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Grænseløs ALSIE EXPRESS MAGAZINE

NO.14 SPRING 2017

IS EUROPE BREAKING UP? GRÆNSELØS ASKED FORMER POLITICIAN, MOGENS LYKKETOFT, ABOUT EUROPE’S FUTURE, SPLITTING UP, AND THE MEANING OF 70 YEARS OF UNITY

Cycling in Southern Jutland

WITH MORE THAN 3,000 KM OF CYCLE ROUTES, SOUTHERN JUTLAND IS A PARADISE FOR CYCLISTS

BUSINESS FORUM · FACTS WORTH KNOWING


GRÆNSELØS MAGAZINE SPRING 2017

No.

14 SPRING 2017

Grænseløs Alsie Express magazine Publisher adformation Nørregade 34A 6100 Haderslev

EDITORIAL

Dear Reader!

T: 7015 5900 @: info@adformation.dk Editor Kira Christensen og Mikkel Bording Ads Brian Markwaldt T: 6114 2530 @: bma@ac-amsmedia.dk Allan Christensen T: 2172 5939 @: ac@ac-amsmedia.dk Layout & production adformation Press Mohrdieck Tryk A/S

“From May onwards, Alsie Express will be taking holiday guests directly from Sønderborg to Pisa and Sardinia, on behalf of Gislev Rejser.“

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We are delighted that more people are now travelling to Copenhagen, and back again, with Alsie Express. As a result, our passenger numbers have experienced a double digit growth in the last six months. We would like to thank you for your support; it’s the many daily guests that enable us to expand our schedule, to the benefit of all our passengers. From May onwards, Alsie Express will be taking holiday guests directly from Sønderborg to Pisa and Sardinia, on behalf of Gislev

Publish in february, may, august, november

Rejser. You can read more about it in this edition of Grænseløs, or in the brochure in the pocket in front of you. Alsie Express and Sønderborg Airport play an important role in accessing Sønderborg. Alongside the other national airports, we form a significant part of Denmark’s infrastructure. That's why Alsie Express is actively joining the political debate on how we can make Denmark better connected, with a heavy focus on national flights together with Copenhagen Airport.

Our goal is to ensure improved commercial framework conditions for national flights, so that we can continue expanding our traffic programme to meet the needs of our loyal guests. Welcome on board!

Lone M. Koch CEO, Alsie Express

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GRÆNSELØS MAGAZINE SPRING 2017

ƒ “The next few years are going to be tough, but I believe we will emerge stronger. Despite Donald Trump, Brexit and Le Pen, the rest of the world is moving in the direction of greater understanding,” says Mogens Lykketoft, who believes in the common European project. Photo: Press photo

If the EU were a marriage, it would be suffering its biggest crisis ever. The question is: will it eventually emerge stronger or will it go its separate ways? Grænseløs talks to former Foreign Minister and Chairman of the UN’s General Assembly Mogens Lykketoft, about Europe’s future, about the split, and what lies behind the 70-year old relationship that is now dissolving.

‘EUROPE SHOULD TAKE MORE RESPONSIBILITY’ It is 9 January 1946. Denmark and the rest of Europe are still licking their wounds following the most catastrophic war in world history. Amidst a confused yet reconciled world, a boy called Mogens is born. As the little boy takes his first steps in Copenhagen, Winston Churchill speaks his first words to England about ‘The unified European States’. Shortly after, a well-developed America presents the ‘Marshall plan’: a heavy support package that will give Europe the vitamin boost it needs to get back on its feet after five years of war.

“But the support package could only be given on the condition that the European countries got better at working together,” says Mogens Lykketoft and raises a hand. “That was the whole idea behind the support package. It would make European countries so dependent on each other financially, that they wouldn’t go to war again,” he adds. Mogens is sitting in a modest office in Christiansborg. A few months ago he returned to Slotsholmen in Copenhagen after a year in New York as Chairman of the UN’s General Assembly. Every day he would lunch with the likes of Ban Ki-moon, discuss international security with Barack Obama, or talk about the

refugee crisis with Jean-Claude Juncker. Now he’s back on European soil. But during his time on the other side of the Atlantic, he witnessed Europe and the world undergo drastic change: Brexit, the rise of the far right in France, and the presidential election in America, all of which are leaving their mark on Europe. Destabilising effects of financial crisis The little boy born at the end of the Second World War in January 1946 is Mogens Lykketoft. He grew up with the EU. And the Europe he has returned to after 15 months in the UN, is far more split than when he left in 2015.

“Europe is, without doubt, experiencing the biggest cooperation crisis ever. Never before have we been as divided as we are now,” says Mogens in a serious tone and adds that, paradoxically, the European union was actually born from a crisis, the Second World War, and is now challenged by crises: a financial crisis, a refugee crisis and a trade crisis. “That's why it’s essential to remain focused on the European Union’s key goal: to avoid a crisis and to come out of it as quickly as possible by sticking together, and not by going our separate ways,” he says.

BY DIANA EBBA Ø. B. PEDERSEN

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“The aim with the union was to avoid anything that looked like a war or crisis, as we saw in the first half of the twentieth century with extreme unemployment and two world wars,” he continues. Mogens views the financial crisis as the main reason why we have begun to shut ourselves away in our countries and why the far right is gaining popularity across Europe and the US. “The financial crisis has had a major impact here. Up until 2008,

the European cooperation was never in question. A divide was simply impossible,” he says. “But opening up the common employment market in the EU culminated at around the same time as the financial crisis. And that’s a very unlucky coincidence,” he explains and adds that many people lost their jobs during the crisis. Consequently, they linked the common job market with the high rate of unemployment. “The crisis was caused by wild and irresponsible speculation on the financial markets, which had been allowed to develop because we had forgotten our lessons from the world crisis in the 1930’s,” says Mogens. He acknowledges that the EU hasn’t worked optimally in all areas.

“You can say what you want about the European collaboration. Improvements could be made. But what isn’t clear to most people at the moment, with all these dissolution trends, Brexit and Trump, is that since the 1950’s the European cooperation has been a driving force for a unique economic progress for Europeans. And it has woven countries’ economies together in a way that stops us ever going into war against each other again,” he says and adds that the EU represented a civilised step forward, one that remains unrivalled in the world’s history. ”And that’s why it’s incredibly sad that it has failed to retain its public support.” According to Lykketoft, the EU was not capable of running an economic policy that was effective enough at getting southern Europe out of the financial crisis. “Because when countries have to live with the fact that half the younger generation is unemployed, it becomes a source of instability, dissatisfaction and a feeling that not enough is being done to get people into work. It’s one of the things that has discredited the European

project,” explains Mogens, who realises that this is no easy job for the EU. Brexit shifts focus from what is really important Mogens Lykketoft is a social democrat. That’s no secret. A one of the longest serving parliament members, in addition to being the Tax Minister for the Social Democrats, he was also party leader, Finance Minister and Foreign Minister during his 36 years at Christiansborg. With 36 years spent at Christiansborg, he is one of the longest serving parliament members; he was the Tax Minister for the Social Democrats, a party leader, Finance Minister and then Foreign Minister. He has always been deeply interested in international affairs, so when the opportunity arose to become Chairman of the UN’s General Assembly in 2015, he didn’t hesitate. Not for the experience, but because he has always been interested in collaborative relationships such as the EU and the UN, which were created to generate growth and peace. “That’s why it worries me that in Europe we have ended up

ƒƒ Mogens Lykketoft is from 1946 and was therefore born the same time

as the seeds for the EU were sewn. According to Lykketoft, the EU has never been more divided than it is now. Photo: Private

ƒ Lykketoft and his wife Mette Holm wrote the book ‘I verdens tjeneste’ about the 15 months spent in New York as Chairman of the UN’s General Assembly. Photo: About Mogens Lykketoft

THREE SHARP ONES FOR LYKKETOFT „ 1. How will Donald Trump’s election affect Europe? “Until Brexit and Trump’s election everything was becoming more globalised and cooperative. This makes me dare to feel optimistic and think that the American presidential election could actually be an eye-opener for Europe and remind us that we are better when we work together.” „ 2. Will Brexit spread like ever expanding circles in the European sea? “We can’t deny that might happen. Europe might be broken into pieces with the trends we are currently seeing. But I believe that we’ll stay together. But politicians need to get better at explaining to EU citizens why it is happening – and what we can do about it.”

Mogens Lykketoft’s parents and their generation were very affected by the Second World War. EU was formed as a result of the war and with the aim of creating an economic and political collaboration that would prevent another war or crisis. Photo: Private

„ 3. Where would Denmark be without the EU? “It’s not clear. You could say that a tiny country like Denmark, which earns most of its revenue from trade with other countries, is particularly vulnerable if the EU cooperation cracks.”


GRÆNSELØS MAGAZINE SPRING 2017

where we are now. That the UK has decided to leave the EU is disastrous for the European cooperation. Because in addition to taking other countries down with it, Brexit will also remove the attention and energy away from the government and chiefs of staff in the EU, energy and attention that could be spent on working together to stop tax avoidance, unemployment, the refugee crisis and terrorism,” he says. There is a brief pause. The office goes quiet. Outside, snow falls against the barred windows and Mogens turns his eyes thoughtfully to the ceiling. “It’s very worrying that in this exact part of world history, where we really need to stand together, we choose to do the opposite. It’s almost incomprehensible,” he says. That Europe finds itself in rebellious times, and that a country like Great Britain pulls out of the cooperation is of grave concern to Mogens Lykketoft. But he understands the mechanisms that have made people want to free themselves from the European Union. “I understand the people who became embittered with the EU. It’s a natural response when the cooperation doesn’t work as it should, and the disappointment over lack of responsibility from the EU has been allowed to grow. It also reveals something about politicians in the EU, and that they need to take greater responsibility and explain why they’re doing what they’re doing, rather than just fousing on referendums,” he says and adds: “But I don’t believe that pulling away is the right solution.” A belief in cooperation Mogens Lykketoft has been in politics since 8 December 1981. He has switched offices several times in the old building and has travelled the world as Minister, party leader, Chairman of UN”s General Assembly and, not least, as an ordinary Social Democrat. And in the near 36 years of his political career, him and his colleagues at Christiansborg have witnessed constant European growing pains. More and more member countries have joined, the cooperation has expanded, the borders have opened, a common currency was born and the free movement of labour was created.

But are we too different for EU countries to stick together? “We have always been different as countries. And we’ll continue to be. That’s why Europe has never become a federal state like America. I believe more than ever that we need to move closer together, and that we need to strengthen the areas where we can work together. This means fighting tax fraud, social dumping and ensuring a fair base for social rights for the workforce that moves around Europe,” he says and adds: “I’m convinced that none of the existential problems, which are essential for us to live in some kind of peace on this planet, can be solved within any one nation’s borders. It requires not a lesser but a greater cooperation in Europe and the rest of the world.” But have we reached the bottom of the cooperation crisis? “I think we have the biggest marital crisis ever in the EU. But I also believe it will turn. The next few years are going to be tough, but I believe we will emerge stronger. Despite Donald Trump, Brexit and Le Pen, the rest of the world is moving in the direction of greater understanding, cohesion and the need for e.g. climate intervention. That’s what business communities, the many sub-states in the US and ordinary citizens around the world are doing. That’s why I hope it's a trend that will win,” he says and gets up from the sofa. He has to leave to cycle to another meeting in Copenhagen. He looks at the weather. The gentle snowfall has turned heavier. “So we just have to prepare ourselves. We can’t let it beat us,” he says and closes the door behind him.

Photo: Socialdemokratiet

ABOUT MOGENS LYKKETOFT „ Born 9 January 1946 in Copenhagen „ Son of paint shop manager Axel Lykketoft and Martha Lykketoft „ Married to journalist Mette Holm „ Has two daughters from a previous marriage to Aase Lykketoft, who died in 1979. He was also previously married to Minister of Culture Jytte Hilden (S) „ Maths student in 1954 „ Masters in Politics in 1971 „ Head of department in Arbejderbevægelsens Erhvervsråd 1975-1981 „ Member of Parliament from 1981 „ Minister for Tax 1981-1982 „ The Social Democrat Party’s political and financial spokesperson 1988-1991 „ Political spokesperson 1991-1993 and 2001-2002 „ Finance Minister 1993-2000 „ Foreign Minister 2000-2001 „ Chairman for the Social Democrat Party 2002-2005 „ Parliament Chairman 2011-2015 „ Chairman for the UN's General Assembly 2015-2016

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FACTS WORTH KNOWING... THE COUNTRY WITH THE MANY STRANGE LAWS AND REGULATIONS

Many think of America as the land of contrasts. A land of riches and extreme poverty. Where the obesity epidemic versus a fitness paradise. People are either for or against abortion. For or against weapons. For or against Trump. All or nothing. Double standards and religion. Genius and ignorance. And that’s what makes America so fascinating. The country is made up of 50 states. And each state has introduced its own set of laws and regulations alongside the national ones. We have taken a closer look at some of the stranger laws adopted by individual states. How many of them are enforced is hard to say‌


GRÆNSELØS MAGAZINE SPRING 2017

BY THE WAY, DON’T TRY TO SMUGGLE AN INNOCENT KINDER EGG INTO AMERICA! If you're found out, you risk being fined up to approx. 15,000 Danish kroner. Not the greatest way to start your holiday...

HANDS OFF THE ROAD In Connecticut you mustn’t cross the road walking on your hands.

It’s not the chocolate that the customs are against, but the surprise inside the egg. They believe it is a major choking hazard to children. That’s why it can’t be brought over legally.

CHRISTMAS DOESN’T LAST TILL EASTER In Maine it’s illegal to have Christmas decorations up after the 14 January.

RED LIGHT / GREEN LIGHT In Illinois you’re allowed to run a red light if you’re on a motorbike or bike.

WHAT ARE YOU STANDING THERE FOR? GO HOME! In Minnesota you can’t stand by a building unless you have good reason to.

RULES FOR MOOSE ONE OF THE MORE PECULIAR LAWS IS FOUND IN ALASKA’S VARIOUS LAWS ON MOOSE. IT IS PROHIBITED FOR A MOOSE TO GO TO BARS, IT IS PROHIBITED TO BRING YOUR MOOSE TO A BAR, AND IT IS PROHIBITED TO GIVE YOUR MOOSE ALCOHOL – AT LEAST IN A PUBLIC AREA.

DON’T WAKE THE BEAR Another slightly odd law in Alaska is that you must not wake a sleeping bear for a selfie.

DON’T EVEN THINK ABOUT MARATHON BINGO IN NORTH CAROLINA YOU’RE NOT ALLOWED TO PLAY BINGO FOR OVER FIVE HOURS.

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Barsø Foto: Erik Christensen

Grænsebom til Tyskland Foto: Jón Frimann Jónnson

CYCLING IN SOUTHERN JUTLAND

Foto: Østdansk Turisme

In Southern Jutland you’ll find some of Denmark’s most attractive and contrasting landscapes. The boundary marking the edge of the glacial movements from the Ice Age cuts across the landscape – and on either side of this line the landscape is strikingly different. In the east you find tunnel valleys, moraine hills and extinct ice landscapes, whereas in the west the landscape is practically flat and slopes gently down to the North Sea, interrupted only by isolated hills with gentle, rounded slopes.

With more than 3,000 km of cycle routes, Southern Jutland is a paradise for cyclists. The region has numerous marked cycle routes. The local, regional and national routes take you through the picturesque countryside and past the region’s many attractions. In the forests you can forge your own route along small roads and forest tracks letting you take in the many burial mounds and unique sights in the region. West Coast Route, National Cycling Route 1: Part of the North Sea Cycling Route. With a length of 6,200 km, the North Sea Cycling Route is the world’s longest signposted cycle route. Following the North Sea

coast through seven countries, it begins at the Danish/German border in Wadden Sea National Park. This part of the route really takes you back to nature. You can enjoy the birdlife in the marshes, whilst the route also runs past flocks of sheep grazing on the dykes along the west coast to the north. Hærvejen, National Cycling Route 3 Hærvejen has been an important travel artery for more than a thousand years. Armies, oxen drivers and pilgrims have travelled through Jutland on this route. As far as possible, the cycling route runs on small roads. Here, you can experience mediaeval churches, Viking runic stones, ancient burial mounds


GRÆNSELØS MAGAZINE SPRING 2017

Vadehavet

and impressive scenery. The majority of the roads are paved, but there are also minor gravel tracks running through forests and fields. Hærvejen runs all the way from Frederikshavn in the north to the Danish-German border in the south. On the German side, Ochsenweg (the oxen way) runs past Flensburg and Schleswig to Wedel near Hamburg.

these towns have to offer. The border route Grænseruten is a thematic cycle route that tells stories from, and the history of, the Danish-German border region. The 130-km cycle route from the Wadden Sea to Flensburg Fjord crosses the historical border at 13 points.

East Coast Route, National Cycling Route 5. The 650-km East Coast Route winds its way along Jutland’s coastline from Skagen in the north to Sønderborg in the south. The route takes you past market towns once frequented by kings, merchants and dukes. Take a well-earned rest en route and enjoy the attractions that

On the idyllic roads along the route, you can experience the expanses of the marshes, inland dunes and heaths, several woodland areas and the tunnel valley at Kruså which was formed during the Ice Age. The route runs through Denmark’s most picturesque village street, whilst providing a range of sights and natural attractions and passing

through two unusual museum areas. Ten stop-offs have been established along the route with covered cycle huts and 40 information points with maps and information about the history of the border region that is both entertaining and informative. Baltic Sea Route The Baltic Sea Route combines some of the best natural and cultural attractions in southern Denmark. Here you have the chance to enjoy plenty of fresh air, attractive countryside and good exercise. You’ll pass the cathedral city of Haderslev, the maritime town of Aabenraa,and Sønderborg, which features the windmill at Dybbøl Mølle and Sønderborg Castle.

Kalvøstien, Genner

Sort sol over vadehavet

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Hærvejen

CYCLING IN SOUTHERN JUTLAND

FIND OUT MORE!

At the various tourist offices, you can find additional materials and route descriptions: Haderslev Southern Jutland - cycle routes The Ancient Road - Hærvejen Mountainbiking in Pamhule Skov forest Sønderborg 'Friluftskort' Sønderborg The North Coast of Als Lake and Fjord landscapes Havnbjerg Strand Nørreskoven forest Stolbro Løkke The Anscient Road - Hærvejen

Aabenraa 'Friluftskort' Aabenraa Barsø Varnæs Kalvø Løjtland Tønder Rømø and List Northsea Cycling Route and Panorama routes

FIND MORE INFORMATION HERE: „ www.visitsonderjylland.com „ www.visitsonderborg.dk „ www.visitaabenraa.dk „ www.visittonder.dk „ www.visithaderslev.info


GRÆNSELØS MAGAZINE SPRING 2017

Tørning Mølle

Sønderborg

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Twice a year, 28 leading Danish and German business managers are invited to a meeting in the Danish-German Business Forum. The focus of the meeting is new business opportunities in the many different industries the members represent. Also discussed are the challenges in the commercial framework conditions that are common to the border region, such as access to infrastructure and workforce. Photo: Mads Schmidt Rasmussen

BUSINESS FORUM

TOGETHER WE ARE STRONGER BY DIRECTOR CLAUS SCHMIDT, THE DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL OF SOUTHERN DENMARK (URS)

The motto ‘Gemeinsam mehr bewegen – Together we are stronger’. Business Forum was founded based on three infrastructure conferences, which the Development Council of Southern Denmark (URS) and the Chambers of Commerce and Industry in Flensburg (IHK) implemented between 2009-2011 together with the local business community. That the Danish and German government subsequently met the business community’s wishes to establish the Danish-German transport commission in 2012, showed business leaders that it helps when you work together across national borders.

When it comes to workforce, companies both north and south of the border face almost the same challenges. These were discussed in the recent meeting in 2016 at Glücksburg Castle, where Slesvig-Holstein’s Minister for Justice, Culture and Europe, Anke Spoorendonk, and Regional Council chairman Stephanie Lose attended as guests. The next meeting takes place in Alsion in Sønderborg in spring 2017, where universities will be the main focus, in particular Sønderborg and the Flensburg University of Applied Sciences.

FACTS

„ Business Forum is run by the Chamber of Commerce and Industries in Flensburg (IHK Flensburg) and the Development Council of Southern Denmark (URS). This is where 14 Danish and 14 German business people meet to discuss areas such as education, workforce and infrastructure. Business Forum is headed by President Uwe Möser, IHK Flensburg, and the chairman of URS, Director Leif Friis Jørgensen, Naturmælk.


From Sonderborg to the charme of Italy GRÆNSELĂ˜S MAGAZINE SPRING 2017

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A strong partnership between Gislev Travel, Sonderborg Airport and Alsie Express has made it possible to fly directly from Sonderborg to 2 exciting destinations in Italy; Sardinia and Tuscany. The Black Plane from Alsie Express will take off 18 times heading towards Italy, from May until August. This gives every one the possibility to experience an unforgettable vacation with trips and hotel inkluded. Parking at the Airport in Sonderborg is of course free of charge. Do you want to know more? Please contact Gislev Travel www.gislev-rejser.dk.

Lots of stories, news and offers. Share your experiences, questions and pictures with other passengers. Follow Alsie Express on Facebook or Instagram.

New departures at Alsie Express Passenger wishes has made Alsie Express expande and alter the timetable, starting from march 27. During af test period there will be an ekstra departure from Copenhagen and Sonderborg on sundays. Also other departures will be changed, so please pay attention to the timetable, which is handed out at the Airport in Sonderborg and onboard at the Alsie Express.

Youth & Senior Tickets Alsie Express Youth & Senior for those above 65 years, below 25 years, or students/apprentices/military conscripts below 31 years. These tickets are available for almost all departures, right up till take off, giving the oppurtunity to travel spontaniously. The only difference is the lower price:

from only 499 Dkr one way.

Find the Alsie Express Youth & Senior tickets on the homepage www.alsieexpress.com


Grænseløs no. 14 (UK)