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Leicester Castle

Number 64

August 2013 1


On the left is a charming photo of our new Master, Tony Chettle, and his Consort, Mrs. Hazel Hague taken after the Gild Banquet on 8th June 2013.

Below is a photo of the Leicester Lord Mayor, Councillor Mustafa Kamal and his Consort, together with Mr. Howard Crapper the Master of the Freemen of Oxford taken before the

Gild Banquet.

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Number 64

August 2013

Patron: Colonel Robert Martin MBE DL President: The Lord Mayor of Leicester OFFICERS 2013 - 2014 Master: A. Chettle Deputy Master: M.E. Ayres Clerk: L.A. Roffee Chamberlain: M.B. Hill WARDENS L. Kirk, J.D. Lewitt, A. Marriott , B.W. Mudford, J.E. Tolton

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GILDHALL NEWS August 2013

Contents Editor’s comments

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Report by Tony Chettle, Master of the Gild

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Report on the Annual Gild Banquet by John Tolton

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Gild Membership by Maurice Hill, Chamberlain of the Gild

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Your Gild Court needs you!

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Report by Bill Hargrave, Chairman of the Board of Deputies

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Trip to Trentham Gardens 4th August 2013 - CANCELLED

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Future programme - dates for your diary Wednesday 18th September, Tour of Everards Brewery Friday 8th November, Fish & Chip Supper, with a talk on WW1 memorials Friday 13th December, Visit to The Little Theatre to see Cinderella

Contributions to the Gildhall News The History of the Freemen of Leicester - part 7, by John Tolton

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Snippets from the past by Lynn Roffee

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Commemoration of 100th Year Anniversary WW1 Project

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For Amusement Only Imagine that you have won a prize

19

Paraprosdokians

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Have you changed your address?

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Forms included with the Newsletter Booking form for Fish & Chip supper on 8th November 2013 Booking form for Pantomime at the Little Theatre on 13th December 2013 Renewal form for annual subscriptions Standing Order form for Annual Subscriptions Application for Membership & Associate Membership of the Gild Gild products order form

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Editor’s Comments We have a new Master, congratulations to Tony Chettle who received the Master’s Chain of Office from the Past Master, John Tolton, at the end of the Annual Banquet on 8th June. Tony’s consort will be Mrs Hazel Hague from York. Hazel was the Master of York from June 2012 to 28th June 2013, when Tony was her consort. Therefore for twenty days in June this year we had two Masters who were each others consort, this must be a unique occurance. The trip to Trentham Gardens on 4th August has had to be cancelled due to lack of support. This is a sad state of affairs when you consider the number of Freemen and Gild associates there are. The future of the Gildhall News is a topic regularly discussed at various meetings. What do you think? Should the hard copy of the Gildhall News be retained in it’s present format and distributed to those who would like to receive it? Or, should it only be available on-line on the Freemen’s website? Or, would you like a few A4 sheets stapled together, produced on a computer printer or photcopier? I look forward to your letters/e-mails. If you have a story that would be of interest to other members, please put pen to paper, or finger to e-mail. We don’t need a book, only a short article, possibly one or two pages long. It could be longer if it’s enthralling!! Preferably I would like to receive them as an attachment to an e-mail if possible, but pen and ink is acceptable.

Brian Mudford

Report by Tony Chettle, Master of the Gild Hello Everyone, This is my first report as Master of the Gild and as I have been Master for just 40 days there are few items to report. My installation at the Leicester Gild Banquet went well, especially for the first attempt, the ceremony needs some fine tuning but it adds well to the ambience of the occasion, the Banquet itself went well and I think it reflects well on everyone involved in making it so. 5


I feel it a great honour to become Master of the Gild and I shall do my best to carry on the excellent work that has been carried out by my predecessors, in this I will be strongly supported by my Consort, Mrs Hazel Hague, a Past Master of the Guild of Freemen of York. Coming to my report. On the 5th June, six robed Freemen attended the Crown Court Ceremony at St. Mary de Castro, Leicester. This was before I became Master but for completeness I have included it in my report. The Armed Forces Day Service at Leicester Cathedral was attended by myself and three other people who acted as representatives of the Leicester Gild. Of the three, one was a member of the York Guild, namely Hazel Hague, who at the time was Master of the York Guild of Freemen, another was a Blue Badge Guide, namely Robert Gregory, who always answers the call when asked! And lastly, Keith Harding, a very supportive member of the Gild. On the 24 th June four robed Freemen attended the Damask Rose Ceremony at O’Neill’s public house in Leicester, formerly known as the Crown and Thistle. The occasion went well with a free beverage from the landlord after the Ceremony! (see photo opposite page 22) Lastly I have had a letter from the Lord Mayor of Leicester’s Office and I am pleased to announce that the Lord Mayor has kindly agreed to be President of the Gild for the coming year. Best Wishes and Kind Regards to you all

Tony Chettle The Gild Annual Banquet Weekend On Saturday 8th June the Gild held their Annual Banquet at Devonshire Place on London Road in Leicester at which event eighty freemen and friends attended. As usual at Devonshire Place the food and service were superb and the whole evening was a great success, and received many favourable comments. Attending the banquet were the Lord Mayor, Councillor Mustafa Kamal, Col Robert Martin, MBE DL, Patron of the Leicester Gild of Freemen, Mr Howard Crapper, the Master of the Freemen of Oxford, Mrs Hazel Hague, Master of the Gild of Freemen of York and Mr Sudhin Basu, Master of the Guild of Freemen of Coventry. Many other freemen attended from 6


Coventry and York along with freemen from Northampton, Pembroke and from London. We were also pleased to welcome Dr John Smail, Master elect of the Freemen of London and the Deacon of the Incorporation of Wrights Glasgow. So we had at our banquet representatives from England, Scotland and Wales. Truly representative of Great Britain. The banquet meal consisted of six courses with a choice for the first course, the main course and the dessert, interspersed with a sorbet between the first and main course and all followed by a cheese board and topped with coffee and mint chocolates. Speeches followed the splendid repast given by the Lord Mayor, Col Robert Martin, John Tolton, the Master of the Leicester Gild of Freemen, and by Howard Crapper, Master of the Freemen of Oxford. The formalities of the evening were completed with the handing over of the Master’s Chain of Office from John Tolton to our new Master, Tony Chettle. Preceding the events of Saturday evening was a fish and chip supper held on Friday night at the Holt to welcome all the visitors from other towns and cities who wished to make a weekend of their visit to Leicester. On Saturday Morning our visitors were treated to a tour of the Richard III trail by Blue Badge Guide Bob Gregory. The Freemen’s Annual Church Service was held on the Sunday Morning at St Mary de Castro attended by the Lord Mayor, the High Sherriff, Mrs Sally Bowie, Col Robert Martin OBE, the Patron of the Leicester Gild, the visiting Freemen and by Freemen of Leicester. After the service we were all invited to take refreshments and to say our farewells to all our guests who I hope went away with a favorable impression of our City. I personally would like to thank all those who helped make the weekend such a success with particular thanks to Michael Ayres for organizing the Friday night supper, Brian Mudford for arranging the Church Service at St Mary de Castro and to Maurice Hill for maintaining the financial records for the whole weekend. The venue and date for next year’s banquet is booked for Saturday 14th June 2014 at Devonshire Place, so take note and put it in your diary.

John Tolton Immediate Past Master

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Gild Membership I am now in my second year as Gild Chamberlain and still, to say the least, finding it fraught with problems these being essentially ones of clearly identifying members and collecting subscriptions.

Members At date I have been able to clearly identify 262 members including associates, but there are others who I cannot identify because when members pay their subscriptions they often also include payment for others without saying who they are paying for and I am not yet experienced enough to guess who the others might be and their details name, address email addresses etc. If you have included others when paying your subscription then please send me details ASAP in order for me to bring our membership records up to date.

Subscriptions Of the 262 clearly identified members some 91 (35%) appear to have not yet fully paid their membership with some owing monies from last year and this year because they had not appreciated that membership fees were increased in 2012 to ÂŁ9 for members and ÂŁ6 for associates. Subscriptions are due on the 1st April each year and now in mid July some members have still not yet paid for this year. The Gild is a non profit making organisation and subscriptions are its only form of income and vital for its continuation. Please send me any monies that you might owe without further delay and amend standing orders if necessary.

Conclusion Please make me happy, take note of the above and help to correct the situation reference the records and finances. My address as usual is:33, Mossdale Road, Kingsway, Leicester, LE3 2UT. Email mozjune@talktalk.net

Maurice Hill Gild Chamberlain 8


YOUR GILD Two of the Gild Court Members have informed the Court that they will not be standing for re-election in 2014. This will create both vacancies and the opportunity for new volunteers to put their names forward to join the Gild Court. We hope that by informing you of this now, it will give each and every one of you time to consider putting your name forward. Whilst age is just a number, there are a number of current Court members who have given years of service and wish to step back and let younger people take up the reigns. There will also be the opportunity to seek election to one of the officer roles. The Gild Court has also been discussing ways in which we can attract younger Freemen to join and participate in the Gild activities. Sadly, no one has come forward to offer to put forward ideas for activities for younger Freemen. In order to try and resolve this issue we have decided to co-opt a “younger “Freemen to join us on the Gild Court. We are looking for someone that represents the under thirties or there about. The Gild Court would provide support and assistance and would like this co-opted member to organise activities suitable for the younger Freemen. It is important that we get new blood on the Court and ensure that all members of the Gild are catered for and for the continuity of the running of the Gild. So give it some thought, specially the new Freemen that have joined us in the last two or three years. If you would like to know more about becoming a member of the Court please do get in touch for an informal discussion. There is also the opportunity for you to meet with the Court members and to attend a Court meeting so that you can see how the Court runs. The frequency of the meetings is every three months, starting at 7.00pm on a Monday evenings and last for about 2 hours.

Tony Chettle

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Report by Chairman of the Board Bill Hargrave Winner of the Website Feedback Prize Draw I would like to thank everyone who provided feedback to our questionnaire on the website. There were many positive comments and constructive inputs. The winner was Mr Alan Plummer who will receive his prize in the post very shortly. We hope that you will continue to visit our website at www.leicesterfreemen.com as we are making every effort to keep this updated with events coming up and the latest editions and archives of the Gildhall News. We encourage everyone with access to the website to use the facility to view their quarterly publication via this facility to help us reduce our costs which are increasing dramatically with the ever increasing postage costs. Reports of the AGM and Board meetings and Annual Reports are available on the “Members” page. Please apply for the password via “Contact us” to access these.

The Future of the Gildhall News We also welcome your suggestions for further improvements to the site. The debate regarding The Gildhall News continues. The Board are conscious that it is vitally important that we continue to communicate with you all. Up to the present time the Gildhall news has provided the most significant communications role. The high cost of producing and postage costs cannot be ignored. The remainder of my report will be posted on our website in early August. If you would like a printed copy as you have no access to a computer please contact the office by phone or letter. My first “website” report will cover the following subjects ·

Recent developments at the Holt

·

The future of the Gildhall news 10


Proposed dates for Freedom ceremonies

New Freemen

The appointment of new Deputies to the Board

The expansion of Hereditary Freemen and the impact on our resources

Finally I hope you are enjoying the current heatwave. After such a dismal winter and spring it does make a pleasant change.

Bill Hargrave

Trip to Trentham Gardens 4th August 2013 - CANCELLED The above trip as had to be cancelled due to of lack of support. Having to cancel this trip was very disappointing because please appreciate a deal of effort is extended when planning trips, pre-visits are made, costs investigated with the bus company concerned, all aspects of the day looked at in detail and followed by the required publicity all with the aim of making it an enjoyable event. The feeling of disappointment was felt more because the three previous trips i.e. Swindon, Grimsby and in June to Hendon were well supported and everyone appeared to have had a good day out and enjoyed themselves. Please support other visits and functions that we arrange and are advertised in the Gildhall News the next visit is to Everards Brewery on 18th September and spaces are available, see details below. For 2014 we are currently investigating possible visits to the restored Cutty Sark and to Hull, and we would welcome suggestions regarding other venues that might be explored. Send your ideas to me at 33 Mossdale Road, Kingsway, Leicester LE3 2UT

Maurice Hill

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Programme of Future Events Visit to Everards Brewery Ltd. Castle Acres Narborough Leics. LE19 1BY Wednesday 18th September 2013 W e have arranged a visit to Everards Brewery and the following

arrangements apply. You are asked to report to Everards reception at 10.30am where you will be shown to the hospitality suite for an introduction to Everards. A tour of the brewery will then take place taking you through production, packaging and warehouse areas. Please be aware that the tour includes several staircases and is unfortunately not suitable for those with walking difficulties. Please wear suitable footwear and clothing as some areas may be cold and wet underfoot. The tour then returns to the hospitality suite where samples of various ales will be available along with a light buffet lunch, and the visit should conclude by 2.00pm. The minimum number of people for the tour is 8 and the maximum 12. The minimum age of visitors is 18 years. The numbers of places on this visit are limited. If you would like to be included then please contact Maurice Hill 33 Mossdale Road Leicester LE3 2UT Tel No. 0116 2895394 who will deal with Everards confirming the visit, and numbers taking part. The cost f the visit is £7.50 per person and you will pay this yourself by cash or cheque to the brewery on arrival.

Maurice Hill

Fish and Chip Supper, Friday, 8th November 2013 Freemen’s Holt, Old Church Street, Aylestone ‘Their Name Liveth For Evermore’ A look at memorials and war graves of WW1 As the 100th anniversary of WW1 nears, this talk will look at some of the memorials to the fallen that left an emptiness in so many lives and graves of particular interest. Our speaker is non other than Brian Johnson, local 12


author, speaker and family historian who has previously given excellent talks at previous events. The talk will include the youngest soldier killed and the sons of well known people who served in The First World War, also referred to as the Great War, the “War to end all Wars”. Tickets are priced at £8.50 each and you are urged to make your booking early using the enclosed booking form.

Lynn Roffee

Visit to the Little Theatre Dover Street, Leicester to see Cinderella on 13th December 2013 starting at 7pm. Take one glass slipper, a magic pumpkin, Buttons and a Fairy Godmother, mix them together with a charming Prince, a girl with a kind heart and her two nasty step sisters, add an invitation to the royal Ball and what have you got? – the traditional family pantomime Cinderella of course. Please book early for this seasonal treat the whole family can enjoy freemen, family and friends. Tickets cost £14 for adults and £12 for children (up to 16). Tickets will be allocated strictly on a first-come, first-served basis. We have paid a deposit for 30 tickets. When we have received sufficient bookings, the Little Theatre will be informed of the mix of children and adult seats rerquired and we will send the final payment. Only then will we receive the tickets, and post them out to you, so don’t worry if you don’t receive them until November. Please remember to complete the application form in capital letters and make sure that your address is clear. We don’t want to send your tickets to the wrong address.

Brian Mudford 13


Contributions to the Gildhall News ***************************** History of Freemen – Part 7, Legislation in Mediaeval Leicester By the middle of the 14th century the authority of the burgesses of Leicester in respect of legislation was still not complete and there were limitations imposed by the Norman administration. They did, however, pass many local by-laws even though those local laws covered matters that were the subject of laws passed by Royal proclamation. An act passed by Edward III forbade men to go armed in ’affray of the peace’ and power was given to the mayor of the borough to deal with offenders. In Leicester they added to the act by adding that men were forbidden to go in armour night or day and offenders were to be kept in prison until the King and the lords of the town had done their will upon them. At the same time period an order was passed in Leicester forbidding the mixing of wine-lees with new wine which again resulted from a similar proclamation by Edward III. The price of beer and bread was fixed in accordance with a proclamation that covered the whole of the country. In the middle of the 14th century the country was decimated by the first visitation of the Black Death and prices fluctuated wildly as a result of shortages of food and drink. In the country harvests were left to rot because of the shortage of labour to gather the harvest and livestock perished creating shortages of meat. A law was passed by parliament forbidding labourers from demanding higher wages during harvesting as it was forbidden for the storage of grain in excess of a personal requirement. An unusual feature of the plague was that it affected young, strong people more than the elderly and weak population. During the early part of the 15th century Edward IV granted a charter creating the role of Justices of the Peace in Leicester of which there were four. This move brought Leicester into line with many other boroughs up and down the country where the respective mayors and justices of the peace ensured that new laws were made known to the population and enforced. Leicester was conveniently divided into four quarters by the two main highways passing east to west and north to south and crossing at the high cross and each quarter was the responsibility of a justice of the peace. 14


The first action was to reintroduce the proclamation that no weapons should be carried save in the support of the mayoral authority. Knights and squires were permitted to have their weapons carried by an attendant following behind. Even though they were forbidden to bear arms the inhabitants of Leicester were expected to be ready at all frays in support of the mayor… Visitors from the country were expected to leave their staves and swords at their inns when they came to town and no weapons were to be lent to them except to support the mayor. Subsequent to the installation of J.P.s there was considerable activity in the passing of local laws in Leicester, particularly in matters of sanitation and decency. Even as far back as the 13th century there had been a by law forbidding the exposure of meat for sale in excess of three days but in the 15th century stringent rules were entered in the Hall Books against butchers who bring flesh to sell ‘corrupt with any manner of sickness’. Likewise it was forbidden to sell twice cooked meat, the food sold must be seasonable and either baked, boiled or roast. Records in the 14th century indicate that there were no regulations limiting the accumulation of rubbish in the street, only a threat of grievous financial penalties against cooks or fisher folk who throw dirty water out ‘to the grievance and soiling of good people’. By the 15th century it was prohibited to allow dirt heaps to lie before the house doors for more than three days in any part of the town. Dead animals were not allowed to be thrown out into the street but must be buried in a field away from the normal passage of people. It had been customary to wait for wet weather before throwing out house sweepings out of the window but this was forbidden under pain of imprisonment. In 1508 certain places were designated for the tipping of rubbish on the west, south and east sides of the town. A special officer was appointed to attend to the cleaning of the market place, but the cleaning of domestic rubbish and dirt heaps left before the houses was left to the householder’s own devices. In 1344 arrangements were made for the building of a public latrine on waste land near the River Soar which I cannot imagine going down well for those down river of the building. Another sanitary order made was that women could not wash clothes at the common wells of the town, nor in the high streets under pain of imprisonment. Pigs were also not allowed in the high streets unless they were ringed and later no pigs at all were allowed in the high streets and only ringed pigs allowed in the lanes. Wandering ducks were also forbidden. 15


It was not until the second half of the 15th century that any written legislation was passed on the morals of the inhabitants of Leicester. In 1467 the heads of the frankpledges (who performed many of the duties of constables) were ordered to present all brothels to the borough court where they were closed at the first warning under pain of imprisonment and a fine to the king. A particularly unpleasant form of punishment was public humiliation which drew disgust and shame on anyone using filthy language or was guilty of other objectionable offences. Any trade regulations enforced by the borough tended to be uniform with royal proclamations or to statute laws. Prices of fuel, tallow and candles were fairly standard throughout the country as were the prices of poultry. Victuallers had to sell at reasonable prices in accordance with the Victualler’s Acts and similar legislation imposed control of bakers and tipplers (ale-house keepers). Because of the nature of life in the middle ages markets were fed with produce from within a radius of 10 or 12 miles around so much of the legislation was local but broadly influenced by national laws. There were exceptions and not all produce was local. Game had become comparatively scarce in the 15th century and Leicester victuallers were forbidden to buy up game until the population of Leicester had been served, and if he did so any would be purchaser could compel the cook; or restauranteur as he would be known today; to sell at the price at which he had bought. Fishermen would sell herrings in Leicester from Great Yarmouth but met competition from individuals known as farloupers, wanderers who would but fish from the fishermen to sell on for profit. They were so numerous as to be able to influence the price of fish at source; something akin to the larger supermarkets today and the price the farmers receive for produce. The Merchant Gild was anxious to protect itself from the farloupers lest the fishermen should be unwilling to come to Leicester with their herrings. By the middle of the 15th century the Gild had a much stronger hold on the local legislation and a greater responsibility for maintaining national laws imposed by parliament, but more of that later.

John Tolton

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Snippets from the Past Having a keen interest in family history means that I often browse through various old records, books and publications and they also paint a picture of the social history as well as individuals. One such a situation arose recently when looking through the Records of the Borough of Leicester from 1689-1835 and I have extracted several records detailed below. Some words are spelt differently today (note below: - the extracts are taken as per the records books– these are not spelling mistakes) and the grammar and sentence construction is also different. Note the spelling of Freedom in 1712 compared with 1743.

Recorded in the Hall Books and Papers 28 November 1712:Question relating to a Freeman’s son “Q. Whether John Lee Eldest Son of Mr. Roger Lee shall have his Freedom of this Burrough his father not having of some time after his birth taken his Freedom by omission of the Officers not calling him to take it as usual And the said Mr Roger Lee not being sensible of the inconveniencie of the neglecting it And in consideration of the said Mr Lees faithfull service to the Corporacion. Yea 37. No. 5.”

Recorded in the Hall Books and Papers 28 January 1740/41:Non-freemen sued “Ordered that the Town Sollictor do forthwith sue George Green otherwise Smith for following the Trade of a Watchmaker in this Borough not being a Freeman of the Corporation”

Recorded in the Hall Books and Papers 29th July 1743:Revised offer to non-free watchmaker “Ordered that of George Smith Green will pay the sume of ten pounds towards the Charges the Corporation have been at in sueing him to oblige him to take up his Freedome and also the further sume of Twenty pounds for his Freedome that Mr. Mayor do admit him as such but if the said George Smith Green shall refuse to pay the said two sumes of ten pounds 17


& twenty pounds then it is further ordered that the Town Sollicitor do either bring a fresh action against him or proceed upon the former as shall be advisable to compel the said Green to take his Freedome it being prejudicall to the Corporation and an encouragement to others in the like Case who follow their Trade not being Freemen” Records for equivalent money calculations have only been kept from 1800 onwards so unfortunately it’s not been possible to accurately calculate the value of £10 in 1743 compared to 2013. To try and give an indication of the value of £10 in 1800 compared to 13th April 2013 would be £585.63, and the value of £20 would be £12,398.22. So I think we can safely say that being sued for not taking up the Freedom would be deemed very expensive in 1743. Lynn Roffee

Leicester Freemen – Commemoration of 100th Year Anniversary WW1 Project The Board of Deputies have agreed to a project to compile information about Leicester Freemen that served in WW1. There are no comprehensive records of Leicester Freemen who fought in world wars, and records do not show that a man was a Freeman. With the Commemoration of 100th Anniversary of WW1 on 5th August 2014, it is fitting that this research be undertaken to remember these men. It will form the basis of an on-going project to collate information on Leicester Freemen who served during all wars. The information will be posted on the Leicester Freemen website under Family History. The Board have also agreed for an exhibition and an event to be held in August 2014 – details to follow. It is hoped that Leicester Freemen, from far and wide, together with their families, will want to contribute to this project by providing details of their ancestors. This may include photos, medals, diaries, letters, postcards and any other memorabilia and stories that have been passed down the family line relating to WW1. If you are able to provide only a name, we can try and undertake very limited research. Regrettably 2/3rds of the military records were burnt in WW2, so there may be limited information about their service records. 18


We will be holding a series of drop in events at The Holt where you can speak with us about the information you have. This is likely to be Wednesday mornings 10.30 – 12 noon. We need your help: If you have information on a Leicester Freemen serving in WW1 and/ or If you would like to get involved and help us with the project Please contact Lynda Bramley:Estate Office:0116 283 4017 Email: office@leicesterfreemen.com

Lynn Roffee Imagine that you had won the following prize in a contest: Each morning your bank would deposit £86,400.00 in your private account for your use. However, this prize has rules. The set of rules would be: 1. Everything that you didn’t spend during each day would be taken away from you. 2. You may not simply transfer money into some other account. 3. You may only spend it. 4. Each morning upon awakening, the bank opens your account with another £86,400.00 for that day. 5. The bank can end the game without warning; at any time it can say, ‘It’s over’, the game is over! It can close the account and you will not receive a new one. What would you personally do? You would buy anything and everything you wanted right? Not only for yourself, but for all people you love. Even for people you don’t know, because you couldn’t possibly spend it all on yourself, right? You would try to spend every penny, and use it all, right? 19


ACTUALLY this GAME is REALITY! Shocked?????YES Each of us is in possession of such a magical bank. We just can’t seem to see it. The MAGICAL BANK is “TIME” !!! 1. Each morning we awaken to receive 86,400 seconds as a gift of life, 2. And when we go to sleep at night, any remaining time is NOT credited to us. 3. What we haven’t lived up that day is forever lost. 4. Yesterday is forever gone. 5. Each morning the account is refilled, but the bank can dissolve your account at any time WITHOUT WARNING.... SO, what will YOU do with your 86,400 seconds? Those seconds are worth so much more than the same amount in pounds. Think about that, and always think of this: Enjoy every second of your life, because time races by so much quicker than you think. So take care of yourself, be happy, love deeply and enjoy life ! Here’s wishing you a wonderful and beautiful day. Start spending. Enjoy those which you have.

Paraprosdokians Paraprosdokians (Winston Churchill loved them) are figures of speech in which the latter part of a sentence or phrase is surprising or unexpected; frequently humorous. 1

Where there’s a will, I want to be in it.

2

Since light travels faster than sound, some people appear bright until you hear them speak.

3

If I agreed with you, we’d both be wrong. 20


4

We never really grow up; we only learn how to act in public.

5

War does not determine who is right - only who is left....

6

Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.

7

They begin the evening news with ‘Good Evening,’ then proceed to tell you why it isn’t.

8

To steal ideas from one person is plagiarism. To steal from many is research.

9

I thought I wanted a career. Turns out I just wanted paycheques.

10

In filling out an application, where it says, ‘In case of emergency, notify:’ I put ‘DOCTOR.’

11

I didn’t say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you.

12

Behind every successful man is his woman. Behind the fall of successful man is usually another woman.

13

A clear conscience is the sign of a fuzzy memory.

14

You do not need a parachute to skydive. You only need a parachute to skydive twice.

15

Money can’t buy happiness,but it sure makes misery easier to live with.

16

Where there’s a will, there are relatives.

17

I used to be indecisive. Now I’m not so sure.

18

You’re never too old to learn something stupid.

19

To be sure of hitting the target, shoot first and call whatever you hit the target.

20

Nostalgia isn’t what it used to be.

21

Change is inevitable, except from a vending machine.

22

Going to church doesn’t make you a Christian any more than standing in a garage makes you a car.

And mine is......... I’m supposed to respect my elders, but its getting harder and harder for me to find one now. 21


Have you changed your address ? In the event that is necessary to inform the Gild or the Board of any change in circumstances then the information should be sent to: Lynda Bramley Clerk to the Board Leicester Freemen’s Estate 32 Freemen’s Holt Old Church Street Aylestone Leicester LE2 8NH Telephone: 0116 – 283 4017 E-mail: leicester.freemen@talktalkbusiness.net Leicester Freemen web site: www.leicesterfreemen.com

Copy for the next issue should reach the Editor by th Friday 18 October 2013 For your News and Views write to : Brian Mudford 11 Huntsman Close Markfield Leicestershire LE67 9XE Telephone 01530 245414 e-mail: brianmudford@tiscali.co.uk

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Four Leicester Freemen attended the Damask Rose Ceremoney at the Crown & Thistle pub, now O’Neills, in Lowesby Lane, where the pub manager made a payment of a peppercorn rent of four old pennies and a damask rose to the Lord Mayor Cllr. Mustafa Kamal

A Ladies Gild scarf is now available at ÂŁ15 + 50p postage in the UK. If you are outside the UK and would like a scarf or one of the other Gild products then please e-mail Maurice Hill for cost of postage.

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Procession of Leicester Freemen and visiting Freemen led by the Leicester Lord Mayor, Councillor Mustafa Hamal and his Consort, before the Annual Freemen’s Service at St. Mary de Castro on the 9th June 2013


BOOKING FORM

Fish & Chip Supper - talk on WWI memorials Friday 8th November 2013 at Freemen’s Holt 7.30pm Please reserve ………. places at £8.50 each My name is.........……………………………………...………………………………. My address is………………………………….....……………………………………. …………………………………………………………………………. Postcode……………………….Telephone……………………………. e-mail address..................................................................................................... I enclose a cheque/postal order for £…………….., made payable to “Gild of Leicester Freemen”. Please send to: Maurice Hill, 33 Mossdale Road, Kingsway, Leicester LE3 2UT. Applications will be dealt with on a first-come, first-served basis

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ---BOOKING FORM

Visit to Cinderella pantomime on 13th December 2013 at the Little Theatre, Dover Street at 7.00pm Please reserve ………. adult places at £14.00 each .......... child places (under 16) at £12.00 each My name is.........……………………………………...………………………………. My address is………………………………….....……………………………………. …………………………………………………………………………. Postcode……………………….Telephone……………………………. e-mail address..................................................................................................... I enclose a cheque/postal order for £…………….., made payable to “Gild of Leicester Freemen”. Please send to: Maurice Hill, 33 Mossdale Road, Kingsway, Leicester LE3 2UT. Applications will be dealt with on a first-come, first-served basis


RENEWAL OF GILD MEMBERSHIP FOR THE YEAR 1ST APRIL 2013 - 31ST MARCH 2014 I would like to pay the annual subscription for my membership/associate membership of the Gild for the year commencing 1st April 2013

Membership

.............at £9.00

= £.............

Associate Membership

..............at £6.00

= £.............

My name is (BLOCK CAPITALS).................................................... My address is (BLOCK CAPITALS) ......................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................... Post code...........................Telephone............................................. e-mail address................................................................................. I enclose a cheque/postal order for £................... made payable to “Gild of Leicester Freemen” Please post to: Maurice Hill, 33 Mossdale Road, Kingsway, Leicester LE3 2UT Any queries, please phone Maurice on 0116 2895394 PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO PAY YOUR ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION BY STANDING ORDER, PLEASE SEE OVER PAGE.


GILD OF LEICESTER FREEMEN (Kindly complete where marked by all dotted lines) To: Maurice Hill, 33 Mossdale Road, Kingsway, Leicester LE3 2UT Date………………………………..20.….. I, ………………………………………………..agree to pay my Annual Subscription to the GILD OF LEICESTER FREEMEN on 1st April each year by means of the signed Standing Order that I have sent to my bank. I understand that the annual subscriptions at present are £9.00 for a full member and £6.00 for an associate member, and that I can stop or amend this Standing Order simply by giving instructions to my bank. Signature………………………………………………………. Address………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………… Post code……………………………………………….

e-mail address...................................................................


STANDING ORDER - PLEASE SEND TO YOUR BANK MANAGER To: The Manager…………………………………………..Bank PLC Address ……....………………………………………………….. ……………………………………………………... ………………………………………………........... Postcode…………………………………………… Please pay to:Lloyds Bank TSB Bank PLC, Old Market Square Branch, Nottingham NG1 6FD (Bank Sort Code 30-96-18) For the account of the Gild of Freemen of the City of Leicester (Account No. 01409164) the sum of £………………. Commencing on 1st April 20.…, and yearly thereafter until further notice. Kindly make the payment with reference …………………………………(my surname and initial). Name of account to be debited....……………………………..….. Account No.........…………………………………………………. Signature………………………………………………………… Date

………………………………………………….20.….

Address .…………………………………………………………. .........……………………………………………………. ..…………………………………………………………. Postcode………………………………………………....


GILD OF FREEMEN OF THE CITY OF LEICESTER APPLICATION FOR FULL MEMBERSHIP

Full Name______________________________________________ (BLOCK LETTERS)

Address_____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

Post Code ________________Tel No. _______________________ e-mail address__________________________________________ I am a duly sworn Freeman of the City of Leicester and apply to be enrolled as a Member of the Gild of Freemen, for which I enclose the sum of £10.00 (Enrolment fee of £1.00 plus the first annual subscription of £9.00).

Signature

Date APPLICATION FOR ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP

Full Name______________________________________________ (BLOCK LETTERS)

Address ___________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Post Code __________________Tel No. ____________________ e-mail address__________________________________________ I certify that I am the SPOUSE / WIDOW / WIDOWER / SON / DAUGHTER / GRANDCHILD aged 18 years or over (please delete where necessary) of Mr. / Mrs./ Ms. _____________________________________(Freeman of Leicester) Or I am a full member of the Guild of Freemen of_________________(City or Town) I apply to be enrolled as an Associate Member of the Gild, for which I enclose the sum of £7.00 (Enrolment Fee of £1.00 plus the first Annual Subscription of £6.00) Signature___________________________________________Date_____________ Please make cheques payable to ‘Gild of Leicester Freemen’ and send with this application to Maurice Hill, 33 Mossdale Road, Kingsway, Leicester LE3 2UT


THE GILD OF FREEMEN OF THE CITY OF LEICESTER GILD PRODUCTS ORDER FORM 1. Tie

- navy

………at £10.00 each

= £………….

- maroon

………at £10.00 each

= £………….

- green

………at £10.00 each

= £………….

- two ties (state colours) ...……at £19.00 two

= £………….

- three ties

…...…at £27.50 three

= £………….

2. Gild scarf

...........at £15.00 each

= £................

3. Key-ring

………at £5.00 each

= £………….

4. Lapel badge

………at £2.50 each

= £………….

5. Cufflinks

..........at £16.00 each

= £………….

………at £3.00 each

= £………….

…...…at £55.00 each

= £………….

.....….at £20.00 each

= £………….

8. Blazer badge

.........at £13.50 each

=£..............

9. Wall plaque, wooden

…..…at £24.00 each

= £………….

6. Gild pens

- new design

7. Arm badge - framed - unframed

10. Gown, made to measure, incl. delivery........price on request = £…………. (Chest ..........ins, height..........ft...........ins). 11. Register of Freemen- 1931-85

………at £4.00 each

= £………….

- 1986-96

………at £3.00 each

= £………….

TOTAL

= £…………. plus postage

I enclose cheque/postal order for the above total, made payable to: “GILD OF LEICESTER FREEMEN” NAME…………………………………………………………………………………….. ADDRESS………………………………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………………… …………………………………………………………………………………. POST CODE…………………………… E-MAIL ADDRESS:........................................................................................ Signed………………………………………………………………………………………. Please post to: Maurice Hill, 33 Mossdale Road, Kingsway, Leicester LE3 2UT Tel: 0116 2895394

Gildhall News August 2013  
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