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POWERSPECTRUM

Green power to Poznań

Converting an old pulverized coal boiler into a bubbling fluidized bed boiler to burn 100% biomass allowed Dalkia in Poland to improve its revenue stream and reduce fossil fuel emissions. The schedule was tight to end the construction works before the winter, so Dalkia turned to ANDRITZ for technology and project execution. One of the leading suppliers of energy services in Europe, Dalkia was formed in 1998 as the subsidiary of two French companies: Veolia Environnement and EDF. Dalkia acquired the combined heat-power (CHP) plant in Poznań, Poland, privatizing the stateowned facility in 2004. Today Dalkia is the largest private operator of heating networks in Poland, managing over 50 district heating networks, among them the largest ones in Warszawa, Łódź, and Poznań. According to Paweł Jazikowski of Dalkia’s asset management department and the Project Manager for a retrofit project, the Poznań plant had three boilers (the oldest one was installed in 1984). The boilers fired coal and heavy oil. “Our aim is to develop new cogeneration based on renewable energy sources wherever possible to maintain

a moderate price level for our customers,” Jazikowski says. Most power boilers in Poland are fired by pulverized coal (PC) or heavy oil. “Our Poznań boilers have been operating 150,000 hours. When you calculate the lifetime of a boiler it is normally 200,000 hours; you can see that some big investments will be necessary in the not-too-distant future.” A Green deadline Dalkia’s Board of Directors took the decision to retrofit the oldest coal-burning boiler so that it could fire biomass. “We are driven by EU directives that require us to retrofit all boilers to achieve certain emissions and to burn certain fuels,” Jazikowski says. Directive 2009/28/EC sets a target of reaching 20% of the EU’s energy consumption through renewable energy sources by 2020

by setting mandatory national targets. For the biomass portion at Dalkia, the target is 20% agro biomass and 80% wood-based. “Our incentive was to do the project quickly, because if we wait, the amount of required agro biomass will increase each year.” Jazikowski explains. “The problem with agro biomass is that it introduces different alkalines, chlorine, potassium, and other compounds that can corrode our old boilers.” In order to secure the certification, all of the retrofit work and paperwork had to be completed early in 2012 in order to get the Green certificates. “The requirements in Poland are very complex and quite strict for the paperwork,” Jazikowski notes.

Local suppliers not interested Quite disappointing to Dalkia Poland was that only one Polish boiler company was interested in quoting retrofit work. “The Polish companies were quite busy with new boilers and large projects and would not even submit a quote for our retrofit project,” Jazikowski says. Dalkia had already contracted with a Finnish company for a retrofit project elsewhere in Poland and was concerned if that company could meet the deadline. So, they decided to see what ANDRITZ could do. The contract was signed with ANDRITZ OY from Finland in August of 2010. “My first experience with ANDRITZ was during the tendering process,” Jazikowski says. Dalkia team members went to visit ANDRITZ’s CHP reference in Estonia and the workshops in Varkaus, Finland.

“I have to admit that I knew nothing about Finns and Finnish culture,” Jazikowski. “My first impression of the project team was not totally positive. They seemed focused on completing the project on-time, but less about the paperwork and starting the project well. But after I got to know Janne and Antti and their team, we became quite good friends.”

When you produce Green power you get extra benefits.

Paweł Jazikowski, Project Manager at Dalkia Poznań


20

21

POWERSPECTRUM

Green power to Poznań

Converting an old pulverized coal boiler into a bubbling fluidized bed boiler to burn 100% biomass allowed Dalkia in Poland to improve its revenue stream and reduce fossil fuel emissions. The schedule was tight to end the construction works before the winter, so Dalkia turned to ANDRITZ for technology and project execution. One of the leading suppliers of energy services in Europe, Dalkia was formed in 1998 as the subsidiary of two French companies: Veolia Environnement and EDF. Dalkia acquired the combined heat-power (CHP) plant in Poznań, Poland, privatizing the stateowned facility in 2004. Today Dalkia is the largest private operator of heating networks in Poland, managing over 50 district heating networks, among them the largest ones in Warszawa, Łódź, and Poznań. According to Paweł Jazikowski of Dalkia’s asset management department and the Project Manager for a retrofit project, the Poznań plant had three boilers (the oldest one was installed in 1984). The boilers fired coal and heavy oil. “Our aim is to develop new cogeneration based on renewable energy sources wherever possible to maintain

a moderate price level for our customers,” Jazikowski says. Most power boilers in Poland are fired by pulverized coal (PC) or heavy oil. “Our Poznań boilers have been operating 150,000 hours. When you calculate the lifetime of a boiler it is normally 200,000 hours; you can see that some big investments will be necessary in the not-too-distant future.” A Green deadline Dalkia’s Board of Directors took the decision to retrofit the oldest coal-burning boiler so that it could fire biomass. “We are driven by EU directives that require us to retrofit all boilers to achieve certain emissions and to burn certain fuels,” Jazikowski says. Directive 2009/28/EC sets a target of reaching 20% of the EU’s energy consumption through renewable energy sources by 2020

by setting mandatory national targets. For the biomass portion at Dalkia, the target is 20% agro biomass and 80% wood-based. “Our incentive was to do the project quickly, because if we wait, the amount of required agro biomass will increase each year.” Jazikowski explains. “The problem with agro biomass is that it introduces different alkalines, chlorine, potassium, and other compounds that can corrode our old boilers.” In order to secure the certification, all of the retrofit work and paperwork had to be completed early in 2012 in order to get the Green certificates. “The requirements in Poland are very complex and quite strict for the paperwork,” Jazikowski notes.

Local suppliers not interested Quite disappointing to Dalkia Poland was that only one Polish boiler company was interested in quoting retrofit work. “The Polish companies were quite busy with new boilers and large projects and would not even submit a quote for our retrofit project,” Jazikowski says. Dalkia had already contracted with a Finnish company for a retrofit project elsewhere in Poland and was concerned if that company could meet the deadline. So, they decided to see what ANDRITZ could do. The contract was signed with ANDRITZ OY from Finland in August of 2010. “My first experience with ANDRITZ was during the tendering process,” Jazikowski says. Dalkia team members went to visit ANDRITZ’s CHP reference in Estonia and the workshops in Varkaus, Finland.

“I have to admit that I knew nothing about Finns and Finnish culture,” Jazikowski. “My first impression of the project team was not totally positive. They seemed focused on completing the project on-time, but less about the paperwork and starting the project well. But after I got to know Janne and Antti and their team, we became quite good friends.”

When you produce Green power you get extra benefits.

Paweł Jazikowski, Project Manager at Dalkia Poznań


20

21

POWERSPECTRUM

Green power to Poznań

Converting an old pulverized coal boiler into a bubbling fluidized bed boiler to burn 100% biomass allowed Dalkia in Poland to improve its revenue stream and reduce fossil fuel emissions. The schedule was tight to end the construction works before the winter, so Dalkia turned to ANDRITZ for technology and project execution. One of the leading suppliers of energy services in Europe, Dalkia was formed in 1998 as the subsidiary of two French companies: Veolia Environnement and EDF. Dalkia acquired the combined heat-power (CHP) plant in Poznań, Poland, privatizing the stateowned facility in 2004. Today Dalkia is the largest private operator of heating networks in Poland, managing over 50 district heating networks, among them the largest ones in Warszawa, Łódź, and Poznań. According to Paweł Jazikowski of Dalkia’s asset management department and the Project Manager for a retrofit project, the Poznań plant had three boilers (the oldest one was installed in 1984). The boilers fired coal and heavy oil. “Our aim is to develop new cogeneration based on renewable energy sources wherever possible to maintain

a moderate price level for our customers,” Jazikowski says. Most power boilers in Poland are fired by pulverized coal (PC) or heavy oil. “Our Poznań boilers have been operating 150,000 hours. When you calculate the lifetime of a boiler it is normally 200,000 hours; you can see that some big investments will be necessary in the not-too-distant future.” A Green deadline Dalkia’s Board of Directors took the decision to retrofit the oldest coal-burning boiler so that it could fire biomass. “We are driven by EU directives that require us to retrofit all boilers to achieve certain emissions and to burn certain fuels,” Jazikowski says. Directive 2009/28/EC sets a target of reaching 20% of the EU’s energy consumption through renewable energy sources by 2020

by setting mandatory national targets. For the biomass portion at Dalkia, the target is 20% agro biomass and 80% wood-based. “Our incentive was to do the project quickly, because if we wait, the amount of required agro biomass will increase each year.” Jazikowski explains. “The problem with agro biomass is that it introduces different alkalines, chlorine, potassium, and other compounds that can corrode our old boilers.” In order to secure the certification, all of the retrofit work and paperwork had to be completed early in 2012 in order to get the Green certificates. “The requirements in Poland are very complex and quite strict for the paperwork,” Jazikowski notes.

Local suppliers not interested Quite disappointing to Dalkia Poland was that only one Polish boiler company was interested in quoting retrofit work. “The Polish companies were quite busy with new boilers and large projects and would not even submit a quote for our retrofit project,” Jazikowski says. Dalkia had already contracted with a Finnish company for a retrofit project elsewhere in Poland and was concerned if that company could meet the deadline. So, they decided to see what ANDRITZ could do. The contract was signed with ANDRITZ OY from Finland in August of 2010. “My first experience with ANDRITZ was during the tendering process,” Jazikowski says. Dalkia team members went to visit ANDRITZ’s CHP reference in Estonia and the workshops in Varkaus, Finland.

“I have to admit that I knew nothing about Finns and Finnish culture,” Jazikowski. “My first impression of the project team was not totally positive. They seemed focused on completing the project on-time, but less about the paperwork and starting the project well. But after I got to know Janne and Antti and their team, we became quite good friends.”

When you produce Green power you get extra benefits.

Paweł Jazikowski, Project Manager at Dalkia Poznań


22

23

POWERSPECTRUM

A maze of paperwork Then there were the challenges of providing the documentation according to Polish legislation and standards, which require a lot of translation work in order to receive approvals from the various authorities. Biomass was first fired on September 30, 2011. “From a mechanical point-of-view, the project was ahead of schedule,” Jazikowski says. “From a paperwork point-of-view, it was tight.”



Exterior of plant



Jazikowski with biomass pellets, Pulkka with agricultural crop pellets

The “Janne” that Jazikowski refers to is Janne Kolehmainen, ANDRITZ’s Project Manager for the retrofit. Kolehmainen and Antti Pulkka, Project Engineer, and their team mobilized on-site in March 2011 with the target of firing the boiler with biomass in September of that same year – in time for Dalkia to make it before winter, the heating season. Kolehmainen cites the tight schedule and the extent of ANDRITZ’s scope in the project as perhaps being the reason for this focused intensity. Mitigating risks ANDRITZ did the mechanical demolition and erection supervision, instrumentation supervision, training, and commissioning/ start-up. In terms of equipment, ANDRITZ supplied the biomass material feeding system, bottom ash handling system, the steel stack, pressure parts, fluidizing grid, some boiler structure, air and flue gas handling equipment, refractory of the lower furnace, insulation, and electrification/automation. For ANDRITZ there were some rather strict performance guarantees. One of the main challenges was meeting the NOx emissions targets because of the short residence time of gases inside the boiler due to the limited furnace height. “The other risk we had to manage in our design,” Pulkka says, “was to accommodate the 20% agro biomass fuel

Jazikowski had witnessed cases in Poland where the mechanical work was done and the boiler was operating for a year without getting the paperwork finalized for Green certification. “In our case, due to an excellent relationship with the authorities, we were able to file the papers and get the certification in one month,” Jazikowski says. Certification was granted in February 2012. which contributes to fouling of the heating surfaces as well as superheater corrosion.” Growing Miscanthus “The EU directives are bringing us quickly to a situation where there is a lack of biomass to choose from,” Jazikowski says. “Just to give an idea, fueling our small (110 t/h steam) boiler requires 230,000 tonnes of biomass per year.” Most of the plant’s agro biomass (stalks, brewery waste, annual plants) comes from a 50 km radius of Poznań. It is pelletized to make it easier to transport and store. But to add to this, and to secure its future, Dalkia leased a plot of land near the plant and is growing Miscanthus (a tall woody plant that grows up to 3.5 m high and is harvested annually).

patented by Vattenfall and ANDRITZ has the license to install this technology in BFB boilers. Pulkka explains that in the ChlorOut system, ammonium sulphate is injected into the furnace. This decomposes into SO2 and ammonia. The amount injected is controlled via an online alkali chloride sensor and NOx emission measurements. The alkaline elements in the fuel (mainly potassium) react with the SO2. The nitrous oxides react with the ammonia. These reactions mitigate both the corrosion rate of the superheaters and the formation of NOx.

The heating value of Miscanthus (~15 GJ/t) is slightly lower than wood (~18-19 GJ/t ) and half the value of coal (~20-30 GJ/t ). “The ash content is quite high, similar to straw,” Jazikowski says. “Plus you have the chlorides and potassium to deal with.” ChlorOut first To meet NOx emissions and anti-corrosion targets head-on, ANDRITZ installed its first ChlorOut unit. ChlorOut was developed and

“When you produce Green energy you get extra benefits,” Jazikowski explains. “For example, we can charge about 45 euro per megawatthour for Black energy production from coal. Red energy (combination heat and power) gener-

ates about 51 euros. And Green energy generates about 112 euros. You can see the incentive for Green energy certification from the producer’s standpoint.” On time. On budget. Safe. Efficient. According to Jazikowski, “The scheduling was excellent. The project was completed safely with no accidents. We were good on the budget with no additional costs from ANDRITZ, and boiler performance has been according to contract.“ The moisture content of Dalkia’s biomass has been above the specified limits, but the boiler has been able to handle this. “We are at the mercy of biomass suppliers,” Jazikowski says. When the Poznań plant was stateowned it produced heat, steam, and power. “Today, thanks to privatization, we produce heat for district heating, process steam for nearby manufacturing plants, district cooling (bromolithium cold water generator), and power through our own turbines,” Jazikowski says.

New stack was part of ANDRITZ’s delivery

Boiler complex at Dalkia Poznań


22

23

POWERSPECTRUM

A maze of paperwork Then there were the challenges of providing the documentation according to Polish legislation and standards, which require a lot of translation work in order to receive approvals from the various authorities. Biomass was first fired on September 30, 2011. “From a mechanical point-of-view, the project was ahead of schedule,” Jazikowski says. “From a paperwork point-of-view, it was tight.”



Exterior of plant



Jazikowski with biomass pellets, Pulkka with agricultural crop pellets

The “Janne” that Jazikowski refers to is Janne Kolehmainen, ANDRITZ’s Project Manager for the retrofit. Kolehmainen and Antti Pulkka, Project Engineer, and their team mobilized on-site in March 2011 with the target of firing the boiler with biomass in September of that same year – in time for Dalkia to make it before winter, the heating season. Kolehmainen cites the tight schedule and the extent of ANDRITZ’s scope in the project as perhaps being the reason for this focused intensity. Mitigating risks ANDRITZ did the mechanical demolition and erection supervision, instrumentation supervision, training, and commissioning/ start-up. In terms of equipment, ANDRITZ supplied the biomass material feeding system, bottom ash handling system, the steel stack, pressure parts, fluidizing grid, some boiler structure, air and flue gas handling equipment, refractory of the lower furnace, insulation, and electrification/automation. For ANDRITZ there were some rather strict performance guarantees. One of the main challenges was meeting the NOx emissions targets because of the short residence time of gases inside the boiler due to the limited furnace height. “The other risk we had to manage in our design,” Pulkka says, “was to accommodate the 20% agro biomass fuel

Jazikowski had witnessed cases in Poland where the mechanical work was done and the boiler was operating for a year without getting the paperwork finalized for Green certification. “In our case, due to an excellent relationship with the authorities, we were able to file the papers and get the certification in one month,” Jazikowski says. Certification was granted in February 2012. which contributes to fouling of the heating surfaces as well as superheater corrosion.” Growing Miscanthus “The EU directives are bringing us quickly to a situation where there is a lack of biomass to choose from,” Jazikowski says. “Just to give an idea, fueling our small (110 t/h steam) boiler requires 230,000 tonnes of biomass per year.” Most of the plant’s agro biomass (stalks, brewery waste, annual plants) comes from a 50 km radius of Poznań. It is pelletized to make it easier to transport and store. But to add to this, and to secure its future, Dalkia leased a plot of land near the plant and is growing Miscanthus (a tall woody plant that grows up to 3.5 m high and is harvested annually).

patented by Vattenfall and ANDRITZ has the license to install this technology in BFB boilers. Pulkka explains that in the ChlorOut system, ammonium sulphate is injected into the furnace. This decomposes into SO2 and ammonia. The amount injected is controlled via an online alkali chloride sensor and NOx emission measurements. The alkaline elements in the fuel (mainly potassium) react with the SO2. The nitrous oxides react with the ammonia. These reactions mitigate both the corrosion rate of the superheaters and the formation of NOx.

The heating value of Miscanthus (~15 GJ/t) is slightly lower than wood (~18-19 GJ/t ) and half the value of coal (~20-30 GJ/t ). “The ash content is quite high, similar to straw,” Jazikowski says. “Plus you have the chlorides and potassium to deal with.” ChlorOut first To meet NOx emissions and anti-corrosion targets head-on, ANDRITZ installed its first ChlorOut unit. ChlorOut was developed and

“When you produce Green energy you get extra benefits,” Jazikowski explains. “For example, we can charge about 45 euro per megawatthour for Black energy production from coal. Red energy (combination heat and power) gener-

ates about 51 euros. And Green energy generates about 112 euros. You can see the incentive for Green energy certification from the producer’s standpoint.” On time. On budget. Safe. Efficient. According to Jazikowski, “The scheduling was excellent. The project was completed safely with no accidents. We were good on the budget with no additional costs from ANDRITZ, and boiler performance has been according to contract.“ The moisture content of Dalkia’s biomass has been above the specified limits, but the boiler has been able to handle this. “We are at the mercy of biomass suppliers,” Jazikowski says. When the Poznań plant was stateowned it produced heat, steam, and power. “Today, thanks to privatization, we produce heat for district heating, process steam for nearby manufacturing plants, district cooling (bromolithium cold water generator), and power through our own turbines,” Jazikowski says.

New stack was part of ANDRITZ’s delivery

Boiler complex at Dalkia Poznań


Energy: Green Power to Poznan