Page 40

OnDitmagazine ― on campus

38

a single flush as a toilet option in some buildings. Even in conservation courses, we’re told to care about our environment while flipping through pages of notes on pristine, titanium white sheets. (It should be noted that the university does pay a higher premium to recycle all their on-site waste - 892 tonnes annually.) However, it is encouraging to know that Ecoversity is collaborating with student organisations such as the Environmental Collective of Students (ECOS) on decision making. It’s an opportunity for students to be engaged and actively decide on their future, rather than leaving it solely in the hands of policy makers. While this is no doubt a positive step, implementing proposed targets and encouraging behavioural change is another issue. Dominic Mugavin, ECOS member and student representative on the Ecoversity Energy Reference Group, says “for Ecoversity to really succeed, it needs every student and staff member to play an active role… The main challenge of many of these projects is empowering students.” One potential solution that Ecoversity is offering is solidarity through good old fashioned competition. The proposal is for buildings and faculties to have Energy Challenges. The building/faculty to reduce their consumption of energy the most, wins a prize. But as Mugavin notes, “With students often using many different areas, there is not a lot of ‘space ownership’ so students [won’t] feel like they can contribute”. The success of these competitions would no doubt be heavily influenced by effective advertising and a suitable prize for both staff and students. Aside from student and staff cooperation for on-campus mitigation, there are still many more factors to be considered before claiming ‘Ecoversity’ status. Transportation for students and staff commuting between home and campus is an issue that remains difficult to claim, cost and count. ‘Food Miles’ and ‘Eating Local’ are also fast becoming in vogue. However, monitoring the food sourcing offered on campus is difficult.

There are clear obstacles ahead that require open debate and effective policy, but the establishment of Ecoversity as a non-traditional, student-friendly alternative to tackling climate change is an opportunity in itself. While it’s easy to blame ‘The Man’ for all this, we can’t forget to scrutinise our own behaviour, especially now that we have a chance to actively offer remedies for ourselves and the university. Whether the University of Adelaide is really an Ecoversity depends largely on the continual cooperation of students, staff and management in ensuring effective strategies are embraced.

-Noby Leong

Architecture

Centre point Construction has begun on a $34 million project to redevelop Hughes Plaza into a multi-levelled student campus hub. Let’s face it, if we want to catch up with friends, grab a quick coffee or get a bit of quiet study done, Hughes Plaza is probably the last place we’d think of. Don’t get me wrong – I’ve never minded passing through it en route to a lecture, dropping in to Bank SA or sussing out the odd promotional event, but generally the less time spent in that dreary concrete courtyard, the better. However, that’s all about to change – the

On Dit Magazine: Volume 78, Issue 1  

On Dit Magazine is a fortnightly Australian student magazine with an emphasis on exceptional writing, photography, and illustration.

On Dit Magazine: Volume 78, Issue 1  

On Dit Magazine is a fortnightly Australian student magazine with an emphasis on exceptional writing, photography, and illustration.