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spring & summer 2013

Program Guide

Adkins Arboretum, a 400-acre native garden and preserve, promotes the conservation and restoration of the Chesapeake region’s native landscapes.

Spring Nursery Opening Weekend! The Arboretum offers N A T I V E P L A N T the region’s largest selection of ornamental native plants. The Native Plant Nursery Ornamental plants for Opening Weekend marks the Chesapeake Gardener the opening of the Nursery for the growing season. New this spring, the Opening Weekend plant sale will be held in the Visitor’s Center front parking area. Following the Opening Weekend, the Nursery will be open to the public Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and weekends and Mondays by appointment. Members, including those who join on any sale day, receive a 10% discount on plants, gift shop items, and books. Members who join at the Contributor ($100) level and above receive a 20% discount on plants. Sale days are crowded, so please leave dogs at home. For more information, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Photo by Ann Rohlfing Illustrations by Barbara Bryan

Members-only Sale

Friday, April 12, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Shop the Members-only Sale for the best selection. New members are welcome!

Public Sale Days

Saturday, April 13 and Sunday, April 14, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Prepare for spring in the garden! The region’s largest selection of ornamental native plants will be for sale, including a broad selection of flowering trees and shrubs, perennials, ferns, and grasses for spring planting. Ornamental native flowers and trees make colorful additions to home landscapes and provide food and habitat for wildlife. Master Gardeners will be available to answer questions, and Arboretum docents will lead guided walks. The sale benefits the Arboretum’s education programs and introduces the public to the beauty and benefit of gardening with native plants.

Used Book Sale

The Arboretum is accepting donations of gently used gardening and nature-themed books and magazines. Donations may be dropped off at the Arboretum Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Shop for books and magazines at great prices on the sale days!


Art Exhibits

“One Hundred Footsteps” is a unique collaboration between writer Jennifer Wallace and visual artist Katherine Kavanaugh, both of Baltimore. Fifty of Wallace’s haiku-like poems are paired with fifty small collage drawings by Kavanaugh. Although the poems and images don’t actually illustrate one another, they share parallel contemplative moods. On view through May 31, this meditative exhibit was inspired by a medieval Japanese collaborative poetic form, the renga, often comprising 100 verses. There will be a reception Saturday, April 20 from 3 to 5 p.m.

The Arboretum sponsors art exhibitions throughout the year, including an annual competition and outdoor environmental art. Call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 or e-mail info@adkinsarboretum.org for gallery hours.

Karen Klinedinst thinks of herself as a new kind of plein air painter. But while the landscapes by this Baltimore artist have the atmosphere of nineteenth-century Romantic paintings, they are shot and processed entirely on her iPhone. Her lush, lightfilled photographs will be on view June 4 through August 2, with a reception Saturday, June 22 from 3 to 5 p.m.

For their eighth biennial outdoor sculpture show, on view June 1 through September 15, Centreville artists Howard and Mary McCoy will create a series of site-specific sculptural installations in the Arboretum forest. Working primarily with natural materials found on-site, the McCoys approach their installations as collaborations with the natural landscape. There will be a guided sculpture walk in conjunction with Karen Klinedinst’s reception on Saturday, June 22 from 3 to 5 p.m.

Events Arbor Day Run Saturday, April 6 Registration 8–8:45 a.m., start time 9 a.m. 5K Fee: $25 members, $30 general public Family Fun Run/Walk Fee: $7 per person members, $10 per person general public

National Public Gardens Day

Join fellow runners and nature enthusiasts for the seventh annual Arbor Day Run. Featuring a 5K Run and a one-mile Family Fun Run/Walk, this favorite early-spring event will kick off with a Kids’ 100-Yard Dash at 8:45 a.m. Catch glimpses of spring on a cross-country course plotted along the Arboretum’s network of scenic forest and meadow paths. Prizes and refreshments will follow.

Friday, May 10, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Celebrate public gardens and their special place in the community! Admission is free—enjoy a walk in the woods, meadows, and gardens.

A keen observer of the changing light of the skies, shimmering water reflections, and rich fields and farmlands, Centreville artist Lani Browning captures the beauty of the Eastern Shore. On view August 6 through September 27, her stunning oil paintings are by turns intimate or panoramic. There will be a reception on Saturday, August 24 from 3 to 5 p.m.

Saturday, May 11, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. In May, when the vibrant false indigo and subtle pinxter azaleas are in bloom, Adkins Arboretum will host its first Native Garden Tour featuring seven gardens in Caroline County. A Celebration of Natives” not only will highlight the beauty of these gardens but emphasize their role in a bio-diverse landscape.

One Hundred Footsteps, poem by Jennifer Wallace, collage drawing by Katherine Kavanaugh

Winter, The North Meadow, Karen Klinedinst, archival pigment print on paper, 12” x 12”

The first of its kind on the Eastern Shore, A Celebration of Natives is a perfect blending of the Arboretum’s mission to foster community relations and demonstrate the importance of using native plants in restoring balance to the Chesapeake ecosystem. The self-guided driving tour features six gardens plus the Arboretum. From new gardens, to town gardens packed with plants, to established gardens thirty years in the making, each site is unique and demonstrates its own flair and commitment in its use of natives.

Fee: $15 adults, $10 students Mark the date—Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night is coming to the Meadow! Bring a picnic, relax under the stars, and enjoy this classic comedy about love and mistaken identity. Directed by Peter Howell, the performances benefit the Arboretum and Shore Shakespeare.

The train runs quickly through the mountain valley but I am lazy near the window with my dreams.

For more information, visit shoreshakespeare.com. Those who support bringing Shakespeare to the Eastern Shore are invited to make tax-deductible donations to Adkins Arboretum and designated for the benefit of Shore Shakespeare.

National Trails Day Saturday, June 1, 10 a.m.– 4 p.m. A walk in the woods offers provides solitude, inspiration, and opportunities for education and exploration. Come for a walk and receive a special discount on membership!

Visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 to purchase tickets.

In the bladed forest, golden leaves swim like minnows through the sunlit wind.

Corsica River, Lani Browning, oil on linen board, 18” x 24” adkinsarboretum.org

Tour hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets are $15 per person in advance and $25 on the day of the tour. A list of local restaurants will be provided. The Arboretum’s Native Plant Nursery will also be open until 4 p.m. on the day of the tour.

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Adult Programs

Exploring Nature’s Role in the Underground Railroad

Registration is required for all programs. Register online at adkinsarboretum.org, call 410-634-2847, extension 0, or e-mail info@adkinsarboretum.org. Please arrive at least 10 minutes prior to program start.

Saturday, June 1, 5:30 p.m.–8:30 p.m. Free with admission

Audio Tour Launch Event!

With its forests, thickets, marshes, rivers and creeks, the Eastern Shore’s natural landscape provided a passageway to freedom along the Underground Railroad for hundreds, and possibly thousands, of slaves, including abolitionists Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman. Designated as a “Place to Visit” on the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway, Adkins Arboretum reflects the conditions through which slaves traveled en route to freedom, and serves as a dramatic vista to experience the little-known relationship between nature and the Underground Railroad.

All Levels Yoga

With generous grant support from Maryland Humanities Council and Maryland Heritage Area Authority, the Arboretum has produced an educational and thought-provoking self-guided audio tour that explores the role of nature for those in pursuit of freedom via the Underground Railroad. Thursdays, May 9, 16, 23, and 30, 9:30–11 a.m. Tuesdays, June 4, 11, 18, and 25, 9:30–11 a.m. Fee: $15 per class or $50 for the series for members, $18 per class or $60 for the series for the general public Begin your day with an outdoor yoga practice with Julie Phillips-Turner surrounded by the natural beauty of Adkins Arboretum. Build your strength and focus in this all-levels Hatha Yoga class that will focus on breath and meditation techniques, as well as proper alignment to maximize your body’s potential. Suitable variations and options for poses will be offered so that each person feels steady and comfortable. Students are encouraged to listen to and honor the messages of the body, mind, breath, and spirit to determine which variation is most appropriate for them in that moment. Mats and yoga props will be available.

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Wednesday, April 24, 10 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Fee: $35 members, $45 general public Join Lee D’Zmura for a focus on the many spring ephemerals in bloom at the Arboretum. Following a brief discussion about these early blooming flowers and techniques to capture their beauty, the class will sketch outdoors and return to compose journal entries. Bring a bag lunch; a list of materials will be provided. Registration required. Limit: 12

Close-up Photography Saturday, April 20, 8 a.m.–noon Fee: $45 members, $60 general public

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Join this special evening to celebrate the completion of this project, meet the project team, and experience the tour. Refreshments will be served. Reservations are required.

Tuesday, May 7, 10 a.m.–noon Fee: $30 members, $35 general public

Thursday, August 8, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Fee: $45 per teacher Join Youth Program Coordinator Jenny Houghton for a day of hands-on professional development. Experience environmental education in action and learn how Maryland’s Environmental Literacy standards can extend beyond the science classroom to complement language arts, music, social studies, physical education, and math curricula. Activities are designed for elementary and middle school teachers. Comfortable walking shoes and clothes that may get a little dirty are advised. Snacks will be provided, and teachers are asked to bring a bag lunch. Space is limited; please register in advance.

Botanical Shoes Thursday, May 9, 1–2 p.m. Fee: $15 members, $20 general public

Spring at the Arboretum is the ideal time to photograph closeup images of colors, textures, and patterns and turn ordinary images into powerful abstracts. Instructor Joshua Taylor Jr. will g apturinwith basic help participants learn how to capture striking images aylor’s C xtures T h s o J nd Te k for photo equipment. The use of extension filters, Loo apes, aclose-up htubes, er 26.the shooting olors, S b to c all C O diffusers, and reflectors willFbe demonstrated during op on worksh session with the instructor. Taylor has presented photography workshops at the Smithsonian National Orchid Show, the U.S. National Arboretum, and the U.S. Botanic Garden, as well as for public gardens, preserves, and horticultural societies across the region. In addition to teaching in the Smithsonian Studio Arts Program and at the Corcoran School of Art and Design, he exhibits his work regularly and speaks at camera and garden clubs.

An Interdisciplinary Approach to Environmental Literacy

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Nature Journaling with Spring Ephemerals

Developed in concert with historians Anthony Cohen and Dr. Kate Clifford Larson, Arboretum Science Advisor Sylvan Kaufman, Arboretum docent Roger Tilden, Arboretum staff Ellie Altman, Robyn Affron, and Ginna Tiernan, and producers Q-Media, the tour enhances participants’ understanding of the Underground Railroad and demonstrates how nature provided both obstacles and opportunities for freedom seekers.

Summer Camp for Teachers!

Julie is the founder of Chesapeake Yoga & Wellness and is a strong believer in the power of yoga to heal the body and the mind. As a Usui Master Reiki practitioner, she enjoys incorporating energetic awareness in her practice through breath, movement, and meditation. A student of yoga since 1990, Julie learned while in college the power of meditation that helps achieve more focus in daily activities. Twenty years later, she completed her teacher training at Golden Heart Yoga in Annapolis. She is a registered Yoga Alliance instructor, RYT 200, and practices many styles of yoga, including Para Yoga with Rod Stryker and Anusara with teachers in Maryland and Sarasota, FL. Registration required. Limit: 10

Art Programs

In 1987, Lenny Wilson learned to make shoes at Cordwainer’s Technical College, a leather trades college in London. Shortly afterward, he began a career in public horticulture and was inspired to create a pair of shoes that incorporated parts of plants into their construction. Using traditional methods and materials, he unifies leather, leaves, and other materials to craft unique life-size shoes. Join Lenny for a unique presentation as he shares his journey, illustrates what inspires him, demonstrates how he selects plants and employs tools, and relates exhibition and workshop experiences.

Kokedama

A native of Wilmington, Delaware, Lenny holds a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Delaware. Currently he is the Assistant Director of Horticulture and Facilities at Delaware Center for Horticulture, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the quality of life in Delaware’s diverse communities through horticulture. His one-of-a-kind shoes made from plant material are displayed in local art galleries and exhibits.

Kokedama is the Japanese art form of enclosing a plant’s root mass in moss. Traditionally, Kokedama is displayed on a unique, often handcrafted tray but more recently these ‘moss balls’ are hung from translucent string to appear to float in the air. Join Samantha McCall to create your own Kokedama to bring home and enjoy.

Sweet Bay Magnolia Painting Thursdays, June 13, 20, and 27, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Fee: $95 members, $115 general public A deciduous native, the sweet bay magnolia is the Arboretum’s 2013 Native Tree of the Year. Its white flowers emerge in early summer and are followed by deep red to brown fruits with bright red exposed seeds. This three-day workshop with Lee D’Zmura will focus on capturing the beauty of the sweet bay in watercolor. Bring a bag lunch; a list of materials will be provided. Registration required. Limit: 12

An avid gardener and a dedicated plantswoman, Samantha is a floral designer, a Master Gardener, and a perennial student at Longwood Gardens. A member of several Eastern Shore garden clubs, she also is the owner of Fleurish, an environmentally friendly floral design studio committed to using local plant material whenever possible.

D’Zmura earned her certificate in botanical art at Brookside Gardens School of Botanical Art and Illustration and now teaches classes in advanced watercolor at Brookside. 5

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Art Programs cont.

Speaker Series

Build a Wave Hill Table or Stool Saturday, July 20, 1–2 p.m. Fee: $75 members, $100 general public

Registration is required for all programs. Register online at adkinsarboretum.org, call 410-634-2847, extension 0, or e-mail info@adkinsarboretum.org. Please arrive at least 10 minutes prior to program start.

Paradise Under Glass

In this workshop, Dan Benarcik will guide you through building your own Gerrit Rietveld-inspired table or stool to match your Wave Hill Chair. No carpentry skills are needed. Bring a cordless drill/screwdriver that is fully charged. All materials, including pre-cut cedar and hardware, are included in the fee.

Weather and Cancellations Programs and walks will be held in all types of weather, including light rain or snow. If the Arboretum decides to cancel a program due to threat of inclement weather, you will be contacted by phone or e-mail and offered a refund or an opportunity to reschedule. If you have any doubts or concerns if a program is to be held, please call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 and/or check the website.

Saturday, May 4, 1–2:30 p.m. Fee: $15 members, $20 general public Like many baby boomers in middle age, Ruth Kassinger was at an emotional crossroads. Confronted with numerous challenges, she was searching for a way forward. One cold, gray evening, flooded with thoughts of change and loss, she wandered into the U.S. Botanic Garden’s conservatory—and a dream was born. Dazzled by the vast and dense tangle of greenery, she began a quest to create a verdant sanctuary of her own at her home in suburban Washington, DC.

Hypertufa Garden Planter Saturday, June 15, 9–11 a.m. Fee: $45 members, $65 general public Registration required. Limit: 8

Build a Wave Hill Chair

Enhance your garden with a hypertufa planter you make in this workshop under the guidance of Rachel Melvin and Arboretum docent Carol Jelich. Hypertufa is an artificial stone material made from several different aggregates to imitate natural tufa rock. It can easily be molded into different forms, is much lighter than concrete, and looks like weathered crumbly stone. All materials will be provided.

Saturday, July 20, 10 a.m.–noon Fee: $150 members, $185 general public Chanticleer Garden horticulturalist and craftsman Dan Benarcik returns to the Arboretum to lead a workshop in the construction of the Wave Hill chair. Based on a 1918 design by acclaimed Dutch architect Gerrit Rietveld and modified in the 1960s, the chair was popularized in the garden at Wave Hill in the Bronx. This timeless and incredibly comfortable chair is suitable for any garden setting. Join Dan to build your own chair at a significant discount from the retail price of $245. No carpentry skills are needed. Bring a cordless drill/screwdriver that is fully charged. All materials, including pre-cut cedar and hardware, are included in the fee. If you are unable to attend the workshop or would like an additional chair, kits will be available for purchase the day of the workshop for $175. Ordering additional chair kits in advance is highly recommended. Registration required. Limit: 12

This workshop will take place in the Nursery Shed or Greenhouse. Wear work clothes and shoes, and bring long rubber gloves and an adventurous spirit.

Kusamono Sunday, July 14, 1–4 p.m. Fee: $55 members, $70 general public Kusamono is a Japanese botanical art form that developed alongside bonsai. These potted arrangements of wild grasses and flowers are selected to suggest a season or place. Focusing primarily on grasses, wildflowers, and small ornamental plants native to the Mid-Atlantic, Young Choe will introduce the unique art of Kusamono through a presentation, a demonstration, and a workshop. Learn traditional planting methods, display techniques, and how to maintain these miniature representations of nature. Ceramic container, plants, soil, and all other materials will be provided.

Paradise Under Glass chronicles her journey from brown thumb to green. In this lecture, Kassinger takes us step-by-step from the construction of her conservatory through her efforts to identify the easiest to grow, most beautiful houseplants. In chronicling journey to create her own tropical refuge, she also provides a lively narrative tour of the glasshouses of the past, including Renaissance orangeries, the whimsical follies of Georgian England, the legendary Crystal Palace, and secluded Victorian ferneries.

Friday and Saturday, July 26 and 27, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Fee: $75 members, $100 general public The surfaces that are presented to us in natural forms are wonderfully varied, from slickly smooth to downy to savoyed. This twoday workshop with Linda Gist will explore the ways in which observation and expression of this variety can enliven our botanical paintings. Using watercolor and colored pencil, students will learn to choose techniques that will allow them to convincingly capture natural surfaces. All experience levels are welcome. Bring a bag lunch; a list of materials will be provided. Registration required. Limit: 12

Throughout, she shares the knowledge and insights that creating and sustaining her garden has bestowed, lessons of loss and letting go, nurturing and rebirth, challenge and change, love and serenity. Paradise Under Glass is the remarkable story of the fruition of a dream that is sure to inspire us all.

Linda Gist received a BFA in illustration from the Philadelphia College of Art (now University of the Arts). She has created artwork for diverse national and international clients, and her work has been shown in numerous exhibitions. She has taught illustration at the University of the Arts and currently teaches a once-yearly botanical illustration workshop at the Academy of Fine Arts in Philadelphia. Linda especially enjoys working from botanical subjects grown by her husband, John, in their own garden.

Young Choe studied traditional art-ink painting and calligraphy in her native Korea before she moved to the United States. She obtained her bachelor’s of science in horticulture from the University of Maryland. While volunteering at the National Bonsai & Penjing Museum, she was able to bring her artistic talent together with her knowledge of horticulture to create Kusamono. She traveled to Japan to study this unique art form with the master Kusamono artist, Keiko Yamane. For more information, visit usna.usda.gov/Gardens/faqs/Kusamono.html. adkinsarboretum.org

Understanding the Surface: The Role of Texture in Botanical Art

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Speaker series cont.

Saturday, July 13, 1–2:30 p.m. Fee: $15 members, $20 general public

Registration is required for all programs. Register online at adkinsarboretum.org, call 410-634-2847, extension 0, or e-mail info@adkinsarboretum.org. Please arrive at least 10 minutes prior to program start.

Buttonbush. Hercules’ club. Panic grass. Tearthumb. Beach spurge. Sea rocket. Ladies’ tresses. These are but a few of the wild and wonderful plants found in Plants of the Chesapeake Bay, a quickreference guide to plants found near the Bay. The guide’s vivid text and photographs make the wide array of plants along the Bay’s waters, marshes, and shorelines easy to identify and wondrous to behold. Its compact, portable design encourages naturalists, local residents, boaters, researchers, and the curious-minded alike to throw the guide in their pack and explore the botanical bounty of the Chesapeake Bay.

Wild and Neat

So you think natives are weedy and messy? This lecture by Claudia West debunks this myth and explores the aesthetic value of native plants and their highly attractive cultivars. You’ll be fascinated by the range of colors and textures found in the region’s native flora. Numerous design examples and plant combinations demonstrate the beauty, elegance, and diversity created through a sense of place, using regionally appropriate native plants in the landscape. Enjoy and be inspired!

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Foraging Sundays, June 2 and September 1, 1–3 p.m. Fee: $15 members, $20 general public Registration required. Limit: 35

Spring Ephemerals—The Fleeting Flowers

Bill Schindler, Ph.D. returns to the Arboretum to lead this hands-on workshop that will immerse participants in the exciting, sustainable, and nutritious world of foraging for wild plants. Participants will be taken into the field to learn how to identify, harvest, and prepare many of spring’s wild edibles. It doesn’t get more local or organic than this!

Sunday, April 21, 1–2:30 p.m. Fee: $15 members, $20 general public r A. Kneppe

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Saturday, June 29, 1–3 p.m. Fee: $15 member $20 general public

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First thing in spring, a dazzling diversity of flowers emerges, but many of us hardly blink before they are gone. Join Arboretum Science Advisor Mary Travaglini on a walk to find these early spring flowers, the harbingers of spring!

Dr. Schindler is a professor of anthropology and archaeology at Washington College. His research focuses on prehistoric foodways and technologies. He incorporates wild foods into his and his family’s diet on a regular basis. Please note that foraging by individuals is not permitted on the Arboretum grounds.

Mary holds a bachelor’s of science from Cornell University and a master’s in landscape architecture from the University of Michigan. Active as an outdoor educator, landscape architect, and ecologist, Mary has worked extensively on federal lands and within the private sector as a trail crew leader and landscape designer, and has worked most recently for The Nature Conservancy, the National Park Service, and the Society for Ecological Restoration.

Summer Flowers Saturday, June 15, 1–3 p.m. Fee: $15 member, $20 general public Enjoy the transition from spring to summer at Adkins Arboretum. There is always something in bloom in June. Join this wildflower hunt with Arboretum Science Advisor Mary Travaglini and enjoy a  leisurely stroll through woods and meadow to discover what’s in bloom.

Co-author Lytton John Musselman is a self-described white-haired botany professor often mistaken for Steven Spielberg who still revels in taking university students into forests, marshes, lakes, and deserts to study plants. He will present his work in this lecture. “My job is to read Nature in the language in which it is written,” he says. “That is, to understand plants in the field and convey that knowledge.”

Claudia West grew up in a family-owned landscape nursery business that specializes in garden design and perennial, woody, and cut flower production. She holds a master’s of landscape architecture & landscape planning from the Technical University of Munich, Germany. Previously, she served as a design consultant for Wolfgang Oehme/Carol Oppenheimer: Landscape Architecture, and was employed at Bluemount Nurseries and Sylva Native Nursery. Her extensive background in horticulture, ecology, and environmental restoration delivers a wealth of experience and knowledge in sales and in her current role as a consultant to North Creek Nurseries.

music

Musselman is the Mary Payne Hogan Professor of Botany and manager of the Blackwater Ecologic Preserve at Old Dominion University. He is author of A Dictionary of Bible Plants and Figs, Dates, Laurel, and Myrrh: Plants of the Bible and the Quran. He also works for Prairie Home Companion as a botanist on cruises with longtime friend Garrison Keillor.

Bird Migration Walk Many Wednesday afternoons, Driven Women practice at Adkins Arboretum and welcome an audience. Call ahead to confirm when they will be playing in the gallery or outside as weather permits.

Driven Women is an aptly named group of old time musicians located on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. Their music comes from fiddle and banjo traditions of the Appalachian mountains, largely from West Virginia and Kentucky. They seek to preserve and revive the various sounds of old time music, including high energy square dance tunes, soothing waltzes, and the melancholy of dark mountain hollows. The group is driven to enjoy, study, and practice the music of the old masters and play it for others to enjoy.

Fiddler Sue Shumaker began playing old time music in the Philadelphia area in 1983. Banjo player Diane Jones began making sojourns to North Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia in 1980. Guitarist Annie Williams became interested in the old music traditions of her home state of West Virginia in 1973. As chance would have it, they finally met and began playing together in 2009.

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Flora and Fauna

Plants of the Chesapeake Bay

Saturday May 4, 8–10 a.m. Free with admission Join Wayne Bell on a guided walk to scout for migrants warblers that regularly pass through the Arboretum in early May. Warblers of note include include Black-and-white, Blackthroated Blue, Black-throated Green, American Redstart, Yellow-rumped (Myrtle), Magnolia, and (rarer) Blackburnian. Rose-breasted Grosbeak should also be passing through, and resident Indigo Bunting and Blue Grosbeak may be present. Scarlet Tanager, which nests in the mature woods, should also be in good voice. Many of these birds are colorful and full of song. Dr. Bell is Senior Associate and former Director of the Center for Environment and Society at Washington College. Prior to joining the Washington College faculty in fall 2000, he was Vice President for External Relations for the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES), a global research facility headquartered at Horn Point near Cambridge, MD. He has served as president of the Arboretum Board of Trustees and is past president of the Maryland Ornithological Society.

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Stewardship

Registration is required for all programs. Register online at adkinsarboretum.org, call 410-634-2847, extension 0, or e-mail info@adkinsarboretum.org. Please arrive at least 10 minutes prior to program start.

Designing for Waterfront Landscapes

Season’s Bounty

Saturday, April 13, 10 a.m.–noon Fee: $35 members, $45 general public Waterfront properties present homeowners with a slew of both daunting challenges and precious opportunities. Join landscape designer and native plant enthusiast Chris Pax, a graduate of the George Washington University sustainable landscape design master’s program, for a look at plants that thrive in waterfront conditions and to review some of the Chesapeake Bay Critical Area rules and regulations that may apply in your county. You may bring your property plat diagram, photos, and a bag lunch to enjoy with the group afterward—Chris will be available until 1 p.m. to answer questions about your specific property. When registering, please specify the county in which your property is located. This class is an excellent follow-up to the Landscape Design Workshop offered on March 16. Registration required. Limit: 16

Fridays, April 5, June 7, and September 6, 10 a.m.–noon Fee: members: $15 each program or $35 for all three general public: $20 each program or $45 for all three Registration required. Limit: 20

Spring Greens—April 5

What Future for Maryland’s Salt Marsh Birds? Audubon’s Salt Marsh Conservation Initiative

survey to locate the highest priority sites for salt marsh birds, and is producing conservation plans to help Maryland’s tidal marshes adapt to sea level rise. David Curson, Audubon’s Director of Bird Conservation in Maryland, will provide the latest update on this story and explain how Audubon is using science and partnerships to give Maryland’s salt marsh birds a brighter future.

Thursday, July 11, 6–7:30 p.m. Free Maryland is home to some of the largest tidal marshes in the northeastern United States and an impressive array of bird species, such as Saltmarsh Sparrow and Black Rail, that live only in this harsh yet beautiful ecosystem. Unfortunately, the future for these birds is uncertain—sea level rise, caused in part by climate change, threatens to drown many of our salt marshes during the present century. To address this threat, Audubon has launched a salt marsh conservation initiative as part of its Atlantic Flyway strategy. In Maryland, Audubon recently completed a two-year salt marsh

Curson has worked as director of bird conservation for Audubon Maryland-DC, since 2004, overseeing the MD-DC Important Bird Areas Program and designing and implementing conservation projects for birds and their habitats in Maryland and DC. Since 2010, Dave’s work with Audubon in Maryland has focused on tidal marsh conservation. Dave grew up in London, England. In 1985, he received his B.Sc. in ecology at the University of East Anglia and began a career in conservation biology, working as a habitat survey ecologist for local government and NGOs in London. He came to the United States in 1993 to begin graduate studies and received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in the Department of Wildlife Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Maryland Native Plant Society Movie Night

As the cold of winter makes its reluctant exit and the palette of the landscape goes from dormant-brown to emergent-chartreuse, we often gravitate toward the fresh experience—being outside, renewing the garden, eating green foods. In this first program of a three-part series, Elizabeth Beggins will help you explore avenues for revitalizing yourself and your menu as she discusses growing and preparing such spring delicacies as zesty mustard, nutty arugula, and elegant pac-choy, in addition to favorites such as lettuce and spinach. Tasting samples and starter seed kits are sure to put some spring in your step.

Tuesday, May 14, 7–8:30 p.m. An early-bird guided walk will be offered at 6:15 p.m. Free Maryland Native Plant Society will screen the video Urban & Suburban Meadows: Bringing Meadowscaping to Big and Small Spaces by author and photographer Catherine Zimmerman. The 60-minute video brings into focus the amazing diversity of life inhabiting meadows, and the beautiful imagery inspires meadow creation. Meadow experts Michael Nadeau, Larry Weaner, and Neil Diboll walk the view through meadow site preparation, design, planting, and maintenance, while entomologist Doug Tallamy, author of Bringing Nature Home, explains the intricate connection between native plants, native insects, and the soil food web.

Abundant Summer—June 7 Days lengthen, thermometers rise, and kitchens fill to overflowing with Mother Nature’s gifts. Now is the time to maximize the bounty of summer. Plan on succession plantings at home, and benefit from the burgeoning variety at farmers’ markets. In the second session of this tasty series, Elizabeth will guide you in how to prolong home harvests and how to savor and store those available from local farmers. Enjoy the flavors of the season as you learn.

Created as a companion to the popular book of the same name, the video addresses the problem caused by the extensive planting of pesticide-ridden, non-native grass lawns across America. Discussion of the video will follow, and refreshments will be served. Registration is requested.

Fall Harvest—September 6 Late summer is the time to plant a fall garden and the time you will find the widest variety of produce all year. Elizabeth will show you how a little preparation now can yield big returns as the weather turns cooler. Greens, garlic, and gorgeous local offerings available at markets and roadside stands are the focus of this final program in the series. As always, savory treats and tools to use at home are an added bonus.

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Stewardship cont. Registration is required for all programs. Register online at adkinsarboretum.org, call 410-634-2847, extension 0, or e-mail info@adkinsarboretum.org. Please arrive at least 10 minutes prior to program start.

Walks

Trips

Guided Walks

Grounds for Sculpture

Explore the rich and unique native plant habitat of Adkins Arboretum. Led by Arboretum docent naturalists, First Saturday Guided Walks are offered on April 6, May 4, June 1, July 6 and August 3 at 10 a.m. The plant habitats you will see include mature and young native forests, meadows, a wetland, as well as a rain garden and a pollinator garden. You may also visit the Arboretum’s Native Plant Nursery and the children’s teaching garden. Tours begin at the Visitor’s Center and last approximately one hour.

Wednesday, June 5

Second Saturday Nursery Walks that explore the diversity of plant material at the Arboretum’s Native Plant Nursery with horticulturalist Eric Wittman beginning on Saturday, April 13 and continue through to October 12. Eric will select dozens of trees, shrubs, and perennials to aid visitors on their journey toward incorporating more native plants into their landscapes. Join Eric at the nursery between 1 and 3 p.m. to learn more about all the plants your native Arboretum has to offer. (Note: April 13 walk will be at plant sale location)

iNaturalist for Teachers— Professional Development Day Friday, June 28, 10 a.m.–2:30 p.m. Looking for inventive ways to engage students in the study of nature and ecology? Join a day-long exploration of iNaturalist, a free and open-source online community that teachers can use to reinforce Maryland State Department of Education STEM standards. iNaturalist is the perfect interface between nature and technology users, encouraging them to observe and describe the natural world around them, to follow their curiosity to learn more, and to share their experiences with others. It provides a public online forum where students’ field observations can be cross-checked by a community of fellow enthusiasts and global experts.

Walks are free with admission and are always free for members. Visit adkinsarboretum.org for more information. To arrange a guided walk for more than 10 participants, contact Adult Program Coordinator Ginna Tiernan at gtiernan@adkinsarboretum.org or 410-634-2847, ext. 27.

Register by Tuesday, May 28 Adkins Arboretum and Academy Art Museum will partner for this day trip to Grounds for Sculpture, a 35-acre arboretum and public sculpture park located in Hamilton, NJ. Grounds for Sculpture was founded in 1992 on the site of the former New Jersey State Fairgrounds by J. Seward Johnson to promote an understanding of and appreciation for contemporary sculpture for all people. Enjoy the outdoor permanent collection and indoor seasonal exhibitions. The park also offers shopping and dining, including the high-rated fine dining destination Rat’s Restaurant.

Spring Soup ’n Walks Nature, Nurture, and Nutrition Saturdays, April 27 and May 18, 11 a.m.–1:30 p.m. Two-hour walk option begins at 10 a.m. Fee: $20 members, $25 general public Registration required. Limit: 25 Track the changing landscape from winter to spring. Following a guided walk with a docent naturalist, enjoy a delicious and nutritious lunch along with a brief lesson about the meal’s nutritional value. Copies of recipes are provided.

The bus departs from Creamery Lane parking lot in Easton at 8 a.m. and from Adkins Arboretum in Ridgely at 8:30 a.m. An additional stop at the 301/291 Park and Ride for Chestertownarea participants will be added upon request. The bus will depart from Grounds for Sculpture at 3 p.m. to return to the Arboretum at approximately 5:30 p.m. and Creamery Lane at 6 p.m. groundsforsculpture.org. Registration required. Limit: 22

April 27—Fleeting Ephemerals Appearing in early spring, ephemerals flower, fruit, and die back in a short period of time. Join a one-hour or two-hour walk to catch glimpses of pink spring beauty, Mayapple, and dogwood blossoms, yellow trout lily, golden groundsel, sassafras and spicebush blooms, and white beech tree blossoms.

For questions regarding trips or to request a Kent County Park and Ride pick-up location, contact Ginna Tiernan, Adult Program Coordinator, at gtiernan@adkinsarboretum.org or 410-634-2847, ext. 27. 

Menu Chicken rice vegetable soup Cabbage and carrot slaw with nuts Ancient grain bread with buckwheat honey Baked pineapple

Although iNaturalist can be enjoyed by all ages, this program will be geared to high school science teachers. The session will provide hands-on examination of iNaturalist, field work in a variety of habitats to explore the strength of iNaturalist as a tool for exploration, and a discussion of ways in which iNaturalist can be incorporated creatively in curriculum development and meet STEM standards. No prior experience with iNaturalist is required, although participants will receive instructions in advance to create a free online account. A free iNaturalist app is available for iPhones and Android phones, but a Smartphone is not required for this session. Bring a bag lunch. To facilitate interactive and hands-on work, registration is limited to 12 participants.

May 18—Tuckahoe Creek and Beyond

Nature as Muse First Wednesdays, April 3, May 1, June 5, 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Free for members, free with admission for the general public Each month this writing group will follow a different winding path through the Arboretum to quietly observe nature in detail. This will provide inspiration for expressing ideas that begin as seeds in our minds and then blossom into discovery as we write. No previous writing experience necessary. Enjoy how the paths in the Arboretum and the paths in your mind can lead you on an unpredictable but delightful journey. Bring a bag lunch and dress for both indoor and outdoor forest adventure.

adkinsarboretum.org

Fee: $85 members, $110 general public includes transportation, tip, and admission

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Tuckahoe Creek is a beautiful, tranquil spot that provides views of a wide variety of flowering plants. Join a one- or two-hour walk to search for mountain laurel, beech and tulip trees, black cherry tree blossoms, pink ladyslipper and Solomon’s seal blooms, and Mayapple fruit.

Menu Thick & Hearty vegetable chili (vegetarian) Roasted red beets over mesclun salad Apple date wheat bread with apple jelly Blueberry marmalade crisp

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Nature Preschool Programs

Trips cont. New York Botanical Garden— New Native Plant Garden

Designed by Oehme, van Sweden, this new garden combines contemporary architectural elements, dramatic water features, sustainable materials, and diverse plantings to celebrate the elegant beauty of native plants, the drama of the natural landscape, and the Garden’s commitment to education and conservation.

Friday, October 11, 7 a.m.–10 p.m. Fee: $125 members, $150 general public includes transportation, tip, All-Garden Pass, curator-guided tour of Native Garden, and lunch

A gourmet bag lunch by Abigail Kirsch will be served upon arrival at the historic and newly refurbished Lillian and Amy Goldman Stone Mill nestled along the banks of the Bronx River. Dinner may be purchased at the Garden Café or the Leon Levy Visitor Center Café.

Join us for an exceptional day at the New York Botanical Garden, a National Historic Landmark, with one of the world’s greatest collections of flora within its 250 acres of natural terrain, dramatic rock outcroppings, rolling hills, waterfalls and ponds, 50-acre old growth forest, and the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory.

Tuesdays, April 9–May 14, 10–11:15 a.m.

April Showers

Fee: $55 members, $70 general public for six sessions ($10 sibling discount)

April 23 We all know that “April showers bring May flowers,” but what brings April showers? Learn how rain forms, then join in a rainy day symphony! We’ll also conduct rainy bag and cloud bottle experiments.

Classes are open to children ages 3 to 5. Advance registration is required. Enrollment is limited to 15 children, so early registration is recommended. Each class includes a healthy snack and a craft. For further information or to register, call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Lovely Ladyslippers April 30 Search for ladyslipper flowers in the woods after a lesson on these lovely native orchids. We’ll make a bouquet of paper flowers, twirl around a maypole tree, and share flower cookies.

The bus departs from Creamery Lane/Aurora Park Drive parking lot in Easton at 7 a.m. and from Adkins Arboretum in Ridgely at 7:30 a.m. An additional stop at the 301/291 Park and Ride for Chestertown-area participants will be added upon request. The bus will depart from the NYBG at 6 p.m. to return to the Arboretum at approximately 9:30 p.m. and Creamery Lane at 10 p.m. Registration required. Limit: 45

The day will include a guided tour of the new Native Plant Garden led by Travis Beck, NYBG Landscapes and Project Manager and recent author of Principles of Ecological Landscape Design, or another talented NYBG curator. The new 3.5-acre Native Plant Garden showcases the beauty and diversity of native plants and the best in contemporary garden design.

Which Nest is Best? May 7 Now that spring is here, many birds are busy building nests for their babies. Take a peek inside the Arboretum’s bluebird houses, hold a nest in your hands, and learn about the different ways birds build their homes. We’ll sample a bird’s nest snack and make a nest craft to take home.

Wetland Magic May 14 The wetland comes alive in spring! Use nets and buckets to discover some of the creatures that call the wetland home, from wiggly tadpole to shy painted turtle. We’ll also mix up a batch of froggy goo and read delightfully swampy stories.

The Science of Spring for Homeschoolers Mondays, April 8 – May 13, 1 – 2:30 p.m. Fee: $55 members, $70 general public ($10 sibling discount)

Bunny Hop

Each spring, the Arboretum’s wetland teems with new life. Home school students will welcome the spring season with handson exploration of plant and animal life cycles. Activities will include using microscopes to study wetland organisms, dissecting flowering plants, investigating metamorphosis in a stream study, and more. Students should be prepared to make new friends, get a little dirty, and have fun with science! This program is designed for students in grades 2–5. Some reading is required.

April 9 Spring is here, and so are the rabbits! Have a thumpin’ good time exploring the world of the bouncy cottontail. We’ll dance the Bunny Hop, munch on rabbit snacks, and watch a puppet show featuring Hoppity Rabbit.

Garden Days April 16

A Spring Evening for Families

Learn how seeds grow, and lend a helping hand in the Funshine Garden! We’ll plant vegetables and flowers in the garden beds, enjoy a picnic snack, and decorate flower pots to take home.

Saturday, May 25, 6:30–8 p.m. Member Fee: $5 per person, $20 per family General Public Fee: $8 per person, $25 per family Experience all the fun of a campout without actually camping out! Take an evening hike with naturalist and educator Jenny Houghton, stopping along the way to play meadow games and roast marshmallows at Paw Paw Playground. Families will enjoy a wetland serenade and learn to recognize the calls of several frog species. A spring nature craft will round out the evening.

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Camp Egret “Wild Investigations”

APRIL 2013

July 8–12, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Ages 10–12 Fee: $180 members, $200 general public ($10 sibling discount) It’s wild out there! The Arboretum’s oldest campers will use scientific skills to investigate native wildlife. Dynamic field experiences will include determining an animal’s environmental lifestyle through its skull structure, examining wetland organisms with microscopes, designing model birds in an exploration of flight adaptation, and conducting habitat assessments. Environmental games, outdoor art, and nature journaling will enhance each day. Healthy snacks will be provided; campers are asked to bring a bag lunch.

Summer Nature Camps For the past eight years, the Arboretum’s Summer Nature Camps have given children the opportunity to enjoy their precious summer the old-fashioned way—outdoors! Campers will make new friends and lifelong memories while exploring the Arboretum’s woodland, meadow, stream, and wetland habitats. From grazing on blackberries to splashing in the Blockston Branch, the Arboretum’s Summer Nature Camps provide children with a truly enchanted experience.

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The Science of Spring for Home School Students 1–2:30 p.m.

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The littlest campers will discover nature’s wonders as they catch tadpoles, pick blueberries, and look for butterflies in the meadow. Arts and crafts, songs, stories, and a healthy snack will add to outdoor fun. Grown-ups are asked to join their little ones throughout the camp experience.

The Science of Spring for Home School Students 1–2:30 p.m.

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The Science of Spring for Home School Students 1–2:30 p.m.

June 10–14, 10–11:30 a.m. Ages 2–3, with a grown-up Fee: $70 members, $80 general public ($10 sibling discount)

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Native Plant Nursery Opening Members-only Day 10 a.m. 4 p.m.

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10 a.m.–4 p.m. Designing for Waterfront Landscapes 10 a.m.–noon Second Saturday Nursery Walk 1–3 p.m. Art reception 3–5 p.m. Close-up Photography 8 a.m.–noon

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April Showers preschool program 10–11:15 a.m.

Arbor Day Run 9 a.m. First Saturday Guided Walk 10–11 a.m.

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Garden Days preschool program 10–11:15 a.m.

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Spring Greens 10 a.m.–noon

Bunny Hop preschool program 10–11:15 a.m.

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The Science of Spring for Home School Students 1–2:30 p.m.

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Spring Ephemerals 1–2:30 p.m.

Space is limited, and advance registration is required. Sign up your young adventurer to grow with the Arboretum.

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Nature Journaling with Spring Ephemerals 10 a.m.–3:30 p.m

Soup ’n Walk 11 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

30 Lovely Ladyslippers preschool program 10–11:15 a.m.

MAY 2013 Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday 1

Camp Pollywog “Nature’s Playground”

Thursday 2

Friday 3

There is a garden in every childhood, an enchanted place where colors are brighter, the air softer, and the morning more fragrant than ever again.

Children learn through play, and nature is the best playground! Campers will float leaf and twig boats down the Blockston Branch, create leafy magic carpets on the forest floor, and mix up gooey wetland “parfaits” while listening to a chorus of frogs and red-winged blackbirds. Songs, crafts, stories, games, and a healthy snack will round out each morning.

Camp Paw Paw “Time Travelers” June 24—28, 9 a.m.–noon Ages 7–9 Fee: $125 members, $145 general public ($10 sibling discount) The Chesapeake Bay region has experienced tremendous change through time. Did you know that the dinosaur Astrodon thrived here in the Early Cretaceous? Or that Woodland Indians harvested tulip trees for their dugout canoes, and settlers used pokeberries to make ink? Campers will explore the history of the Chesapeake Bay region through exciting, hands-on activities, including target practice with hand-crafted bows and arrows, natural dye-making, and an archaeological dig.

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6 Shakespeare in the Meadow 3 p.m.

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The Science of Spring for Home School Students 1–2:30 p.m.

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The Science of Spring for Home School Students 1–2:30 p.m.

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7 Which Nest is Best?

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preschool program 10–11:15 a.m. Kokedama 10 a.m. – noon

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preschool program 10–11:15 a.m. MNPS Movie Night 7–8:30 p.m.

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All Levels Yoga 9:30–11 a.m. Botanical Shoes 1–2 p.m.

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Soup ’n Walk 11 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

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All Levels Yoga 9:30–11 a.m.

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Native Garden Tour 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Second Saturday Nursery Walk 1 – 3 p.m.

All Levels Yoga 9:30–11 a.m.

—Elizabeth Lawrence

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Saturday 4 Bird Migration Walk

8–10 a.m. First Saturday Walk 10 a.m. Paradise Under Glass 1–2:30 p.m. Shakespeare 6 p.m.

Nature as Muse 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

June 17–21, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Ages 4–6 Fee: $80 members, $90 general public ($10 sibling discount)

adkinsarboretum.org

Wednesday Nature as Muse 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

Native Plant Sale 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

Camp Bumblebee “Planting Seeds”

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JUNE 2013 Sunday

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First Saturday Walk 10–11 a.m. National Trails Day Underground Railroad Audio Tour Launch 5:30–8:30 p.m.

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Foraging 1–3 p.m.

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All Levels Yoga 9:30–11 a.m.

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Camp Bumblebee begins 10–11:30 a.m.

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Second Saturday Nursery Walk 1–3 p.m.

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15 Hypertufa Garden Planter 9–11 a.m. Summer Flowers 1–3 p.m.

Sweet Bay Magnolia Painting 10 a.m.–2 p.m.

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8 Abundant Summer 10 a.m.–noon

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Sweet Bay Magnolia Painting 10 a.m.–2 p.m.

All Levels Yoga 9:30–11 a.m.

Camp Paw Paw begins 9 a.m.–noon

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Grounds for Sculpture bus trip Nature as Muse 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

All Levels Yoga 9:30–11 a.m.

Camp Polllywog begins 9:30–11:30 a.m.

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Art reception 3–5 p.m.

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All Levels Yoga 9:30–11 a.m.

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iNaturalist for Teachers 10 a.m.–2:30 p.m.

Sweet Bay Magnolia Painting 10 a.m.–2 p.m.

Wild and Neat 1–3 p.m.

JULY 2013 Sunday

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Saturday 6 First Saturday Guided Walk 10–11 a.m.

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What Future for Maryland’s Salt Marsh Birds? 6–7:30 p.m.

Camp Egret begins 9 a.m.–3 p.m.

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Nursery Walk 1 – 3 p.m. Plants of the Chesapeake Bay 1–2:30 p.m.

Build a Wave Hill Chair 10 a.m.–noon Build a Wave Hill Table or Stool 1–2 p.m.

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Understanding the Understanding the Surface: The Role of Surface: The Role of Texture in Botanical Art Texture in Botanical Art 10 a.m.–noon 10 a.m.–noon

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These are transformational and exciting times at the Arboretum. Capital Campaign Committee Peter B. Stifel, Honorary Chair Patricia Bowell, Chair Sydney Gadd Doehler, President of the Board Henry Brandt, Board Treasurer Vicki Arion Blair Carmean Julie DeStefano Janet Doehler Trish Reynolds

Campaign Project Update: Visitor’s Center Bridge Restoration Completed

Arboretum Architect Lake/Flato named one of the world’s top 10 most innovative companies in architecture Lake/Flato, the award-winning architect for Adkins Arboretum’s Arboretum Center project , has earned another accolade. Fast Company, a leading business magazine, named the San Antonio, TX-based firm to its World’s Top 10 Most Innovative Businesses in Architecture. “Our annual guide to the state of innovation in our economy features the businesses whose innovations are having the greatest impacts across their industries and our culture as a whole,” notes Fast Company on its innovation list webpage.

The Arboretum Visitor’s Center’s beloved wetland bridge has had a face lift that now affords bridge walkers a panoramic open view of the wetland and nearby woods. Work began in mid-December to replace the degraded pressure treated decking (installed in 1984 with a projected lifespan of 15 years) with Trex, a recycled plastic and wood product that simulates real wood. The new decking has a life expectancy of 40 years and none of the negative impacts of toxic preservatives. George Johnson, a Queen Anne’s County native and owner of Big Island Ventures who knows the waterways of these parts, having made his livelihood building piers, was responsible for the deck’s restoration.

Lake/Flato placed tenth on the list for its designs of the new Texan landscape. “The group has created structures with an aesthetic unique to Austin (the Hotel San Jose) and west Texas (the Thunderbird Motel, which played a crucial role in establishing Marfa, Texas, as a destination for creative folk). Recently launched Porch House project, a collection of highend, modular, and LEED-certified dwellings, is one of the first appealing examples of pre-fab housing,” the magazine wrote.

Once the new deck was installed, Maryland Fabricators of Millington began screwing 20-foot panels of metal railings to the deck. The railings are designed to protect even the tiniest of visitors from making a miscalculation and slipping through the railings, but at the same time they are almost transparent when compared to the clunky wood railings they replace.

The contemporary design of the new Arboretum Center embraces a balance between building and sustainability with sensitivity to our native landscape that is consistent with the Arboretum’s conservation mission. The proposed new facilities will support the expansion of the Arboretum’s popular cultural and environmental programs for all ages. Lake/Flato has designed commercial and residential buildings across the United States and has been recognized year after year for the firm’s commitment to creating buildings that reflect the local landscape and culture.

The bridge restoration was funded by The Campaign to Build a Green Legacy and is part of the overall Native Garden Gateway project to bring new gardens, greener parking alternatives, and a stormwater management system that reduces runoff into Chesapeake Bay tributaries. To learn more about The Campaign to Build a Green Legacy, contact Kate Rattie, Director of Advancement and Planning, at 410-634-2847, ext. 33 or krattie@adkinsarboretum.org.

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Enjoy... learn...be inspired!

Mark Your Calendar! 9–14|15

Fall Native Plant Sale September 14 and 15

9–28

Magic in the Meadow September 28

Celebrate

9–29

Tent Symposium September 29

Unity Church Hill Nursery

12–7

Holiday Wreath Sale December 7

12–14

’Tis the Season December 14

Adkins Day at Garden Speakers will be presenting throughout the day!

3621 Church Hill Rd. Church Hill, MD 21623 Saturday, June 15, 2013 11 am to 4 pm

Designing and constructing ecologically sensitive and functional outdoor space. 410.556.6010 | unitychurchhillnursery.com

Printed on recycled paper.

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Adkins Arboretum spring 2013 programs