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2009 WINTER PROGRAMS & EVENTS

Art at the Arboretum

Soup ’n Walks

The Arboretum sponsors six art exhibitions each year, including an annual competition and an outdoor environmental art show. Please call the Arboretum at 410-634-2847, ext. 0 or e-mail info@adkinsarboretum.org for gallery hours.

Nature, Nurture, and Nutrition Saturdays, February 28, March 28, and April 25 11 a.m.–1:30 p.m. Fee: $18 members, $20 general public Pre-registration required. Call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 to register. Discover the late winter greens in the forest, search for early spring blooms, and catch the April ephemerals. Following a guided walk with a docent naturalist, enjoy a delicious and nutritious lunch followed by a brief lesson about the meal’s nutritional value. Copies of recipes are provided. During the March and April programs, participants will have the option of signing up for a one- or two-hour guided walk. February 28

Discover the Greens in the Winter Woods Mossy banks, greenbrier and bush stems, cranefly orchid, magnolia and holly leaves, Christmas fern, pines, red cedar

Baltimore painter Marc Boone’s exhibit, “What the Light Was Like,” continues through January 30. Boone’s abstract images hold a subtle and dazzling complexity of nature, landscape, water, sky, and earth.

Watch fo March 28 r Buds and E S Skunk pring Blooms arly cabbag e

MENU Caldo Verde with Kale Pasta Primavera Pumpernickel Bread with Spinach Spread

The Arboretum’s Annual Art Competition Exhibition opens February 16 and runs through March 27, with a reception on Saturday, February 28 from 5 to 7 p.m. The winners of the Leon Andrus Awards, first and second places, will be announced. The show will include two- and three-dimensional fine art by regional artists. The show’s theme—Discovering the Native Landscapes of the Coastal Plain— celebrates the Arboretum’s conservation mission and the region’s nature and landscapes.

Cranberry Nut Bars

MENU Chicken Rice Veg etable S Cabbag oup e and C arrot Sla w with Nuts Whole W heat Sco n Berries es with Pecan S weet Po tato Pie

April 25

Catch the Ephemerals and Tree Blossoms

Columbia, MD, fine art photographer and mixed-media artist Denée Barr will exhibit new works from March 28 through May 29. A reception for the artist will be held on Saturday, April 18 from 5 to 7 p.m. Barr’s work features Adkins Arboretum, as trees are an inspiration for her work. Visit www.deneebarrartnews.blogspot.com.

Spring beauty, May apple, and golden groundsel, dogwood, paw paw, sassafras, and spice bush blooms

The 2009 environmental art exhibit will feature the works of Centreville artists Mary and Howard McCoy, created onsite with natural materials. The show will open June 1.

Brown Rice with Peas, Red Pepper, and Ginger

MENU Hearty Minestrone Soup

Spiced Pumpkin Bread Baked Pineapple 1

, and blo odroot, spring beauty hickory , paw pa w, buds beech,


ADULT PROGRAMS Pre-registration is required for all programs. Call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 or e-mail info@adkinsarboretum.org for more information.

THE SECRETS OF BUDS AND BARK IN THE WINTER FOREST

Conservation Landscape Design Series

Wednesday, February 11, 1–2:30 p.m. Fee: $15 members, $18 general public

Tuesdays, February 10, 17, 24, and March 3, 1–3 p.m. Series fee: $125 members; $140 general public

Break the winter blues and discover the secrets revealed by spring buds and bark as clues to plant identification in winter and to the beautiful greenery of spring to come. Arboretum docents Julianna Pax and Mary Jo Kubeluis will lead an indoor program followed by a walk in the forest.

This series of four classes will guide you through the landscape design process from site analysis and plant selection to installation, with inspiring thoughts from leading conservation designers and stunning photographs of native plant gardens—public and private—from throughout the region. You will learn about ornamental native plants that are well suited for residential landscapes, and how to design a landscape that is functional, eco-friendly, beautiful, and brings you great pleasure and pride.

GREEN CLEANING BASICS Thursday, March 5, 1–2:30 p.m. Fee: $15 members, $18 general public

Participants are strongly encouraged to bring a diagram of an area of your property to use as a design project. The last 20–30 minutes of each class will be devoted to one-on-one consultations with the program’s teacher, garden designer Chris Pax. Participants may work on their own landscape or garden project and ask questions that are unique to their needs and interests. The four classes will cover the following fundamentals of landscape design:

Ingredients in commercial cleaners can pollute the environment both inside and outside your home. Join Maintenance Supervisor Paul McMullen and Gardener Buck Schuyler to learn about natural alternatives to toxic, caustic, and flammable cleaning products. Learn how to make your own “green” cleaning products and discuss natural products available in stores. Samples of both caustic and natural products will be on hand for comparison.

• Session 1: Tuesday, February 10 Principles of conservation landscaping, site analysis, native woodland aesthetics

PYSANKY: THE ART OF UKRAINIAN EGGS

• Session 2: Tuesday, February 17 Why native plants matter, beginning the design process with “bubble” diagrams, aesthetics of meadows and forest edges

Thursday, March 12, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Fee: $30 members, $45 general public Create a beautiful egg in a Ukrainian tradition reaching back to antiquity. These eggs use symbolic motifs rooted in nature and the cycles of life. Among the designs used are spiders and sheaves of wheat, spirals, stars and circles, bees, acorns, garlands of flowers, clusters of grapes, birds, and mammals. Designs are made with an instrument called the kistka, beeswax, and dyes. Each part of the process is symbolic. Instructor Coreen Weilminster, who learned the art from her greataunts, has been making Pysanky for almost 20 years. Bring a bag lunch; drinks will be provided. Limited to 14 participants.

• Session 3: Tuesday, February 24 Design concept and development, uniting house and setting, plant selection • Session 4: Tuesday, March 3 Inspired conservation designs, site preparation, planting and maintenance Chris Pax is a landscape designer who lives in Maryland’s Catoctin Mountains. She teaches at three area colleges on topics related to landscaping with natives, and has served on the Chesapeake Conservation Landscaping Council. She is currently completing the master’s program in Sustainable Landscape Design at George Washington University.

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ADULT PROGRAMS Pre-registration is required for all programs. Call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 or e-mail info@adkinsarboretum.org for more information.

BACK TO BASICS: BIRD-WATCHING

Journal Writing with Nature

Saturday, April 4, 8–10:30 a.m. Fee: $8 members, $10 general public

SPRING SERIES

The Arboretum’s bird population is diverse throughout the year. Join birder Karen Harris on a walk to learn the basics of bird-watching and identification. Whether you’re a beginner or just want to brush up on your skills, you’ll learn to distinguish birds by habitat, color, and head and body markings, and will practice using a birding field guide. Bring binoculars.

Workshops about discovering nature through art and words First Wednesdays in spring—March 4, April 1, May 6, and June 3, 9 a.m.–noon Fee: $15 per session, $55 for the series for members; $18 per session, $70 for the series for the general public.

GARDENING FOR A RAINY DAY: USING RAIN GARDENS AND RAIN BARRELS FOR A “GREENER” LANDSCAPE

This series features two guest presenters who will collaborate with poet Erica Weick to explore creating paper and journals and viewing the natural world through a camera lens. Each workshop stands alone and will help participants unleash their imaginations and let their creativity flow.

Saturday, April 4, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Fee: $20 members, $25 general public Gardeners are always looking for ways to keep their gardens green. Consider ways to truly “green” your garden and manage both stormwater and surface runoff. Join Arboretum staff Sue Wyndham and Coreen Weilminster for a workshop that addresses two easy methods of capturing rainwater. The morning session addresses a simple, oldfashioned technology: rainwater harvesting with rain barrels. This basic technology reuses barrels from the food industry, and helps save on water bills to ensure that plants don't suffer in the next drought.

DISCOVER NATURE WITH WORDS March 4 and June 3 Poet Erica Weick will lead planned exercises to ease the way and lead you to explore uncharted territories, to learn fun ways to see spring with all of your senses. We will walk in the forest, listen, take notice, and write. The workshop offers the opportunity for a morning of guided introspection, nature observation, and much writing. Sharing is optional. New and experienced writers are welcome, as are those who express themselves through the visual arts.

The afternoon session will explore the use, design, and function of rain gardens in the public and private landscapes. Rain gardens are an increasingly popular method for controlling and managing stormwater, roof, and surface runoff. They are innovative water conservation landscape features that blend function and aesthetics—a nice way to employ ornamental native plants in water quality issues. Optional materials may require an additional fee.

PHOTOGRAPHY AND THE MIND’S EYE April 1 Photography can trigger some interesting reflections. Images of nature can reveal truths that are new and interesting, yet profound and awesome. Join photographer Ann Rohlfing to search for symbolism through the viewfinder.

"A waster of water is a waster of better." – Old Irish Adage

NATURE JOURNAL AS ART May 6

BOTANICAL ART SERIES—EXPLORING FERNS

Join teaching artist and naturalist Maureen Mikolajczak and build your own journal. Using nature as our inspiration, we will experiment with papermaking from natural materials and create our own handmade journals. Bring dried flowers or any plant material you may wish to include in your own distinctive journal cover. A variety of artistic materials will be provided. We also will wander the Arboretum paths to enjoy the spring ephemerals and write about our experience.

Monday and Tuesday, April 6 and 7, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m. Fee: $110 members, $125 general public; limit 10 participants This workshop will focus on learning about ferns and capturing their beauty in watercolor. The two-day program will emphasize not only the unique botanical structure of the fern family but also composition and the watercolor techniques employed to complete a botanical study.

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PRESCHOOL PROGRAMS Classes are open to children ages 3 to 5. Pre-registration is required. Enrollment is limited to 15 children, so early registration is recommended. Sessions include eight classes; all classes begin promptly at 10 a.m. For further information or to register, call 410-634-2847, extension 0. The fee for a session (six classes) is $35 for members and $45 for the general public. Each class includes a snack and a craft. Programs are led by popular children’s teacher Jenny Houghton. Session 1 is on Mondays, Session 2 is on Tuesdays, 10 - 11:15 a.m.

SNOWY DAYS

TRACK DETECTIVES

February 9 and 10

March 2 and 3

Brrr! It’s cold enough to snow! We’ll talk about how snowflakes are formed, make glittery snowflake crafts, and warm up from a winter walk with mugs of hot chocolate and snowy day stories.

Who’s out and about in the cold? Learn basic track identification and find out! We’ll experiment with track reading by making some tracks of our own and look for animal tracks along the Arboretum paths. For our craft, we’ll mix up Plaster of Paris to make 3-D tracks to take home.

FOR THE BIRDS FUN WITH TWIGS

February 16 and 17

March 9 and 10

Have you ever noticed that different types of birds have different shaped beaks? Learn why with a hands-on experiment and make tasty treats to help our feathered friends weather the cold. We’ll sample some birdseed snacks after a brisk walk in the woods, sing bird songs, and read a beak book.

How can we identify trees when they don’t have any leaves? Become a master “twigger” and try your hand at a game of twig-matching. We’ll enjoy the beauty of tree silhouettes in the woods and make twig prints. Our lesson will end with a snack and tree stories.

LIVELY LEAF LITTER

SPRING COMES TO THE GARDEN

February 23 and 24

March 16 and 17

We all know that bears snooze through winter cold, but what about smaller critters like bugs and worms? Let’s go on a leaf litter adventure to find out! We’ll make a creepycrawly craft, explore the forest floor, and finish our lesson with a snack of ever-popular “dirt cups.”

Spring is just around the corner, and it’s time to visit the Arboretum’s Funshine Garden! In the garden, we’ll prepare beds for spring planting and sprinkle hardy spinach, lettuce, and radish seeds in the Bunny Patch. Back in the classroom, we’ll read garden stories and munch on some of the veggies that bunnies love to eat.

CREATIVE KIDS’ CAMP at Adkins Arboretum! Winter is a great time to plan for the coming year…from poring over seed and garden catalogs to planning your next vacation. It’s also a great time to think about summer camp! If you have a young one in your family who enjoys spending time outdoors, consider a week of summer fun at Adkins Arboretum. These popular day camps seek to foster an appreciation for and love of the natural world through hands-on, experiential learning. Preschool camps, for ages 3 to 5, are Camp Bumblebee (June 15–19) and Camp Pollywog (June 29–July 3). Camp Paw Paw (June 22–26) is open to campers ages 6–8. Camp Egret, for ages 9–12, runs July 6–12. Members enjoy a reduced rate and an invitation for early registration. Space is limited. Registration will open to the public March 31. Camp themes for 2009 are as follows: Camp Bumblebee (June 15–19) How Does Your Garden Grow? Camp Paw Paw (June 22–26) Adventure Nature! Camp Pollywog (June 29–July 3) Damsels, Dragons, and Frog Princes: A Wetland Fairy Tale Camp Egret (July 6–12) Exploration + Inspiration = Art! Visit www.adkinsarboretum.org for more details. 4


FAMILY PROGRAMS

Sense of Wonder Sundays—A Family Affair WINTER/SPRING SESSIONS The Arboretum invites the whole family for a fun-filled Sunday afternoon. Program topics include nature journaling, life in winter, gardening with kids, and wetlands. Fee: $5 per person members, $7 per person general public Pre-registration is required; call 410-634-2847, extension 0 to register.

THE NATURAL YEAR—NATURE JOURNALING FOR ALL AGES

GEARING UP TO GARDEN WITH KIDS Sunday, March 29 11 a.m.–2:30 p.m.

Sunday, January 25 11 a.m.–2:30 p.m.

Spend an afternoon in the Arboretum’s Children’s Funshine Garden. We’ll discuss resources for gardening with children, learn how the children’s garden exhibit was designed, do a little routine garden preparation, and, if the weather is right for planting, plant the Three Sisters garden plot. Pack a lunch and dress for both indoor and outdoor activities.

Make a resolution to document the natural year in 2009. Start by creating your own nature journal and participating in journaling activities that will stimulate your creativity. This family program works best with children who can draw or write. Outdoor exploration will give us much to think about and document in our new journals. Pack a lunch and dress for both indoor and outdoor activities.

WOW! WETLANDS ARE WONDERFUL ALIVE IN THE DEAD OF WINTER

Sunday, April 26 11 a.m.–2:30 p.m.

Sunday, February 22 11 a.m.–2:30 p.m.

After a spring thaw, the Arboretum’s wetland will be teeming with critters. We’ll use nets and field microscopes to investigate what is stirring in the water, and we’ll also explore why wetlands are so important to our land and waterways. Through simulation games and scientific investigation, we’ll look into what makes wetlands WONDERFUL! Pack a lunch and dress for both indoor and outdoor activities.

The quiet of winter may be upon us, but life is thriving at the Arboretum. Come to learn about which plants are blooming despite the cold, and explore the Arboretum grounds for signs of animal activity. We’ll engage in activities that demonstrate why snow is a welcome blanket for many animals, which plants can melt the snow, and what it takes for animals to find suitable shelter. Pack a lunch and dress for both indoor and outdoor activities.

ARBOR DAY 5K RUN & FAMILY FUN RUN/WALK Saturday, April 18 Registration 8–8:45 a.m., Start time 9 a.m. 5K Fee (included T-shirt): $15; and $20 day of event Family Fun Run/Walk Fee: $10/family Join fellow runners and nature enthusiasts for the fourth annual Arbor Day Run. The event, which features a 5K Run and a one-mile Family Fun Run/Walk, will kick off with a Kids' 100 Yard Dash at 8:45 a.m. Participants will catch glimpses of spring as they traverse the cross-country course plotted along the Arboretum's network of scenic forest and meadow paths. Prizes will be awarded and refreshments provided. To register, call 410-634-2847, extension 0 or info@adkinsarboretum.org. 5


CALENDAR OF PROGRAMS AND EVENTS JANUARY Marc Boone exhibit on view through January 30 Sense of Wonder Sunday, January 25, 11 a.m.–2:30 p.m.

FEBRUARY 1

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9 Children’s Program 10–11:15 a.m.

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Children’s Program 10–11:15 a.m. Art Competition exhibit opens

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Sense of Wonder Sunday 11 a.m.–2:30 p.m.

Children’s Program 10–11:15 a.m.

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Children’s Program Buds and Bark in 10–11:15 a.m. the Winter Forest Conservation 1–2:30 p.m. Landscaping 1–3 p.m.

17 Children’s Program 10–11:15 a.m. Conservation Landscaping 1–3 p.m.

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Children’s Program 10–11:15 a.m. Conservation Landscaping 1–3 p.m.

Soup ’n Walk 11 a.m.–1:30 p.m. Art reception 5–7 p.m.

MARCH 1

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3 Children’s Program 10–11:15 a.m.

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Journaling with Nature 9 a.m.–noon

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Children’s Program 10–11:15 a.m.

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12 Pysanky Workshop 10 a.m.–2 p.m.

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Children’s Program 10–11:15 a.m.

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Green Cleaning Basics 1–2:30 p.m.

Children’s Program 10–11:15 a.m.

Children’s Program 10–11:15 a.m.

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Children’s Program 10–11:15 a.m. Conservation Landscaping 1–3 p.m.

Volunteer Training 9:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m.

20 Volunteer Training 9:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m.

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27 Volunteer Training 9:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m.

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Sense of Wonder Sunday 11 a.m.–2:30 p.m.

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28 Soup ’n Walk 11 a.m.–1:30 p.m. Denée Barr exhibit opens


CALENDAR OF PROGRAMS AND EVENTS APRIL 1

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6 Botanical Art 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m.

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4 Bird-watching 8–10:30 a.m. Rain Gardens and Rain Barrels 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Guided walk 11 a.m.

Journaling with Nature 9 a.m.–noon

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11 Guided Walk 11 a.m.

Botanical Art 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m.

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Arbor Day Run 8 a.m. Guided Walk 11 a.m. Art reception 5 - 7 p.m.

Soup ’n Walk 11 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

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Sense of Wonder Sunday 11 a.m.–2:30 p.m.

Birding on Call Fee: $8 members, $10 general public Want to work on birdsongs, improve your identification skills, or brush up on basics? Birding on Call is a volunteer service for solo birders or small groups wishing to bird at the Arboretum—recently designated an Important Bird Area by the Audubon Society. Call 410-634-2847, extension 0 or e-mail info@adkinsarbortetum.org to make an appointment with an experienced volunteer birder.

GUIDED WALKS

GROUP TOURS AND “ON THE ROAD” PROGRAMS

Saturdays, April to November, 11 a.m.

Call to schedule your docent-guided group tour for more than 10 participants and for “Adkins Arboretum on the Road” community outreach presentations. Combined indoor programs and tours can be arranged. Call 410-634-2847, extension 0 or click on the “What we offer” link at www.adkinsarboretum.org for additional information and to book a tour.

Enjoy the beauty of the forest in early spring by searching for ephemeral wildflowers, skunk cabbage, and mayapple. Join a guided walk led by an Arboretum docent naturalist. Guided walks are free for members and free with admission for the general public. Tours begin at the Visitor's Center and last approximately one hour. Reservations are required for groups of more than 10 participants and can be made by calling 410-634-2847, extension 0. 7


TRIP

Southwestern Plants and Gardens of New Mexico July 13–19 $1,600 per person, double occupancy ($650 single supplement) Minimum number: 8; maximum: 20 From desert landscapes to mountain meadows, New Mexico offers incredible scenery, a diversity of plant life, and unique culture. On this five-day excursion, we will visit some of the wonderful gardens and natural landscapes of northern New Mexico, the Land of Enchantment. On Tuesday you will visit the Rio Grande Botanic Garden’s extensive gardens in Albuquerque and tour the Rio Grande Nature Center State Park’s cottonwood gallery forest. In the afternoon there will be time to visit Albuquerque’s Old Town and get a first taste of New Mexico’s traditional dishes at a welcome dinner. The next morning you travel to Santa Fe, our home base for the rest of the trip. At 7,000 feet, New Mexico’s beautiful capital city is located in the high desert. Temperatures are similar to the Eastern Shore in summer, but with such low humidity that it is always cool in the shade. You will have time to explore the Plaza with its many shops and galleries and Museum Hill with its four world-class art and culture museums. Day trips will include visiting Bandelier National Monument to learn about the ancient pueblo people, with a focus on how they used local native plants, and a hike in the Pecos Wilderness to see the beautiful mountain wildflowers and aspen and evergreen forests. Close to Santa Fe we will visit private local gardens and the Santa Fe Botanic Garden’s unique Leonora Curtin Wetland Preserve. For the farewell dinner you will have a four-course meal at SantaCafé, one of the best restaurants in the city. Your tour leader is Sylvan Kaufman, ecologist and formerly Adkins Arboretum’s Conservation Curator. She has been living in Santa Fe this past year and is excited to share her passion for the Southwest’s landscapes and plants. Local guides will lead the informative and entertaining tours of parks and gardens. The trip includes six nights hotel, breakfasts, most lunches, two dinners, transportation within New Mexico, and all admission and fees for tour stops. The price includes a $100 tax deductible donation to Adkins Arboretum. There will be several evenings free for participants to make their own arrangements for attending the Santa Fe Opera, plays, concerts, and Friday night gallery openings. For more details, pick up a brochure at the Arboretum front desk or request one by e-mailing info@adkinsarboretum.org. Any questions can be e-mailed to Sylvan at skaufman@adkinsarboretum.org.

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Native Seed - Winter 2009 Programs