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Adkins Arboretum, a 400-acre native garden and preserve, promotes the conservation and restoration of the Chesapeake region’s native landscapes.

NATIVE SEE

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PROGRAMS EVENTS

SPRING | SUMMER 2014

Summer Nature Camps, page 25 Photography and Botanical Illustration, pages 15–16 Rick Darke and Doug Tallamy, the Living Landscape, page 18

Adkins Arboretum, a 400-acre native garden and preserve, fosters the adoption of land stewardship practices for a healthier and more beautiful world. It is operated by the not-for-profit Adkins Arboretum, Ltd. under a 50-year lease from the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Native Seed is published three times a year and is distributed free to members. To become a member, visit adkinsarboretum.org. 12610 Eveland Road, P.O. Box 100 Ridgely, MD 21660 410-634-2847, 410-634-2878 (fax) info@adkinsarboretum.org adkinsarboretum.org HOURS Visitor’s Center: 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Tuesday–Saturday; noon–4 p.m. Sunday Grounds are open daily.

Arts and Culture at Adkins Arboretum With 400 acres of meadow, forest, and wetland as its pallet, Adkins Arboretum provides a rich medium for art exhibitions, musical and theatrical performances, and an ever-expanding curriculum of artistic experiences for all ages. Art at the Arboretum focuses on: • Interpreting nature and its processes, • Educating about environmental problems, and • Redefining our relationship with nature by proposing new ways to reduce human impact on the environment. Whether a site-specific sculpture installation in Nancy’s Meadow, a juried show in the Art Gallery, or a musical or theatrical performance on the grounds, the Arboretum offers an array of unique artistic presentations that celebrate and are informed by the region’s native landscape.

ADMISSION $5 for adults $2 for students ages 6–18 free to children 5 and under Admission is free for members. BOARD OF TRUSTEES Officers Ms. Sydney Doehler, President Mr. Will Cook, Vice President Mr. Henry Brandt, Treasurer Mr. Blair Carmean, Secretary Members Ms. Katherine Allen Ms. Vicki Arion Ms. Patricia Bowell Ms. Julie DeStefano Ms. Darlene Housley Ms. Carol Jelich Mr. Michael Jensen Ms. Mary Jo Kubeluis Ms. Barbara McClinton Ms. Kelly Phipps Ms. Nancy Jane Reed Mr. Alan Visintainer Ms. April Walter Trustees Emeriti Ms. Kathleen Carmean Dr. Peter Stifel

Entry, The Marion Price Art Gallery

“Art is a key element of the Arboretum’s Campaign to Build a Green Legacy,” notes Peter B. Stifel, Ph.D., honorary chair of the Arboretum’s first capital campaign to fund the expansion of its visitor’s center. “The Arboretum is connecting people to nature in the most meaningful way—by harmoniously blending the arts, culture, and natural sciences in profound and moving experiences.” The central core of the new visitor’s center will be the Marion Price Art Gallery, named for the Arboretum’s first art exhibit curator, Marion Price. The gallery, an 860-square-foot, naturally lighted space, will display traditional and contemporary art—paintings, sculpture, photography, prints, and mixed media.

STAFF Ellie Altman, Executive Director Robyn Affron, Visitor Services Coordinator Diana Beall, Receptionist Meg Gallagher, Advancement Assistant Joanne Healey, Nursery Manager Jenny Houghton, Youth Program . Coordinator Kate Rattie, Director of Advancement and Planning Michelle Smith, Bookkeeper Ginna Tiernan, Adult Program Coordinator Allison Yates, Facilities Maintenance Coordinator

“The Arboretum works collaboratively to create exhibitions of the highest quality that attract, educate, and inspire the public, incite curiosity, and spark awareness of the natural environment through art, music, and performance,” notes Marcy Dunn Ramsey, chair of the Arboretum Art Committee.

Jodie Littleton, Newsletter Editor Joanne Shipley, Graphic Designer Photos by Ann Rohlfing Illustrations by Barbara Bryan

To learn more about the Marion Price Gallery and the Campaign to Build a Green Legacy, contact Kate Rattie at 410-634-2847, ext. 33, or krattie@adkinsarboretum.org.

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The new gallery, designed by Lake/Flato Architects, will feature hardwood floors, pickled wood ceilings, and clerestory windows that allow natural light to flood the interior. Movable panels will extend opportunities to showcase larger exhibitions, as well as the display of video.

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Art Committee Marcy Dunn Ramsey, Chair Katherine Allen Barbara Bryan Howard McCoy Mary McCoy Anne Nielsen Bill Price

ART EXHIBITS The Arboretum sponsors art exhibitions throughout the year, including an annual competition and outdoor environmental art. Call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 or e-mail info@adkinsarboretum.org for gallery hours.

Untitled (stitched, fourth attempt), Marian Glebes, moth, embroidery thread, and sewing needle, 4” x 7” x 3”

Through May 30: With a sense of childlike wonder, Baltimore artist Marian Glebes collects and preserves moths, dandelion

seeds, and cicadas. In Surface Treatments, her found insects and mixed media works on paper are playful meditations on how we perceive nature and the absurdity of trying to hold onto its ephemeral beauty. There will be a reception on Saturday, April 19 from 3 to 5 p.m.

June 3–August 1: Intimate Waterscapes—up-close and wet in an urban creek presents Julius Kassovic’s stunning close-up

photographs of Takoma Park’s Sligo Creek. Trees, skies, leaves, pebbles, grasses, and occasional junk combine to form phantasmagorical waterscapes with upside-down vistas, horizons askew, backgrounds as foregrounds, and lurid but beautiful reflections. There will be a reception on Saturday, June 21 from 3 to 5 p.m. June 1–September 15: The seventh biennial Outdoor Sculpture Invitational—Artists in Dialogue with Nature

Inspired by particular sites in the Arboretum’s forest and meadow, the artists will create work in close collaboration with the landscape. During May, there will be the opportunity to talk with the artists as they install their work on site. There will be a reception and guided sculpture walk on Saturday, June 21 from 3 to 5 p.m.

August 5–September 26: Fran Skiles’s abstract landscapes are born of the light, vegetation, and moist soil she finds in the natural environments of West Virginia and South Florida where she lives. In Earth Matters, she intuitively layers photography, paint, ink, pencil, embroidery, paper, and fabric to create work brimming and energy and nuance as brilliant color sings out against earth tones. There will a reception on Saturday, August 16 from 3 to 5 p.m.

Top: Earth Paper Series VIII, Fran Skiles, mixed media/collage, 24” x 18” Left: Skylight, Julius Kassovic, digital photograph, 17” x 23”

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EVENTS

Spring Nursery Opening Weekend Spring has been slowly making its presence known at the Arboretum. Emerging skunk cabbage in the woods of Blockston Branch, the appearance of robins, and warming temperatures all make for an exciting time of year! The Spring Nursery Opening Weekend will be just as exciting. The Arboretum offers the region’s largest selection of ornamental native plants, and this season’s offerings will include an assortment of woodland flowers and spring ephemerals (those that disappear once they have flowered). Selections include cranefly orchids, commonly found on the Arboretum grounds, trillium, Jack-in-the-pulpit, and many more. ‘Creel’s Quintet’ sumac is a new shrub offered this spring. Its compact female form, coupled with purple fall colors and an interesting leaflet arrangement, make it the perfect sumac for smaller gardens.

Arbor Day Run Saturday, April 5 Registration 8–8:45 a.m., Healthy Kids Dash at 8:50 a.m., 5K at 9 a.m.

As a participant in the Marylanders Plants Trees Program, the Arboretum offers a $25 discount on any tree or shrub priced $50 and higher. A wonderful selection of larger trees is available for sale this spring: American beech (the Arboretum’s Native Tree of the Year), oak, magnolia, dogwoods, yellowwood, and silverbell.

Fee: $25 ages 16 and up, $15 ages 15 and under. The Healthy Kids Dash is free.

Join fellow runners and nature enthusiasts for the ninth annual Arbor Day Run. Participants will catch glimpses of spring as they travel the cross-country course plotted along the Arboretum’s network of scenic forest and meadow paths. Post-race festivities include refreshments, awards, and children’s activities. Register online at TriSportsEvents.com or in person at the Arboretum front desk.

The Opening Weekend sale will be held in the Visitor’s Center front parking area. Members, including those who join on any sale day, receive a 10% discount on plants, gift shop items, and books. Members who join at the Contributor ($100) level and above receive a 20% discount on plants. Sale days are crowded, so please leave dogs at home. For more information, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0. Following the Opening Weekend, the Native Plant Nursery will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Friday, through October.

Members-only Sale

Friday, April 11, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

Shop the Members-only Sale for the best selection. New members are welcome! Local musicians Ampersand will play folk and historical music during sale hours.

Public Sale Days Saturday, April 12, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. and Sunday, April 13, noon–4 p.m.

Local musicians Driven Women will play old-time music during Saturday’s sale hours (see page 22).

Having recently relocated to the Eastern Shore from upstate New York, Ampersand will perform Friday, April 11 at the Members-only Sale from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The group plays a variety of acoustic music, from historical tunes and songs (Colonial American, Civil War Era) to blues songs of the 1920s and ’30s, to modern folk music.

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Used Book Sale The Arboretum is accepting donations of gently used gardening and nature-themed books and magazines. Donations may be dropped off at the Arboretum Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Shop for books and magazines at great prices on the sale days! 4

magic

in the meadow an enchanted evening to benefit Adkins Arboretum Saturday, September 27, 2014 6–9 p.m.

SAVE THE DATE!

BROWSE the unique auction items… SAVOR delicious food by Magnolia Caterers… ENJOY a delightful evening under the stars. Phone or e-mail: Meg Gallagher at 410-634-2847, ext 23, mgallagher@adkinsarboretum.org

SAVE THE DATE!

Sunday, September 28, 2014

Nature Lessons: Looking Toward a Resilient Future She is co-author of the highly regarded book Invasive Plants: Guide to Identification and the Impacts and Control of Common North American Species.

It’s easy to become discouraged by the changes we see in the environment around us—trees choked by invasive vines, homes lost or damaged from severe storms and frequent floods, massive wildfires that threaten lives in the West, agriculture productivity impacted by the loss of pollinators. While change is inevitable, can we adopt more flexible approaches to adapt? Can we thrive in this new environment of climate change by embracing flexible alternatives and creative innovations? This symposium explores the science behind resilience in plants and animals, in our climate, and in our communities.

Resilience in ecological terms refers to the ability of natural systems to recover from disturbances. This ability depends on many factors, from the genetic and species diversity within a system to the frequency and intensities of the disturbances. Biodiversity matters in establishing resilient ecosystems, from the backyard to the large biomes in which we live. Climate change forces us to reassess conventional approaches to conservation and restoration to adapt to rapid changes.

Dr. Sylvan Kaufman, adjunct professor for George

The program for the day will include climate change experts, exhibits to educate and engage participants on climate change impacts and solutions, and artists who will portray the symposium’s theme.

Washington University’s Sustainable Landscapes Program, will present The Resilient Environment. Kaufman holds a B.A. in biology from Vassar College and a Ph.D. in ecology and evolutionary biology from Rutgers University. 5

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EVENTS NATIONAL PUBLIC GARDENS DAY

MAY 9, 2014

National Public Gardens Day

National Trails Day

Friday, May 9, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

Saturday, June 7, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

Celebrate public gardens and their special place in the community! Admission is free—enjoy a walk in the woods, meadows, and gardens. 

A walk in the woods offers solitude, inspiration, and opportunities for education and exploration. Come for a walk and receive a special discount on membership!

Celebrating Natives, the Second Annual Native Garden Tour, Highlights Gardens of Queen Anne’s County Saturday, May 17, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. and will wind its way through the towns of Centreville and Queenstown and into the lovely Queen Anne’s County countryside. Join the tour, visit the gardens at your own pace, and dine in one of Centreville’s many restaurants.

This May, Adkins Arboretum brings its second Native Garden Tour, ‘Celebrating Natives,’ to Queen Anne’s County. Seven gardens are highlighted on this tour, and each one brings something different. Besides the affinity for native plantings, many of the featured gardens showcase aspects of sustainable practices, such as composting systems, erosion control designs, rain gardens, rain barrels, and wildlife features.

Tickets are $20 in advance and $30 on the day of the tour, and are available at adkinsgardentour.org or by calling the Arboretum at 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

The self-guided tour will begin at the Queen Anne’s County Free Library in the heart of historic Centreville

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The 2015 Native Garden Tour will highlight gardens of Talbot County.

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ADULT PROGRAMS Program Registration Guidelines Registration is required for all programs. Register online at adkinsarboretum.org, call 410-634-2847, extension 0, or e-mail info@adkinsarboretum.org. Please arrive at least 10 minutes prior to program start. While the Arboretum’s 400 acres showcase its mission of land stewardship, its education programs are designed to inspire and guide both children and adults to explore and appreciate the region’s natural beauty and take action to contribute to the protection and enhancement of our backyards, neighborhoods, and communities. Programs for adults and children are offered in three sessions per year: winter, spring/summer, and fall. Members receive discounted program fees. Unless otherwise specified, advance registration is required for all programs at adkinsarboretum.org, by calling 410-634-2847, extension 0, or by sending e-mail to info@adkinsarboretum.org. Please arrive 10 minutes prior to the program starting time. Programs and walks are held in all types of weather, including light rain. If Caroline County schools are closed due to weather, then Arboretum programs will be canceled. If a program is canceled due to the threat of inclement weather, participants will be notified by phone or e-mail and offered a refund or an opportunity to reschedule. If in doubt about whether a program will be canceled, call the Arboretum or check the website/Facebook for information. Adult education programs are offered in the areas of stewardship, flora and fauna, art, music and performances, guided walks, and trips. Youth and family offerings include programs for preschoolers and homeschool families, and special programs that encourage families to enjoy time together in nature. The Arboretum’s art program includes the exhibition of art indoors and outdoors, as well as classroom instruction, workshops, and demonstrations. If you have ideas of programs you would like the Arboretum to offer or would like to become involved in the education programs as a volunteer, contact Adult Program Coordinator Ginna Tiernan at 410-634-2847, ext. 27 or gtiernan@adkinsarboretum.org, or Youth Program Coordinator Jenny Houghton at 410-634-2847, ext. 21 or jhoughton@adkinsarboretum.org.

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ADULT PROGRAMS Brooklyn Grange Rooftop Farm and Brooklyn Botanic Garden

TRIPS Wave Hill and New York Botanical Garden

Wednesday, June 4, 8 a.m.–10 p.m.

A Field Trip with Chesapeake Touring and Promotions

Fee: $110 members, $135 non-members includes transportation, driver gratuity, admission, and guided tours

Wednesday, April 30, 7 a.m.–10 p.m.

Brooklyn Grange includes two rooftop vegetable farms, totaling 2.5 acres and producing over 50,000 pounds of organically grown vegetables each year. Tour the farm located atop Building No. 3 at the historic Brooklyn Navy Yard with Brooklyn Grange president, co-founder, and head farmer Ben Flanner. Towering twelve stories over the East River, the Navy Yard Farm comprises a massive 65,000-squarefoot roof and was installed in 2012 with support from the Department of Environmental Protection’s Green Infrastructure Stormwater Management Initiative. From the Grange, we will travel to the Brooklyn Botanic Garden with its new green-roofed visitor center for a guided tour of the Native Flora Garden expansion—a newly planted area that features a cultivated pine barrens and a meadow modeled after Long Island’s Hempstead Plains. The new habitats include native species, many of them rare or threatened and most propagated from seeds legally collected in the wild.

Fee: $115 members, $140 non-members includes transportation, driver gratuity, Wave Hill admission, and guided tour at Wave Hill.

FULL

Registration required. Limit: 9

This spectacular day will begin at Wave Hill, a 28-acre public garden and cultural center in the Bronx overlooking the ext.is0totocelebrate the , 7 4 8 2 Hudson River and Palisades. Its mission 4 3 10-6 all 4gardens aiting list. to preserve artistry and legacy ofCits he wlandscapes, tand to d e d d a e to explore human connections its magnificent views,band to the natural world through programs in horticulture, education, and the arts. The visit includes a guided tour and lunch on your own at The Café. After lunch, we will travel 5 miles to the New York Botanical Garden, a National Historic Landmark, featuring one of the world’s greatest collections of flora within its 250 acres of natural terrain, dramatic rock outcroppings, rolling hills, waterfalls and ponds, 50-acre old growth forest, and Enid A. Haupt Conservatory and the new 3.5-acre Native Plant Garden designed by Oehme, van Sweden. The new native plant garden combines contemporary architectural elements, dramatic water features, sustainable materials, and diverse plantings to celebrate the elegant beauty of native plants, the drama of the natural landscape, and the Garden’s commitment to education and conservation. The NYBG grounds are free on Wednesdays. Participants can purchase a NYBG All-Garden Pass for $20 that will provide access to the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory.

The bus departs from Aurora Park Drive in Easton at 8 a.m. and from the Route 50 westbound and 404 Park and Ride at 8:20 a.m. An additional stop at the 301/291 Park and Ride for Chestertown-area participants will be added upon request. The bus will depart for home at 6 p.m.

Pack a lunch to eat on the bus. Dinner can be purchased at the Brooklyn Botanical Garden Terrace Café. Please contact Ginna Tiernan at gtiernan@adkinsarboretum.org or 410-634-2847, ext. 27 with your pick-up location.

Priscilla Timken, travel planner and executive director of Chesapeake Touring and Promotions, will facilitate this trip. Transportation is a 10-passenger executive-style van. The van departs from Aurora Park Drive in Easton at 7 a.m. and from the Route 50/404 westbound Park and Ride at 7:20 a.m. An additional stop at the Route 301/291 Park and Ride for Chestertown-area participants will be added upon request. The van will depart from NYBG at 5:30 p.m. to return to the Route 50/404 Park and Ride at approximately 9:30 p.m. and Aurora Drive at 10 p.m.

Brooklyn Grange Rooftop Farm and Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Photo by Les Loup.

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Registration is required for all programs. Register online at adkinsarboretum.org, call 410-634-2847, extension 0, or e-mail info@adkinsarboretum.org. Please arrive at least 10 minutes prior to program start.

FAUNA AND FLORA Spring Ephemerals: The Fleeting Flowers Sunday, April 27, 1–2:30 p.m. Free for members, free with $5 admission fee for nonmembers Registration required. Limit: 20

Discover the botanical treasures of early spring: trout lilies, Virginia bluebells, spring beauties, pink lady’s slipper, and more. Spring at Adkins Arboretum offers a dazzling diversity of flowers that emerge and are gone in a blink. Join Arboretum docent and Maryland Master Naturalist Margan Glover on a walk to find these early flowers, sure signs of spring!

Eat the Landscaping Sunday, May 18, 1–3 p.m. Photo courtesy of Longwood Gardens

Longwood Gardens

F ee: $15 members, $20 non-members

Add beauty to your gardens and food to your table by mixing ornamentals and edibles in your landscaping. Elizabeth Beggins will inspire you to step outside the boxwood with vegetables, fruits, and herbs sure to enliven your planting beds and supplement the foods you prepare. All you need is some sun and some creativity to become a successful edible gardener. This program offers the complimentary option of a light seasonal lunch if desired. Contact Ginna Tiernan at gtiernan@adkinsarboretum.org or 410-634-2847, ext. 27 if you wish to enjoy the lunch option. Lunch begins at 1 p.m.; the program follows at 1:30 p.m.

Thursday, September 18, 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Fee: $65 members, $80 non-members includes transportation, driver gratuity, admission, and guided tour

Longwood Gardens is a living expression of all that its founder, Pierre S. du Pont, found inspiring, meaningful, and beautiful. From the intricate fountain systems to the meticulous gardens to the architectural grandeur, aweinspiring discoveries await at every turn. The focus of the day will be the new Meadow Garden, recently expanded from 40 to 86 acres with additional open meadows of native flowers and grasses, wetlands with moisture-loving plants and animals, a birding overlook high on a hill, four pavilions, the historic Webb Farmhouse, and galleries and additional seating throughout. The design approach of this newest garden demonstrates best practices in stewardship, preserving and improving the quality of its environmental resources—its ecosystems, biodiversity, water, soil, air, and human connections. There will be plenty of time to explore the other gardens and to lunch at your choice of cafés.

Foraging Sunday, June 8, 1–3 p.m. Fee: $15 members, $20 non-members Registration required. Limit: 35 Bill Schindler, Ph.D. returns to the Arboretum to lead this hands-on workshop that will immerse participants in the exciting, sustainable, and nutritious world of foraging for wild plants. Go into the field to learn how to identify, harvest, and prepare many of the season’s wild edibles. It doesn’t get more local or organic than this!

The bus departs from Aurora Park Drive in Easton at 8 a.m. and from the Route 50 westbound Park and Ride at Route 404 at 8:20 a.m. An additional stop at the 301/291 Park and Ride for Chestertown-area participants will be added upon request. The bus will depart from Longwood Gardens at 3 p.m. and will return to Aurora Park Drive at approximately 5 p.m.

Dr. Schindler is a professor of anthropology and archaeology at Washington College. His research focuses on prehistoric foodways and technologies. He incorporates wild foods into his and his family’s diet on a regular basis. Please note that foraging by individuals is not permitted on the Arboretum grounds.

Please contact Ginna Tiernan at gtiernan@adkinsarboretum.org or 410-634-2847, ext. 27 with your pick-up location.

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ADULT PROGRAMS GIFTS Tracks and Scat Sunday, September 7, 1–2:30 p.m. Fee: $15 members, $20 non-members

What do animals leave behind, and how can you tell which animal left it there? Learn to identify the tracks and scat of local wildlife with educator and naturalist Jenny Houghton. Hone your tracking skills on a nature walk, interpret track stories, and make scale models of scat to test your fellow trackers in training.

Native Seed Collection and Post-Harvest Handling

Sweet Bay Gifts is stocked for spring with new selections for the gardener, including knee pads, gloves, hats, and children’s gardening supplies. A new item, the Gardener’s Hollow Leg, provides a third hand when pruning, weeding, or cutting flowers, or an extra pocket for treats while walking your dog at the Arboretum. Botanical Interests organic seeds are now in stock, just in time for GMO-free spring planting! New notecards featuring the stunning images of iPhoneography artist Karen Klinedinst join Charley Harper stationery and the perennially popular Winding River reversible women’s jackets.

Saturday, October 4, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Fee: $35 members, $40 non-members Registration required. Limit: 15

Join horticulturist Leslie Hunter Cario as she shares her expertise in growing native plants from seed. Discover the basics of collecting, processing, storing, and preparing seeds for propagation as well as sustainable harvest considerations. This is a hands-on workshop, so please dress for the weather and plan to hike to various plant communities within the Arboretum for field identification and seed collection. Following the field activities, participants will work on post-harvest handling at the Arboretum’s Native Plant Nursery. Seeds harvested will be shared by program participants for their own gardens and the Native Plant Nursery to supplement its future production projects. Please bring a bagged lunch.

Many fans of Beatrix Potter’s classic children’s tales don’t realize that the author was a landscape and natural history artist, farmer, and conservationist. In her later years, she was responsible for the preservation of large areas of the Lake District (Great Britain’s largest national park) through her gifts to the National Trust. Beatrix Potter’s Gardening Life by Marta McDowell is just one of a broad catalog of gardening and nature books.

The Living Landscape, a collaboration by Rick Darke and Douglas Tallamy, will be available in the gift shop in June. This definitive guide to designing a beautiful and biodiverse home garden explores layers of the landscape and the role the plants within them play in the larger environment. Petite Retreats, which suggests ways to renew the mind, body, and spirit without leaving home, is co-authored by Master Naturalist, Arboretum volunteer, and Shinrin-Yoku instructor Anna Harding.

Leslie is a Certified Professional Horticulturist involved with the native plant industry since 1997. As the principal of Chesapeake Horticultural Services, LLC, she works as an independent consultant with projects such as nursery development, inventory management, seed sourcing, and horticultural/botanical education. Previously she directed a wetland plant nursery with a strong emphasis on seed production of native species from local ecotypes. She also has experience collecting and processing seeds for a major seed supplier. She is a recent graduate of LEAD Maryland Foundation’s fellowship, where she took part in extensive training in agricultural and natural resource leadership, and currently serves as Chair of the Chesapeake Conservation Landscaping Council.

Sweet Bay Gifts highlights the work of local artists, including pottery created exclusively for the Arboretum by Jean Higgins, jewelry by Sue Stockman, and much more. Come for a visit, enjoy coffee, Wi-Fi, and a seat with a meadow view, and browse the newest nature-inspired gifts!

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Registration is required for all programs. Register online at adkinsarboretum.org, call 410-634-2847, extension 0, or e-mail info@adkinsarboretum.org. Please arrive at least 10 minutes prior to program start.

Beekeeping Workshops

Pollinator Week: June 16–23

Fee: $15 members, $20 non-members per workshop

Seven years ago, the U.S. Senate unanimously approved and designated a week in June as “National Pollinator Week,” marking a necessary step toward addressing the urgent issue of declining pollinator populations. Pollinator Week has blossomed into an international celebration of the valuable ecosystem services provided by bees, birds, butterflies, bats, and beetles.

Registration required. Limit: 20

Join University of Maryland Extension Apiculturalist Mike Embrey for one or all of these beekeeping and crafting workshops. All programs are held from 1 to 3 p.m.

Pollinating animals are vital to our delicate ecosystem, supporting terrestrial wildlife and contributing to healthy watersheds and other benefits. Visit Adkins Arboretum during Pollinator Week to learn how to support and celebrate pollinators. Pick up locally collected Liatris seed packets, and Stick Bee Houses with instructions for making more at home. Sweet Bay Gifts will feature pollinator books and gifts, including bee condos handcrafted by Arboretum volunteers, and children’s activities will be offered in the lobby. On Saturday, June 21, join a Summer Flora walk with Margan Glover, and stay to learn about Monarchs with Jim Wilson. Watch for announcements of beekeeper visits to the Arboretum throughout the week. Pollinator Week was initiated and is managed by the Pollinator Partnership. http://pollinator.org

Saturday, April 12: Open Hive Frames. This demonstration and information session will be held at the hive location near the Native Plant Nursery. Meet on the Visitor’s Center back patio at 1 p.m. Saturday, May 10: Split and Divide a Hive. Mike will offer this demonstration at the hive location near the Native Plant Nursery. Meet on the Visitor’s Center back patio at 1 p.m. Saturday, July 12: Honey Extraction. Learn to harvest honey at this indoor demonstration held in the Native Plant Nursery. Saturday, October 11: Building Equipment. Join Mike for this demonstration in the Nursery Potting Shed.

Saturday, June 21 Summer Flora

Saturday, November 8: Candle Making. Learn to pour and wrap beeswax candles in this demonstration and hands-on workshop in the Nursery Potting Shed. Each participant will leave with a few candles.

10–11:30 a.m. Fee: Free for members, free with $5 admission fee for non-members

Enjoy the transition from spring to summer at Adkins Arboretum. There’s always something in bloom in June! Join this wildflower hunt with Maryland Master Naturalist Margan Glover and enjoy a leisurely stroll through woods and meadow to discover what’s in bloom.

Monarchs 11:45 a.m.–12:45 p.m. Fee: Free for members, free with $5 admission fee for non-members

The population of Eastern Monarch butterflies has suffered a precipitous decline, dropping from approximately one billion in 1996 to 33 million in 2013. The entire 2013 population at their overwintering site in Mexico occupied only 1.5 acres. Jim Wilson will discuss the Monarch migration, the causes

for the Eastern Monarch’s decline, and, most importantly, what individuals can do to help the Monarch. He will distribute nectar plant seeds and milkweed seeds for those who want to start a Monarch way-station. June is not too late to help the Monarchs that will be laying eggs and departing for Mexico in August, September, and October.

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ADULT PROGRAMS STEWARDSHIP

Landscape Design Workshop

Designing for Waterfront Landscapes

Fee: $95 members, $120 non-members, $150 member couples

Sunday, October 12, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

Saturday, April 12, 10 a.m.–noon

Registration required. Limit: 14

Fee: $35 members, $45 non-members, $55 member couples

Three experienced landscape designers and avid gardeners will lead this all-day intensive design workshop that addresses the typical challenges of homeowners in the Chesapeake Bay region. Come with your challenges and dreams, and leave with a landscape plan, ideas, and confidence to transform your home landscape for your enjoyment and pride.

Registration required. Limit: 16

Waterfront properties present homeowners with a slew of both daunting challenges and precious opportunities. Join landscape designer and native plant enthusiast Chris Pax, a graduate of the George Washington University sustainable landscape design master’s program, for a look at plants that are good for waterfront landscape conditions and to review some of the special rules and regulations that may apply in your county. You may bring your plat diagram, photos, and a bag lunch to enjoy with the group afterward—Chris will be available until 1 p.m. to answer questions about your specific property.

Topics include analyzing the challenges and opportunities of your property; developing a plan for circulation and unique features; designing “rooms” for outdoor living; choosing materials for patios and walks; incorporating sustainable practices; and selecting ornamental plants. The day will be organized around brief presentations followed by breakout sessions for one-on-one work with the instructors. The designers will offer practical advice on getting started, what to do with wet areas, how to lay out a path, how to screen an undesirable view, and plants recommended for specific conditions. Step by step, you will develop your own landscape design.

When registering, call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 or e-mail info@adkinsarboretum.org to specify the county in which your property is located. This program is an excellent prerequisite for the Landscape Design Workshop offered on October 12 and provides wonderful shopping ideas for the Native Plant Nursery Opening Weekend.

Workshop leaders are Arboretum Executive Director Ellie Altman; landscape architect Barbara McClinton, formerly of the Baltimore landscape architecture and land planning firm Daft, McCune, Walker; and landscape designer and native plant enthusiast Chris Pax, a graduate of the George Washington University sustainable landscape design master’s program. Bring lunch. A continental breakfast and break refreshments will be provided. Also bring a property plat, photos, and other documentation of your property. Worksheets and handouts on native plants will be provided.

Introduction to Vermiculture: Build and Take Home a Worm Bin

Hold a retreat at Adkins Arboretum!

Sunday, October 5, 1–2:30 p.m. Fee: $30 members, $35 non-members

Join Jenny Houghton and learn the power of using earthworms to grow stronger seedlings and enrich your garden soils, houseplants, and ornamentals. Class participants will learn an easy, low maintenance way to significantly reduce kitchen waste, reduce your carbon footprint, and create a fantastic soil amendment. Students will build their own portable worm bin and leave with the knowledge and tools to get started vermicomposting!

The Arboretum gallery is available for rent by nonprofit and corporate groups. The gallery seats 40 and can be arranged to suit a variety of meeting needs. Participants are welcome to tour the grounds free of charge during the rental period. Docent-led tours and catering may be arranged. For more information, contact Robyn Affron, Visitor Services Coordinator, at 410-634-2847, ext. 0 or raffron@adkinsarboretum.org.

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Registration is required for all programs. Register online at adkinsarboretum.org, call 410-634-2847, extension 0, or e-mail info@adkinsarboretum.org. Please arrive at least 10 minutes prior to program start.

ART Dogwood (Cornus florida) Thursday and Friday, April 24 and 25, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m. Fee: $95 members, $120 non-members Registration required. Limit: 12

Found throughout Maryland, the dogwood tree is a dearly beloved harbinger of spring. This watercolor class taught by Lee D’Zmura will focus on the history, folklore, and botany of the dogwood’s delicate flowers as participants create a watercolor botanical art piece. Various techniques for painting leaves, including colored pencil and watercolor and dry brush, will be demonstrated. Some watercolor experience is necessary. Bring lunch and snacks to keep you comfortable through the day.

Photo Capture and Enhancement

is non-technical and visually informative, and includes both outdoor shooting with the instructor and classroom instruction. This workshop is designed for increasing your photographic skills and the joy of using your camera.

Saturday, May 10, 8 a.m.–noon Fee: $45 members, $60 non-members Registration required. Limit: 12

Josh has presented photography workshops at the Smithsonian National Orchid Show, the U.S. National Arboretum, the U.S. Botanic Garden, and for public gardens, preserves, and horticultural societies across the region. In addition to teaching in the Smithsonian Studio Arts Program and at the Corcoran School of Art and Design, he exhibits his work regularly and speaks to camera and garden clubs. Note: Bring ALL photo equipment, including a digital memory card, extra batteries, and camera manual. A tripod is optional but is highly recommended. Point-and-shoot cameras are welcome and can work quite well, but be reminded that these cameras do have limited options.

Join Joshua Taylor, Jr. to learn how to get the best images from your camera and how to enhance your images in Photoshop/Photoshop Elements. The Arboretum’s spring landscape will be the setting for practicing newly acquired skills. This hands-on workshop covers basic shooting techniques for capturing spring splendor and image processing, such as cropping, compositing (combining two or more images), content-aware fill, and converting to black and white. If you’re new to Photoshop/Photoshop Elements or are considering purchasing photo editing software, this workshop will be most helpful in bringing you up to speed. The program

Photo by Joshua Taylor, Jr.

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ADULT PROGRAMS Concrete Leaf Casting Friday, June 6, 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Fee: $40 members, $50 non-members Registration required. Limit: 12

Cast a live leaf into stone to create a unique garden ornament or bird bath. Crafters Sandy Bemis and Chris Eckert will guide you through the process every step of the way while Dick Bemis mixes concrete for your use. All materials, including large leaves, will be provided, but feel free to bring your own leaf if you prefer. Castings require a one-week setup time before they can be unmolded, so please bring a large strong flat board (minimum 24” x 30”) to create your leaf on and transport your casting home. This workshop will take place in the Nursery shed. Wear work clothes and shoes, and bring long rubber gloves and an adventurous spirit.

Jewelry Workshop

Introduction to iPhone Photography

Friday, August 8, 10 a.m.–noon

Sunday, September 21, noon–4 p.m.

Fee: $35 members, $50 non-members

Fee: $55 members, $65 non-members

Registration required. Limit: 12

Registration required. Limit: 8

Create your own bracelet, necklace, pin, or earrings with forged copper or brass wire.  Embellish with smaller gauge wire to add glass beads, stones and beach glass. Sue Stockman will instruct and guide you as you learn the techniques needed to create a piece of jewelry that reflects your individuality and unique journey. All materials are included.

Inside your iPhone is one of the most inspiring, capable, and fun imaging systems for photography. More than just a snapshot device, the iPhone is a powerful creative tool for creating art. We now carry both a camera and a darkroom with us! Liberated from rushing home to our computers, we can shoot and process our images in the field, learning what works (and doesn’t) to make our captures match our vision. In this workshop taught by Karen Klinedinst, you’ll learn camera capture techniques that are exclusive to iPhone photography; discover which apps are best for contrast, color, sharpening and stylizing your captures; and study combinations of apps that transform your images into fine art.

Celebrated local artist Susan Stockman exhibits her jewelry, mosaics, and sculpture throughout the United States, and her pieces reside in collections worldwide. Her popular classes and workshops encourage personal creativity and growth on many levels.

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Karen is a landscape photographer and graphic designer. She graduated with a BFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore. She has exhibited her landscape photography in galleries throughout Maryland and the East Coast, including a solo exhibition at Adkins Arboretum of her landscape iPhoneography. Three years ago, she started experimenting with her iPhone to create photographic images on a trip to Cornwall, England. On this trip, she discovered that the iPhone can be a powerful creative tool by using many different apps to manipulate the photos that she had captured with her phone. With her iPhone, she’s able to create a new way of expressing the landscape. Please note that Introduction to iPhone Photography is also offered on Sunday, June 15. The program is full, but interested participants may be added to a waiting list by calling 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

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Registration is required for all programs. Register online at adkinsarboretum.org, call 410-634-2847, extension 0, or e-mail info@adkinsarboretum.org. Please arrive at least 10 minutes prior to program start.

Movie in the Afternoon

Photo by Zan Maddox

Photo by Frank Konhaus

Bending Sticks Sunday, August 24, 1–2 p.m. Fee: Free for members, free with $5 admission fee for non-members Registration requested. Limit: 35

The feature-length documentary Bending Sticks celebrates the 25-year career of internationally renowned environmental artist Patrick Dougherty, who has created hundreds of monumental, site-specific sculptures out of nothing more than saplings. The film follows the artist and his collaborators during a year of stick work and reveals Dougherty’s process, personal story, and inspirations. The heart of the film is the creation of five Dougherty commissions in different locations, from the North Carolina Museum of Art to the gardens of Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, DC, as the artist and many others transform piles of sticks into energetic lines and exuberant forms. Dougherty’s projects invite collaboration and engage communities in the making and viewing of his very public art.

Bending Sticks explores how the artist’s childhood—spent rambling through the woods and building forts and hideouts with his four siblings—fueled his career and nurtured the prolific, insightful artist he is today. The time is right for a film about this great living artist who is at the top of his game after a quarter century of stick building in such places as Tacoma, Honolulu, Dublin, Brooklyn, Chateaubourg, and Tokyo. http://bendingsticksthefilm.com

Photo by Zan Maddox

Close-up Photography Saturday, October 25, 8 a.m.–noon Fee: $45 members, $60 non-members Registration required. Limit: 12

Capture intimate views of nature’s display of fall colors, textures, and patterns on the grounds of Adkins Arboretum. Learn and discover how to create striking close-up images with basic photographic equipment. The use of macro lenses, extension tubes, close-up filters, diffusers, and reflectors will be demonstrated during the shooting session with instructor Josh Taylor, Jr. Participants will receive online pre-workshop instruction and an illustrated handout. The workshop includes a morning photo shoot with the instructor and a classroom session to reinforce close-up techniques. This workshop is open to all levels of photography.

Photo by Joshua Taylor, Jr.

Note: Bring ALL photo equipment, including a digital memory card, extra batteries, and camera manual. A tripod is optional but is highly recommended. Point-and-shoot cameras are welcome and can work quite well, but be reminded that these cameras do have limited options. 15

ADULT PROGRAMS BOTANICAL ART SERIES WITH LEE D’ZMURA Botanical Illustration Thursdays, June 26, July 3, 10, 17, and 24, 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Red maple sumara by Lee D’Zmura

Fee: $115 members, $140 non-members Registration required. Limit: 12

Drawing is the backbone of botanical art—a painting is only as good as the drawing beneath. An important step in developing proficiency in botanical art, this introduction to botanical drawing will focus on the development of skills and techniques necessary to capture the essence of flowers, fruits, pods, and leaves. Form, scale, depth, and perspective will be emphasized. Each participant will produce a detailed botanical study in pencil. Instructor Lee D’Zmura is an award-winning botanical artist whose experience as a landscape architect enriches her watercolors. With a focus on historic landscape preservation, her professional projects include the Jefferson Memorial and Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, DC, and Ann-Marie Sculpture Garden in Solomons, MD. The transition from landscape documentation and design to botanical painting was a natural extension of her knowledge and love of plants. Her watercolors are an attempt to capture the beauty and delicacy of the individual specimen with botanical accuracy. The fine detail in her paintings is in part the result of years of technical drawing. D’Zmura received her certificate in Botanical Art from the Brookside Gardens School of Botanical Art and Illustration, where she now teaches advanced watercolor classes. She has also studied with several master botanical artists and is a member of the American Society of Botanical Artists, the Botanical Art Society of the National Capital Region, the Working Artists Forum, and the St. Michaels Art League. Her work is in collections throughout the country. She maintains a studio in St. Michaels, MD, where she draws inspiration from her neighbors’ gardens and from the native wildflowers of Maryland’s Eastern Shore.

Introduction to Watercolor for Botanical Art

Botanical Illustration II Session 1: Thursdays, May 15 and 22 and Wednesday, May 28, 9:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

Thursdays, October 3, 10, 24, and 31, 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Session 2: Thursdays, August 7, 14, 21, and 28, 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Registration required. Limit: 12

Fee: $95 members, $120 non-members

Watercolor is the traditional medium used in creating botanical art. The third course in developing proficiency in botanical art, this program will focus on the introduction on basic watercolor techniques. Class exercises and projects will provide participants with a fundamental understanding and mastery of those techniques. A materials list will be provided.

Fee: $95 members, $120 non-members Registration required. Limit: 12

In drawing, light and shade communicate the three dimensionality of the plant. Highlights and shadows bring depth and form to a drawing. This course will emphasize the principles of light and shadow and the techniques necessary to add tonal shading to graphite drawing. Botanical Drawing I is required. AdKINSARBORETUM.ORG

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We invite you to become a member. Adkins Arboretum members receive unlimited free admission and discounts on programs, trips, native plants, and gift shop purchases. By joining, you are supporting the Arboretum’s mission of preserving and conserving the region’s native landscapes. Complete the form below, or join online at adkinsarboretum.org.

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Included with your membership or membership renewal is a one-year subscription to Better Homes and Gardens®! You’ll receive 12 issues filled with great gardening ideas. You can choose either the print or digital edition.

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Members receive this new Adkins Arboretum decal with their membership cards. To request a decal before your renewal date, contact Meg Gallagher at 410-634-2847, ext. 23 or mgallagher@adkinsarboretum.org.

It’s our way of saying “Thanks!”

SPOUSE NAME (MR./MRS./MS./MR. & MRS)

B Individual $50 B Household $75 B Grandparent $75 B Contributor $100 B Supporter $250 B Sustainer $500 B Leon Andrus Society $1000+ B Garden Club or Nonprofit Organization $100 B Business $500

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MEMBERSHIP FORM By becoming a member of the Arboretum, you are making a significant contribution to the conservation of the natural heritage of the Chesapeake Bay. For your convenience, you may join online at adkinsarboretum.org. NAME (MR./MRS./MS./MR. & MRS)

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Make checks payable to Adkins Arboretum and mail to: Advancement Department, P.O. Box 100, Ridgely, MD 21660 Adkins Arboretum is a nonprofit organization. Contributions are tax deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law.

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ADULT PROGRAMS SPEAKERS The Living Landscape: Designing for Beauty and Biodiversity in the Home Garden

Doug Tallamy and Rick Darke

Saturday, June 7, 1–4 p.m. at the Academy Art Museum, Easton Fee: $30 members, $35 non-members Registration required. Limit: 90

This three-part presentation by Rick Darke and Doug Tallamy will explore in depth the topic of their new book of the same title, and will provide inspiration and practical advice for anyone interested in enriching the living layers in their own home habitat.

Doug is a professor in the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware, where he has authored 80 research articles and has taught Insect Taxonomy, Behavioral Ecology, Humans and Nature, Insect Ecology, and other courses for 32 years. Chief among his research goals is to better understand the many ways insects interact with plants and how such interactions determine the diversity of animal communities. His book Bringing Nature Home: How Native Plants Sustain Wildlife in Our Gardens was published by Timber Press in 2007 and was awarded the 2008 silver medal by the Garden Writers Association. He was awarded the Garden Club of America Margaret Douglas Medal for Conservation and the Tom Dodd Jr. Award of Excellence in 2013.

Looking at the Layered Landscape The richness of life in any landscape is linked to the richness of its layers, and this is true for both people and wildlife. Rick Darke will open the program with an illustrated discussion of the living layers in local and regional landscapes, both as they occur naturally and as they are often modified by human culture. This exploration will provide a basis for understanding the essential characteristics of healthy layers and how they can be conserved and enhanced in home gardens and shared landscapes.

Lessons from the Layered Landscapes of Adkins Arboretum

Rebuilding Nature’s Relationships Specialized relationships between animals and plants are the norm in nature rather than the exception. Plants that evolved in concert with local animals provide for their needs better than plants that evolved elsewhere because introduced plants have not had time to develop the specialized relationships that sustain local species. Doug Tallamy will explain why this is so, why specialized food relationships determine the stability and complexity of the local food webs that support animal diversity, why it is important to restore biodiversity to our residential properties, and what we need to do to make our landscapes functioning ecosystems once again.

Walk and Talk with Rick Darke and Doug Tallamy Sunday, June 8, 10 a.m.–noon Fee: $75 members, $100 non-members

Designing and Maintaining the Living Landscape Rick Darke will illustrate and discuss how an understanding of living layers and relational biodiversity can be put to practical use in the making and maintenance of residential gardens and community landscapes. Strategies for employing “organic architecture” in creating beautiful, conserving, highly functional layers will be presented in detail.

Registration required. Limit: 20

Join Rick Darke and Doug Tallamy, co-authors of The Living Landscape: Designing for Beauty and Biodiversity in the Home Garden, for an intimate exploration on foot of the living layers of Adkins Arboretum. Using the elements in the Arboretum’s landscape as models, Rick and Doug will demonstrate techniques for observing and understanding the plants, animals, and relationships that characterize healthy layering. Bring your cameras and binoculars along on this special opportunity that is sure to provide inspiration for your own home habitat. Morning pastries, fruit, coffee, and tea will be provided.

Rick’s work is grounded in an observational ethic that blends art, ecology, and cultural geography in the design and stewardship of living landscapes. His work has been feature in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Huffington Post, and elsewhere. His books include The American Woodland Garden: Capturing the Spirit of the Deciduous Forest and The Wild Garden: Expanded Edition. For more information, visit rickdarke.com.

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Grow More with Less: Creating a Sustainable Landscape Thursday, September 11, 1–2:30 p.m. Fee: $15 members, $20 non-members Registration required. Limit: 35

With limited natural resources and growing challenges in the garden, finding long-term ways to sustain our landscapes is essential. Vincent Simeone will present ways to create a more sustainable environment, including recycling, habitat management, managing invasive species, composting, and proper plant selection. He will also offer a selection of plants and gardening methods that are sensitive to the health and wellbeing of your pet and answer questions related to pets in the garden. Vincent has worked in the horticultural field for more than 27 years. He received an AAS degree in ornamental horticulture from SUNY Farmingdale and a B.S. in ornamental horticulture from the University of Georgia, where he studied under well-known professors Michael Dirr and Allan Armitage. His latest book, Grow More With Less: Creating a Sustainable Landscape, will be available for purchase and signing.

The Arboretum has joined the American Public Garden Association’s YOUtopia program, an initiative for public gardens to reduce their climate impact and engage and inspire their 80+ million annual visitors regarding climate change solutions. The YOUtopia pledge

Adkins Arboretum signs the YOUtopia pledge!

is a commitment to reduce the Arboretum’s net climate impact, engage staff and visitors on climate impacts and solutions, provide a broad range of programs and free resources to educate visitors, and develop an inspiring communications platform that brings the facts of climate change to life in ways that are compelling and motivating. With YOUtopia, visitors will perceive the impacts of climate change and learn about solutions currently in place, including ways they can prepare for and help prevent further change.

The Arboretum recycles, limits the use of plastics, composts with bins and vermiculture, favors buying local, avoids chemical use, has eliminated use of antibacterial soaps, is moving toward non-bleached paper products, manages nursery water runoff with rain barrels and a rain garden, and is improving energy efficiency and developing signage to relay opportunities for others to engage in climate change reduction and resiliency. Almost every adult and youth program, workshop, and trip offered by the Arboretum promotes stewardship and the YOUtopia pledge. Save the date Sunday, September 28 for the Fourth Annual Tent Symposium: Nature Lessons: Looking Toward a Resilient Future.

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ADULT PROGRAMS GUIDED WALKS

Bird Migration Walk

Dog Walking with Vicki Arion

Free for members, free with $5 admission for non-members

Saturday, May 3, 8–10 a.m.

Join Wayne Bell on a guided walk to scout for migrants warblers that regularly pass through the Arboretum in early May. Warblers of note include black-and-white, blackthroated blue, black-throated green, American redstart, yellow-rumped (myrtle), magnolia, and (rarer) blackburnian. Rose-breasted grosbeak should also be passing through, and resident indigo bunting and blue grosbeak may be present. Scarlet tanager, which nests in the mature woods, should also be in good voice. Many of these birds are colorful and full of song.

Every Thursday, 10:30 a.m. Free for members, free with $5 admission fee for non-members

Adkins Arboretum is a wonderful place to take a walk, but did you know you can bring along your best friend, your dog? The Arboretum now offers a Dog Walking and Jogging Map that marks great routes to enjoy with your furry friend. The paths are well maintained, and each path offers something different. Nancy’s Meadow Loop is an open space where you can feel the sun on your face and watch birds flying across the sky. The woodland paths allow for introspection in a lush environment where you can admire many species of trees throughout the changing seasons. The Tuckahoe Creekside Walk follows the Tuckahoe Creek, where you can relax on a bench. Exploring the paths at the Arboretum is a fun way to exercise and bond with your pet. The next time you visit, ask the Visitor’s Center staff for a Dog Walking and Jogging Map, and bring your best friend on a leash!

Dr. Bell is Senior Associate and former Director of the Center for Environment and Society at Washington College. Prior to joining the Washington College faculty in fall 2000, he was Vice President for External Relations for the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES), a global research facility headquartered at Horn Point near Cambridge, MD. He has served as president of the Arboretum Board of Trustees and is past president of the Maryland Ornithological Society.

Arboretum Board member Vicki Arion will lead this one-hour walk. She and her husband have had their veterinary practice in Caroline County for over 20 years, and she is an avid volunteer for the local Humane Society.

Bird Migration Walk

Shinrin-Yoku: The Healing Practice of Forest Bathing

Saturday, September 13, 8–10 a.m. Free for members, free with $5 admission fee for non-members

Sunday, May 4, 1–3 p.m. Free for members, free with $5 admission for non-members

Join Wayne Bell on a guided bird walk to scout for early fall migrants and lingering summer residents that may be found in the Arboretum’s fields and forests. Many colorful species will no longer be in breeding plumage, including scarlet tanager and Baltimore oriole.

L L U F

Experience a very slow, contemplative walk with Anna Harding on a forest trail in this program dedicated to awakening the senses. The Japanese practice of forest bathing is a way to deepen one’s connection to the natural world in ways that remind us of our belonging it. 47, ext. 0 tosto 4-28walking 3 6 0 t. 1 li Experience the gifts that come from in quiet, 4 g ll a C itin the waopening d tosenses mindful awareness andbfrom to the e addeour healing effects of the forest and all its offerings.

Special attention will be paid to “confusing fall warblers,” some of which are young birds on their first trip to their wintering grounds. We’ll look for some more common examples, including American redstart, black-throated green warbler, and common yellowthroat. Indigo bunting and blue grosbeak will still be here, but the young should outnumber their more colorful parents. Few birds will be in song, but there should be plenty of ‘chips’ to keep us busy.

Not only will this program encourage you to slow down and breathe in the forest medicine, it will engage your senses in ways that might surprise you and lead you into a deeper understanding of your relationship to nature. Anna Harding has a professional background in holistic body work, life coaching, and as an artist. She is co-author of the book Petite Retreats: Renewing Body, Mind and Spirit Without Leaving Home.

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Registration is required for all programs. Register online at adkinsarboretum.org, call 410-634-2847, extension 0, or e-mail info@adkinsarboretum.org. Please arrive at least 10 minutes prior to program start.

Fleeting Ephemerals Sunday, April 6, 12:30–3 p.m.

Appearing in early spring, ephemerals flower, fruit, and die back in a short period of time. Join a 90-minute walk to catch glimpses of pink spring beauty, Mayapple, and dogwood blossoms, yellow trout lily, golden groundsel, sassafras and spicebush blooms, and white beech tree blossoms. Lunch begins at 12:30 p.m.; the walk will follow.

MENU (vegetarian) Spring lentil soup Ginger carrot salad with cranberries Ancient grain bread with orange marmalade Fudge cake brownies

Nature Nurture Nutrition

Tuckahoe Creek and Beyond Saturday, May 3, 11 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

Tuckahoe Creek is a beautiful, tranquil spot that provides views of a wide variety of flowering plants. Join a 90-minute walk to search for mountain laurel, beech and tulip trees, black cherry tree blossoms, pink ladyslipper and Solomon’s seal blooms, and Mayapple fruit.

Fee: $20 members, $25 non-members Registration required. Limit: 25

Track the changing spring landscape on a guided walk with a docent naturalist, followed by a delicious and nutritious lunch and a brief talk about the meal’s nutritional value. Copies of recipes are provided. All Soup ’n Walk participants receive a 20% discount on Sweet Bay Gifts purchases.

MENU Scallop and vegetable soup Roasted red beets and carrots Apple date walnut bread with apple jelly Fruity nutty oatmeal bars

SATURDAY WALKS

Second Saturday Nursery Walks explore the tremendous diversity of plant material at the Arboretum’s Native Plant Nursery with horticulturalist Eric Wittman on April 12, May 10, June 14, July 12, August 9, September 13, and October 11. Eric will select dozens of trees, shrubs, and perennials to aid participants on their journey toward incorporating more native plants into their landscapes. Join Eric at the Native Plant Nursery between 1 and 3 p.m. to learn more about the plants your native Arboretum has to offer. (Note: The April 12 and September 13 walks will take place at the Native Plant Sale location.)

Explore the rich and unique native plant habitat of Adkins Arboretum. Led by Arboretum docent naturalists, First Saturday Guided Walks are offered on April 5, May 3, June 7, July 5, August 2, September 6, October 4, November 1, and December 6 at 10 a.m. Discover mature and young native forests, meadows, a wetland, and rain and pollinator gardens, as well as the Arboretum’s Native Plant Nursery and the children’s teaching garden. Tours begin at the Visitor’s Center and last approximately one hour.

Walks are free with the Arboretum’s $5 admission fee and are always free for members. Visit adkinsarboretum. org for more information. To arrange a guided walk for more than 10 participants, contact Adult Program Coordinator Ginna Tiernan at gtiernan@adkinsarboretum.org or 410-634-2847, ext. 27.

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ADULT PROGRAMS WRITING Nature as Muse First Wednesdays, May 7, June 4, July 2, August 6, September 3, October 1, November 5, and December 3, 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Free for members, free with $5 admission fee for non-members

Enjoy writing as a way of exploring nature. A different prompt presented in each session offers a suggestion for the morning’s theme. These prompts assist the writer in connecting the natural world outdoors with the natural world inside oneself. This group is open to anyone who enjoys scribbling lines of thought across parts of trees now bound with rings or glue. Bring a bag lunch and dress for both indoor and outdoor forest adventure.

Forest Music

Mana Saxophone Quartet

A special performance by the Mana Saxophone Quartet in the forest at Adkins Arboretum Thursday, June 5, 5 p.m. Free

MUSIC AND PERFORMANCES

Adkins Arboretum joins with the National Music Festival in presenting a unique improvisatory performance in the Arboretum forest by Mana Saxophone Quartet. Positioning themselves in various places in the forest, within hearing distance though not necessarily within sight of one another, these innovative musicians will respond to each other’s playing in a musical conversation winding through the trees. Following this event, they will give a brief concert in the Visitor’s Center. Known for its distinctive energy and superb musicianship, Mana Quartet returns to the NMF for its third year as Resident Chamber Ensemble. The first saxophone quartet to win the prestigious Coleman International Chamber Ensemble Competition, the quartet has spearheaded the growing acceptance of the saxophone in classical music. Gallery seating is limited. Early registration is highly recommended.

Shakespeare in the Meadow: Romeo and Juliet Saturday, May 31, 6 p.m. Sunday, June 1, 3 p.m. Fee: $10 members, $15 non-members

Shore Shakespeare returns for its second season at the Arboretum with one of Shakespeare’s most enduring plays and the greatest of all love stories, Romeo and Juliet. In fair Verona, where we lay our scene, experience again the story of the star-cross’d lovers and their warring families. Join Shore Shakespeare in the Arboretum Meadow for an unforgettable evening of love and fate—and surely some of the most glorious language ever written.

Driven Women is

an aptly named group of old-time musicians located on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. Their music comes from fiddle and banjo traditions of the Appalachian Mountains, largely from West Virginia and Kentucky. They seek to preserve and revive the sounds of old-time music, including high energy square dance tunes, soothing waltzes, and the melancholy of dark mountain hollows. The group is driven to enjoy, study, and practice the music of the old masters and play it for others to enjoy.

Romeo and Juliet is by William Shakespeare, with additional material by Chris Rogers, and is an original production of Shore Shakespeare. Bring chairs, blankets, and a picnic, and enjoy this production in the Arboretum meadow. Meals from The Lily Pad Café will be available at each event but must be ordered by Wednesday, May 28. Meals may be ordered when registering online or by calling 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

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Driven Women intermittently appear in the afternoon to practice at Adkins Arboretum. Call ahead if you would like to know when they will be playing in the gallery or outside as weather permits.  22

YOUTH & FAMILY FAMILY Natural Egg Dyeing Saturday, April 12, 1–2:30 p.m. Fee: $5 per person for members, $7 per person for nonmembers. Ages 2 and under are free. Registration required

Enjoy the art of dyeing Easter eggs using blueberries, onion skins, coffee, and other natural items! Bring your own blown or hard-boiled eggs, and be sure to wear old clothes. Eggdyeing will be followed by a peek into an Arboretum bluebird box and a nest hunt along scenic woodland paths.

SPRING NATURE PRESCHOOL PROGRAMS

Hay Bale Garden

Tuesdays, April 8–May 13, 10–11:15 a.m.

April 22

Fee: $55 members, $70 non-members for six sessions ($10 sibling discount)

Let’s make hay while the sun shines! We’ll plant hay bale lettuce in the Funshine Garden, visit the Arboretum’s goat herd, and share a picnic snack. We’ll also make spongy alfalfa “hay bales” to take home.

Classes are open to children ages 3 to 5. Advance registration is required. Enrollment is limited to 15 children, so early registration is recommended. Each class includes a healthy snack and a craft. For further information or to register, call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Wiggly Worms April 8

Welcome to the wiggly world of worms! Did you know that worms are a gardener’s best friend? Enjoy a walk to the Funshine Garden, where we will peek into a composting “worm hotel” and dig for worms in the soil. We’ll also sing a “Wiggle and Waggle” song and snack on garden veggies.

Incredible Eggs April 15

Help crack the mystery of the incredible egg! How are eggs formed? How do they hatch? Which animals lay eggs? Young nature detectives will conduct an egg-speriment, hunt for eggs in the meadow, and use natural dyes to color eggs.

Wildflower Wonderland April 29

Follow enchanted woodland paths in search of spring wildflowers. Virginia bluebells, native azalea, dogwood, and lady’s slippers are sure to delight. Woodland sprites will make flower crowns and play a game of fairy tag.

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YOUTH & FAMILY

Life cycle of the butterfly

SPRING HOMESCHOOL PROGRAM

Butterfly Ball May 6

The butterflies are back! Explore the butterfly’s transformation from lowly caterpillar to winged beauty, and flutter your wings to the tune of the “Butterfly Ball.” We’ll look for butterflies and caterpillars in the Funshine Garden and make glittery butterfly masks.

Aquatic Adventures Mondays, April 7–May 12, 1–2:30 p.m. Fee: $55 members, $70 general public ($10 sibling discount)

Calling all creek freaks! Join Youth Program Coordinator Jenny Houghton with nets, stopwatches, and pH strips to find the answers to some pressing aquatic questions. What is a riparian buffer zone? How are aquatic plants and animals adapted to their watery environment? What is the relationship between precipitation, runoff, and aquatic habitats? Homeschoolers will explore the fascinating world of water through field studies of the Arboretum’s wetland and stream. Classes are designed for students ages 8–12. Come prepared with a folder, paper, a writing utensil, comfortable walking shoes, and clothes that may get dirty. Rain boots or other waterproof shoes are a good idea.

Pollywog Adventure May 13

No need to feel stuck in a bog! Spring is in full swing, and so are the Arboretum peepers! We’ll stomp our feet to the “Pollywog Wiggle,” make a froggy craft, and get up close and personal with our tadpole friends on the wetland boardwalk.

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SUMMER NATURE CAMPS For the past nine years, the Arboretum’s Summer Nature Camps have given children the opportunity to enjoy their precious summer the old-fashioned way—outdoors! Campers will make new friends and lifelong memories while exploring the Arboretum’s woodland, meadow, stream, and wetland habitats. From grazing on blackberries to splashing in the Blockston Branch, the Arboretum’s Summer Nature Camps provide children with a truly enchanted experience. Space is limited, and advance registration is required. Sign up your young adventurer to grow with the Arboretum.

Camp Bumblebee: Nature’s Playground

Camp Paw Paw: Young Naturalists

June 16–20, 10–11:30 a.m.

July 7–11, 9 a.m.–noon

Ages 2–3, with a grown-up

Ages 7–9

Fee: $70 members, $80 general public ($10 sibling discount)

Fee: $125 members, $145 general public ($10 sibling discount)

Children learn through play, and nature is the best playground! Campers will float leaf and twig boats down the Blockston Branch, create leafy magic carpets on the forest floor, and mix up gooey wetland “parfaits” while listening to a chorus of frogs and red-winged blackbirds. Songs, crafts, stories, games, and healthy snack will round out each morning. Grown-ups are asked to join their little ones throughout the camp experience.

Love birds, plants, bugs, tadpoles, butterflies, hiking, and exploring the great outdoors? Then you’re on your way to becoming a naturalist! Join other young naturalists in an exciting week of outdoor discovery. Activities are designed to foster creativity, careful observation, and respect for nature by introducing a wide array of artistic and natural science activities. Campers will keep nature journals, build flower presses, develop photography skills, and make paper, all while exploring the Arboretum’s wetland, meadow, forest, and stream habitats.

Camp Pollywog: Summer Magic June 23–27, 10 a.m.–noon

Camp Egret “Wild Investigations”

Ages 4–6

July 14–18, 9 a.m.–3 p.m.

Fee: $80 members, $90 general public ($10 sibling discount)

Ages 10–12

What lights up a firefly? How does a watermelon grow? Do turtles have ears? The mysteries and magic of summer will be revealed as campers dip their toes in the Blockston Branch, snack on blueberries in the Funshine Garden, and scoop up critters in the Arboretum’s wetland. Each fun-filled morning will include a song, crafts, stories, games, healthy snacks, and plenty of fresh air and exercise.

Fee: $180 members, $200 general public ($10 sibling discount)

Develop resiliency and confidence of character while gaining incredible outdoor skills, including wilderness survival, archery, stealth, wild plants, navigation, and animal tracking. Campers will build a fire without matches, craft a traditional wood survival bow, follow animal trails, and construct shelters. Powerful lessons in ecology, teamwork, selfconfidence, empathy, and leadership are part of the ranger experience.

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Surface Treatments, works by Marian Glebes, on view through May 30

Sunday

Monday

APRIL 2014

Tuesday 1

Wednesday 2

Thursday 3

Friday 4

Saturday 5 Arbor Day Run

Registration begins at 8 a.m. First Saturday Guided Walk 10 a.m.

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7 Soup ’n Walk 12:30–3 p.m.

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8

Native Plant Sale noon–4 p.m.

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Spring Ephemerals 1–2:30 p.m.

12 Plant Sale 10–4 Open Hive Frames 1–3 Native Plant Nursery Opening members-only Natural Egg Dyeing 1–2:30 plant sale day Second Saturday 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Walk 1–3 18

19 Art reception for Marian Glebes 3–5 p.m.

Dog Walk with Vicki Arion 10:30 a.m.

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Dogwood 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m. Dog Walk with Vicki Arion 10:30 a.m.

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26 Dogwood 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m.

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Wildflower Wonderland preschool program 10–11:15 a.m.

Aquatic Adventures homeschool program 1–2:30 p.m.

Surface Treatments, works by Marian Glebes, on view through May 30

Sunday

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Hay Bale Garden preschool program 10–11:15 a.m.

Aquatic Adventures homeschool program 1–2:30 p.m.

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Dog Walk with Vicki Arion 10:30 a.m.

Incredible Eggs preschool program 10–11:15 a.m.

Aquatic Adventures homeschool program 1–2:30 p.m.

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Wiggly Worms preschool program 10–11:15 a.m.

Aquatic Adventures homeschool program 1–2:30 p.m.

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Monday

MAY 2014

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday 1

Friday

3 Bird Migration

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10 Photo Capture

Walk 8–10 a.m. First Saturday Guided Walk 10 a.m. Soup ’n Walk 11 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

Dog Walk with Vicki Arion 10:30 a.m.

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5 Shinrin-Yoku 1–3 p.m.

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Aquatic Adventures homeschool program 1–2:30 p.m.

12 Aquatic Adventures homeschool program 1–2:30 p.m.

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8 Nature as Muse 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

Butterfly Ball preschool program 10–11:15 a.m.

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Botanical Illustration II 9:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. Dog Walk with Vicki Arion 10:30 a.m.

Pollywog Adventure preschool program 10–11:15 a.m.

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National Public Gardens Day

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8 a.m.–noon Split and Divide a Hive 1–3 p.m. Second Saturday Walk 1–3 p.m.

17 Native Garden Tour 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

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Botanical Illustration II 9:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. Dog Walk with Vicki Arion 10:30 a.m.

Eat the Landscape 1–3 p.m.

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Dog Walk with Vicki Arion 10:30 a.m.

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Saturday

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Botanical Illustration II 9:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

AdKINSARBORETUM.ORG

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Dog Walk with Vicki Arion 10:30 a.m.

Romeo and Juliet 6 p.m.

Intimate Waterscapes, works by Julius Kassovic, on view through August 1

Sunday 1

Monday 2

Tuesday 3

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Wednesday 4

Brooklyn Grange/ Brooklyn Botanic Garden bus trip 8 a.m.–10 p.m. Nature as Muse 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

Romeo and Juliet 3 p.m.

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JUNE 2014

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Thursday 5

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Camp Bumblebee begins 10–11:30 a.m.

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Concrete Leaf Casting 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

National Trails Day First Saturday Guided Walk 10 a.m. The Living Landscape 1–4 p.m.

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14 Second Saturday Walk 1–3 p.m.

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21 Summer Flora

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10–11:30 a.m. Monarchs 11:45 a.m.–12:45 p.m. Art reception for Julius Kassovic 3–5 p.m.

Dog Walk with Vicki Arion 10:30 a.m.

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Botanical Illustration 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Dog Walk with Vicki Arion 10:30 a.m.

Camp Pollywog begins 10 a.m.–noon

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Saturday 7

Dog Walk with Vicki Arion 10:30 a.m.

Foraging 1–3 p.m.

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Dog Walk with Vicki Arion 10:30 a.m. Forest Music 5 p.m.

Friday 6

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JULY 2014 Sunday

Monday

Tuesday 1

Wednesday 2

Outdoor Sculpture Invitational on view through September 15

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3 Nature as Muse 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

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Botanical Illustration 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Dog Walking with Vicki Arion 10:30 a.m.

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Botanical Illustration 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Dog Walking with Vicki Arion 10:30 a.m.

Camp Paw Paw begins 9 a.m.–noon

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Thursday

Friday 4

Saturday 5 First Saturday Guided Walk 10 a.m.

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12 Honey Extraction 1–3 p.m. Second Saturday Walk 1–3 p.m.

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Botanical Illustration 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Dog Walking with Vicki Arion 10:30 a.m.

Camp Egret begins 9 a.m.–3 p.m.

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Botanical Illustration 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Dog Walking with Vicki Arion 10:30 a.m.

Dog Walk with Vicki Arion 10:30 a.m.

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Non Profit Org US Postage PAID Mail Movers

PO Box 100 Ridgely, MD 21660

Native Landscape Design Center at Adkins Arboretum The Arboretum announces its newest initiative to assist homeowners in creating healthy beautiful landscapes: the Native Landscape Design Center. The Center builds upon the Arboretum’s many resources of education programs, lectures, workshops, garden tours, and nature walks, its Native Plant Nursery, and its 400 acres that showcase the region’s native habitats and conservation landscaping practices, including rain gardens, pervious paving, invasive plant management, pollinator garden, and more. Conventional landscaping, with large lawns, a limited palette of non-native evergreen plants, annuals, and ornamental plants that are maintained with herbicides, are harmful to the environment and can work against nature’s ability to clean air and water, minimize flooding, and build resilience in the face of climate change. Adkins Arboretum now offers a way for homeowners to achieve an affordable, professionally designed native landscape. Working in conjunction with a landscape designer, you will create a native landscape that is beautiful, serves your needs, and benefits the environment and wildlife.

The Native Landscape Co-Design Service

The centerpiece of the new Center’s resources for homeowners is an affordable four-session native landscape design consulting service that engages homeowners as co-designers. Printed on recycled paper.

• In the first session, you will discuss your goals, draw a base plan, and conduct an inventory of your landscape;

NEW!

• In the second session, you will determine the location of paths, trees, and planting beds with the goal of reducing lawn; • In the third session, you will focus on year-round appeal, as well as attracting beneficial wildlife; and • In the fourth session, you will develop a plan for implementing and maintaining your design. As the sole participant, you will receive the designer’s full and undivided attention. The final product will be a landscape plan that will guide your landscape investments. The fee for the four-session design service is $500. Additional services are available for an hourly consultant fee. Chris Pax serves as the Center’s lead designer. A landscape designer, Chris holds a master’s degree in sustainable landscape design from George Washington University. Since 2007, Chris has been teaching and designing professionally and has completed the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center’s training to teach Landscape for Life, a program of the Sustainable Sites Initiative (SITES), the national guidelines for sustainable land design, construction, and maintenance practices.


Native Seed Spring/Summer 2014