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THE FUNNIES: R.I.P. Hughes plaza

Above: Another glorious day at Hughes Plaza

Today, comrades, we farewell a masterpiece of modern architecture. A place hitherto untouched by entrepreneurial greed and the evils of stimulus cash. The place I refer to, of course, is Hughes Plaza, the bustling hub of the proletarian paradise that is Adelaide University. Hughes never cared for decadent aesthetics, prefering the Socialist Classicism of the Ministry of Highways, Tbilisi, and Lenin Square, Ekaterinburg. However Hughes distinguishes itself from its noble comrades by uniting its ugliness with a total lack of functionality. The end result, while being a horrific under-capitalisation of prime city land, is one of the world's best examples of a style now dubbed by architectural and psychological ex-

perts as bruto-depressivism. Always striving for greatness, Hughes was not content to merely occupy space; its ambition has been, indeed, to brutalise that space with grand artistic and political statements. Lately it became a de-facto contemporary gallery. Its sole acquisition, a series of multicoloured metal mesh grids woven into an indeterminate polygon, is a powerful statement against the shallowness of aestheticism. And remaining true to its Marxist roots to the very end, Hughes has continued to be a leading venue for the AUU Elections, South Australia's lengthiest and most frustrating socialist mating ritual. But, as one door is closed by the force of free market trade, another opens, and as

the sun sets on old Hughes Plaza, we now await the arrival of new Hughes Plaza, described by the University Bureau of Propaganda to be one of Adelaide's most dynamic interactive spaces for students, staff and the general public. Students for whom three nearby food courts and an on-campus refectory/dog-food factory are insufficient will find a variety of new options upon which to lavish their untoward capitalist wealth. Hughes Plaza is survived by several of its comrades: brother, Ligertwood Plaza, parents Napier and Schultz, and its only child, Union Hall (recently sentenced to death by capitalist oppressors for its political beliefs). - James Gould

On Dit Magazine: Volume 78, Issue 1  

On Dit Magazine is a fortnightly Australian student magazine with an emphasis on exceptional writing, photography, and illustration.

On Dit Magazine: Volume 78, Issue 1  

On Dit Magazine is a fortnightly Australian student magazine with an emphasis on exceptional writing, photography, and illustration.