attempt you try to get the feel of the spot and try not to fall hard, just get comfortable. Then you start getting a little bit closer. ARS: What other sports do you play? DH: I curl in the winter. We won the qualifier spiels and are going to provincials. In the summer I golf – not as competitively as I used to – and work at the Wascana (Country Club). ARS: What are your goals beyond high school? DH: Growing snowskating by selling snowskates and continuing to snowskate for more people to watch us and learn about the sport. We try to skate more and get people to see it. I’m going to go to the University of Regina and go into Business Administration. I’m going to go into either accounting or marketing. If snowskating goes well, I might go into marketing and work for Icon, but I have no idea what will happen.

Photos courtesy of David Haines

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Photos: Lisa Swallow helps Regina Thunder quarterback Reid Quest rehab his knee

Getting back on the field Injuries happen. Chronic or acute – an overuse injury or a one-time instance – they are unwanted but can happen to any athlete at any time. It’s important to treat them properly in order to get back on the field,on the ice, or in the gym as soon as possible. This is when an athletic therapist can be of extreme help. He or she is trained with the knowledge to work through the injury and treat it in such a way that each individual will heal as fast as his or her body can. “An athletic therapist would be someone who specializes in musculoskeletal-based injuries that tend to be sport related,” said Lisa Swallow, a certified athletic therapist at Stapleford Physio in Regina. “They’re certainly a specialist in the area of bone joints, soft tissue type injuries, and they’re experts in the area of being able to rehab the injury all the way from the acute stage through to return to play. They have the skills and abilities to analyze mechanics that are required for the sport, and patterns and those kinds of things in order to

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ensure that people meet the abilities and demands of their sport.” Athletic therapists treat a variety of sports injuries – from football to gymnastics, or from an elite athlete to an ordinary person who needs to get back to a job rather than a sport. Different injuries come in every day, and every body and every injury may need to be treated a bit differently. “There’s the science in practice and there’s the art in practice,” said Swallow, who works with many sports teams in the city, including the Regina Thunder Football Club. “The art comes with working with that individual, and the differences that you’ll see with different clients. Some people will heal faster, some people will take longer. Sometimes you’ll run into things like fear of re-injury, so there are psychological components you’re addressing at the same time…. You can have three sprained ankles that affect the same ligaments and structures in three different people, and the rehabs will go completely different.” What type of sport the athlete is rehabbing for is also important,

ADRENALINE Regina Sports Dec/Jan. 2009-10

depending on how the muscles, ligaments, and joints are used, and the chances for re-injury. But an athletic therapist make be sure the athlete returns at the proper time. Many athletic therapists are involved with a particular team or organization, and can see an injury through from the actual incident through the treatment and back to the return. Other times the therapist may simply see the injury later on, but can still use the rehab principles accordingly. Prevention and education are another aspect of the athletic therapist’s job – education on what needs to be done in the rehab process and why it will work, and on how to prevent injuries in the future. “We certainly want to give people the tools to take with them at the end of the day so they can self-manage and prevent a problem in the future. If you can educate them and self-empower them to have that knowledge and ability, that’s really important,” said Swallow. She also talked about chronic injuries and how it’s important not to just try to work through them. “Eventually it will become a problem,


and when it does it’s when it’s starting to affect their performance. They should come before it gets to a point where their performance in declining.” To look for an athletic therapist or other service provider, it’s very important to find someone who has the proper credentials, as education and certification is vital to receiving the correct treatment to heal your body in the short term and keep it healthy for the long term. The Saskatchewan Sports Medicine and Science Council is a great place to find contacts and direction for services. Swallow said success means preventing injury as well as treating it, and helping the athlete to get back to his or her best. If she is covering an event and doesn’t have to do anything, that’s a good day. If she has helped prepare a team in the offseason and injuries are prevented in season, that’s a success. And when you bring someone back to health, that’s a success too. “When you are able to assist and help somebody meet a goal that they have set or be able to do what they like to do, again that’s where it comes down to the focus is always on the function,” said Swallow. “If they’re functioning and competing and doing well, then you’ve done your job.”

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SPORTS PERSONALITIES

Born to Skate Dame College, Bobyck decided instead of playing in the Western Hockey League for the Regina Pats – to whom he was drafted – he wanted education at the same time, so went to the University of North Dakota. He said it was a good choice, and offered him great experiences, as he played with high quality players and scored big goals to win the NCAA championship.

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rent Bobyck could skate forever.

In fact, he has. He skated through midget hockey at Notre Dame, college at the University of North Dakota, and a professional career across North America and Europe. He’s now sped back to Canada, where skating has become his career as an elite power skating instructor. “(Skating) is one of the reasons I’m doing what I am doing today,” he said, “because I was blessed with the ability to skate and I was fortunate enough to have some good preparation.” When Bobyck, 41, was developing his own stride, power skating wasn’t available. He took a different route; when he was eight-years-old, his mother put him into figure skating. “It was excellent for learning your edges and learning your transitions, doing crossovers and maneuvering both inside and outside edges. The strides are a little bit different, but the concepts are definitely the same,” he said. After playing midget hockey at Notre

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He’s also got a few other highlights to share. Bobyck was drafted to the Montreal Canadians, and then played in both North America and Europe: in the American Hockey League, the East Coast Hockey League, the Colonial Hockey League, the International Hockey League and the Super League.

In one stint with the Canadian National Team, Bobyck played for Dave King on a line with Chris Draper and Mike Blaisdell. “Mike was on the right side, Chris Draper was our centre, and I was on the left side,” said Bobyck. “Chris was a couple years younger than me, but he and I could skate pretty well. Mike was eight or nine years older than us, and I remember him saying, ‘I’ll be in the high slot tonight – you guys will be chasing the pucks!’” Bobyck also played for Blaisdell on the Sheffield Steelers in Europe. Bobyck always had a great deal of respect for Blaisdell as a great coach who brought teams together for success.

“I’d say in Europe, one thing that I “Also with Team Canada I had Tom enjoyed was the size of the rinks,” said Renney as our Bobyck. “I always had the natural ability of coach,” said “I liked being able to skate... but I always wanted Bobyck. “I’ve had the idea to know why and how it worked.” great coaches of playing right from North on the - Brent Bobyck Dakota, with Gino bigger ice Gasparini, Dean Blais, John Marks… surfaces, having more room to really good hockey coaches.” maneuver and using your skating abilities.” Bobyck has used all of that coaching experience in what he does today. He Bobyck was in Europe for only a few began helping teach hockey schools days when he met Lynne, to whom he when he was 15 at Notre Dame, and has now been married to for 14 years even when he was playing professional and has two daughters with, Kayley hockey, he would come back to Canada and Kennedy. He liked the country and teach power skating. and the hockey but also enjoyed playing for Canada. “I always had the natural ability of being able to skate, I had the “It’s such a buzz having the background with figure skating, but I opportunity to represent your always wanted to know why and how it country,” said Bobyck, who played for worked; I was always trying to study,” Team Canada three times. “Anytime he said. “I always had a good rapport you get that chance, it’s always such a with the kids. It was a natural thing. great honour.”

ADRENALINE Regina Sports Dec/Jan. 2009-10


Parents saw my enthusiasm and that I really enjoyed doing it. I knew there was something special there.” Brent and Lynne had been coming back to Canada in the hockey offseason, and when they came back after Bobyck’s hockey career, his intention was to teach power skating and combine it with personal training, as he didn’t think power skating would be busy enough to be a full-time job. “And then it just happened so quick I couldn’t even do the personal training,” said Bobyck. “It caught on. It was like fire; I couldn’t believe it.” From there, his focus was on the ice, his true passion. Bobyck began opening doors by doing camps around the province. Now he has been a skating coach for players drafted to the NHL, like Alex Plant, who was drafted by the Edmonton Oilers, Matt Calvert, who went to the Columbus Blue Jackets, Garrett Mitchell and Joel Broda, who were drafted by the Washington Capitals, and Matt Delahey who went to the New Jersey Devils.

Brent Bobyck instructs his power skating students.

“My first year of bantam I worked with (Bobyck) every week, throughout the season too,” said Mitchell. “He picked up my arm swing, and noticed my feet wouldn’t come back to the middle at the end of my stride, so I ended up wide tracking. I now get my foot back to the middle, and it’s made me a much better skater.” Mitchell added that as he’s moved up from bantam to midget AAA to WHL to Under-18 to NHL camps, skating becomes more and more important at each level. He said Bobyck was a great person to learn from.

“I don’t think I’ve seen a faster skater – as fast or as powerful – as him,” said Mitchell. “And we had tons of fun with him, even if it was 7:15 in the morning.” Bobyck also works with kids as young as seven, teaching proper techniques and muscle memories. He works with the stride to ensure it works for the skater. One younger skater he’s worked extensively with is his daughter, Kennedy, now 8. She’s learned the proper way to skate and can really fly with power and speed. Bobyck is also coaching Kennedy on a tier one novice team. It’s not his first time coaching – he also coached the Junior Pats, a AAA spring team, a few years ago, which got him going in coaching. Now with his business built up, he can spend more time coaching Kennedy and hopes to move up with her through her hockey days. “You take all the things you’ve gathered from your good coaches… and you try to take as much as you can and give it to these younger kids,” said Bobyck. “Plus, I want to keep learning to get better, and never get to the point where I know everything. I know some, and I want to keep filling up my C Drive. It’s never ending.”

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FOREVER & TODAY

Building Saskatchewan’s Rider Pride G

eorge Reed and the Saskatchewan Roughriders. The man and the team go handin-hand, and have for the past 46 years. Which is why it makes sense that Reed has return to his adopted hometown and been welcomed back as if he never left. “It almost feels like I haven’t been gone in the way in which people treat me,” said Reed from his office at Casino Regina, where he has been working since February this year. Reed is one of two of the most remarkable and recognizable names in Roughrider history. Reed and Ron Lancaster’s photos adorn the sides of Mosaic Stadium, and their names sprawl across the backs of Rider jerseys on game days. Their history with the club will forever remain, as they helped make Rider Pride into what it is today.

George Reed

Bob Hughes covered the Saskatchewan Roughriders for the Leader-Post throughout Reed’s time with the team. He said it’s unbelievable the way in which his reputation remains. “I emceed an event at the Casino not long after Photo courtesy of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame & Museum (Reed) came back,” said Hughes. “George and I were sitting at one table, and there were current Riders, but not to that extent… That changed the image and Roughriders at another booth. People were all coming to direction of this football team, when those two played here. ask George for his autograph – they wanted him. The guy hasn’t played here since 1975 – it was 34 years since he was I think Glenn Dobbs, when he played here for a couple of years in the early ‘50s, he was a big hero here, but nowhere here – and they still remember him. It really is an amazing near the status of those guys because they played here for thing.” so long and had so much success.” The days of Reed and Lancaster with the Riders was truly the beginning of Rider Pride. Reed said it all started in 1963 with the “Little Miracle at Taylor Field” – when the Riders came back from a 26-point deficit in a two-game total point match against the Calgary Stampeders and won the game. The pride kept growing in 1965 when Eagle Keys took over as head coach and the team kept getting better – it was the same year Reed won the Schenley Award for MVP – progressing to 1966 with the eventual win of the Grey Cup. “You could see it,” said Hughes of the shift to a renewed passion for the team. “I think people have always loved the

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Reed started with the Roughriders in 1963, after the BC Lions traded his rights to Saskatchewan. Reed left Washington for the unknown province of Saskatchewan. He bypassed Regina and was in Balgonie when he realized he had driven right by. He ended up at Martin Ruby’s gas station. Ruby took him in to see head coach Bob Shaw. “The first thing Bob Shaw said to me was that I was too small to play fullback for him and I may catch on as a spare,” said Reed. “I would have gotten back in the car and gone back home, but I was stubborn. I stayed and when I

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Reed was only 205 pounds, but broke the arms of three linebackers who tried to tackle him – when Reed had a full head of steam, he wasn’t someone you wanted to run into. Reed’s success on the field is unparalleled in football. He broke many records, including Jim Brown’s professional football career rushing record, but Reed was never concerned about that. It was about the wins and the team.

George Reed at a recent Casino Regina media conference

walked into the dressing room I knew I should have gone back home. They had two pot bellied stoves, three light bulbs, and two showers in the place that worked… but he made that statement that I couldn’t play and that I would be the eighth fullback on the depth chart, so I just decided to stay and give it a shot and if I didn’t make it I’d go back and play in the National Football League.” Reed started the first game that year and never looked back. After the 1964 season, he thought he would return to Washington and take a job as a teacher and coach. But then Shaw left and Eagle Keys was brought to Saskatchewan. Reed and Lancaster stayed and the dynasty continued. “We really started playing for one another, and we had fun around each other,” said Reed. “We never missed playoffs, and had the ability to come back on teams when we were down to win crucial games.” Off the field, most of the team lived in the city year round, and spent much time helping various causes, whether it was helping kids raise money or pouring tea for elderly ladies. People started talking about the team, and they soon became the best drawing team on the road. “I always thought he was the silent leader on the team,” said Hughes about Reed. “He was probably the toughest player I ever had anything to do with…. In one game, the Riders put together a 100-yard drive that was to win the game. George carried the ball every play. I asked Ronnie after about that, and he said when George is like that, you’ve got to give him the ball. He said ‘when George came into the huddle on the last play of that drive, there was blood coming from his nose, tears coming from his eyes, and I thought I was going to kill him. I looked at him and said, ‘George can you go one more play?’ He said ‘oh yeah,’ ran in, and didn’t get touched.”

“The best part about the game was the locker room – being around the guys in the locker room,” said Reed. “We joked, we had a good relationship, we had a lot of fun together. Game day was like a day off for me. A lot of people don’t understand it, but I worked so hard in practice, and then on game day it was time to put things in action so it was kind of a relief.” Reed’s playing style was just unstoppable – he’d go hard and fast and hit with a toughness far greater than his size. Players today watch his highlights and are in awe. “I remember one night at a Casino reception, Wes Cates was watching these highlights and not believing what he was seeing,” said Hughes. “After he said, ‘I’ve never seen a better running back – his moves, the power.’” Reed retired after the 1975 season, and continued working for Molson’s. He was transferred to Calgary in 1984, and now he’s happy to have moved back to Saskatchewan, which became home to him during his playing days. Meeting and talking to a legend is an honour. But Reed is not a person who has ever acted bigger or better than anyone else – he just likes to share his time as much as he is able to. “I’m probably remembered as much for stuff that I did off the field as what I did on the field,” said Reed when asked why he thinks his name is still remembered so well today. “I think if you asked people, they enjoyed watching me play but they also liked that I got involved in a lot of community projects, helping out different organizations, working with different groups.” The George Reed Foundation for the Handicapped raised millions of dollars – and not just because Reed’s name was attached. As Hughes said, whenever Reed attached his name to something, he would put himself into the project as well. Just like he did on the football field - giving all of himself to the game.

www.adrenalinereginasports.com

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FOCUS ON With the release of “Whip It,” and great recruiting events such as roller skating through the aisles on the movie’s opening night, the club had 30 “fresh meat” (new members ) at their recruitment night. The next step for fresh meat is to train for three to six months, pass their benchmarks, and then the club can break into three teams to play each other and have championships. “We do all the training because it keeps us safe,” said Cookie. “We tell our fresh meats they have to work out three times on their own each week in addition to training with us, because you will get hurt if you don’t train.”

Fun & Fishnets

D

oom Cookie, Jo Di Ablo, and Kitty Killswitch sip their coffees and smile as they talk about their passion for roller derby. At the moment, they more resemble Kaeli Madill, Jodi Holliday, and Lia Skaar – but they answer to their derby names and love to speak about that side of their personality. “A big part of roller derby is creating your persona,” said Killswitch. “I’m a mom with kids, so going out there on the track as Killswitch really helps me feel that I can do this. Lia might not want to create so much carnage, but Killswitch is OK with it.” Derby names are just one part of the fun – and the challenge, as you have to register a unique name with the international federation. Roller derby was founded around a little bit of a rockabilly and punk aesthetic, so personalities come out in names, makeup, and outfits.

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“Fishnets… ruffle panties… do-ityourself mods…” said Di Ablo, “it’s definitely a persona.”

The Pile O’Bones Derby Club began in Regina in 2008. The sport had caught on again in the United States, and made its way to Canada in 2005. Girls in Regina picked up on the idea and decided they could start a club. It has been growing and with the release of the roller derby movie “Whip It,” interest is greater than ever. It also helps that it’s a lot of fun, whether you want a great workout, to get on skates and roll, or knock people over.

“Bruises are a badge of honour” - Jo Di Ablo Up until this year, the Regina club has never had enough players for a full team. Instead, they go to scrimmages, in which players are randomly selected to a team. A bout is a game of two teams against each other.

ADRENALINE Regina Sports Dec/Jan. 2009-10

Basic skills include skating, stopping, crossovers, and falls, and then fresh meat move onto cutting, manoeuvring, making their way through packs, hitting, and whipping (throwing someone forward). Regina hosted a Summer Smackdown scrimmage in the summer. More people are learning about roller derby and becoming interested in the sport. “People are starting to realize what derby’s about, and they’re pumped we have a team,” said Cookie. “It’s an exciting sport – the sport itself is intense. It’s got the contact – big hits, blows, stuff that makes everyone in the crowd wince. It’s also got a lot of spectacle and a lot of spirited women.” “We’re starting to learn the theatrical side,” said Di Ablo. “There’s no other place where I would skate by a crowd and lift my skirt up to show them my underwear.” It’s an awesome sport to watch as the crowd gets really into it, even helping up players when they get tossed into the crowd.


The women in derby become a close-knit group; and it’s not just within their own teams. A derby player can go to another city and the group will readily invite her to come train or participate in a bout. Derby is a lot about friendships as well as discovering new things about yourself. “It’s an empowering sport,” said Cookie. “You get to realize what strength and toughness you have inside you that you probably didn’t realize you had before. And that transfers to real life.” The club has two coaches – one male and one female. Males are involved in the sport in different aspects, such as coaching, reffing, and any other role they can be a part of. If they don’t join in the sport they may end up missing their wives and girlfriends, who dedicate a lot of time to play. The club continues to develop as they learn more about roller derby. They go to conferences and camps and talk to as many other derby people as they can.

The problem for the Regina club is finding practice space. Their season goes throughout the summer, because that’s when they can use the Callie Curling Club. In the winter – the true season of the sport – the curling and hockey rinks are no longer an option and they can’t find any more warehouse space.

How to play roller derby

“Until we get more known and have that buzz or somebody wants to help us out… it’s like derby – do it yourself, quick and dirty, whatever you can get,” said Cookie. “That’s our sport and that’s what we love about it.”

first whistle, four blockers (the pack)

“I’m sad I didn’t find roller derby earlier in my life,” said Di Ablo. “I fell in love with it immediately. I can’t see myself playing anything else – if there’s no fish nets involved, why do it?”

pass on the opposing team. Meanwhile,

If you think roller derby and you think girls in the ‘70s pulling hair and punching -- it’s changed. Roller derby still has personality, but it’s also a serious sport. Players are either blockers or jammers. The “jam” is a two-minute period which starts with a whistle of one of the 13 referees. On the from each team begin skating. The double whistle will blow three to five seconds after. On this whistle, the jammers start skating. The goal of the jammers is to get through the pack and then lap the pack. They receive a point for every person they the blockers’ purpose is to block opposing jammers and help their own jammers get through.

To join roller derby, you must be 19 or over. Fees are $20 a month, for practice space. See www.reginarollerderby.com to learn more or to arrange a time to go out and try roller derby.

www.adrenalinereginasports.com

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December Event Calendar

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

1

2

Thursday

Friday

3

8 pm Notre Dame @ Pat C’s

Saturday

4 7 pm Briercrest @ MHockey

5 7 pm Brandon @ Pats 8 pm Swift Current @ Rebels Track @ Friendship Games

6 2 pm Swift Current @ Rebels

7

8

7 pm Team Canada Intersquad 20

5 pm CZE vs FIN

11

12 8 pm Prince Albert @ Capitals

8 pm Swift Current @ Pat C’s 17

18

19

24

25

26

14

15

16

7 pm Team Canada Intersquad

7:30 pm Notre Dame @ Rebels

8 pm Fort Knox @ Capitals

21

22 7:30 pm Pilot Butte @ Capitals

23 6 pm CAN vs CZE

1 pm CZE vs SWE

8 pm CAN vs FIN Moose Jaw Civic Centre

7 pm SWE vs SUI Crescent Pt Place, Weyburn

5 pm RUS vs AUT

29 1 pm AUT vs CZE

30

7 pm CAN vs SWE

27 1 pm AUT vs SWE

10

7 pm Kelowna @ Pats

6 pm Prince Albert @ Pats 13 2:30 pm Swift Current @ Pat C’s

9

28 5 pm FIN vs RUS

5 pm SWE vs RUS

1 pm FIN vs AUT

31 1 pm SWE vs FIN 5 pm RUS vs CZE

Home game venues unless otherwise noted: • Pats @ Brandt Centre • World Junior games @ Brandt Centre • Pat Canadians, Rebels, Capitals @ Al Ritchie • Cougar basketball, volleyball, and wrestling @ University of Regina • Cougar hockey @ Twin Arenas Cougar sports legend • WBB - Women’s Basketball • MBB - Men’s Basketball • WVB - Women’s Volleyball • MVB - Men’s Volleyball • MHockey - Men’s Hockey • WHockey - Women’s Hockey • MWRES - Men’s Wrestling • WWRES - Women’s Wrestling

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ADRENALINE Regina Sports Dec/Jan. 2009-10


January Event Calendar

Sunday

Monday

3

Tuesday

4

2:15 pm West Central @ Capitals

10

Wednesday Thursday

5

6

Friday

7

7:30 pm Assiniboia @ Capitals

11

2:30 pm Melville @ Rebels Location TBA

12

13

7:30 pm Notre Dame @ Rebels

7 pm Brandon @ Pats

14

6 pm Kootaney @ Pats 12 pm Simon Fraser @ WVB Swim @ Canada West Championships

2

8 6 pm BC @ WVB 7 pm BC @ WHockey 8 pm BC @ MVB 7 pm Moose Jaw @ Pats 7:30 pm Battlefords @ Rebels 7:30 pm Cypress @ Capitals Location TBA

9 7 pm Medicine Hat @ Pats

15

16 7 pm Swift Current @ Pats

7 pm Edmonton @ Pats

6 pm BC @ MVB 7 pm BC @ WHockey 8 pm BC @ WVB

7 pm Saskatchewan @ MHockey MWRES & WWRES Cougar Invitational

18

19

20

21

MWRES & WWRES vs Jamestown College (dual)

24

1

7:30 pm Melville @ Rebels

2:30 pm Notre Dame @ Pat C’s Location TBA

17

Saturday

25

26

27

7:30 pm Pilot Butte @ Capitals

8 pm Notre Dame @ Pat C’s

28

22 7 pm Swift Current @ Pats

23 Swim @ Canada West Championships

6:15 pm Brandon @ WBB

1 pm Simon Fraser @ WVB

8 pm Brandon @ MBB

6:15 pm Brandon @ WBB

Swim @ Canada West Championships

8 pm Brandon @ MBB

29 7 pm Moose Jaw @ Pats

30 7:30 pm Beardy’s @ Pat C’s

6 pm Calgary @ WVB

6 pm Calgary @ MVB

7 pm Calgary @ MHockey

7 pm Calgary @ MHockey

8 pm Calgary @ MVB

8pm Calgary @ WVB

31 7 pm Saskatchewan @ WHockey 2:30 pm Battlefords @ Pat C’s

www.adrenalinereginasports.com

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ADRENALINE Regina Sports Dec/Jan. 2009-10

Adrenaline Dec 2009 Jan 2010  

Adrenaline Regina Sports December 2009 January 2010 edition

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