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What the Psychotherapy Treatment entails: insights from Psychotherapist London

Psychotherapy is a journey of understanding and thinking. It promotes selfdiscovery, conflict resolution, relief for feelings and symptoms and an overall personality development. It takes place when two people meet, one seeking help and desiring to change, the other using his or hers sensitivity, knowledge and skills to help promote development by offering the possibility of thinking about the difficulties in a free, non-judgmental way. And in the collision of two minds, a great creative process takes place. But how does psychotherapy work, what does it entail? This is what I aim to convey with this article. Talking helps Psychotherapy, or more precisely psychoanalysis, was once described as the talking cure. It’s undeniable that there is something powerful in expressing what happens in our internal world trough the spoken word. The relief felt when a thought or feeling is expressed is called catharsis, which is an important aspect of psychotherapy. However, for this to be truly therapeutic is must happen as a two way process. Catharsis alone can be limited in its effects, otherwise talking to the wall would do the job of providing relief. Real change takes place when what’s being expressed finds understanding and significance in the therapist’s mind. The psychotherapist is there to help the patient find the meaning in his or her experiences. The model is very similar to how mothers use their empathic sensitivity to understand what a baby who can’t yet talk is experiencing, and ultimately to attribute meaning to feelings that have yet to receive a name. This risks being patronizing, but the truth is that we all struggle with unconscious elements in our minds that have yet to be named. In this sense, the psychotherapist London will help the patient to pay attention to what is being spoken, looking for what’s having difficulty in being expressed, thus finding the meaning underneath the words Another therapeutic aspect of talking is that when a patient describes difficult experiences or painful feelings, it brings about a chance to revisit what’s going on


and to find new ways of thinking about it. The psychotherapist is there to help find new perspectives, new ways of thinking about old problems. Interpretations In a psychotherapy session, the therapist will share thoughts and make interventions when appropriate, pointing to hidden feelings or conflicts, to contradictions and slips of the tongue, or simply making known patterns that the patient may still be unaware of. The psychotherapist London may also point to dynamics that may be occurring in the here-and-now of the session. The purpose of interpretations is to make conscious what is unconscious. Although being deeply understood can be relieving, receiving an interpretation is not always a happy insightful moment. Our minds have defensive mechanisms and maneuvers to avoid psychic pain and anxiety, and so when this process is interrupted (often by the psychotherapist calling it out), it leaves the patient in a state of raw-open wound. This is why many patients can feel overwhelmed when something they may be trying to defend against (albeit unconsciously) is pointed out to them. However, this is why psychotherapy works, because it disrupts unhealthy defensive measures to confront real internal conflicts, leading to new possibilities and the chance to break up patterns. So interpretation is nothing more than the psychotherapist using his or her sensitivity to call out what may be happening in the patient’s mind. Transference One of the main engines that move the psychotherapy work is called transference, which in a nutshell is the dynamics that take place, consciously and unconsciously, between psychotherapist and patient. Whereas the transference was once seen as a hindrance to the work, therapists learn to pay a lot of attention to what happens in the therapeutic relationship as it brings about important insights regarding unconscious feelings and patterns of relationships. Pointing to what is happening in the here-and-now of the session is important because it may shed light into aspects that the patient may be transferring from other relevant relationships (e.g with father, mother, siblings, etc), which is then replicated with the psychotherapist, often inadvertently. So by grasping these dynamics the patient will become more aware of them in the external world, thus being able to control and change patterns. There are many more elements that entail the psychotherapeutic work, but the most relevant ones lie in the power of talking, the changing nature of interpretations and the important awareness of the transference, that is, of what happens between patient and psychotherapist. I hope this helps in elucidating a bit more of how psychotherapy works.

What the Psychotherapy Treatment entails: insights from Psychotherapist London  

Psychotherapy is a journey of understanding and thinking. It promotes self- discovery, conflict resolution, relief for feelings and symptoms...

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