Page 1

CMYK

The Daily Mail Copyright 2017, Columbia-Greene Media Volume 226, No. 202

Windham Journal SEE PAGES A6 - A7

The nation’s fourth-oldest newspaper • Serving Greene County since 1792

All Rights Reserved

Price $1.50

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2018

New jail preparations begin

n WEATHER FORECAST FOR CA TODAY TONIGHT

FRI

By Sarah Trafton Warm with periods of rain

Clouds breaking; cooler

Partly sunny and cooler

HIGH 75

LOW 54

62 42

Complete weather, A2

n SPORTS

Soccer heats up Criswell, Greenville continue dominance PAGE B1

n NATION

Columbia-Greene Media

SARAH TRAFTON/

CATSKILL — Lawmakers decided to move forward with plans to temporarily relocate the county sheriff’s office and processing and holding area for detainees at Tuesday’s Public Safety Committee meeting. Legislators discussed the relocation to the office of Flach Real Estate — a 3,600-squarefoot building at 370 Mansion St. across from Cumberland Farms in Coxsackie — because the existing holding area needs repairs to make it through the winter and the county needs a facility until the new jail is built

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

Legislators discuss options to temporarily relocate the county sheriff’s office processing and holding area at Tuesday’s Public Safety Committee meeting.

in Coxsackie. No formal vote was taken on the plan. The state Commission of Corrections approved the location at 370 Mansion St. on Sept. 28. Lawmakers also discussed the demolition of the old jail Tuesday. “The obvious, best answer is to do it all in Coxsackie,” said Legislator Lee Palmateer, DAthens. “What else is there to talk about?” Legislator Kevin Lennon, DCatskill, expressed concern the county had not fully investiSee NEW JAIL A12

Dutchess legislators call on AG investigation into Molinaro By Amanda Purcell Columbia-Greene Media

Michael turns into a monster Hurricane could become the strongest storm on record to hit the Florida Panhandle PAGE A2

n REGION

Windham welcomes fall Fair weather and more than 60 vendors make Autumn Affair a day to remember PAGE A3

Due to earlier press time, Columbia-Greene Media will no longer publish lottery numbers.

n INDEX Region Opinion State/Nation Obituaries Sports Comics/Advice Classiied

A3 A4 A5 A5 B1 A8-A9 B4-B5

On the web www.HudsonValley360.com Twitter Follow: @CatskillDailyMail Facebook www.facebook.com/ CatskillDailyMail/

ALBANY — The campaign for Republican gubernatorial nominee Marc Molinaro called pay-to-play allegations by Dutchess County legislators “pathetic and groundless” Wednesday. Eight of 11 Democratic Dutchess County lawmakers submitted a formal complaint to the state Attorney General’s Office and Joint Commission on Public Ethics on Oct. 5, calling on the state to investigate possible ethics violations against Molinaro, who is the Dutchess county executive. The allegations surround Molinaro’s wife, Corrine Adams, who was awarded a job at the architectural firm Tinkelman Bros. Development Corp., of Poughkeepsie, which was awarded county contracts and tax breaks. The company made donations totaling $6,800 to Molinaro from 20062018, according to the complaint. Tinkleman reported received $227,000 in tax breaks in June 2015 after the county approved a project awarded to Tinkleman Architecture. Tinkleman “immediately after” created a new “Director of Marketing” position and hired the county executive’s then-girlfriend to fill the job at an annual salary of $26,500, according to the complaint. See MOLINARO A12

SYDNEY SCHAEFER/WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES

Republican gubernatorial candidate Marc Molinaro spoke recently in Watertown.

Infested trees to be cut down in Athens By Daniel Zuckerman Columbia-Greene Media

ATHENS — Several village trees infested with the destructive emerald ash borer will be cut down and removed to prevent the spread of the pest, members of the Friends of Athens said. The Athens Village Tree Committee is ready to begin planting new trees with help from an anonymous $5,000 donation after a survey discovered some trees had to be cut down. A survey of trees on villageowned property, completed in June by Integral Tree and Landscape of Stanfordville, determined 11 trees have to be cut down, said Catherine Censor, a member of the Friends of Athens. “The Friends of Athens paid for the arborist to come and look,” Censor said. “One of the members of the Friends of Athens was able to take the findings and turn it into an in-

teractive GPS map.” Some of the surveyed ash trees were infested with the emerald ash borer or jewel beetle whose larvae feed on the inner bark of ash trees — disrupting the tree’s ability to transport water and nutrients. The arborist told the tree committee the number of trees to be cut down is low, Village Trustee Stephan Bradicich said. “It’s killing the trees,” Bradicich said. “He recommends removing them to prevent further spread. There were a number of them that were expected [to be cut down.]” The downing of trees began last week and was extending into this week, Bradicich said. Censor hopes the planting of new trees can begin in the spring and the tree committee will seek additional grants to pay for the trees to be profesCONTRIBUTED PHOTO

See TREES A12

A honey locust tree in front of Michael Black’s home in Athens before it was cut down.


CMYK

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA • THE DAILY MAIL

A2 Thursday, October 11, 2018

Weather FORECAST FOR CATSKILL

TODAY TONIGHT

FRI

SAT

SUN

MON

Hurricane Michael could become the strongest storm on record to strike the Florida Panhandle Jason Samenow The Washington Post

Warm with periods of rain

Clouds breaking; cooler

HIGH 75

LOW 54

Partly sunny Brief showers and cooler

62 42

Partial sunshine

Showers possible

60 45

59 41

57 37 Ottawa 70/42

Montreal 60/48

Massena 73/45

Bancroft 67/36

Ogdensburg 72/48

Peterborough 71/41

Plattsburgh 71/51

Malone Potsdam 71/47 73/47

Kingston 69/44

Watertown 72/47

Rochester 74/46

Utica 73/45

Batavia Buffalo 72/46 71/45

Albany 73/51

Syracuse 74/48

Catskill 75/54

Binghamton 71/44

Hornell 74/45

Burlington 71/51

Lake Placid 69/43

Hudson 75/54

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

SUN AND MOON

ALMANAC Statistics through 3 p.m. yesterday

Temperature

Precipitation

Yesterday as of 3 p.m. 24 hrs. through 3 p.m. yest.

High

0.00”

Low

82

67

Today 7:03 a.m. 6:20 p.m. 9:33 a.m. 8:12 p.m.

Sunrise Sunset Moonrise Moonset

Fri. 7:04 a.m. 6:19 p.m. 10:38 a.m. 8:49 p.m.

Moon Phases

YEAR TO DATE NORMAL

First

Full

Last

New

Oct 16

Oct 24

Oct 31

Nov 7

33.09 30.64

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2018

CONDITIONS TODAY AccuWeather.com UV Index™ & AccuWeather.com RealFeel Temperature®

0

0

0

1

1

1

1

1

0

0

0

70

68

69

74

72

73

74

75

74

75

73

8 a.m. 9 a.m. 10 a.m. 11 a.m. Noon 1 p.m. 2 p.m. 3 p.m. 4 p.m. 5 p.m. 6 p.m. The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme. The patented AccuWeather.com RealFeel Temperature is an exclusive index of effective temperature based on eight weather factors.

NATIONAL WEATHER TODAY Seattle 63/46

Winnipeg 34/22 Montreal 60/48 Billings 44/29

Minneapolis 41/28

Chicago 50/34 San Francisco 68/52

Denver 47/31

Toronto 69/42

Detroit 58/39

New York 76/61

Atlanta 79/51 El Paso 79/60

Miami 90/78

Monterrey 82/70

ALASKA HAWAII

Anchorage 54/44

-10s

-0s

0s

showers t-storms

rain

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Hilo 83/70

Juneau 52/39

10s

John Wagner

Honolulu 84/72

Fairbanks 48/27

20s flurries

30s

40s

snow

50s ice

60s

70s

cold front

80s

90s 100s 110s

warm front stationary front

NATIONAL CITIES City Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Billings Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, SC Charleston, WV Charlotte Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Columbus, OH Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Knoxville Las Vegas

Today Hi/Lo W 70/49 pc 54/44 pc 79/51 r 78/62 r 79/55 r 44/29 pc 77/49 pc 58/36 s 72/61 r 84/61 r 72/41 r 78/53 r 44/28 c 50/34 s 63/39 pc 66/46 r 64/42 r 71/57 s 47/31 r 47/34 s 58/39 pc 74/57 r 84/72 pc 82/60 s 56/37 s 53/36 s 72/47 r 77/64 pc

Fri. Hi/Lo W 69/49 c 51/41 r 75/54 s 67/52 pc 64/46 s 59/33 pc 73/53 s 62/37 s 65/45 pc 80/56 s 60/44 s 75/52 s 54/36 pc 48/32 pc 58/41 s 54/42 pc 57/40 s 72/60 pc 59/34 c 44/33 r 53/37 pc 61/42 pc 84/72 sh 81/66 s 54/36 pc 46/34 r 66/50 s 80/64 s

zones to move inland IMMEDIATELY,” the Weather Service tweeted late Tuesday night. “#HurricaneMichael is coming and you’re running out of time!” While the most severe hurricane conditions are expected along the coast, devastating hurricane effects are forecast to expand considerable distances inland. “A potentially catastrophic event is developing,” wrote the National Weather Service forecast office serving Tallahassee and surrounding areas. The office warned of “widespread power outages, downed trees blocking access to roads and endangering individuals, structural damage to homes and businesses, isolated flash flooding and the potential for a few tornadoes.” Damaging winds and flooding rain were also predicted to reach southern Georgia and southeast Alabama on Wednesday. By Wednesday night and Thursday, heavy rains from Michael are likely to streak into the Carolinas, perhaps bringing more flooding to some of the same areas still recovering from Hurricane Florence. As of 5 a.m. EDT Wednesday, Hurricane Michael’s peak winds were 140 mph, a Category 4, as it moved north at 13 mph. The National Hurricane Center said some additional strengthening is possible before Michael makes landfall. The storm was centered about 140 miles

south-southwest of Panama City. At Michael’s current rate of advance, tropical-stormforce winds should reach the northern Gulf Coast very early Wednesday, after which conditions will deteriorate. Landfall is projected for Wednesday afternoon. Michael is projected to strike an area that is exceptionally prone to storm surge because of the adjacent shallow shelf water and the concave shape of the coast. Like a bulldozer, the storm will push a vast amount of ocean water inland, potentially inundating homes, roads and businesses. Areas to the east of where the storm center tracks will experience the greatest storm surge, and flooding will be worse around the high tides. Storm surges just east of where the center makes landfall could reach 9 to 13 feet if the storm comes ashore around high tide. Here are specific storm surge projections from the Hurricane Center for locations in Florida: • Tyndall Air Force Base to Keaton Beach: 9 to 13 feet; • Okaloosa-Walton county line to Mexico Beach: 6 to 9 feet; • Keaton Beach to Cedar Key: 6 to 9 feet; • Cedar Key to Chassahowitzka: 4 to 6 feet; • Chassahowitzka to Anna Maria Island, including Tampa Bay: 2 to 4 feet; The Hurricane Center projects widespread rainfall

Kellyanne Conway unloads on Hillary Clinton, calls her ‘graceless’ and less popular than her husband

MICHAEL

Houston 82/60

Chihuahua 84/55

BLOOMBERG PHOTO BY LUKE SHARRETT

A customer enters a boarded up gas station ahead of Hurricane Michael in Panama City Beach, Florida, on Oct. 9, 2018.

Washington 79/57

Kansas City 53/36

Los Angeles 72/59

Hurricane Michael rapidly gained strength Wednesday morning, threatening to become the most intense hurricane on record to strike the Florida Panhandle. The storm, now an extremely dangerous Category 4 hurricane packing 140-mph winds, is predicted to make landfall this afternoon with that same intensity, an event that has never happened in records dating to 1851. As the storm intensified Tuesday evening, forecasters on Twitter described feelings of sickness and dread. “Hurricanes that intensify overnight just before reaching land are the worst nightmare of forecasters and emergency managers,” tweeted Bob Henson, a meteorologist and journalist for Weather Underground. Both Florida’s Panhandle, from Pensacola to Apalachicola, and its Big Bend area are forecast to be hardest hit. Water levels had already begun to rise Tuesday and the storm is poised to push ashore a “life-threatening” surge of ocean water that could inundate more than 325 miles of coastline. The storm also will bring destructive winds and flooding rain throughout Wednesday. Population centers that could witness some of the most severe hurricane effects include Fort Walton Beach, Destin, Panama City Beach and Apalachicola. The surge, or the rise in ocean water above normally dry land along the coast, could reach 9 to 13 feet, inundating roads, homes and businesses. The National Weather Service warned many buildings could be completely washed away and that “locations may be uninhabitable for an extended period” after the storm. Authorities plead with residents, who had not followed evacuations order, to leave. “Our local offices, emergency management partners and media in Florida are urging people in evacuation

amounts of 4 to 8 inches, from the Florida Panhandle and Big Bend areas north into southeast Alabama and southern Georgia, and isolated amounts of up to a foot. “This rainfall could lead to life-threatening flash floods,” it said. Heavy rain could arrive in southern Alabama and southern Georgia early Wednesday. By Wednesday night and into Thursday, heavy rain will rapidly streak through Georgia and into the Carolinas. Rainfall of 3 to 6 inches is likely to affect some of the areas recovering from Hurricane Florence in the Carolinas, which could lead to more flooding. Parts of eastern Georgia and southern Virginia may also receive 3 to 6 inches. The rain is expected to reach the eastern Mid-Atlantic late Wednesday night into Thursday before rapidly exiting by Friday, where 1 to 3 inches is most likely, with locally higher amounts. Michael’s maximum sustained winds are forecast to be around 140 mph or stronger when it strikes the coast. Winds this strong will be confined to the ring around its calm eye, known as the eyewall, and “catastrophic” wind damage could occur in this narrow zone. Here is the damage the Hurricane Center describes associated with Category 4 winds: After the storm strikes land, this eye wall will quickly collapse and winds will weaken. While hurricane-force winds of over 74 mph will be confined to a relatively small area, tropical-storm-force winds of 39 to 73 mph will occur over a much larger zone and could result in minor structural damage and many downed trees and power outages. The Weather Service tweeted that tropical-stormforce winds “currently extend more than 300 miles across.” A computer model run at the University of Michigan projects about 2 million customers will lose power, the majority in the Florida Panhandle and southern Georgia.

City Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York City Norfolk Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland Portland Providence Raleigh Richmond Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Francisco Savannah Seattle Tampa Washington, DC

Today Hi/Lo W 69/46 s 72/59 pc 90/78 t 49/34 pc 41/28 c 69/43 s 83/61 s 76/61 r 85/64 r 61/48 s 48/36 s 90/71 t 79/57 r 82/66 pc 71/43 r 59/54 r 70/44 s 74/62 r 79/55 r 81/57 r 79/48 s 59/40 s 55/36 r 68/52 s 86/61 r 63/46 pc 90/76 t 79/57 r

Fri. Hi/Lo W 64/50 pc 81/62 pc 89/77 t 47/32 pc 44/34 pc 65/45 s 80/65 s 62/49 pc 70/55 s 67/42 sh 46/35 r 89/65 s 64/47 pc 80/65 sh 52/39 c 62/39 pc 70/46 s 63/44 pc 72/50 s 70/49 s 84/50 s 50/37 r 58/37 s 74/56 s 82/57 s 63/48 s 89/68 s 66/49 s

Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

The Washington Post

WASHINGTON - White House counselor Kellyanne Conway on Wednesday called recent comments by Hillary Clinton “a little bit dangerous” and otherwise unloaded on the 2016 Democratic presidential nominee, saying that she is married “to a much more popular man who was actually a two-term president that she’ll never be.” Conway offered her assessment during an interview on “Fox & Friends” on Fox News Channel, in which she was asked about Clinton’s recent assertion that Democrats have to be tougher with Republicans. During an interview Tuesday with CNN’s Christiane Amanpour, Clinton said, “You cannot be civil with a political party that wants to destroy what you stand for, what you care about,” adding that “civility can start again” if Democrats win back control of the House or the Senate.

“Usually when she opens her mouth, respectfully, she offends at least one half of the country, and she did it again, but I think her discourse now is a little bit dangerous,” Conway said in an appearance on the White House lawn. “I don’t like the implications there,” she said. “It’s one thing to call us deplorable, irredeemable, laugh at people who don’t have all the privileges that she has had with her Ivy League law degree and her marriage to a much more popular man who was actually was a twoterm president that she’ll never be. . . . I don’t like that kind of talk. I avoid it.” Conway also suggested that Clinton will be of little

HUDSON RIVER TIDES High tide: 4:44 a.m. 4.5 feet Low tide: 11:22 a.m. -0.3 feet High tide: 5:10 p.m. 4.9 feet Low tide: 11:51 p.m. -0.2 feet

help to Democrats on the ballot next month. “I don’t see all these Democratic candidates banging down Hillary Clinton’s door, asking her to lock arms,” she said, before

taking a final shot at her “civility”comments. “I think it’s not just unfortunate and graceless, but a little bit dangerous, and I would ask her to check that,” Conway said.

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA he Daily Mail is published Tuesday through Saturday mornings by Columbia-Greene Media (USPS 253620), One Hudson City Centre, Suite 202, Hudson, NY 12534, a subsidiary of Johnson Newspaper Corp. Periodicals postage paid at Hudson, N.Y., and additional mailing oices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to he Daily Mail, One Hudson City Centre, Suite 202, Hudson, NY 12534. TO SUBSCRIBE To order a subscription, call our circulation department at (800) 724-1012 or logon to www.hudsonvalley360.com SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Digital Pass is included with print subscription Daily (Newsstand) $1.50 Saturday (Newsstand) $2.50 Carrier Delivery (3 Months) $71.50 Carrier Delivery (6 Months) $143.00 Carrier Delivery (1 Year) $286.00 EZ Pay Rates: 3 months $65.00 6 months $130.00 1 year $260.00 DIGITAL PASS ONLY RATES: Includes full access to HudsonValley360.com and the e-edition. 3 Months $30.00 6 Months $60.00 1 Year $120.00 Home Delivery & Billing Inquireries Call (800) 724-1012 and reach us, live reps are available Mon.-Fri. 6 a,m - 5 p.m., Sat. 6 a.m. - noon Sun. 8 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Due to earlier press time, Columbia-Greene Media will no longer publish stock market information.

powered by Register-Star and The Daily Mail

Check us out on the go....www.hudsonvalley360.com


CMYK

Thursday, October 11, 2018 A3

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA • THE DAILY MAIL

CALENDAR Thursday, Oct. 11 n Coeymans Town Board 7 p.m. Coey-

mans Town Hall, 18 Russell Ave., Ravena n Greene County Legislature finance audit 4 p.m. at the Greene County Office Building, 411 Main St., Catskill n Windham-Ashland-Jewett CSD Board of Education 7 p.m. in the School Library, 5411 Route 23, Windham

Monday, Oct. 15 n Athens Town Board 6:45 p.m. at the

Town Hall, 2 First St., Athens n Greene County Legislature economic development and tourism; gov. ops.; finance; and rep. and dem. caucus 6 p.m. at the Greene County Office Building, 411 Main St., Catskill n Greenville Town Board 7 p.m. at the Town Hall, 11159 Route 32, Pioneer Building, Greenville

Tuesday, Oct. 16 n Athens Village Planning Board 6:30

p.m. at Village Hall, 2 First St., Athens n Durham Town Board 7:30 p.m. at Town Hall, 7309 Route 81, East Durham n Hunter Town Board 7 p.m. at the Town Hall, 5748 Route 23A, Tannersville n Ravena Village Board 6 p.m. Ravena Village Building, 15 Mountain Road, Ravena

Wednesday, Oct. 17 n Catskill Central School District BOE

7 p.m. in the CHS Library, 341 West Main St., Catskill n Catskill Town budget workshop followed by committee meeting 5:30 p.m. at the Town Hall, 439 Main St., Catskill n D.R. Evarts Library budget/board of trustees vote noon-8 p.m. at the library, 80 Second St., Athens n Greene County Legislature Meeting No. 10 6:30 p.m. at the Greene County Office Building, 411 Main St., Catskill

Thursday, Oct. 18 n Coxsackie Village Planning Board 7

p.m. at the Village Hall, 119 Mansion St., Coxsackie

Tuesday, Oct. 23 n Catskill Town budget meeting 6 p.m.

at the Town Hall, 439 Main St., Catskill n Catskill Town Planning Board 7 p.m. at the Town Hall, 439 Main St., Catskill

Wednesday, Oct. 24 n Athens Village Board 6:30 p.m. at

Village Hall, 2 First St., Athens n Catskill Village Board 7 p.m. at the Senior Center, Academy Street, Catskill n Coeymans Town Board 7 p.m. Coeymans Town Hall, 18 Russell Ave., Ravena

Wednesday, Oct. 31

Windham welcomes FALL By Sarah Trafton Columbia-Greene Media

WINDHAM — Over 60 vendors lined the sides of Main Street for the 24th Autumn Affair on Sunday. The Autumn Affair took place Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. Visitors walked through lines of pop-up tents filled with handmade crafts, clothing, artwork, soaps, honey and other commodities. The event also included live entertainment, a petting zoo and a variety of snack options. “It’s been a tremendous success for the town,” Tom Nawkirk, owner of King Hill Miniatures in Freehold, said. “A lot of city people come and a lot of the younger generation. It’s a good thing; it keeps everything going.” Nawkirk has been attending the festival for at least 10 years. “We also do the Fourth of July parade,” he said. “They [the miniature horses] ride on the float.” Nawkirk had three miniature horses with him Sunday for children, or really anyone, to visit. “Clyde came from Florida 15 years ago,” Nawkirk said. “He’s an electric Appaloosa, which is very rare.” Another attraction at the event was Lex Gray and The Urban Pioneers, a fusion of old school blues and classic rock, who performed outside the church. The event had been highly recommended to Katerina Fiore, who recently moved to Phoenicia. “It was one of the better events to do with the kids,” she said. “We were very interested in the scarecrow and the petting zoo.” Mary and Steve Cohen, of Hunter, like to come to the festival and compare the economic development of Hunter and Windham. “Hunter could learn a few things,” Steve Cohen added. The couple felt the turnout had been good due to the nice weather. “It all depends on the weather,” Steve Cohen said. “It’s nice to come see all the locals.”

SARAH TRAFTON/COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

A scarecrow on stilts made his way up and down Main Street performing for visitors at the Autumn Affair in Windham on Sunday.

SARAH TRAFTON/COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

Lex Gray and The Urban Pioneers perform Sunday in Windham.

n Catskill Town Halloween Curfew 9

p.m.

SARAH TRAFTON/COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

Ronan Kneissl, 6, of Phoenicia, pets Clyde, a miniature horse from King Hill Miniatures in Freehold, at the Autumn Affair.

SARAH TRAFTON/COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

Over 60 vendors lined the Main Street in Windham for the 24th Autumn Affair on Sunday.

Considering prearrangement?

Bob Gaus Licensed Manager

Authentic German cuisine

It’s our speciality.

DAILY SPECIALS

• Prepay installment plan(s); • Guaranteed funeral home charges; • Revocable and Irrevocable trusts through New York State PrePLAN; ...and much more!

Reservations Recommended

Call us today and ask how to prearrange and prepay for your funeral so it is guaranteed.

Millspaugh Camerato Funeral Home www.MillspaughCamerato.com • (518) 943-3240 Our family to yours, offering compassionate, professional, and affordable services to Greene County and beyond since 1926.

COUNTRY INN & RESTAURANT

“Wunderbar”

866 Mountain Avenue, Purling, NY 12470 Thur 5pm-8pm, Fri 5pm-9pm, Sat 5pm-9pm & Sun 1pm-8pm 518-622-3261 • www.bavarianmanor.com

Looking for a New Home? Local Open Houses • Local Agents Local Searchable Listings

www.hvpropertysearch.com


CMYK

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA • THE DAILY MAIL

A4 Thursday, October 11, 2018

Trump’s trolling vs. the ‘constitution of knowledge’

THE DAILY MAIL Established 1792 Published Tuesday through Saturday by Columbia-Greene Media

JOHN B. JOHNSON

JOHN B. JOHNSON JR.

HAROLD B. JOHNSON II

CEO AND CO-PUBLISHER

CHAIRMAN

VICE CHAIRMAN AND CO-PUBLISHER

HAROLD B. JOHNSON EDITOR AND PUBLISHER 1919-1949

JOHN B. JOHNSON EDITOR AND PUBLISHER 1949-2001

JOHN B. JOHNSON JR. CO-PUBLISHER 2001-2013

MARK P. VINCIGUERRA One Hudson City Centre, Suite 202, Hudson, N.Y. 12534 LOCAL PUBLISHER Phone (518) 828-1616 Fax (518) 671-6043

MARY DEMPSEY MANAGING EDITOR

OUR VIEW

More than collateral damage As U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand fights for Navy veterans exposed to the far-reaching effects of Agent Orange while stationed offshore in Vietnam, opposition is coming from an unlikely source: the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Vietnam naval veterans who served on vessels anchored offshore, known as Blue Water veterans, do not receive compensation from the Veterans Administration for health complications caused by exposure to the toxic herbicide. Gillibrand wants to change that with new legislation. Amazingly, VA Undersecretary for Benefits Administration Paul Lawrence, at an Aug. 1 Senate hearing, said

his department opposes the legislation. “There is no conclusive science from the institute of medicine to support claims of exposure,” Lawrence testified. Local Vietnam veterans were stunned by the testimony. “They’ve been studying this for 50 years,” an angry Columbia County Veterans Services Director Gary Flaherty said. “It’s time to stop stalling, stop studying and give these veterans what they deserve.” Greene County Veterans Service Agency Director Michelle Romalin Deyo called Lawrence’s position “disconcerting.” “We have a significant population of Blue Water veterans affected by herbicide-exposure-

related illnesses considered presumptive for so-called boots-on-the-ground veterans.” Deyo called on Congress to find sources outside Veterans Administration channels to fund Blue Water compensation. The solution to this impasse will come eventually, but unfortunately it will be too late for the offshore Navy veterans who died from Agent Orange exposure, miles from inland combat. Flaherty said he knows Navy veterans who have died waiting for this legislation to pass. These men are more than just collateral damage. As the wheels of justice for these veterans grind slowly, all we can do is stand by them and offer our support.

ANOTHER VIEW

Democrats look, shout and storm like a mob Ed Rogers The Washington Post

The Post’s Dan Balz nailed it in his recent analysis of the Democratic Party, which included the summary “They have no unifying leader and no clear message.” Balz wrote: “The best that congressional Democrats have recently come up with in terms of messaging was their ‘A Better Deal’ program - a package of old and new ideas that captured the imaginations of few voters.” The Democratic Party isn’t even a discernible coalition anymore. It is a cluster of angry subgroups: the Black Lives Matter movement, the tiresome Hollywood hypocrites, and most recently the paid hecklers and the creepy stalkers we saw on Capitol Hill during the Brett Kavanaugh nomination hearings, whose boasts of their training and effectiveness have turned them into something of a gentrified Antifa. Of course, the Democrats and their media allies are defensive about being called out. They are trying to derail the growing mainstream opinion that the mob tactics everyone has witnessed over

the past few weeks could make Democrats vulnerable to being likened to, well, a mob. And worse, they are trying to suggest that the very idea of such a characterization is mere Republican slander. Ahem, if it looks like a mob, shouts like a mob and storms around like a mob, well, it could be a mob. If the shoe fits . . . Anyway, along with their dishonest defensiveness and preemptive strikes against Republicans, the Democrats are also engaged in a pathetic round of post-defeat self-pity. Multiple Democrats have come forward to say their problem is that they are just too good, too nice, too sincere and too righteous to do battle with evil Republicans, as if the Democrats’ smears, taunts, untruths and ambushes follow noble rules and rise from their innate goodness. Please. Perhaps President Barack Obama started this self-righteous pity party when, according to his former deputy national security adviser Ben Rhodes, Obama asked soon after Donald Trump won the 2016 election: “What if

we were wrong? Maybe we pushed too far. Maybe people just want to fall back into their tribe.” More pointedly, as Maureen Dowd wrote in The New York Times this year, “the president made it clear that what he meant was: What if we were wrong in being so right? What if we were too good for these people?” She was spot on. Obama and his team in the White House thought they were just too good to be effective. So here we are. Between the ragged groups, the dishonest defensiveness and the self-pity, the Democrats are painting a compelling picture for why voters should look elsewhere. That’s not to say they won’t win the House or reap the benefits of a correction in governors’ races, but those victories won’t be because they are running an appealing campaign or offering any leadership or direction. Democrats haven’t learned anything from the Kavanaugh experience, and that doesn’t speak well for how they will govern when they share more power with Republicans.

Great Answer: Next time there is a problem to solve, best thing to listen to is “There must be a reason why”- then ignore all rejoinders except the one that says “I don’t know, but I’ll find out.” The Daily Mail welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must contain a full name, full address and a daytime telephone number. Names will be published, but phone numbers will not be divulged. Letters of less than 400 words are more likely to be published quickly. The newspaper reserves the right to edit letters for length, clarity and content. Letters should be exclusive to this

publication, not duplicates of those sent to other persons, agencies or publications. Writers are ordinarily limited to one letter every 30 days.

SEND LETTERS: n Mail: Letters to the editor, The Daily Mail

1 Hudson City Center, Hudson, NY 12534 n E-mail: editorial@thedailymail.net

WASHINGTON — On the road again, and full of indignation about, or perhaps admiration for, what he called “made-up” and “fabricated” Democratic accusations during the recent judicial confirmation turmoil, America’s feral president swerved into a denunciation of a nonexistent bill — “It’s called ‘the open borders bill’” — that, he thundered, “every single Democrat” in the Senate has “signed up for.” Now, before you wax indignant, if you still bother to, about such breezy indifference to reality, you must remember this: Donald Trump is guilty of much, but not of originality. Before Trump was in the White House, Harry Reid was in the Senate. In 2012, while the Nevada Democrat was majority leader, he brassily said during the presidential campaign that the Republican nominee, Mitt Romney, had paid no taxes for a decade. This was wildly, demonstrably untrue: Romney, unlike the Republicans’ nominee four years later, did not hide his tax returns. Reid, however, remained proud as punch of his accusation when, three years later, he was asked why he still defended it: “Romney didn’t win, did he?” Although 2018 has two and a half more months in which to provide redundant evidence against belief in progress, it is not too soon to award the trophy for the year’s most cogent distillation of urgently needed thinking. It is this: “We don’t mail Elvis a Social Security check, no matter how many people think he is alive.” No. Matter. How. Many. This apercu comes from the Brookings Institution’s Jonathan Rauch. His essay, titled “The Constitution of Knowledge,” in National Affairs quarterly is his response to Trump’s guiding principle, as stated by Steve Bannon, whose body but not whose mentality has left the White House. Bannon says: “The way to deal with

WASHINGTON POST

GEORGE F.

WILL [the media] is to flood the zone with shit.” Rauch says: Trump’s presidential lying, which began concerning the size of his inauguration crowd, reflects “a strategy, not merely a character flaw or pathology.” And the way to combat Trump’s “epistemic attack” on Americans’ “collective ability to distinguish truth from falsehood” is by attending to the various social mechanisms that, taken together, are “the method of validating propositions.” Modernity began when humanity “removed reality-making from the authoritarian control of priests and princes” and outsourced it to no one in particular. It was given over to “a decentralized, globe-spanning community of critical testers who hunt for each other’s errors.” This is why today’s foremost enemy of modernity is populism, which cannot abide the idea that majorities are not self-validating, and neither are intense minorities (e.g., the “Elvis lives” cohort). Validation comes from the “critical testers” who are the bane of populists’ existence because the testers are, by dint of training and effort, superior to the crowd, “no matter how many” comprise it. “Think,” says Rauch, “of the constitution of knowledge as a funnel”: “At the wide end, millions of people float millions of hypotheses every day. Only an infinitesimal fraction of new ideas will be proven true. To find them, we run the hypotheses through a massive, socially distributed error-finding

process. Only a tiny few make it to the narrow end of the funnel.” The authors of those that do receive the prestige of recognition — and the enmity of populists, who worship the many in order to disparage the few. Disparagement is the default position of all levelers. Rauch surely knows that he stands on the shoulders of Friedrich Hayek. He recommended to governments epistemic humility, and preached the superiority, and indispensability, of markets, society’s spontaneous order for gathering dispersed information and testing it. Rauch says that Trump’s “trolling of the American mind” has enjoyed “the advantage of surprise.” But as this diminishes, the constitution of knowledge can prevail because, although trolling has “some institutional nodes” (e.g., Russia’s Internet Research Agency and Trump’s Twitter account), they are, over time, much inferior in intellectual firepower to the institutions of the constitution of knowledge. Ominously, in the most important of these, the colleges and universities, serious scholars “are not the dominant voices.” Trump, bellowing “fake news” and “sham” this and “rigged” that, is on all fours with his leftist, often academic and equally fact-free despisers who, hollering “racist” and “fascist,” are his collaborators in the attack on the constitution of knowledge. “No wonder,” Rauch writes, “much of the public has formed the impression that academia is not trustworthy.” Imposing opinions and promoting political agendas, many academics have descended to trolling, forfeiting their ability to contest he whom they emulate. George Will’s email address is georgewill@washpost.com. (c) 2018, Washington Post Writers Group

ANOTHER VIEW

Trump said Kavanaugh was ‘proven innocent.’ He wasn’t. Deanna Paul The Washington Post

A gleeful President Donald Trump appeared at the ceremonial swearing-in for Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh on Monday at the White House, where the president offered a broad apology for the judge’s “suffering” throughout his confirmation process, then said directly to Kavanaugh: “I must state that you, sir, under historic scrutiny, were proven innocent.” Though it is true that American jurisprudence requires that, as Trump said, the criminally accused be “presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty,” Kavanaugh was not a criminal defendant. A confirmation hearing is a congressional proceeding, not an adjudication of guilt. It is not a trial, and there are no fact finders. More, despite Trump’s words to the contrary, “proven innocent” is neither a legitimate legal standard nor a goal of the American legal system. “We don’t judge innocence in courtrooms in the United States,” Duke University School of Law professor Donald Beskind told The Washington Post.

The notion of finding someone “not guilty” is wholly separate from finding someone innocent. “What we decide is whether the state - which has the burden of proving guilt beyond any reasonable doubt, the highest standard in our legal system has met that burden of proof,” Beskind said. When a jury finds an individual “not guilty,” it is saying that doubt remains, not that the individual is innocent. It’s common for jurors to believe that a defendant committed the crime charged, yet still vote “not guilty” because they aren’t certain it’s been proven to the satisfaction of the legal system, according to Youngjae Lee, criminal law professor at Fordham University School of Law. A 12-person jury could unanimously agree that there is a 75 percent possibility that the defendant is guilty of the crime charged - and that jury could still decide unanimously to acquit because the panelists think prosecutors have not proven the defendant’s guilt beyond a reasonable doubt, Lee said. “That is what the proof

beyond a reasonable doubt demands,” Lee told The Post. “So it’s simply false to say that an acquittal is the same as proof of innocence in the criminal context.” Fifty senators voted to confirm Kavanaugh on Saturday. Forty-eight voted not to. Lee explained that there were many possibilities to explain what the confirmation vote indicated about Kavanaugh’s innocence. It’s possible, for instance, that 98 senators unanimously believed he committed sexual assault, as alleged, but 50 still thought that he should be confirmed. Or, 98 senators could have unanimously believed he did not do it, and 48 of them still voted against confirmation, Lee said. Kavanaugh has now taken a seat on the Supreme Court, and that is a historical fact. It exists apart from the question of guilt or innocence, which has little to do with the week-long investigation and Senate Judiciary Committee hearing that occurred in recent weeks. Paul covers national and breaking news for The Washington Post. Before joining The Post, she spent six years as a New York City prosecutor.

MEDIA

Columbia-Greene

Columbia-Greene Media

DIRECTORY

The Daily Mail

Mark Vinciguerra Publisher - ext. 2401

MAIN NUMBER

NEWS EXECUTIVES

To place an ad, report news or contact us, call 518-828-1616 For contact by mail: One Hudson City Centre Suite 202, Hudson, NY 12534

Mary Dempsey Executive Editor -ext. 2533 Sue Chasney Editorial Representative ext. 2490

Kate Lisa Managing Editor - ext. 2495 Ray Pignone Managing Editor - ext. 2469 Brian Radewitz Sports Editor - ext. 2306 Leigh Bogle Editorial Art - ext. 2470

BUSINESS EXECUTIVES Peter Dedrick Circulation Manager - ext. 2411 Gregory Appel Advertising Director - ext. 2463 Tammi Ullrich HR/ Business Manager ext. 2402

COMMUNITY RELATIONS CGM Cares For information about Columbia-Greene Media’s role in the community, including charitable donations, sponsorships, and matching grants:

Contact Erica Izer at cgmcares@ columbiagreenemedia.com. Erica Izer Promotions Manager - ext. 2468

ONLINE www.hudsonvalley360.com


CMYK

Obituaries Thursday, October 11, 2018 A5

THE DAILY MAIL

How to submit obituaries and death notices Obituaries: Are paid notices. We reserve the right to edit all copy. Funeral directors may email us the information at obits@columbiagreenemedia.com anytime. Include life background information on the deceased, a full list of immediate survivors, services and the name of the funeral home. Any questions or for rate information, call 518-828-1616, ext. 2461. Funeral notices: Are paid follow-ups to obituaries. We reserve the right to edit all copy. Funeral directors may email us the information at obits@columbiagreenemedia.com anytime. Any questions or for rate information, call 518828-1616, ext. 2461. Death Notices: Are free notices that don’t exceed 20 words. For more information, funeral directors may call 518-828-1616, ext. 2461. In memorium ads: Are paid ads that are guaranteed to run. Call the Classified department at 518-828-1616, ext. 2461

Marco Richard Cantele He was preceded in death Marco Richard Cantele, 80, passed away Sunday July 22, by his parents, Victor and Ma2018, at FirstHealth Hospice ria Cantele; brother, Benjamin House, with his family at his Cantele; and sister, Jean Cantele. side. Marco is survived by his wife He was born New Years day in 1938 in Mellenville, Columbia of 56 years, Terry Cantele; two County, N.Y., the third child of children, Matthew Cantele and Jeffrey (Maria) Cantele; and two Maria and Victor Cantele. grandchildren, Kristin After graduation and Kara Cantele. from Ocklawamick A memorial service High School, Marco will be held at 12 p.m. served more than four Saturday, Oct. 13, years in the Navy. Fol2018, at Hudson Celowing his service to dar Park Cemetery. The our country, He went to family wishes to exMiami of Ohio Univerpress their gratitude to sity and then graduated the team at FirstHealth from Ryder College. Cantele Hospice House. Marco then married In lieu of lowers, gifts Terry Johnson on June 17,1961, in Hudson, N.Y. They of remembrance may be made lived briely in Trenton, N.J., be- to Hospice House at FirstHealth fore moving to Pleasant Valley, Hospice, 150 Applecross Road, N.Y. Upon retirement, Marco Pinehurst, NC 28374. Online condolences may be and Terry moved to Southern made at www.bolesfuneralPines in 2002. Marco was an avid golfer, home.com. Boles Funeral Home at steadfast friend, fantastic husband, father and grandfather. Southern Pines is serving the family. Truly a great person.

Francis Henry Gardner, Sr. Francis Henry Gardner, Sr., Dawn (Victor) Dugan, Francis 78, of Valatie, New York, passed Gardner, Jr., 15 grandchildren, away on October 6, 2018 at St. 8 greatgrandchildren. He is Peter’s Hospital. Fran was born preceded in death by his wife, in Valatie, NY to Emma (Repp) Rosemary Gardner and his parand Marvin Gardner on August ents. He is survived by siblings 7, 1940. He was the irst Marvin Gardner, James graduating class of the Gardner, Shirley PowIchabod Crane High ell and Denise Gaylord School. He worked and several nieces and many years for W.T. nephews whom he Grant Co. Fran was loved dearly. Viewing a small business adwill be held at Raymond vocate and worked at E. Bond Funeral Home several small commuin Valatie on Monday, nity businesses; retirOctober 15, 2018 from ing from Mario’s Home 4-6 p.m. Memorial serGardner Center after 20+ years. vice will immediately Fran enjoyed watching the New follow at Bond Funeral Home. York Mets and spending qual- In lieu of lowers, the family reity time with his family. Fran is quests memorial donations can survived by his 5 children; Bon- be made to the American Heart nie (Bob) Hawley, Barbara (Bri- Association and/or the Amerian) Domigan, Cheryl Thatcher, can Kidney Foundation.

Emmie Louise Liebhart Pilch Emmie Louise Liebhart Pilch of Pine Plains, Benjamin Blackentered eternal rest on October burn of Hillsdale and Hudson 4, 2018. Porter and Gemma Porter of Emmie was born on Septem- Arizona. ber 25, 1926 in Manhattan, the Emmie is also survived by her daughter of the late Joseph and forever friend, Dr. Vito Gesualdi Anna Liebhart. of Bethel, CT. Barbara Dohan Emmie attended school in and Sumar Fayad were her Rye, NY. She was employed by friends to the end. IBM in Poughkeepsie, Merrill Emmie was the last of the Lynch in White Plains and most Golden Girls. The perpetually recently by Danbury Hospital as fun loving group of Vivian Smith, a Patient Access AssoRegina Castelli and ciate. Kathleen Moore are Emmie was pre deunited again to bring ceased by her son laughter to the saints. George H. Pilch on Emmie is also surMarch 22, 2107. She vived by several nieces was also pre deceased and nephews including by two brothers, JoJoAnn and Bob Wolfe seph Liebhart and Henof Stanfordville. ry Liebhart. Friends are invited Pilch Emmie is survived by and may call on Thursher daughter in law, Juday October 11, 2018 dith M. Pilch of New Milford, CT from 4 – 7 PM at the Peck and and her daughter and son in law, Peck Funeral, 7749 S. Main St. Kathy J. and Alfred Blackburn of in Pine Plains, NY. Pine Plains. A Mass of Christian Burial Emmie, affectionately known will be offered on Friday Octoto all as Nanio, had the joy of ber 12, 2018 at 11 AM at St. Aneight grandchildren. thony’s Roman Catholic Church Brett Porter of Phoenix, in Pine Plains with the Rev. Kent AZ, Michael Porter and wife Wilson oficiating. Heather Williams Porter of Red Interment will be at the conHook, NY, Christopher Mitch- venience of the family. ell of Newport News, VA, Nora Emmie’s family would like Therese Wolf and husband to extend their most sincere James Wolfe of Valatie, NY, Al- thanks and gratitude to the staff fred Blackburn and wife Mau- of the Gardens in Danbury, CT reen Murray Blackburn of Pine who made the last two months Plains, Jacquelyn Stoliker and of Emmie’s life illed with love husband Shawn Stoliker of Red and compassion. We could not Hook, Bob Blackburn and his have asked for more. The grawife Nina Bruneau of Hillsdale, cious care that Emmie received NY and Daniel Blackburn and in the ER of Danbury Hospital his wife Caroline Nelson Black- and the 11th loor will forever be burn of Stanfordville, NY. appreciated by her family. Emmie’s life was brightened In lieu of flowers the famby her eleven great grandchil- ily requests donations be made dren, Nolan Wolfe, Seamus to the Wounded Warrior ProjWolfe and Trevor Wolfe all of ect, 4899 Belfort Rd., Unit 300, Valatie, NY; Hunter Stoliker and Jacksonville, FL 32256, Julia Stoliker of Red Hook, NY; To send an online condoBrianna Blackburn, Michelle lence please visit www.peckaBlackburn and Alfred Blackburn ndpeck.net.

Tammy C. Flaherty Tammy C. Flaherty passed away suddenly on October 8, 2018 at Berkshire Medical Center. Born August 16, 1959 she was the daughter of John H. Sr. and Kay Bailey Crosby. She was the loving wife of Command Sergeant Major, USA(R) Gary Flaherty and is survived by her brother, John H. Crosby Jr.(Robin). She was predeceased by her sister Nancy. Tammy was the Site Manager - Canaan Senior Program, a member of the Canaan Protective Fire Company Fire Police, Corresponding Secretary of the Canaan Protective Fire Company, Secretary to The Town

Grayson Eugene Jones

of Canaan Planning Board and Curator and Treasurer of the Canaan Historical Society. She loved animals and particularly her cats. Tammy was totally involved with working along side her husband assisting Veterans and their families. Family will receive friends Sunday from 1 to 3pm at the French, Gifford, Preiter & Blasl Funeral Home. Interment will be private on Monday at the Gerald B. Solomon Saratoga National Cemetery. Those who wish may contribute to the Canaan Fire Company or The Historical Society in her honor. Condolences may be conveyed at frenchblasl.com.

SOUTH CAIRO – Grayson Eu- Eugene Jr., and Ethan; his grandgene Jones, 16 months, passed mothers, Kathy Jones and Marie away suddenly on Monday Octo- Elena Deyo; his aunts, Melany, ber 8, 2018. He was born on May Michelle, and Eva; his uncles, Mi22, 2017 in Hudson to chael, Scott, and Don; Eugene Jones and Darla and many cousins and Deyo. He was a perfect two nephews. and happy little boy, who Grayson has been could make everyone privately cremated. laugh. He was loved by all and he brought joy to Calling hours will be everyone he met. With held on Saturday Octoa simple smile, Grayson ber 13th from 2 to 4pm can make any bad day go at the A.J. Cunningham away. He will be greatly Jones Funeral Home, 4898 missed. State Route 81, GreenGrayson is survived by his ville, followed by a memorial serparents; his siblings, Mitchell V, Nicholas, Savannah, Courtney, vice at 4pm. Condolences can be Brittany, Jennifer, Rozlyn, Adam, posted at ajcunninghamfh.com.

Elizabeth A. Olivett Elizabeth (Betty) Ann Olivett (Harlow) passed away on October 10, 2018. She was born in Hudson, NY on March 2, 1934 to Anna and Hubert “Hub”Harlow. She graduated from St. Mary’s Catholic Academy (Hudson) in 1951 and was active in the Library Club, Latin Club, and played basketball and was known as a “smooth dancer.” She is survived by her husband of 63 years, Thomas Olivett, her three children Thomas (Julie) Olivett, Christine (Lance) Palmateer, and Paul (Denise) Olivett, 4 grandchildren (Lance, Lauren, Renee, and

Paul) and many nieces, neph- loved creating clothing and toys ews, and extended family mem- for her grandchildren and many bers. others in her extended family. She was employed The kids loved playing for many years as Vilwith Grammie’s toys lage Clerk in Athens and and wearing her handas the Village Treasurer made sweaters. in Coxsackie. As with She was a regueverything in her life, lar at the Heermance she was deeply comLibrary in Coxsackie mitted to helping peoand grateful to those ple and loved her work librarians like Christine helping residents of Reda, Linda Deubert, Olivett both villages. She espeLynn Erceg, and Sandy cially loved working with Stephens for helping numbers long before computers her ind books that allowed her and spreadsheets. to follow her lifelong passion for She loved her crafts. She was reading. She and her husband an accomplished knitter and Tom are also very grateful to be

members of the Coxsackie Rescue Squad for their wonderful care and support. Family and friends may pay their inal respects on Saturday, October 13, 2018 at Richards Funeral Home, 28 North Vernon Street, Athens, N.Y. from 10:00 A.M. – 12:00 Noon with a brief service and interment immediately following. In lieu of lowers, donations can be made to the Heermance Library in Coxsackie, NY and/or the Coxsackie Rescue Squad. Condolences may be made at www.richardsfuneralhomeinc. net.

Ruth M. Wasner Ruth M. Wasner, 80, of Claverack passed away September 26, 2018 at her residence. She was born on March 8, 1938 in Carmel, New York and was one of six girls to Nicolas and Nina (Smalley) Geoffroy. A devoted wife, mother, grandmother, and great grandmother, family was her greatest joy. Ruth was very involved with the Second Reformed Church of Philmont. Where she served as the inancial secretary for the church for

many years. She also taught Sunday school and Bible school. Ruth is survived by her four children; Robert Jr. and his wife Diane Wasner, Elizabeth Kitsock, Douglas and his wife Julie Wasner, and Leann and her husband Christopher Wolfe. Her ten grandchildren; Jenifer, Brian, and Steven Wasner, Nicolas and Adam Kitsock, Kylie and Jayden Wasner, and Timothy, Alexander, and Bradley Wolfe. One great granddaughter, Alexa

Kitsock. Also surviving are four sisters, Helen Dykeman, Sylvia Mateer, Arlene Quinion, and Anita Vitali. In addition to her husband, Robert Wasner, she also was predeceased by her sister, Jeanne Beebe. A memorial service will be held on October 15, 2018 at 11:00 am at St. Thomas Lutheran Church in Churchtown. Interment will follow in St. Thomas Cemetery.

The family wishes to thank the caregivers who so gently cared for Ruth in her inal days, especially the ones from the Community Hospice of Columbia and Greene Counties. Donations be made to the Community Hospice of Columbia and Greene Counties, 47 Liberty Street, Catskill, NY 12414. For directions or to leave a message of condolence please visit www.batesanderson.com

Find us on Facebook!

Son of limo company owner is arrested after fatal crash

www.facebook.com/ CatskillDailyMail

Jesse McKinley and William K. Rashbaum

FUNERAL DIRECTORS

New York Times News Service

ALBANY — The operator of a limousine company at the center of an investigation of the crash in upstate New York that killed 20 people was arrested Wednesday and charged with criminally negligent homicide, according to the State Police. Nauman Hussain, the son of Shahed Hussain, the owner of Prestige Limousine, was taken into custody by the State Police during a traffic stop on a highway in the Albany area. The arrest came four days after a stretch limousine, rented out by Prestige, ran through a stop sign in Schoharie, New York, a town about 40 miles west of Albany, struck two pedestrians and a parked car, and landed in a shallow ravine. All 17 passengers and the limousine’s driver were killed, as were two pedestrians. The arrest is the latest development in a fast-moving investigation focusing on the limousine — a 2001 Ford Excursion — that had repeatedly failed inspections, including one as recently as last month. The company, which was doing business out of a lowbudget hotel north of Albany, has been visited multiple times by State Police investigators, who are also seeking the elder Hussain, a former FBI informant. The crash on Saturday was the worst transportation-related accident in the country in nine years, dating to a 2009 plane crash outside Buffalo that killed 50 people. Among the victims Saturday were 17 young friends — all between 24 and 34 — who had been traveling in the limousine for a birthday party trip at a local brewery. In remarks to reporters outside a State Police barracks on Wednesday afternoon, a lawyer for the company, Lee Kindlon, said that the State Police

Copake, N.Y. (518) 329-2121 Pine Plains, N.Y. (518) 398-7777

KYLE ADAMS/THE NEW YORK TIMES

State police officers at the site of a limousine crash that left 20 dead in Schoharie, N.Y., Oct. 8, 2018. The son of the owner of a limousine company at the center of the investigation of the crash was arrested on Oct. 10, according to a law enforcement official. Nauman Hussain, the son of a Shahed Hussain, the owner of Prestige Limousine, was taken into custody by the State Police. The charges were to be announced soon.

and other authorities were “jumping the gun” in arresting and charging Nauman Hussain. “Even the most simple investigation, done well, takes months,” Kindlon, said adding that his client would plead not guilty to the charges. “And now because of the actions taken today, that time frame is compressed.” The crash has also raised questions about the regulation and oversight of stretch limousines, specially made vehicles that are built from former cars or sport utility vehicles and often do not have to meet strict federal safety requirements. Federal safety officials investigating the Schoharie crash have described the accident as a “high-energy impact,” which drove the limousine’s engine into the driver’s side. State officials have said that the 2001 Ford Excursion was not supposed to be on the road, having failed inspections, including tests of its brakes. The charges against Hussain were announced by State Police Maj. Robert E. Patnaude, the commander of Troop G, which is based in Latham, New York, and is investigating the crash. State Police have made clear that they would like to interview the elder Hussain, 62.

He has a curious history, having worked as an informant, helping to convict two leaders of an Albany mosque in a 2004 plot to import a missile and assassinate a Pakistani diplomat, as well as a case in 2009 involving a conspiracy to bomb synagogues in the Bronx. In both cases, the attacks were thwarted. But his record is also filled with criminal acts, including fraudulently obtaining driver’s licenses, and financial troubles — he filed for bankruptcy in 2003 after accumulating debts of $177,000. That bankruptcy case was finally settled in 2007. A year later his family started Prestige Limousine. On Wednesday, Kindlon said Hussain had been in Pakistan for some time to deal with health issues. He said that the older Hussain had been much more involved in the day-today running of the company than his son, who he said mainly helped market the company and answer business calls. He added that Nauman Hussain’s father was “worried sick about his own son,” and may return to the United States to assist in the investigation. “I know that should we need him,” Kindlon said, “he will come here.”

VITO LAWRENCE

SACCO Sacco-McDonald-Valenti Funeral Home 700 Town Hall Drive Hudson, New York 12534 • 518-828-5000 e-mail: smvfh700@gmail.com

M. GRIMALDI FUNERAL HOME & CREMATION SERVICES 25 Railroad Ave., Chatham, N.Y.

(518) 822-8332 Mario A. Grimaldi, Manager

RAYMOND E. BOND FUNERAL HOME Kinderhook Street, Valatie, N.Y. (518) 758-7031 David B. Scace, Richard J. Gagnon Andrew P. Scace

ATTENTION FUNERAL DIRECTORS Obituaries, Death Notices Or Funeral Accounts Should Be Submitted Before 2PM Daily For The Next Day’s Paper.

Notices should be emailed to: obits@registerstar.com or obits@thedailymail.net

Call Patti to advertise your funeral home: (518) 828-1616 x2413

For

CURRENT OBITUARY LISTINGS be SURE to CHECK our WEBSITE: hudsonvalley360.com


CMYK

Windham Journal

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2018

Good ol’ boys of the mountaintop are on the mend By Abby and Gabby For Columbia-Greene Media

PRATTSVILLE — Been out of the loop for a week, so news is still a bit light, but will bring you whatever news is available. Now is the time to remind all of you to get your news to me at robgin@mhcable.com or gurleyrv@gmail.com or call 518-299-3219. Thanks. Well, the Prattsville bridge is now open, albeit one lane. Any progress is progress. The good ole boys of the mountaintop are on the mend. Billy Mead and Clarence Soule, of Jewett, are on the road to recovery. Clarence got an A-1 rating and Billy is not far behind. Clarence got his good news at Albany Med while under the love and care of daughter, Jessica. Billy should not try to just toughen things out. Bob Gurley is home and is meeting all health goals. With three nurses

in the family, Bob is well taken care of. Chuckie Brainerd, of Conesville, is also feeling better. As with many of us, medication adjustments do a lot to correct a condition. Good health, gentlemen. In speaking with Tim Brand, he said his late brother, Gary, will be interred in Arlington Cemetery as befits an American hero. The ceremony will take place at a later date. Gary earned his Air Force rank through hard work and dedication. Our thanks are for his loyalty and with his family. Wish we had more citizens of his character. Many did the tour of the autumn activities in our area during the past weekend. They took in OktoberFest at Hunter Mountain and Windham’s Autumn Affair on Saturday and that made for a very busy day. By all accounts, the area was busy, busy, busy. Congratulations to Nadine

PHOTO BY LAUREL VAN AKEN

Laurel Van Aken snapped this picture of the newly opened bridge for one lane only at the west side of Prattsville, Route 23.

Gurley and Isaac Huntsman on their recent engagement. Ron and Freda Fancher hosted their annual Shoot Out and Picnic at their Camp Titanic in Conesville on Sunday. This was the 51st year for this

great outing. Ron’s brother and sister-in-law, the late Stan and Hilda, were sorely missed. Our prayers are with the victims and their families of the horrific crash in Schoharie on Saturday.

Will do a little catch up with birthdays and anniversaries. The Greene County American Legion monthly meeting will be held in Prattsville at the Prattsville Hotel at 7 p.m. Oct. 19. Legionnaires of Virgil

E. Deyo Post No. 1327, Prattsville, please plan on attending. Thank you. Happy birthday to Samantha Baker on Oct. 9. On Oct. 10, happy birthday to Brian Young. Billy Decker, of Lexington, is wished a happy birthday Oct. 11. Way out there in Oregon, we wish our own Judy Chatfield a very happy birthday Oct. 12. Also on Oct. 12, we wish Holly Dibble, granddaughter of Ken and Karen Aurigema, a happy birthday. On Oct. 14, we wish Cathy Brainerd Martino and Fritzie Schmidt a very happy birthday. Also on Oct. 14 we wish twins Connie Brainerd Constable and Becky Brainerd Benson a great happy birthday. On Oct. 19, we wish McKenzie Constable, daughter of Connie and Michael Constable, a very happy birthday. Sorry for the delay with some of you, but now everyone knows you are a year older. Enjoy.

Sundays were for family, church and fellowship As I write this, the nation is celebrating Columbus Day. Not in my book — Columbus Day is Oct. 12. As you can see, the trees are trying to conform to government standards, but you can’t fool Mother Nature. I bet next weekend the mountains will be ablaze. It’s such a shame, when I go through Hensonville, I see all of the buildings being torn down and nothing replacing them. I feel that the town will soon cease to exist. It is with great pleasure, then, that I look next door and see a brand new house where an old cellar was. Thank you, Skip Newcomb for rebuilding in Ashland. Good luck. Hope Restoration announces its annual Community Thanksgiving Dinner on Nov. 2. As always, it is a free-will donation, with the proceeds going to a worthy cause. Please call the church to reserve your place. Pastor asks for the number of people in your party and time you wish to eat. Seating starts at 4:30 p.m. No takeouts except for the Homebound. Alumni weekend brings so many people together. Rose Hudecek got a surprise visit from Jim and Dottie (Jacobs) Dunham on Thursday. When the Dunhams called Marty Hudecek over the summer, they promised to drop in and visit with mom. It seems they also heard the Manhattan Club meets daily in Jewett. No one was disappointed that day. WAJ Class of 1968 held a reunion picnic at C D Lane Park on Sunday. When driving toward the park, it was hard to miss the smoke and the aroma of barbecue chicken being

ASHLAND SPEAKS

LULA

ANDERSON cooked by Jere Baker, with assistance by John LoPresti. The picnic was put together by Diane Peck Baker, Patti Wieninger Lawyer and Judy Hudecek LoPresti. Attending were Larry Thompson and wife, Claudia, Skip Newcomb and wife, Jocelyn, Barbara Dunbar Blake, Greg and Dawn Bailey Thorp, Ken Hudecek, Ruth Cady Muller brought her sister, Mary, and the center of attention, former class advisor Ken Mabey and wife, Charlene. Both were very influential in all of our lives. There was no end to the memories shared. Each member present gave a somewhat brief synopsis of the past 50 years. How time flew! Four hours passed by so quickly with never a lull in the conversation. For a brief time, we were all teenagers again, without a care in the world. Thanks to all who participated in Windham Affair. I had a wonderful weekend, met plenty of friends and sold out all of my pies. It was great to see all of the vendors with crowds. Although it was hard to drive through Windham, we all appreciated the crowds. Even the weather cooperated. As usual, Larry Tompkin’s slideshow was superb. A good crowd showed up and enjoyed correcting Larry, and identifying more people in his pic-

tures. The culmination of the show was the presentation of the 2019 calendar with the Man of the Year award going to Richard Morse from Morse’s store, across the street from WAJ. Who doesn’t remember going there? Accepting the accolades for their dad were Richard, Keith and Barbara. The WAJ Alumni Dinner was not so well-attended. Of course, I was the only one representing my class of 1948. Yes, I graduated 70 years ago. Can that be possible? I can’t believe there were no representatives for 10 and 25 years — the youngest being Yvonne Soule Mead from 1983. I know that there are other reunions for individual classes, but it’s still nice (and proper) to support your alma mater. Recognized, also, as the oldest Alum was Roberta Christman 97 years young and still feisty as ever. As we all fondly remember Stanley, who was such an authoritarian figure in the halls of WAJ, the waitresses who worked for them fondly remember Roberta as the one who ruled the roost. It’s stories and memories that make this an event that is worth attending. On Oct. 28, there will be a Tricky Tray/ Basket Social for the benefit of local charities being held at the Saugerties Knights of Columbus Hall, 19 Barclay St., Saugerties. It is sponsored by the Saugerties Columbiettes. Doors open at noon with calling at 1:30 p.m. Did you see Linda Blanden in the audience of Wheel of Fortune a couple of weeks ago? Her daughter, Abby, was a contestant and she won! Linda looks as young and beautiful

as ever. Addition to the Rummage Sale Roster. Just in: Windham Hensonville United Methodist Church will be holding its Fall Sale on Oct. 26 and 27. Save some room in your house for its treasures. There are still openings at the new Prattsville complex. Please go Prattsville Town Hall for further information. This is for senior and low income housing.

PRAYERS AND CARES Prayers for Sandy and Frank Shelhorne. Sincere sympathy to Louise LeBrun on the passing of Rob. Great news for Clarence Soule who thanks all for the prayers and blessings bestowed upon him.

UPCOMING EVENTS n

Oct. 10: Women’s Guild dinner at Pegasus n Oct. 12 and 13: Jewett Presbyterian Church Rummage Sale n Oct. 16: Roast Pork Dinner Kaaterskill United Methodist Church, Tannersville Rescue Squad Building, takeouts at 5 p.m., seating at 5:30 p.m.; $12 adults, $6 children n Oct. 19 and 20: East Jewett United Methodist Church Rummage Sale n Oct. 20: Lay Speakers Class Lexington 9 a.m.-2 p.m. n Oct. 26: Bake sale to benefit Senior Angels, Greene County Office Building, Catskill n Oct. 26 and 27: Rummage sale at Windham United Methodist Church n Oct. 27: Lay Speakers Class Lexington, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. n Oct. 28: Tricky Tray at Saugerties Knights of Columbus Hall, noon

BRIEFS We want to hear from you. To send information to be included in Briefs, email to editorial@thedailymail.net; mail to The Daily Mail, Atten: Community News, One Hudson City Centre, Suite 202, Hudson, NY 12534; fax to 518-828-3870. We would like to receive items at least two weeks in advance.

OCT. 19 TANNERSVILLE — “Discovering Nazareth” with Pianist Ehud Asherie in concert 7-8:15 p.m. Oct. 19 at the Mountain Top Library, 6093 Main St. Tannersville. Admission is free. For information, call

518-589-5707. HUNTER — The Hunter Tannersville Central School District theater department will be performing The Seussification of Romeo and Juliet at 7 p.m. Oct. 19 and 2 p.m. Oct. 20 in the MS/HS gym, 6094 Main St., Tannersville. Priority seatin, $10; studlets, $8; seniors and students, $5. This Seussified adaptation of Shakespeares classic Romeo and Juliet, is full of Dr. Seuss rhyme, color, and humor appropriate for the whole family. HANNACROIX

The

Medway-Grapeville Fire Company Auxiliary is hosting a Nickel Social Oct. 19 at the Medway-Grapeville Firehouse, 1352 County Route 51, Hannacroix. A wide assortment of both indoor and outdoor useful items will be available including a separate bake sale and special items raffle. The Firehouse will open at 6 p.m. for viewing of merchandise and early ticket sales with drawings beginning at 7 p.m. Delicious refreshments will be available. All are welcome to attend and try their luck at winning these great items. Early donations for the Nickel

Social can be dropped off at the Firehouse. For information including donations, contact Elina at 518-731-6559. EAST JEWETT — The annual fall sale will be held 4-7 p.m. Oct. 19 and 9 a.m.-noon Oct. 20 at the East Jewett United Methodist Church, Route 23C, East Jewett. Bag sale on Saturday. Lots of housewares, pots and pans, dishes, utensils, clothing, shoes, books and more. Refreshments available including soup, hot dogs, salads and homemade pies.

n Nov. 2: Thanksgiving dinner at Hope Restoration n Nov. 3: Time to fall back, reset your clocks n Nov. 6: Election Day It’s time to start sending me your November activities. Oh my, how the time is flying by. Send to lmgeand@yahoo.com, call me at 518-734-5360.

AS I REMEMBER IT Where did Sunday School go? When I was young, Sunday was for family. Chores done, then church. Does anyone remember Ellis Bently? He lived on South Street. I only remember him as an older man. He held an adult Sunday School class at Windham before church services, in the right side of the back pews. I can see him standing: teaching, questioning, reading. At the same time, the young would gather in the back (now the Fellowship Hall) for classes. It seemed the room was full. I wish I could remember the names of the teachers. Eva Thompson was mine. She was Elwood Hitchcock’s sister. I remember being devastated when she died. I was 5 or 6 at the time. I remember Miss Paterson, Mrs. Keller, Mrs. Comstalk. It was always a joy to be with others my age, playing on the lawn and the fence between the driveway and lawn. We would play tag, do backflips and somersaults. Every church had a large group. Ashland had 30 or 40 kids attending. It seemed every year we had a church picnic with all the games and food. The Presbyterian church had the Morris and Eva Decker

family and the Mulburry family. There are pictures of the Jewett families. Children’s Day was special as each child had a piece (poem or scripture reading) to recite. George was older, but I always had to prompt him, hold his hand. We put on a Thanksgiving pageant and the BIG ONE: the Christmas pageant where we dressed as a shepherd or a lamb, resisting all the way. Moms, dads, grandparents, aunts and uncles came to sit in the audience and clap really loud. Some kids took many bows, some kids hid in the back. Mrs. Frank Keller kept the Cradle Roll. No new child was overlooked and was recorded on the wall. Today parents have to sleep in. There are complaints the parents work hard all week and have jobs to do on Sunday. One parent complained they had to go skiing on Sunday mornings and had no time for Sunday school. Others drop off the kids and expect someone else to watch them for the hour plus that they go to the diner for breakfast. If you get 3 or 5 today, that’s a lot. Where do they go? Not to church. I can still hear Mr. Bently, “Keep the children quiet. No running in the church, stay off the altar unless you have permission to be there.” Church was God’s house and we were taught to respect it. Which Sunday School teachers do you remember? Some later teachers were Gwen Wakefield and Nola Barlow. Who was yours?

HEEL PAIN? New Techniques Better Results! We feature the latest in Podiatric Technology... • ESWT - a non-surgical Now A treatment for heel spurs c New P cepting • CRYOSTAR CRYOSURGERY atients ! a minimally-invasive, in-ofice treatment for Plantar Fasciitis and Neuromas... in 15 minutes or less!

H U D S O N VA L L E Y F O OT A S S O C I AT E S W. COXSACKIE • ALBANY (518) 731-5444

RED HOOK • HUDSON Toll Free: 1-877-339-HVFA

www.hvfa.com

KINGSTON (845) 339-4191


CMYK

Thursday, October 11, 2018 A7

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA • THE DAILY MAIL

Come out to share memories from ‘in the day’ By Christine Dwon For Columbia-Greene Media

Deepest condolences to Mike Pushman and all the family and friends of Bertha “Bootie” Pushman who passed away on Oct. 8. Viewing will be 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Oct. 11 at the E. B. Gormley Funeral Home in Phoenicia. A funeral service will be held at 10 a.m. Oct. 12 at the Gormley Funeral Home. Refreshments will follow at the Community Hall, 141 Spruceton Road, West Kill following the service. Paul, Liza and Abby Dwon, Matthew, Katelyn and Emma Dwon and myself had fun checking out all the vendors, listening to the different bands and the children thoroughly enjoyed the hay maze and other interesting things to do at the Autumn Affair in Windham on Oct. 6. Happy birthday to Dale Schwarzenegger on Oct. 12. Oct. 13 is Steve Palazzolo’s birthday. Birthday greeting to Charina Falke on Oct. 18. Best wishes to all. The Lexington Farmers Market will be held 10 a.m.noon Oct. 13 under the pavilion at the Lexington Municipal Building. The vendors have wonderful local products and produce. Also at the Farmers Market on Oct. 13, the Lexington Historical Society will hold a combination bake and soup sale. The Kaaterskill United Methodist Church is holding a roast pork and homemade pie church supper Oct. 16 at the Tannersville Rescue Squad building. Takeouts are at 5 p.m. and serving at 5:30 p.m. Adult dinners are $12, children are $6 and under 5 years are free. Book club will meet at 6 p.m. Oct. 17 to discuss “The Tiger

in the House” by Jacqueline Sheehan at the home of Diane Clarke, West Kill. Lexington Historical Society’s Archival Day is 1-4 p.m. Oct. 20 at the Historical Building on Church Street. There will be a bake-and-soup sale and the annual raffle drawing. The raffle drawing will be around 3 p.m. Prizes for the raffle are a goodie basket filled with fun items, $100 in cash, flower painting grouping by Emily Valerio and Lexington of the Past calendar. Each raffle ticket gives you a chance to win any of the four prizes. Instead of having an outside guest speaker that day, local residents will share memories about Lexington as it used to be “in the day.” If you are a local resident and would like to join the chat group, call 518-989-6646. Frank Bibbo is leading a Bible study on Mondays, 6 p.m. in the Lexington United Methodist Church hall on Genesis. Bible study is also held at 7 p.m. Wednesdays in the Jewett Firehouse, county Route 17 on the Gospel of John. Prayers for Ellouise Cole, Linda Neice, Art Maxwell, Ruth Blumenthal, Pastor Bob and Kate Barnum, Marilyn and Nancy Dippold, Bill and Aud Gannon, John Grinnell, Bud Osborn, Ellis and Betty Potter, Stephanie Pushman, Pastor Bob and Diane Nash, Joan Rappleyea, Ann Robinson, Art Rood, Ann Simpfenderfer, Clarence and Jeanne Soule, Don and Diane Strausser, Gladys Van Valkenburgh, Annette Waller, Mickie Winters, our leaders, our country, our military and their families and all others in need of prayer. Greene County Senior Nutrition Program menu for the week of Oct. 15–Oct. 19 is as follows: Monday — Chick-

BRIEFS We want to hear from you. To send information to be included in Briefs, email to editorial@thedailymail.net; mail to The Daily Mail, Atten: Community News, One Hudson City Centre, Suite 202, Hudson, NY 12534; fax to 518-828-3870. We would like to receive items at least two weeks in advance.

OCT. 12 CATSKILL — The Catskill Elks Lodge is holding an extra night of bingo on Oct. 12 at the lodge, 45 North Jefferson Ave., Catskill. Doors open at 5 p.m.; early bird games start at 6:40 p.m.; regular bingo starts at 7:05 p.m. This is in addition to the regular Wednesday night bingo. A limited menu will be available. CAIRO — An all you can eat pancake and sausage supper will be held beginning at 4:30 p.m. until all served on Oct. 12 at the South Cairo United Methodist Church, 25 County Road 67, Leeds. Menu includes homemade applesauce and desserts. Adults, $8; children 6-12, $4; children 5 and younger, free. TANNERSVILLE — Discovering Johannesburg Jazz with Saxophonist McCoy Mrubata & Pianist Paul Hanmer in concert 7-8:15 p.m. Oct. 12 at the Mountain Top Library, 6093 Main St., Tannersville. Admission is free. For information, call 518-589-5707. VOORHEESVILLE — Old Songs Inc. presents Ustad Shafaat Khan in concert at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 12 at Old Songs Community Center, 37 South Main St., Voorheesville. Tickets are $25. For information and tickets, call 518-765-2815 or online at oldsongs.org.

OCT. 13 SAUGERTIES — The Katsbaan Ladies Aid Society will sponsor a Book, Chili, Soup & Pie Sale, plus Holiday Items, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 13 in the Katsbaan Reformed Church Hall, 1801 Old Kings Highway, Saugerties. Tables full of books for adults and kids; our ever popular homemade chili (beef or veggie) by the quart; homemade soups by the quart;

homemade pies; new & gently used Halloween and Christmas items. Note that we will not be having our Holiday Fair this year. Visit the church website at http:// www.katsbaanchurch.org. CLAVERACK — The Columbia-Greene Humane Society/SPCA will be hosting a Fee-Waived Adoption Event and Open House 11:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 13 at the Columbia-Greene Humane Society/SPCA, 111 Humane Society Road, Claverack. During the event, all adoption fees are waived for approved homes. There will be free hot dogs and soft drinks. Local radio celebrity host Bill Williams from Oldies 93.5 FM, 98.5 FM The Cat, and WRWD will be on hand with the “Prize Wheel.” To get pre-approved for adoption, visit cghs.org.

en chow mein, brown rice, Oriental mixed vegetables, pineapple chunks; Tuesday — Crab-topped cod, scalloped potatoes, Antigua mixed vegetables, tropical-mixed fruit; Wednesday — National Pasta Day: Stuffed shells, Italian green beans, chocolate mousse; Thursday — Farm to Table: Roast pork with gravy, applesauce, mashed potatoes, farm-fresh acorn squash, apple cranberry crisp; Friday — Chicken salad plate, fresh greens, potato salad, fresh fruit. Everyone over 60 is invited to attend. Meals are served at noon for a suggested donation of $4 per meal. Please call at least a day in advance to reserve your meal. Mountain

Top Senior Service Center is located at the Jewett Municipal Building, Route 23C, 518263-4392. Lexington/West Kill United Methodist Church Administrative Council is scheduled to meet at 5 p.m. Oct. 22 in the Lexington church hall. The last Greene County Public Health rabies clinic for 2018 for Greene County dogs, cats and ferrets will be held 6-8 p.m. Oct. 24 in the Hensonville Firehouse, 432 Route 296. Donations are highly encouraged. Please call ahead for ferrets. Bring record of pet’s previous vaccination to receive a three-year certificate. If no record is shown, pet will be given a one-year vaccination.

New Baltimore Animal Hospital will provide the veterinary service. Questions? Call 518719-3600. Friday, Oct. 26 is Free Movie Night at 7 p.m. in the Lexington/West Kill United Methodist Church hall in Lexington sponsored by the Lexington/ West Kill United Methodist Women. Movie is “Mountain Top: A Journey of Faith.” All welcome. If you would like to order bricks for the Lexington Commemorative Brick Garden, give Mary a call in the history room at 518-989-6476 ext. 16 or 518-989-6813. The bricks will cost $45 each. Stop by the Lexington Municipal Building to see the brick garden in place around

the flagpole. There are a couple of dates to remember for November: Tuesday, Nov. 6 is the Election Day Dinner at the Lexington/ West Kill United Methodist Church hall. Saturday, Nov. 10 is the annual Bake Sale for Veterans at 9 a.m. at Jim’s Great American, Prattsville, sponsored by the American Legion Auxiliary, Virgil E. Deyo Unit No. 1327. Baked goods and/or donations can be dropped off at Jim’s prior to 9 a.m. or call 518299-3219. All proceeds benefit local veterans and/or veterans’ families. Until next week, take care, be thankful and please be kind.

CHECK OUT THESE SPECIALS... STK#

STK#

0659

1754

2018 GMC YUKON SLT

2019 GMC SIERRA 1500

Leather, Loaded, Tow Package, 20” Wheels

$

CREW CABS

WAS

Stop By And Take A Look!

64,720 NOW

$

58,900 STK#

STK#

1998

9327

2018 GMC SIERRA 3500

2018 GMC TERRAN SLE

Duramax, Dump Trucks

AWD, Driver Convenience Package

IN STOCK

13% OFF MSRP

CALL NOW STK#

STK#

3970

3943

2018 GMC CANYON SLE

2018 GMC 1500 DENALI

4WD, Crew Cab, Trailer Pckg, V6, Remote Start

Crew Cab, 4WD

STARTING AT $

Starting as low as

33,900

$

51,800

STK#

STK#

5641

6093

2018 GMC ACADIA

2018 GMC YUKON XL

All Wheel Drive, All Terrain Loaded

Denali, 4WD

Priced to Move!

$

MSRP

43,195

YOUR COST $

36,900

STK#

0282

2018 GMC CADILLAC XT5

USED CARS

All Wheel Drive, Loaded

COXSACKIE — The 5 week Mixed Media Art Class is ideal for all skill levels. Students will create multi-disciplined compositions with a variety of different substrates and materials. Techniques will include collage, monotype printing, drawing, painting, assemblage, cutting and pasting, and mark making. This course is designed to give students a wide variety of art making experiences allowing the students to explore various visual art forms and techniques. Both traditional and non-traditional approaches will be used so that students may produce original artworks while learning skills and techniques associated with a variety of art media. Students will learn the elements of art and design with an emphasis on color, texture and composition. Projects include: Artist Trading Cards, Mixed Media Tags, Mono Prints and Collage on canvas. Instructor will supply: Stamps, Stencils, Collage Papers, Magazines, Old Books, Additional brushes, glues, heat guns, geli plates and pasto paints. The program will be held 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Oct. 13, 20, 27, Nov. 3 and 10 at the Heermance Memorial Library, Ely St., Coxsackie. Free program. Ages 15 and older. Registration required. Parking available in rear of building. To register and for more information, call 518-731-8084.

YOUR COST $

45,995

STK#

2768

2018 GMC SIERRA 2500 HD Duramax, SLT, Loaded, In Stock

ONLY

3 LEFT

‘18 CADILLAC XT5 AWD....................$45,995 ‘18 NISSAN FRONTIER CREW 4WD...$26,795 ‘17 NISSAN ROGUE SV4....................$20,995 ‘16 GMC YUKON SLT 4WD.................$33,995 ‘15 GMC SIERRA 2500HD DBL 4WD..$29,595 ‘15 GMC SIERRA 1500 CREW 4WD...$32,995 ‘15 GMC TERRAIN SLE AWD..............$14,995 ‘15 CHEVY TAHOE LT 4WD..................$29,995 ‘14 CHEVY EQUINOX LTZ AWD............$16,995 ‘14 GMC TERRAIN SLT AWD..............$17,995 ‘14 GMC SIERRA 1500 CREW 4WD...$24,995 ‘14 GMC SIERA 1500 DOUBLE CAB 4WD...$24,495 ‘13 GMC YUKON DENALI AWD...........$31,595 ‘11 GMC TERRAIN SLT AWD...............$10,995 ‘18 CHEVY CRUZE PREMIER SEDAN....$18,995 ‘17 CHEVY CRUZE LT SEDAN...............$15,995 ‘17 CHEVY IMPALA LT PREM..............$24,995 ‘16 SUBARU IMPREZA PREMIUM SEDAN...$15,995 ‘14 CHEVY CRUZE LTZ RS SEDAN..........$9,995 ‘10 CHEVY MALIBU LTZ SEDAN...........$11,995

www.Thorpesgmcinc.com MAIN STREET • TANNERSVILLE Dealer #3200004 SALES HOURS: M-F 8AM-7PM; SAT 8AM-4PM; SUN CLOSED

SALES: (518) 589-7142 or 589-7143 SERVICE: (518) 589-5911 or 589-5912

ALL PRICES INCLUDE REBATES • TAX NOT INCLUDED

OVER 65 NEW GMC’S IN STOCK


CMYK

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA • THE DAILY MAIL

A8 Thursday, October 11, 2018

A cottage owner in Onteora, a friend to all children By Dede Terns-Thorpe For Columbia-Greene Media

It is a pleasure sharing what I’ve recently learned of this talented poet and children’s author. Mary Mapes was born in 1831 to Sophia Fuhrman and James J. Mapes, a well-known chemist, inventor, civil engineer and author. Mr. Mapes spent years dedicated to improving the conditions of farmers and to all living in rural areas. In 1859, James Mapes patented “Mapes Fertilizer,” concentrating on drainage, crop rotations and seeding. In 1851, he became associate editor of the Journal of Agriculture, which began in Boston. Mapes passed his gentle view of the world to his daughter, Mary. He also shared his grand love of nature. Mary was home-schooled by tutors and at just 8 years of age was writing short stories. She spent most of her life in a

literary atmosphere with music and drama. At 20 years old, Mary married attorney William Dodge, but was widowed in just seven years. She soon was aware she needed employment as she was left alone to raise and educate her two young boys. In 1868, Dodge became an associate editor of “Hearth and Home,” working alongside Harriet Beecher Stowe followed with the 1873 launching of St. Nicholas — an illustrated monthly magazine for children. Mary soon became its editor-in-chief as well as contributing stories. In that capacity, she became a very dear friend of thousands in both this country and in England. Mrs. Dodge imported the name St. Nicholas from Holland. It soon became a very successful children’s magazine. She stayed as editor of “St. Nicholas” until she passed away in her beloved Onteora Park in 1905.

Mary Mapes Dodge’s headstone reads: “Lover and Friend of Children and in Countless Homes Beloved.” Mrs. Dodge was most famous for her 1865 novel, Hans Brinker, also known as the Silver Skates. In 1874, she wrote “Rhymes and Jingles” and “Poems and Verses” in 1904. Her poetry often contained gentle, moral lessons told in playful, rhymed verse. She wrote: “Early to bed”; “Fire in the window”; “The Mayor of Scuttleton”; “The Moon Came Late”; “Poor Crow”; “Shepherd John”; “Taking Time to Grow.” Mrs. Dodge was a regular contributor to many magazines and wrote numerous (18+) books for children. “When Life was Young,” written in 1894, has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilizations as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact and

remains as true to the original work as possible. At one-point, Mary Dodge said: “I am almost sorry to confess that my career has been without a struggle. Perhaps it has been too easyeverything I wrote was kindly received.” Thank you to Mrs. Dodge for bringing so many children hours of enjoyment with her talent and abilities. Thanks for reading, I hope you enjoyed the story. I thank the many sources I obtained this information from. Until next week, take care. Be thankful and be kind. You never know how your act of kindness may change someone’s life. Please send me any comments or corrections, townofhunterhistorian@yahoo.com or call 518-5894130. Have a good week.

Falling for Olana

‘TEN MILES IN TEN MINUTES’

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

The Bronck Museum will offer “Ten Miles in Ten Minutes,” the third and final program in this year’s Sundays Along the River series. Members of the Hudson River Ice Yacht Club will present the program at 2 p.m. Oct. 21 at the Bronck Museum, 90 County Highway 42, Coxsackie. In both the New and Old Netherland sail boats used to carry cargo were occasionally equipped with runners to allow transport of goods on frozen waterways. In America the sport of ice yachting is generally believed to have had its beginnings in 1790 when Mr. Oliver Booth of Poughkeepsie equipped a wooden box with three runners and a single sprit sail to create a primitive ice yacht. Improvements in design resulted in sleeker yachts with more sail that were able to cover the river ice with ever increasing speed. On a day when it was seriously cold with lots of wind and the Hudson was solidly frozen and without much snow cover the best designed ice yachts could cover ten miles in ten minutes. By the middle decades of the 1800s ice yacht clubs sprung up in several Hudson River communities including clubs in both Athens and Hudson. Rivalries developed between the clubs resulting in challenge races some attracting over 20 yachts. Winners could claim both bragging rights and sometimes purses upward of $5,000. Adult admission is $8, GCHS members and children $4. Pictured is the Ice Yacht “Haze” in February 1863.

HUDSON – The Olana Partnership announces the launch of “Falling for OLANA” programming for the autumn season. Olana State Historic Site is a popular place in the Hudson Valley to enjoy the autumnal colors and clear views. Gather some friends and family and get out into fall at Olana! October is the perfect month for picnicking on the weekends and Olana has brought in Gracie’s Food Truck to provide you with everything you need for lunch, with the best view in town. Gracie’s will again be onsite the last weekend in October — the weekend of Oct. 27 — so you can try out their hamburgers/veggie burgers, fries and milkshakes taste from Olana’s hilltop. The Olana Partnership is offering programs worthy of pre-registration in addition to others that you can experience with no planning necessary. Planning is encouraged for the “Artist on Art” tours that will continue through Dec. 1, as participants further explore what happens in a historic house when contemporary artists of Arab and Muslim decent serve as the tour guides of an exhibition with Middle Eastern themes. The experience is always different, but also enlightening and expansive. “Artist on Art” tours will be held every other weekend. The following tour dates remain: Oct. 27 with artist Audree Anid, Nov. 3 with artist Jordan Nassar, Nov. 17 with artist Baseera Khan, and Dec. 1, again with

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

As part of its 2018 “Artists on Art” tours, the site will include the Olana Middle East costume exhibition, and will feature tours by artists of Arab and Middle Eastern heritage.

artist Baseera Khan. Continuing the theme of artists as interpreters at Olana, the site will offer actor Tom Lee’s storytelling tour of the house using an adapted Palestinian folk tale about a greedy prince to set the mood for this tour. The story is culturally appropriate and is a free tour for all ages; Lee also delivers a Question Tour that is making waves at other historic artist homes nationally. In addition to tours inside the Main House at Olana, the landscape tours continue through November and there are a range of ways to traverse the carriage roads. Whether you choose on foot or in an electric vehicle, a guided or self-guided tour, there are new things to experience and learn at OLANA if you make time. Suggestions include down-

loading the “Middle Eastern Adventures” audio tour to listen to Frederick Church’s letters and diaries from his Middle Eastern trip in the mid-19th century, or purchase the new map and exploration guide designed by Germantown artist Dawn Breeze. Keri Smith’s Wander Society Adventure Tent can be your base camp for hours of painting with the rentable plein air painting kit, reading, pondering and prompts the artist has created for visitors, or just staring out upon the landscape. Join in and fall into Olana this autumn. Click on the calendar at www.OLANA.org to learn more. For more information about volunteering and membership, call 518-828-1872 x102 or email misaacs@olana.org.

Sleepy Hollow Lake holds meet and greet ATHENS — Community members of Sleepy Hollow Lake will host a meet and greet with political candidates running for office in 2018 beginning at 5 p.m. Oct. 14 at The Lodge, 102 Lisa Lane, Athens. This is an excellent opportunity to meet and hear from candidates running for offices of the U.S. House of Representatives, State Senate and State Assembly, Greene County District Attorney, Greene County Treasurer and Coroners, and Athens and Coxsackie Legislature on Nov. 6. This event is open to residents of Sleepy Hollow Lake, the surrounding community, and area high school students. Everyone is welcome to attend the event. Light refreshments will be served. This meet and greet is not sponsored by Sleepy Hollow Lake. It is a grassroots resident-

led nonpartisan event that is hosted by an informal group of neighbors who are interested in increas-

ing political wareness and promoting participation in the political process in our community.

A.J. Cunningham Funeral Home Curtis A. Cunningham • Scott M. Zielonko • Emily N. Evans

Greenville

Ravena

P.O. Box 146 4898 State Route 81 Greenville, NY 12083

P.O. Box 92 9 Main Street Ravena, NY 12143

1898

518-966-8313

518-756-3313 ajcunninghamfh.com

Our Family Serving Your Family For Over 115 Years

Sitcer

Seamless Gutters Over 30 Colors Available Fully Insured • scott24@statetel.com

518-731-3103

n e e w o l l Ha y t r a P


CMYK

Food & Drink

www.HudsonValley360.com

Thursday, October 11, 2018 A9

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

Food Briefs UKRAINIAN FALL BAZAAR HUDSON — St. Michael Ukrainian Orthodox Church, 51 Partition St., Hudson, Ukrainian Fall Bazaar and Food Sale will be held 10 a.m.2 p.m. Oct. 20. Including pierogies, Ukrainian fruit rolls, Ukrainian Babka, Borscht and more. For information and to place an order, call Father Mykola at 716-525-6230.

CHICKEN BARBECUE GREENPORT — A Brooks Chicken Barbecue will be held 3:30-6:30 p.m. Oct. 23 at Sacred Heart-Our Lady of Mount Carmel Shrine, 442 Fairview Ave., Hudson. Dinners, $12; half chicken, $8. Dinner includes half chicken, baked potato, cole slaw, dinner roll, cookie and bottled water. Preorder by calling 518-851-2439 or day of, call noon-5:30 p.m., 518-828-8775. DELMAR — The Kiwanis Club of Delmar will serve a pancake breakfast 8 a.m.-noon

Oct. 13 at Delmar Presbyterian Church, 585 Delaware Ave., Delmar. Adults, $6; children, $4; preschool, free.

FRESH HAM DINNER GHENT — A fresh ham dinner will be served at 5 and 6:30 p.m. Oct. 20 at the Ghent Reformed Church, 1039 County Route 22, West Ghent. Take outs at 5:30 p.m. Adults, $14; seniors, $12; children 5-10, $6; children under 5, free. To reserve tickets, call the Church at 518-828-5946 or Dick Leggett at 518-392-2062.

SOUP AND SANDWICH LUNCHEON STUYVESANT — The Stuyvesant Reformed Church, Route 9J and Church Street, Stuyvesant, will serve a free soup and sandwich lunch 11 a.m.-1 p.m. the first Saturday of the month October through April.

CHICKEN BARBECUE

ATHENS — The First Reformed Church of Athens, 18 North Church St., will host a chicken barbecue catered by Tom Frese of Ravena 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Oct. 14. Take out Only. Pre-sale only, tickets are $12. For tickets and information, call 518-334-9488.

PANCAKE BREAKFAST COXSACKIE — The D.M. Hamilton Steamer Co. No. 2 will serve an all you can eat pancake breakfast 8 a.m.noon Oct. 28 at the D.M. Hamilton Steamer Co. No. 2 Fire Company, 119 Mansion St., Coxsackie. Menu includes pancakes, French toast, eggs, bacon, sausage, toast, sausage gravy, coffee, tea and orange juice. Free will offering.

- a FUNdraiser for the Staatsburg Library on Oct. 14 at the library, 70 Old Post Road, Staatsburg. There are five categories for entries: pies & tarts, cakes & cupcakes, cookies, gluten free, unique desserts in three competitive divisions: Junior (6-12 yrs) Teen (13-16 yrs) Adult (17+ yrs). You may enter in one or more categories, the cost is $5 per entry. For cupcakes and cookies (1 entry = 1 dozen). On the day of the event, entry registration is at 1 p.m. and judging and awards will be held from 2-4 p.m. Submit a baked good or simply enjoy those baked by others. Throughout the day there will be raffles, music, sale of entered baked goods and refreshments. For information, email staatslibrary@gmail. com or call 845-889-4683.

BAKING CONTEST STAATSBURG — The Friends of the Staatsburg Library are hosting the Great Staatsburg Baking Contest

PANCAKE AND SAUSAGE SUPPER CAIRO — An all you can eat pancake and sausage supper will be held beginning at 4:30

p.m. until all served on Oct. 12 at the South Cairo United Methodist Church, 25 County Road 67, Leeds. Menu includes homemade applesauce and desserts. Adults, $8; children 6-12, $4; children 5 and younger, free.

SUB SALE STOTTVILLE — The Stottville Volunteer Fire Company will host its annual hot sub sale beginning at 11 a.m. on Election Day, Nov. 6 at the firehouse, Atlantic Avenue, Stottville. Pepperoni, sausage and pepper and meatball subs, as well as any combination of those ingredients, will be available. The sale will last until 7 p.m. or when supplies are sold out. The price of the sub is $8. To order the day of the sale, call 518-828-6328; to preorder, call 518-929-0624.

TURKEY DINNER SCHODACK

LANDING

— The Reformed Dutch Church of Schodack at Muitzeskill will be holding its annual turkey dinner with seatings at 4:30, 5:30 and 6:30 p.m. Oct. 27 at the church, Schodack Landing Road and Muitzeskill Road, Schodack Landing. The dinner is served family style. The menu will include turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, gravy, green beans, squash, cranberry sauce, rolls and various pies for dessert. Take out is available at 4 and 5 p.m. No early arrivals. Adults, $14; children 6-12, $6; children 5 and younger, free. Reservations are required. For reservations, call 518-732-7345. If no answer, leave a message with your name, phone number and state that you are calling regarding the church dinner. Your call will be returned the same day before 8 p.m. to confirm it was received. If your call is not returned the same day, call again.

Are restaurants too loud? Ins and outs of restaurant acoustics By Grace Wong Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — When Pacific Standard Time opened in April, it was one of the city’s buzziest openings, but to actually eat there was almost deafening. “I was able to step back and say this is the biggest issue with the restaurant,” said partner Joshua Tilden. “It wasn’t the food, it wasn’t the service, (but) I thought this problem was easily rectifiable.” In a city where bustling restaurants often mean noisy dining experiences, patrons like Claudia Fariello Bolnick, 71, of Streeterville, find themselves increasingly frustrated with their inability to have conversations with family and friends. Fariello Bolnick said she’s noticed the issue isn’t unique to Chicago — other cities she’s visited seem to have similarly loud volume issues. While she considers Chicago a “fabulous restaurant city,” she believes diners’ experiences could be more pleasant if restaurants considered their volume. “Some people have told us if we go at 5 o’clock, we can have a nice experience, but we don’t like to eat at 5 o’clock. We’re not that old!” Fariello Bolnick said. “How (restaurants) can be so shortsighted to put it (low) on the priorities list is amazing to me.” The Acoustical Society of America is launching a subcommittee to explore this issue, while other organizations like Consumer Reports and Zagat have also conducted studies, concluding that the ability to hold a conversation is more important to patrons than previously thought. Noisy restaurants aren’t always bad — sometimes it’s even preferred, and creating a lively atmosphere requires a certain level of noise, Tilden said. But it’s about getting the right amount that’s key. Tilden originally took a do-it-yourself attitude to fix the noise issue at Pacific Standard Time, laying out rugs and installing carpet beneath tables. But the restaurant remained loud. The only next step was to hire an audio engineer. A few sound-wave tests later, the restaurant installed soundproofing methods that were both effective and fit with the design. “It’s made a world of a difference,” Tilden said. “You can hear conversa-

tions now. You can hear the music now. And guests’ comfort is something that’s really important to all of us. It felt good to finally get a solution in place.” In an ideal situation, sound would be one of the highest priorities and taken into account during the design process, said David Paoli, an acoustical engineer at Shiner Acoustics. Sound absorption is the key to a good-sounding restaurant because it reduces the noisy din that can often be created by both the materials in the restaurant and the patrons themselves. Hard surfaces like wood, concrete, steel and brick are remediated by soft, porous materials that absorb the sound waves frantically bouncing off everything in a restaurant. Stephen Blake, architectural and contract territory manager with Armstrong World Industries, which provides consultations and products for noise control for commercial spaces and homes, said that soundabsorbing tiles and “blades” (or panels) help to absorb these sound waves and prevent them from bouncing around. Many sound abatement companies offer products like sound blades made with a fiberglass or mineral fiber core as the main absorption material. The blades are covered by a soft fabric that is acoustically transparent, meaning the sound waves pass through to the core material, and installed in ceilings, a space’s largest unobstructed surface area. “Without sound absorption, spaces

get noisy,” Paoli said. “When you’re talking and you want to be heard, you have to raise your voice, and before you know it, it’s very loud.” When sound engineers go into a space, they measure reverb time, a measurement of how long it takes for sound energy to dissipate, Blake said. Restaurants with hard surfaces like the previously mentioned concrete and brick may seem to have normal volume until patrons start coming in and add to the sound energy. With nowhere to go, sound bounces off hard surfaces, subtly causing people to raise their voices, creating a din. This is often observed when a restaurant has been constructed without sound absorption techniques and products. Applying sound abatement strategies after a restaurant is already finished is much more difficult and expensive than taking it into consideration from the start, Paoli said. Simply put, it tends to cost less to incorporate acoustics into the design than it does to retrofit them in a space that’s already operating. “It all comes down to aesthetics,” Paoli said. “We consult the architectural community, and they know who we are. But a lot of times, it comes down to budget and (does the restaurant) want to spend the money on our service or try to do it themselves?” Tilden agreed, saying that in a perfect world, sound would be a higher priority, but in reality, most opening

restaurants are “under the gun” to hit a certain budget. Acoustic design can get pushed to the side. “In order to get it done right, it costs a lot of money,” Tilden said. “It’s not like we’re in an extremely lucrative profession as is, so I think every dollar counts before you open. If I had to make assumptions on why it’s not done more often, that’s probably it.” After consulting with an audio engineer and finding a solution that would also mesh with the design of the restaurant, the Pacific Standard Time team settled on a product that could be sprayed on and matched with the stucco walls. And because the ceilings are high, the material is barely noticeable once the sun begins to set. However, this may only be a shortterm solution, said Blake. Spray-on material tends to degrade fairly quickly, Blake said, and after about 30 years, it can even disintegrate. “You don’t want that over your food,” Blake said. “It’s good and effective stuff, but like everything, it has its pros and cons.” For Gregory Scott, who has hearing loss and lives in New York, it became near impossible to go on dates at a restaurant simply because he couldn’t hear the person he was with. He had to check online reviews and ask friends about the quiet spots around town. He began compiling a list of places that he would share with other people who had the same concerns. Before

long, he created Soundprint, an app billed as “like Yelp, but for sound.” Using one’s iPhone (Android options are being explored), people can measure sound in a restaurant, bar or cafe with a decibel meter, and the crowdsourced measurements are shown on a map. Users can look at the app and immediately see where quiet and loud businesses are located by the crowdsourced score, allowing them to decide whether it’s an establishment they’d like to visit. “(The app is raising) noise pollution awareness,” Scott said. “(Noise pollution is) an epidemic, and we’re making ourselves deaf. Places are getting louder and louder, and people think it’s normal. We want to raise awareness on what is a safe environment to have conversation in.” Soundprint is now in such major metropolitan areas as Chicago, New York, Las Vegas, Nashville, New Orleans and D.C. Scott has worked with restaurants in some of these areas to find solutions to their noise problems. Loud venues are also dangerous for employees who work for long periods of time, Scott said, and he hopes restaurants won’t see the app as an attack, but rather a quantifiable way to assess their noise levels. Daisies’ owner Joe Frillman said capital is hard to come by when you’re starting out and not part of a restaurant group. To address the volume of the neighborhood restaurant in Logan Square, he bought noise-reducing foam from Amazon. Within three days, it turned yellow. He scheduled an appointment with a professional and plans to have additional sound abatement products installed before cold weather sets in. In the meantime, Daisies doesn’t take reservations for parties of more than seven and has had some other absorption products installed until the restaurant can be fully outfitted with sound abatement products. “It’s becoming something a lot more people are paying attention to,” Frillman said. “If something is getting in the way of people having a great time there, there are so many restaurants. They can choose to go somewhere else. Unfortunately, something like noise might be enough for someone to not come back.”

Fall 2018 Hudson Valley Restaurant Week restaurant line-up revealed BEACON — The Valley Table magazine officially kicks off the beginning of fall 2018 Hudson Valley Restaurant Week (HVRW), revealing the nearly 200 participating restaurants. Running from Oct. 29Nov. 11, restaurants will feature their best dishes by way of three-course, prixfixe lunch ($22.95) and dinner ($32.95) menus. Hudson Valley Restaurant Week encompasses restaurants from Columbia, Dutchess, Orange,

van, Ulster and Westchester counties, spanning 114 miles. “The time of year where all of Hudson Valley’s counties come together to promote their restaurants and chefs is among the Valley’s most exciting and fulfilling,” says Publisher of The Valley Table and Founder of Hudson Valley Restaurant Week, Janet Crawshaw. “As The Valley Table continues to celebrate its 20th year, we remain com-

promoting the importance of the Hudson Valley’s restaurant and chef community as well as all of our amazing farms, wineries, purveyors and other local products.” The majority of participating chefs and restaurateurs use locally-sourced ingredients in support of area farms, winemakers, distillers, artisanal producers and purveyors. Of the nearly 200 participating restaurants, more than 15 restaurants are

Some of the new restaurants include: The Whitlock, offering hyperlocal cuisine in a modern farmhouse atmosphere in Westchester County; BLT Steak, serving guests American steakhouse fare in a bistro-like setting at The Ritz-Carlton Westchester; Cellaio, the recently opened, Italian-inspired steakhouse from celebrity chef Scott Conant, located at the Resorts World Catskills in Sullivan County and Farm-

County, providing a globally influenced menu, complete with seasonal and local ingredients offered in a casual setting. The complete list of participating restaurants is available here: valleytable. com/hvrw. Reservations are recommended at all Hudson Valley Restaurant Week restaurants. The Valley Table is responsible for producing Hudson Valley Restaurant Week, made possible by the support of commu-

Hudson Whiskey, Whitecliff Vineyards, Dutchess Tourism, Rockland County Tourism, Ulster County Tourism, Westchester County Tourism, The Culinary Institute of America, Angry Orchard, Pamal Broadcasting, The Poughkeepsie Media Group and The Journal News. Join the conversation with Hudson Valley Restaurant Week on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram with hashtag


CMYK

The Scene

To submit an event to The Scene, please send a press release and any artwork to scene@registerstar.com. Information should be sent 2 weeks prior to the publication date.

www.HudsonValley360.com

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

A10 Thursday, October 11, 2018

Helena Hernmarck: Weaving in Progress RIDGEFIELD, Conn. — The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is pleased to present Helena Hernmarck: Weaving In Progress, organized by The Aldrich’s interim co-director Richard Klein. In addition to exhibiting a selection of her work, Hernmarck, one of the most important contemporary figures in the evolving history of woven tapestries, will be in residence at the Museum from October 14, 2018, to January 13, 2019. The museum is located at 258 Main Street in Ridgefield, CT. Hernmarck began her career in the 1960s during an explosion of interest in fiber arts. Her innovations over the ensuing years are unsurpassed in visual imagery and technical innovation. Unlike many of her contemporaries, Hernmarck focused her practice on the pictorial, rather than sculptural form and abstraction. Influenced by pop culture, her mature style evolved into the creation of often-monumental tapestries that exhibit complex illusionary space and diverse subject matter, including trompe l’oeil, landscape, still life, and the human figure. Her primary technique, a discontinuous plain weave on top of which she hand picks a supplementary pattern weft, resembles computer pixels, enabling Hernmarck to produce images that expand the use of photographic imagery into territory that is both abstract and realistic. During Weaving in Progress, the gallery space will not only exhibit a selection of tapestries, but also function as a weaving studio. Three days a week, Hernmarck, and her apprentice Mae Colburn, will be working at the artist’s five-foot-wide Glimåkra Countermarch loom. An inventory of the

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Helena Hernmarck’s studio in Ridgefield, CT.

wool used in the process will be on view, along with a display of materials from the artist’s archive, including photographs, watercolors, drawings, prototype samples, and other ephemera that illustrate and inform Hernmarck’s process and the evolution of her career. The majority of the wool used in the tapestries is spun to her specifications at a family-run spinning mill in Sweden, and hand-dyed to reflect her color sensibilities. Visitors may touch and pick up the skeins of wool, amplifying the material nature of tapestry production. Weaving In Progress is the first solo exhibition of Hernmarck’s work in the United States since 2012 and will present twenty tapestries. Many of the works will be hung from the ceiling, so visitors can experience the complex three-dimensionality of her

weaving technique, and the unusual materials she sometimes uses, such as leftover sequin material. The exhibition will transform the Museum from a place of looking to a place of making, where the physicality of fiber is amplified by the presence of the artist’s hand. The sound of the loom’s beater being sharply pulled to compress each row of weft will fill the space and the evolving progress of the tapestry will encourage repeat visitation. Helena Hernmarck was born in Stockholm, Sweden in 1941. She lives and works in Ridgefield, Connecticut. A full-color, soft-cover scholarly publication with essays by Richard Klein and Mae Colburn will be available during the exhibition.

Lord’s Acre Auction at North Chatham United Methodist Church NORTH CHATHAM — The North Chatham United Methodist Church will be holding their 70th annual Lord’s Acre Auction and Sale on October 13th. The church is located at 4274 Route 203 in the hamlet of North Chatham. There will be a brief worship service at 8:00, with most departments opening at 8:30. The “White Elephant” department will open @ 10 and the auctioneer will start @ 11:00 sharp.

Plenty of FREE off-street parking is available and there is good food for sale all day. This is a great chance to pick up all kinds of bargains – clothing, shoes, Christmas & holiday items, linens, books, sporting goods & toys, antiques, housewares, brand new merchandise, electrical items, furniture, etc. Featured items under the auction tent include a 1917 Victrola with 50+ records, a 2005 Ford Taurus (167,000

miles) and some very nice furniture. Our website (northchathammethodistchurch.org) will have pictures of these items. If more “big things” come in we will post that information as well. Please keep checking, and come join us! For more information on the Lord’s Acre Auction and Sale or any of our other events and activities, please call 766-3535 or visit our website.

‘A Star Is Born’ revisits a Hollywood fable MOVIES TO WATCH R ‘A Star Is Born’ By Raymond Pignone Columbia-Greene Media

In “A Star Is Born,” the fourth iteration of the classic Hollywood cautionary rise-andfall fable, Lady Gaga steals the movie from co-star and director Bradley Cooper. It’s still a pretty good yarn, but the whole enterprise feels unnecessary. The pop diva’s flash and outrageousness in concert and her album-cover photos is played down here, but she succeeds in making the most of her character, a waitress named Ally who writes songs but is afraid to go on stage and sing them in front of an audience. Ally has a big nose and worries about it a lot. “They like the way I sound but they don’t like the way I look,” she says. Her father (Andrew Dice Clay excellent in a straight dramatic role) is her biggest champion; he instinctively recognizes her talent. When drunken countryrock star Jackson Maine (Cooper) stumbles into the drag bar where Ally performs “La Vie en Rose,” it’s love at first sight, and what a sight! Ally lies across the bar and slowly turns her kabuki face and arched eyebrows toward his. It’s Gaga’s finest moment in the film, turning what could have been camp into a powerful display of screen presence. Cooper wisely doesn’t sentimentalize the charismatic Jackson, whose dependency on booze and drugs is tearing him apart. Despite his popularity, he is self-destructive, and as his personality and talent disintegrate, his addictions intensify. Keeping him in line is his manager and brother, the gruff, resentful Bobby (Sam Elliott) who dutifully gets him to his concerts, cleans up his messes and smooths out the trouble he

CALENDAR LISTINGS

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

A Star Is Born is a 2018 American musical romantic drama film produced and directed by Bradley Cooper, in his directorial debut, and written by Cooper, Eric Roth and Will Fetters.

causes when he screws up. Jackson invites Ally to sing with him, takes her on tour and they fall in love, an occasion that evokes some strange dialogue. “If you don’t dig into your soul, you won’t have legs,” he tells her. His problem is that he did not dig far enough into his own soul. True to this durable tale, Maine’s career slides and Ally’s ascends. Ally is modest and deferential, but she has drive and ambition and Cooper the director deftly handles Ally’s transformation. Jackson is brought down by alcoholism, drug addiction and, as if these weren’t enough, a painful childhood and memories of an abusive father. His rehabilitation drags the film’s pace to a crawl and leaves a dull dramatic lapse in the plot. As a director (and co-writer), Cooper brings extraordinary authenticity to the film’s look and sound. The actor looks rugged and burnished like a high-living country-rock star and his onstage band is portrayed by Neil Young’s Promise of the Real. This “A Star Is Born” has dynamics and edges that the flat 1976 Barbra Streisand version lacked. Cooper captures the raw

excitement of live performance and the highs and lows the performers undergo. Jackson is losing his hearing. Inebriated and babbling, Jackson disgraces himself at a convincing recreation of a Grammy Awards show and there is an excruciating episode at a Roy Orbison tribute concert where Jackson struggles to play his guitar in tune.

Gaga is a natural talent — her star as a screen actress is born here — but the filmmakers blow an opportunity to make her provocative by playing it safe with her image and music. And Cooper can’t find an emotional equivalent to the moment from the 1954 Judy Garland version of “A Star Is Born” when a despondent James Mason walks into the sea and is swallowed up by the waves. The movie is not just about ambition, fame and self-destruction. It’s an exemplary love story. Cooper and Gaga bring a soulful chemistry and tenderness to their scenes together as Cooper weaves his camera around them in intimate closeups. “A Star Is Born” is a surprising if not original variation on an American cinematic fairy tale that has endured for more than 80 years. The basic heartbreaking situation is the same, but the filmmakers provide details that make it very much a movie of its time.

TSL Films n Five Seasons: The Gardens of Piet Oudolf — Revolutionary landscape designer Piet Oudolf is known for designing public works like New York City’s popular High Line and the Lurie Garden in Chicago’s Millennium Park that redeine our conception of gardens as works of art in themselves. This gorgeous, meditative documentary immerses viewers in his work, taking us inside Oudolf’s creative process. From his aesthetic theories to his strikingly abstract sketches to the ecological implications of his ideas, the ilm poetically reveals how Oudolf upends conventional notions of nature, public space, and, ultimately, beauty itself. In English and Dutch with subtitles. 2018. 1h 15 m. n Kusama: Ininity — The topselling female artist in the world, Yayoi Kusama overcame impossible odds to bring her radical artistic vision to the world stage. Kusama was an underdog with everything stacked against her: the trauma of growing up in Japan during World War II, life in a dysfunctional family that discouraged her creativity, sexism and racism in the art establishment, mental illness in a culture where that was particularly shameful, and even continuing to pursue her art full-time on the cusp of her 90s. In spite of it all, she has created a legacy that spans the disciplines of painting, sculpture, installation art, performance art, poetry, and literary iction. 2018. 1h 20 m. n Bisbee ’17 — A noniction feature ilm set in Bisbee, Arizona, an eccentric old mining town just miles away from both Tombstone and the Mexican border. Radically com-bining documentary, Western, and musical elements, the ilm follows several members of the close-knit community as they attempt to reckon with – and reenact – their town’s darkest hour. In 1917, nearly two-thousand immigrant miners, on strike for better wages and safer conditions, were violently rounded up by their armed neighbors, herded onto cattle cars, shipped to the middle of the New Mexican desert, and left there to die. This long-buried, and largely forgotten, event came to be known as the Bisbee Deportation. 2018. 2h 4 m. n Moynihan — Daniel Patrick Moynihan (1927-2003) did not just live in the twentieth century, he strode across it: a colossus of ideas and a man of deeds. He was an inluential intellectual and sociologist, policy specialist, ambassador and long-serving senator. In an age of rigid ideologies, he was a man who embraced the contradictions and complexity of public policy without ever despairing of the role of government in the lives of its citizens. Fifteen years after his death, as the nation sinks further into hyperpartisanship and politics has become dominated by the frenzy of social media, the irst feature length documentary about his life captures Moynihan as never before. 2018. 1h 44 m. n Ingmar Bergman Centennial: The Magic Flute (1975) — Celebrating Ingmar Bergman’s 100th birthday: Ingmar Bergman puts his indelible stamp on Mozart’s exquisite opera in this sublime rendering of one of the

composer’s best-loved works: a celebration of love, forgiveness, and the brotherhood of man. The Magic Flute (Trolllöjten) stars Josef Köstlinger as Tamino, the young man determined to rescue a beautiful princess from the clutches of parental evil. In Swedish with subtitles. 1975. 2h 25 m. n A Bread Factory • Part One — Celebrate our independent theater and the city of Hudson in a cinematic experience like no other. See A Bread Factory, the new ilm from writer-director Patrick Wang (In the Family, The Grief of Others), while sitting in the seats of the very theater where it was ilmed! And see it before it premieres in New York City and Los Angeles! Told in two ilms, A Bread Factory was shot in Hudson and at Time & Space Limited in 2017. It features a cast and crew from your neighborhood and beyond and takes its inspiration from the life story of TSL’s co-directors Linda Mussmann and Claudia Bruce. A Bread Factory Part One: For the Sake of Gold. After 40 years of running their community arts center, The Bread Factory, Dorothea (Tyne Daly) and Greta (Elisabeth Henry) are suddenly ighting for survival when a celebrity couple – performance artists from China – come to Checkford and build an enormous complex down the street catapulting big changes in their small town. 2h 2 m. n A Bread Factory • Part Two — Celebrate our independent theater and the city of Hudson in a cinematic experience like no other. See A Bread Factory, the new ilm from writer-director Patrick Wang (In the Family, The Grief of Others), while sitting in the seats of the very theater where it was ilmed! And see it before it premieres in New York City and Los Angeles! Told in two ilms, A Bread Factory was shot in Hudson and at Time & Space Limited in 2017. It features a cast and crew from your neighborhood and beyond and takes its inspiration from the life story of TSL’s co-directors Linda Mussmann and Claudia Bruce. Part Two: Walk With Me a While At The Bread Factory, Dorothea (Tyne Daly) and Greta (Elisabeth Henry) rehearse the Greek play, Hecuba. But the real theatrics are outside the theater where the town has been invaded by bizarre tourists and mysterious tech start-up workers. There is a new normal in Checkford, if it is even really Checkford any longer. 2h. n King of Hearts (1966) — During World War I, Scottish soldier Private Plumpick is sent on a mission to a French village to disarm a bomb set by the German army. He encounters a strange town occupied by the residents of the local psychiatric hospital who escaped after the villagers deserted. Assuming roles like Bishop, Duke, barber, and circus ringmaster, they warmly accept the visitor as their King of Hearts. With his bomb-defusing mission looming, Plumpick starts to prefer the acceptance of the insane locals over the insanity of the war raging outside. Since its debut, King of Hearts has become a worldwide cult favorite and stands out as one of Philippe de Broca’s most memorable ilms. Fifty years after its original release, this satirical look at the absurdities of war is presented in a gorgeous new restoration. In English, French, and German with subtitles. 1966. 1h 42 m.

DIRECTV NFL PACKAGE HERE!

Sunday & Monday Night

FOOTBALL SPECIALS! Boneless Chicken Wings (Just $5 per order!) FREE PIZZA • $2 Draft Pints

Oct. 5th thru Oct. 14th 866-811-4111 | 518-758-1648

3rd Generation Owned & Operated

Open 7 Days A Week 646 Albany Turnpike, Old Chatham, NY www.jacksonsoldchathamhouse.com (518) 794-7373 EST. 1943

Try our famous Prime Rib! Wed, Fri, Sat, Sun

TheTwoOfUsProductions.org Performing Arts Center at Taconic Hills The event is made possible (in part) with public inds from the Decentralization Progrma of the New York State Council on the Arts, administered in Columbia County by the Greena County Council on the Arts.


CMYK

The Scene

To submit an event to The Scene, please send a press release and any artwork to scene@registerstar.com. Information should be sent 2 weeks prior to the publication date.

www.HudsonValley360.com

Thursday, October 11, 2018 A11

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

Havest Festival with the 77th NY Regimental Balladeers GLEN — The Glen Conservancy and the 77th NY Regimental Balladeers will host Harvest Fest in the hamlet of Glen, Saturday, October 13, 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Events will take place in and around Conservancy Hall at 1538 Route 161 in Glen, 4 miles south of Fultonville and will include activities at the Glen Cottage Farms, and at the Rustic Red House at the Glen Country Store at the confluence of Routes 30A and 161. Please join us! The first Fall Music and Harvest festival in the tiny hamlet of Glen will be a celebration in honor of the generous spirit of singer/songwriter Balladeer John Kenosian. Many instances of his donations of time and “self” will live on in Conservancy Hall, evidenced in its physical support and in its legacy of

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

1840s Conservancy Hall and Glen Harvest Festival poster.

musical support and encouragement. Join Conservancy Hall and the 77th NY Regimental Balladeers on Saturday October 13 from 11-4. 11:00 - 2:00: There will be face painting offered by Crystal Palmieri at Tracie’s Glen

Cottage Farms across the street from the Hall, where Tracie Soper, Glen’s local farmer/florist will be hosting flower arranging and will have cut flowers and pumpkins for sale. Sharon Quinn and Maxine Getty will guide you in pumpkin

painting at Conservancy Hall from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Shari Cramer Crawford will have an assortment of delightful games for children on the lawn near The Rustic Red House at the Glen Country Store, which will be open with gifts, candy and snacks and special offerings for the day. Many of you will be familiar with Shari’s delightful period games provided at re-enactments and special events in museums around the Mohawk Valley. 2:00-4:00 The 77th Regimental Balladeers will present a concert in Conservancy Hall in honor of John Kenosian, followed by a dance led by Shari Crawford. Join the hamlet and the Balladeers in a day of celebration of a life that touched hearts with his music, his art, his humor, and love.

CALENDAR LISTINGS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14 TSL Films n A Whale of a Tale — In 2010, Taiji, a sleepy ishing town in Japan, suddenly found itself in the worldwide media spotlight. The Cove, a documentary denouncing the town’s longstanding whale and dolphin hunting traditions, won an Academy Award. Almost overnight, Taiji became a battleground for activists from around the world. Can a proud 400-yearold whaling tradition survive a tsunami of modern animal-rights activism and colliding forces of globalism vs. localism? A Whale of a Tale reveals the complex story behind the ongoing debate. Told through a wide range of characters including local ishermen, international activists, and an American journalist, this powerful documentary unearths a deep divide in Eastern and Western thought about nature and cultural sensitivity in the face of global activism. In English and Japanese with subtitles. 2018. 1h 36 m. n Schedule and tickets at 518822-8448 or www.timeandspace. org – Time & Space Limited., 434 Columbia Street

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11

Driving Miss Daisy by Alfred Uhry CATSKILL – Catskill’s beloved Flo Hayle takes the wheel to direct a two-weekend run of Alfred Uhry’s heart-warming 1988 Pulitzer Prize-winning drama “Driving Miss Daisy”, parking itself at Bridge Street Theatre for eight performances only, Thursdays through Sundays from October 11-21, 2018. Atlanta, Georgia, 1948. An elderly Jewish widow named Daisy Werthan has just totaled her new car and her insurance company has declared her a high risk. While she’s determined to maintain her independence, her son Boolie insists she get herself a driver, and he hires an African-American man named Hoke Colburn to be her chauffeur. And though the relationship gets off to a rocky start, these two very different people gradually develop a close mutual friendship, one that transcends both

Friday Oct 19 @ 7:30pm Saturday Oct 20 @ 7:30pm Sunday Oct 21 @ 2:00pm (Special Benefit Performance for the Town and Country Women’s Network Scholarship Fund)

TICKETS

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

the racial prejudices of the time and all the societal changes that occur over the 20-plus years Hoke spends ‘driving Miss Daisy’. Featured in this production are local actors Lora Lee Ecobelli as Daisy, Paul Carter as Hoke, and Tony Pallone as Boolie. The play is directed by Flo Hayle, with sets and lighting designed by John Sowle, and costumes by Michelle

Rogers. Production Stage Manager is Frank Dianda.

PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE Thursday Oct 11 @ 7:30pm (“Pay What You Will” preview) Friday Oct 12 @ 7:30pm (Opening Night) Saturday Oct 13 @ 7:30pm Sunday Oct 14 @ 2:00pm (“Pay What You Will” matinee) Thursday Oct 18 @ 7:30pm

Advance tickets available at https://driving.brownpapertickets.com by calling 800-8383006. Advance tickets are $22, $10 for students. Tickets can also be purchased at the door prior to each performance (on a space available basis) for $25, $10 for Students. Tickets for the Special Benefit Performance on Sunday October 21 are $35 and include a pre-show reception at 1:00pm. Contact Joan Young at 518-943-4992, Tammy Anderson at 518-728-4340, or Ellen De Lucia at 518-943-1836 or ellendelucia@yahoo.com for reservations.

Driving Miss Daisy 44 West Bridge Street, Catskill 518-943-3818 Catskill’s beloved Flo Hayle returns to the director’s chair for a two-weekend run of Alfred Uhry’s heart-warming 1988 Pulitzer Prize-winning drama “Driving Miss Daisy”. It’s 1948 and Daisy Werthan, an elderly Jewish widow living in Atlanta, has just crashed her car. Though she’s determined to maintain her independence, her son Boolie hires her a chauffeur, an AfricanAmerican man named Hoke Colburn, who spends the next 25 years “driving Miss Daisy”. With Lora Lee Ecobelli as Daisy, Paul Carter as Hoke, and Tony Pallone as Boolie. Eight performances only, October 11-21, Thursdays through Saturdays at 7:30pm and Sundays at 2:00. Bridge Street Theatre, 44 West Bridge Street, Catskill, NY. General Admission $25, Students 21 and under $10. Discounted advance tickets available at driving.brownpapertickets. com or by calling 800-838-3006. Tickets will also be sold at the door one half hour prior to each performance subject to availability. For more details, visit BridgeSt.org.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12

‘The Seussification of Romeo and Juliet’ HUNTER — The Hunter Tannersville Central School District theater department will be performing a comedy play, The Seussification of Romeo and Juliet, in the MS/ HS gym on Thursday, Oct 18th @ 7 p.m, Friday, October 19th @ 7 p.m. and Saturday,

October 20th @ 2 p.m. Ticket prices are: Priority seating $10, Adult $8, Students and Seniors $5. This Seussified adaptation of Shakespeares classic Romeo and Juliet, is full of Dr. Seuss rhyme, color, and humor appropriate for the whole family! What was

once a tragic love story, is altered with an ending that includes a Sneetch machine, to prove that love is more powerful than hate! Please come out to support the hard work of the theater students directed by an HTC senior, Elizabeth Czermerys.

Indie-rock legends The Feelies bring their punk-infused sound back to Club Helsinki HUDSON — Having formed in 1976, The Feelies date back to the first generation of punkrock. Their melodic guitars, manic vocals, and strippeddown sound — itself influenced largely by the Velvet Underground and Television — would go on to influence legions of alternative rock, collegiate rock, and indie-rock groups, including R.E.M., Talking Heads, the Violent Femmes, Yo La Tengo, and the Replacements, although mainstream success forever eluded the Hoboken, N.J.-based group dubbed by the Village Voice in 1978 “the best underground band in New York.” For me, the video for “Sooner or Later” perfectly captures that sound that launched a thousand bands. Supporting the release of their first four albums, the band appeared on the “The Late Show with David Letterman” and in concerts with the Patti Smith Group, R.E.M., and Bob Dylan, as well as touring with Lou Reed. The group even appeared in Jonathan Demme’s 1986 film, “Something Wild,” portraying a party band playing a cover of David Bowie’s “Fame.” The Feelies have always been

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

masters of rock minimalism, combining basic, repetitive riffs with soaring vocal melodies (or talk-sung lyrics) and sinuous, catchy guitar lines, as in “Let’s Go” and “The Boy With the Perpetual Nervousness.” The group’s rocky career saw them sporadically release albums and play shows throughout the 1980s until they first called it quits in 1992. They regrouped in 2008, and since then they’ve been regulars on the indie-rock club circuit, having released several new albums, including last year’s “In Between,” which Pitchfork

called “as precise and efficient as it is casual and comfortable” while describing the group’s telegraphic interplay thusly: “They’re masters at weaving their moving parts into a kinetic whole.” Glenn Mercer did an in-depth interview with Paste Magazine on the occasion of the album’s release. The group is still led by founding guitarists and songwriters Glenn Mercer and Bill Million. In this article by my old pal Jim Sullivan, former rock critic at the Boston Globe, he explores the strange phenomenon of why the Feelies actually rarely play

out, much less tour. The Feelies celebrated their 40th anniversary two years ago with a concert at the Great Hall at Woodlands in Maplewood, N.J. In addition to a journey through the band’s own music, the setlist included covers of songs by Buddy Holly, the Rolling Stones, Jonathan Richman, the Beatles, the Velvet Underground, the Doors ... even Neil Diamond. And Yo La Tengo showed up to join in during the encores and help celebrate their fellow indie-rockers. And you can watch the entire 2+ hour affair here. If you’ve only got a half-hour to spare, check them out in this 35-minute set at Vintage Vinyl. If you’ve never seen the Feelies, then do yourself a favor and catch these legends in concert while you still can. If you’ve already seen them, well then, I know I’ll see you there! Remember - for reservations in The Restaurant or in the club call 518.828.4800. To purchase tickets online go here For the most up-to-date concert information, always visit Club Helsinki Hudson.

Copake’s Haunted House 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. Copake Community Center 305 Mountain View Road, Copake Theme: Bloody Demons!!! Come out, if you dare, to our Haunted House... enjoy a hayride after (weather permitting). Treats for everyone! $3 – $5 Bobby Previte’s All-Star Rhapsody Band 7 p.m. Hudson Hall 327 Warren Street, Hudson (518) 822-1438 www.hudsonhall.org Rhapsody (Terminals Part II: In Transit) Drummer/Composer Bobby Previte returns to Hudson Hall with an all-star band, including Wilco guitarist Nels Cline, keyboardist John Medeski of Medeski Martin and Wood, Zeena Parkins, who’s played harp with artists ranging from Bjork to John Zorn, saxophonist extraordinaire Fabian Rucker, and critically acclaimed vocalist and multi-instrumentalist, Jen Shyu. An acoustic song cycle featuring musicians better known for their electric work, RHAPSODY draws on non-jazz genres to deliver a meditation on what it means to be “in transit,” both as a traveler and a migrant. $30 – $35 Mamma Mia! 7:30 p.m. Taconic Hills Performing Arts Center 73 County Route 11A, Craryville 518-325-2800 www.taconichills.k12.ny.us/ Page/205 The Two Of Us Productions is proud to present a full-orchestra production of the smash feelgood musical MAMMA MIA. $15 – $20 The Father 8 p.m. The Ghent Playhouse 6 Town Hall Place, Ghent 800-838-3006 www.ghentplayhouse.org

Set in a Paris apartment, this mystery play brings its audience inside the mind of an elderly man with dementia. Laced with humor, the play has the audience constantly questioning the truth and nature of reality. Winner of France’s 2014 Moliere Award for Best Play and nominated for Broadway’s 2016 Tony Award for Best Play, THE FATHER makes its regional premiere at the Ghent Playhouse. $10 – $22 The Insolent Willies 8 p.m. - 11 p.m. Chatham Brewing 59 Main Street, Chatham 518-697-0202 www.chathambrewing.com Live music... enjoy along with some beer and eats! Punk-Infused Indie-Rock 9 p.m. Club Helsinki 405 Columbia Street, Hudson 518-828-4800 www.helsinkihudson.com Indie-rock legends The Feelies bring their twin-guitar attack and punk-infused sound to Hudson! Having formed in 1976, The Feelies date back to the irst generation of punk-rock. Their melodic guitars, manic vocals, and stripped-down sound – itself inluenced largely by the Velvet Underground and Television — would go on to inluence legions of alternative rock, collegiate rock, and indie-rock groups, including R.E.M., Talking Heads, the Violent Femmes, Yo La Tengo, and the Replacements, although mainstream success forever eluded the Hoboken, N.J.-based group dubbed by the Village Voice in 1978 “the best underground band in New York.” Supporting the release of their irst four albums, the band appeared on the “The Late Show with David Letterman” and in concerts with the Patti Smith Group, R.E.M., and Bob Dylan, as well as touring with Lou Reed. The group’s rocky career saw them sporadically release albums and play shows throughout the 1980s until they irst called it quits in 1992. They regrouped in 2008, and since then they’ve been regulars on the indie-rock club circuit, having released several new albums, including last year’s “In Between.” The group is still led by founding guitarists and songwriters Glenn Mercer and Bill Million. $25 – $30 Steampunk Halloween Part 1 348 Sunside Road, East Durham 518-634-2541 From the group that brought you The Steampunk World’s Fair (the world’s largest Steampunk event!) and The Wicked Winter Renaissance Faire....comes an incredible Halloween vacation! Incredible meals! Lovely lodgings! A little Halloween village! All manner of things dark and wonderful! Performers! Vendors! An onpremise haunted house! * FIVE lovely gourmet meals, including a wondrous Halloween ball - Friday buffet, Saturday breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and Sunday brunch! * Accommodations for both nights* All the entertainment* Unlimited Haunted House time* Wonderful vendors* And all manner of Halloween delights All for $150 per person for the WHOLE weekend - that’s INCREDIBLE! It’s an allinclusive vacation weekend! Discovering Johannesburg Jazz 6093 Main Street, Tannersville 716-696-2823 The musical spirit of Johannesburg and Durban comes to the mountaintop in this night of South African jazz featuring two of the genre’s most respected masters, reedman McCoy Mrubata and pianist Paul Hanmer, in a celebration of 30 years of friendship and musical collaboration. This duo comes to Tannersville straight from Jazz at Lincoln Center to bring the sounds of South Africa to our mountaintop following their 2014 and 2016 residency performances with Catskill Jazz Factory! Free admission & All ages encouraged S’mores Pop-Up with Fruition Chocolate at West Kill Brewing 2173 Spruceton Road, Westkill 518-989-6001 Get ready for Halloween and join us on October 13th for an afternoon of roasting S’mores over the ire at West Kill Brewing. Catskills-based Fruition Chocolate will be in the house with their award-winning chocolates along with homemade graham crackers and marshmallows! We will also have some special *taproom only* chocolate beers available to sip along aside the s’mores!


CMYK

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA • THE DAILY MAIL

A12 Thursday, October 11, 2018

New jail From A1

gated the cost of a temporary facility. In addition to paying $4,200 a month for rent, the building must be returned to pre-existing conditions according to the contract, Lennon said. “We don’t have a full, comprehensive report on what it is going to cost to occupy the building and put it back the way it was,” Lennon said. Legislators Michael Bulich, R-Catskill, and Charles Martinez, R-Coxsackie, plan to renegotiate the rent, they said. The state Commission of Corrections recommended security improvements estimated to cost about $50,000, Greene County Administrator Shaun Groden said. “We have to replace the doors with metal ones, change the lighting and the ceiling,” he said. “With everything included, it will be in the sixfigure range. We will have a full

Molinaro From A1

This information was not listed on Molinaro’s financial disclosure forms, according to the legislators. “Nonetheless, County Executive Molinaro’s financial disclosure statements filed for 2015 and 2016 never identified his relationship with Tinkleman or his wife’s employment with that company that he personally was involved in awarding at least one county contract,” according to a letter submitted to the state Attorney General’s office.

Trees From A1

sionally planted, she said. The Tree Committee is spearheading this effort. “It could be as many as 51 trees, but that’s a goal,” she said. “It’s going to form a really solid foundation going forward.” The arborist and members of Cornell Cooperative Extension of Columbia and Greene counties will have a say on the planting of trees. The new trees can’t be planted over a cut-down tree because the stump has a network of roots below ground, Censor said. “We are certainly trying to put trees on South Franklin Street where there are holes,” Censor said. Trees won’t be planted near residents’ homes who don’t want them, she added. “Not everyone wants a tree planted,” Censor said. “We intend to work closely with homeowners to plant trees where they’re welcome.”

TREE-CUTTING REVIEWED Michael Black, of Athens, shared his concerns at a Sept. 26 village board meeting about the way a honey locust tree was trimmed in front of his Second Street property. The arborist determined the tree was cut improperly, Black said Wednesday. “A gentler approach could have saved part of the tree at least,” Black said. “I have many decades of experience with trees and tree culture.” The tree committee and Mayor Peter Alberti reviewed the way the tree was cut. The arborist determined it was the proper way and he showed village Public Works Department Superintendent Anthony Proper how to do it, Alberti said. “This is the proper way to trim it — end of story,” Alberti said. “I’m not here to argue with you tonight because if you keep arguing with me, we’re done.” Black disagreed and showed a picture of the tree cut down. A projecting stump makes a tree more susceptible to rotting, Black said. “If it’s cut too close to the limb, when it grows out, it has a

estimate by our next meeting.” Repairs to the old holding facility on Bridge Street in Catskill include new heating, water and sewer systems. “It would be about $300,000 and we would still need a temporary location while the repairs were made,” Groden said. “Why pay for it twice?” Some legislators wondered about what other options are out there. Martinez suggested the county purchased the building. “Have we looked into portable units?” Bulich said. “This was not an exhaustive search,” Groden said. “We have to move because of the weather. We moved quickly — this building was available, it meets the requirements. We’re running against the clock.” Getting buildings approved by the state Commission of Corrections takes time, Groden said. Greene County Sheriff Greg Seeley will maintain an office in the Greene County Office Building at 411 Main St.

in Catskill. The sheriff’s office will also have a satellite location on the second floor of the Greenville Pioneer building, 11184 Route 32, Greenville. Groden expects the county will be in the new facility by Dec. 31, he said, adding demolishing the old jail is less time-sensitive time pressure and the process will be less costly if the decision is not divided, Groden said. “Why don’t we give it away for $1 and let someone else worry about it?” Martinez said. “I think if you’re looking for a consensus, we want to move to the temporary facility and demo all the buildings,” said Legislator Aidan O’Connor Jr., D-Durham. The state Historic Preservation Office may deem that the buildings surrounding the old jail have historic value, Groden said. “They’re old, but are they historical?” Groden asked. “I expect the carriage house will live and we will redevelop after the other three come down. It will probably start out as a

parking lot and then become a new county building.” If the house was to be saved, it would be tricky because it is

attached to the old jail, Groden said. “It would have to be rehabbed to come up to code,”

he added. Groden expects the county will send the demolition project to bid in the spring.

It was discovered that Molinaro’s wife works for Tinkleman after Molinaro released one year of his tax returns as required of political office, and his wife’s income and employer were listed on the return, according to the legislators. “Our hope in the caucus is that these allegations will be explored promptly and thoroughly so we can see what an investigation might or might not reveal,” Dutchess County Legislator Nick Page said. “I don’t want to comment beyond that at this point.” “If the allegations that led to this complaint are true, I don’t know that the county executive has a sense of ethics

and ethical standards that are what the voters in Dutchess County want in the way of leadership,” Dutchess County Legislator Frits Zernike said. The state Attorney General’s Office and Joint Commission on Public Ethics declined to comment on Wednesday. “By law, I cannot comment on anything that is or may be an investigative matter before the Commission,” said Walter McClure, director of communications and public information officer. Katy Delgado, a spokeswoman for the Molinaro campaign, called the allegations “pathetic and groundless.” “Twenty-seven days before an election, the most corrupt

governor in New York history engineers a fake political hit against a modest local businessman and talented, decent woman using Dutchess County Democrats. Andrew Cuomo is even uglier and more morally corrupt than we thought.” The allegations drew fury from some Republicans who said Cuomo has his own allegations of corruption to address. “The pervasive culture of corruption that has defined Gov. Cuomo’s term in office has been toxic and costly to New Yorkers,” Assemblyman Chris Tague, R-102, said in a statement. “For the governor’s political allies to peddle

a story in an effort to deflect from Mr. Cuomo’s inability or unwillingness to own up to the very corruption under his watch is shameful and pathetic.” U.S. Rep. John Faso, R-19, agreed. “This is a manufactured scandal, promoted by supporters of Gov. Cuomo,” Faso said in a statement. “Gov. Cuomo is the last person who should be making ethical allegations, given the convictions for corruption of some of his closest aides and advisors.” Dani Lever, a spokesperson for Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the allegations against Molinaro need to be taken seriously.

“Marc’s campaign is a joke, but these allegations are serious and nobody knows more about the rampant pay to play politics in the Molinaro administration than members of the Dutchess County Legislature,” Lever said. “It is no surprise that John Faso is coming to the defense of Trump mini-me Molinaro – he has done nothing but aid and abet Donald Trump in his sabotage of the people of New York.”

said. The village board has been proactive about the trees since neighbors expressed anger over a historic oak tree on South Franklin Street that was cut down June 14, 2017, Alberti said. “This board has been very nice for the past year and a half with trees,” Alberti said. “My temperament is beyond belief. Keep in mind, this board did not want this the way it went — the public did.” Black was shocked by what he believed was aggressive behavior on Alberti’s part. “I tried to be polite and respectful,” Black said. “I was stunned by it — I didn’t know what to say or how to respond.”

Michael Black, of Athens, discusses his concerns about the way a tree was trimmed in front of his Second Street property with the village board.

SARAH TRAFTON/COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

Greene County sheriff’s deputies were in the audience Tuesday while lawmakers discussed relocating the sheriff’s office processing and holding area at the legislature’s Public Safety Committee meeting.

To reach reporter Amanda Purcell, call 518-828-1616 ext. 2500, or send an email to apurcell@ thedailymail.net, or tweet to @ amandajpurcell.

DANIEL ZUCKERMAN/COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

AFTERMATH The arborist advised the village board and Proper not to cut inside a tree’s root collar because it’s better for the tree’s health, Bradicich said, adding Black’s point was valid. “When you’re doing a lot of trees, you want to err towards leaving a few inches of branch remaining because it’s healthier for the tree,” Bradicich said. “I know what Anthony did was in keeping with the directions the arborist gave.” Not every resident will be

happy with trees coming down, Bradicich said Monday. “It makes sense to do it in an intelligent way,” he said. “People care a lot about it. It speaks to their property values.” The village board has used the survey as a road map of what trees can be cut down, Black said, adding the village has an anti-tree bias. “They seized on it as an excuse to remove trees,” he said. “This is the largest tree removal program I have seen.”

NOTICE! NOTICE! NOTICE!

Hudson Register-Star / Catskill Daily Mail Advertising Deadlines... Publication Date

Deadline Display

Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

Classiied Line Ad

Fri. Noon Mon. 10am Mon. Noon Tues. 10am Tues. Noon Wed. 10am Wed. Noon Thurs. 10am Thurs. Noon Fri. 10am

To place Display ad, call (518) 828-1616 ext. 2463 To place a Classiied Ad call (800)

724-0401

Black plans to bring up the issue of tree-trimming again with village trustees but on a more face-to-face basis. “One hopes for a more enCONTRIBUTED PHOTO lightened approach, but I’m not seeing that amongst a larger The stump of a honey locust tree in front of Michael Black’s home in Athens. group of people,” Black said.


CMYK

Sports

Brantley on the move?

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

& Classifieds

Indians free agents, including Catskill native’s son, unsure of future.Sports, B2

SECTION

B Thursday, October 11, 2018 B1

Brian Radewitz, Sports Editor: 1-800-400-4496 / sports@registerstar.com or sports@thedailymail.net

Criswell, Greenville continue dominance on pitch CAIRO — Behind Bergen Criswell’s fourth hat trick of the season, and third straight game, the Greenville Spartans extended their winning streak to seven games with a 5-2 victory over Cairo-Durham on Tuesday in Patroon Conference boys soccer action. Greenville opened the scoring with senior Jude Kappel netting his first goal of the season, however, from there it was all Criswell. The senior striker scored minutes later to put the Spartans up 2-0. With over 15 minutes remaining in the first half, Criswell struck again, poking a shot past keeper Robert Lampan for his second goal of the day. The Mustangs responded with Joey Arp knifing through Greenville defense en route to booting a shot past a diving Morgan Gergen to make it a 3-1 game heading into halftime. In the second period it was all Greenville. The Spartans maintained possession and controlled the game for the better part of the second half. Continuing the attack, Criswell netted his third goal of the game in the 50th minute to put the Spartans up 4-1. Greenville capped their scoring after sophomore midfielder James Mitchell was fouled in the box, granting him a penalty kick that he slotted past Lampman. Cairo-Durham scored one last time with under 10 minutes left in the game. A direct kick attempt by Noah Warner was saved by Gergen, but Ethan Phillips gathered the rebound off the save and poked it past Gergen. With the game in hand, in the final three minutes Mitchell was handed a red card after growing frustrated with the referees’ non-calls. With the red card, Mitchell will be out in Greenville’s next game against Hudson, but will return for the final game of the season on Saturday versus Maple Hill. Greenville outshot CairoDurham 33-6 and Gergen finished with five saves while Lampman stopped 12 shots. Greenville (9-5, 9-3) travels to Hudson while Cairo-Durham (0-13, 0-12) hosts Chatham on Thursday at 4:15 p.m. COLONIAL BOYS SOCCER Albany Academy 2, Ichabod Crane 1 ALBANY — The Icha-

JUSTIN PORRECA/COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

Greenville’s Aidan O’Connor and Cairo-Durham’s Armando Salvatore battle for possession in the corner during the second half in Patroon Conference boys soccer action.

bod Crane Riders saw their 10-game winning streak come to a close on Tuesday with a 2-1 defeat at the hands of the Albany Academy Cadets in Colonial Council boys soccer action. Crane senior Giovanni Gomez scored the lone goal for the Riders. Academy’s Connor Smith and Niko Moutopolous provided the goals for the Cadets. Despite the loss, Ichabod Crane held a 10-6 shots on goal advantage. Keeper Spencer Bates finished with four saves. Ichabod Crane (13-2, 12-2) hosts Schalmont today at 6;30 p.m. in the season finale. CHVL BOYS SOCCER New Lebanon 4, Germantown 1 GERMANTOWN — New Lebanon spoiled senior night for Germantown on Tuesday as the Tigers picked up a 4-1 win in CHVL varsity boys soccer. Germantown and New Lebanon stayed even up until the

less than 2 minutes in the first half when Tigers’ James Lambert shot past the keeper. New Lebanon lead at half 1-0. In the second half, New Lebanon added three more goals by Liam McDonald, Cole Keating and Paulinho Scolari. Germantown scored its lone goal off a corner kick by Dylan Mayr. Germantown plays its last league game against Bishop Maguinn on Thursday. PATROON GIRLS SOCCER Greenville 3, Catskill 1 CATSKILL — Greenville clipped Catskill 3-1 in Patroon Conference varsity girls soccer on Tuesday. The Lady Spartans saw three different players find nylon, with Morgan Whitbeck, Meghan Misuraca and Morgan Holznagel socring. Holznagel and Alexis Caprio also contributed assists. Maci Mosher scored the lone goal of the day for the Lady Cats. See LOCAL B3

JUSTIN PORRECA/COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

Cairo-Durham defender Dennis Thorpe goes to clear the ball out of Mustang territory as Greenville’s Aidan O’Connor steps in front to block the attempt.

Albany Empire add veteran coach to staff

CELEBRATING SENIORS

By Jordan Lomaestro For Columbia-Greene Media

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Germantown seniors pose for a photo including, from left, captain Riley Griffin, captain Shane Dunn, captain Jeremy Cosenza, Victor Rucco, B Southerland and coach Ryan Broast.

ALBANY — The Albany Empire announced that twotime ArenaBowl champion, Dave Ewart, will join the coaching staff for the 2019 season as Director of Player Personnel and Line Coach. Ewart has coached on eight different teams over a span of two decades in the Arena Football League. “I have been fortunate enough to be around this league for a long time,” Ewart said. “I’ve had many great battles in Albany over the years and have heard so many great things about what the organization is doing. When I got the call from Coach Keefe, it brought back the fire to get back at it!” Albany brings back fond memories for Ewart as he picked up his first ever win as a head coach in the Arena League here in the Capital Region at the helm of the St. Louis Stampede. The veteran skipper began his coaching career in college football at both East Tennessee State and Glenville State

College before making his way into the AFL as a Defensive and Offensive Coordinator with the Cleveland Thunderbolts in 1994. Ewart was a member of the Tampa Bay coaching staff in 2003 when he won his first ArenaBowl Championship, with his second championship coming 11 years later as a member of the Arizona Rattlers. “The experience that Dave brings to the Empire and his rapport with the players are unparalleled,” said Rob Keefe, Head Coach of the Albany Empire. “We now have three ArenaBowl winning head coaches on our staff. Dave brings a wealth of knowledge to the team and compliments the culture that we are trying to build within the organization both on and off the field.” The Empire also announce that two coaches from the 2018 inaugural season, Chris Thompson and Beau Bell, will not be returning to the Empire in 2019. Most recently, Ewart See ALBANY B3


CMYK

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

B2 Thursday, October 11, 2018

Impending free agents in Indians clubhouse discuss futures MICHAEL BRANTLEY UNSURE OF NEXT MOVE By Ryan Lewis Akron Beacon Journal

CLEVELAND — Following the 11-3 loss to the Houston Astros on Monday, Josh Tomlin walked over to Michael Brantley’s locker and sat down to quietly chat in a clubhouse meeting of two of the longesttenured players with the Indians who, once the postseason ends, will both be free agents with uncertain futures. Because, after all, this could be it. Tomlin has been walking around that Progressive Field home clubhouse since 2010, when he broke in as a rookie. Brantley has been roaming that room, in parts, since 2009. Nobody knows if they’ll be back. Nobody knows if it’s the last time they’ll wear that Indians uniform. Nobody knows if it’s the final time they’ll pack up their stuff after a home game in Cleveland. After nearly a decade, their Cleveland tenure might have just ended at the hands of the Astros and a threegame sweep in the American League Division Series. Yonder Alonso slowly joined them, slumping down in the corner and sitting on the floor. A few moments later, Yan Gomes pulled up a chair, forming a mini-circle. The four veterans talked amongst themselves, having already fulfilled their media responsibilities. They were free of the rush of media members crisscrossing the room and out of the way of the clubhouse attendants zipping around and helping others pack up their clothes and belongings. Now, it was just them and the end of a long season and a short, sudden postseason. But, they didn’t want to leave the clubhouse, the season and potentially their teammates behind. Not yet. It was too soon. Brantley took several moments to look out over the

NHL Eastern Conference Atlantic Division GP W L OT SO Pts Toronto 4 3 1 0 0 6 Boston 3 2 1 0 0 4 Bufalo 3 2 1 0 0 4 Montreal 2 1 0 1 0 3 Ottawa 3 1 1 1 0 3 Tampa Bay 1 1 0 0 0 2 Detroit 3 0 1 1 1 2 Florida 1 0 0 0 1 1 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT SO Pts Carolina 4 3 0 1 0 7 NY Islanders 3 2 1 0 0 4 Columbus 3 2 1 0 0 4 Washington 2 1 0 1 0 3 New Jersey 1 1 0 0 0 2 Pittsburgh 2 1 1 0 0 2 Philadelphia 3 1 2 0 0 2 NY Rangers 3 0 3 0 0 0 Western Conference Central Division GP W L OT SO Pts Chicago 3 2 0 1 0 5 Dallas 3 2 1 0 0 4 Colorado 3 2 1 0 0 4 Winnipeg 3 2 1 0 0 4 Nashville 3 2 1 0 0 4 Minnesota 2 0 1 0 1 1 St. Louis 2 0 1 1 0 1 Paciic Division GP W L OT SO Pts Anaheim 3 3 0 0 0 6 Calgary 3 2 1 0 0 4 San Jose 4 2 2 0 0 4 Los Angeles 3 1 1 1 0 3 Vancouver 3 1 2 0 0 2 Vegas 3 1 2 0 0 2 Edmonton 1 0 1 0 0 0 Arizona 2 0 2 0 0 0 Monday’s games Boston 6, Ottawa 3 NY Islanders 4, San Jose 0 Bufalo 4, Vegas 2 Anaheim 3, Detroit 2, SO Tuesday’s games San Jose 8, Philadelphia 2 Carolina 5, Vancouver 3 Columbus 5, Colorado 2 Calgary 3, Nashville 0 Winnipeg 2, Los Angeles 1 Toronto 7, Dallas 4 Wednesday’s games Philadelphia at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m. Vegas at Washington, 8 p.m. Arizona at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Thursday’s games Edmonton at Boston, 7 p.m. Colorado at Bufalo, 7 p.m. Columbus at Florida, 7 p.m. Washington at New Jersey, 7 p.m. San Jose at NY Rangers, 7 p.m. Vegas at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. Toronto at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Vancouver at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. Calgary at St. Louis, 8 p.m. Winnipeg at Nashville, 8 p.m. Chicago at Minnesota, 8 p.m.

clubhouse, viewing all the activity. His locker is the last one leading to the hallway that snakes back to the showers and dining area, one that in a way overlooks the entire room if turned that direction. He might not be returning to it. Someone else might occupy this sought-after locker next spring, and Brantley could find a new home elsewhere. “This has been an honor,” Brantley said when asked for his takeaway if this was his final Indians game. “It’s been an honor to wear that uniform, it’s been an honor, every player I’ve played with in this organization, for all the help everybody gave me, it was always appreciated. It will never be forgotten.” Tomlin’s future is entirely up in the air. There’s no doubt manager Terry Francona would love to retain Tomlin, but it would have to be a very team-friendly deal. Tomlin has gritted his way through nine major-league seasons and who played a role in the Indians clawing and scratching their way to the World Series with a depleted pitching staff. For Tomlin, it was all about the personal relationships that were built. The pitchers he helped as a veteran. The guys he saw every day in the summer for so many years. The daily Cribbage matches with Francona. On and on. It’s part of the reason he sat down near Brantley’s locker. He wasn’t ready to walk out of that room. “The family aspect of it,” Tomlin said when asked what has stood out during his time in Cleveland, if this is indeed the end. “I played with a bunch of these guys for 7-8 years now. Knowing all of our time might be coming to an end here regardless of what happens next year, there’s a pretty good chance not all of us are coming back. So, you take a minute and

Major League Baseball GF GA 20 17 10 10 7 7 7 4 11 13 2 1 6 10 1 2 GF GA 17 11 9 5 9 7 13 7 5 2 8 11 9 15 8 14 GF GA 15 14 12 8 11 8 8 7 7 8 2 6 5 10 GF GA 9 4 12 9 13 13 7 7 12 14 6 10 2 5 0 4

Golf PGA TOUR CIMB CLASSIC WHEN & WHERE: Oct. 11-14; TPC Kuala Lumpur, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (Par 72, 7,005 yards) PURSE: $7 million (Winner: $1.26M and 500 FedEx Cup points) DEFENDING CHAMPION: Pat Perez TELEVISION: Wednesday-Thursday, 10:30 p.m.-2:30 a.m.; Friday-Saturday, 11 p.m.-3 a.m. (All times on Golf Channel) THIS WEEK: The 72-player field is open to players from top 60 in last season’s FedEx Cup standings, down to the 125th spot, along with the top-10 available money leaders from the Asian Tour Order of Merit and eight sponsor exemptions. ... Venezuela’s Jhonattan Vegas withdrew due to visa issues and was replaced by Sam Ryder. ... Perez is seeking to become the third repeat champion of the event (Ryan Moore in 2013-14, Justin Thomas in 2015-16). He earned 56 percent of his FedEx Cup points last year during the three-event Asian swing. ... This is the second of eight events during the PGA Tour’s fall wraparound schedule before a seven-week break. ... Thomas (262 in ‘16) holds the tournament scoring record, while Nick Watney (71 in ‘12 fourth round) holds the 18-hole record. ... Thailand’s Kiradech Aphibarnrat will make his irst start as a member of the PGA Tour. ... Moore and Brandt Snedeker, who lost to Tway in the three-way Safeway Open playof on Sunday, are in the ield.

POSTSEASON DIVISIONAL PLAYOFF (Best-of-5; x-if necessary) American League Boston 3, New York 1 Friday, Oct. 5: Boston 5, New York 4 Saturday, Oct. 6: New York 6, Boston 2 Monday: Boston 16, New York 1 Tuesday: Boston 4, New York 3 Houston 3, Cleveland 0 Friday, Oct. 5: Houston 7, Cleveland 2 Saturday, Oct. 6: Houston 3, Cleveland 1 Monday: Houston 11, Cleveland 3 National League Milwaukee 3, Colorado 0 Thursday, Oct. 4: Milwaukee 3, Colorado 2 Friday, Oct. 5: Milwaukee 4, Colorado 0 Sunday, Oct. 7: Milwaukee 6, Colorado 0 Los Angeles 3, Atlanta 1 Thursday, Oct. 4: Los Angeles 6, Atlanta 0 Friday, Oct. 5: Los Angeles 3, Atlanta 0 Sunday: Atlanta 6, Los Angeles 5 Monday: Los Angeles 6, Atlanta 2 LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) American League Houston vs. Boston-New York Sunday, Oct. 14: Houston at Boston Tuesday, Oct. 16: Houston at Boston Wednesday, Oct. 17: Boston at Houston Thursday, Oct. 18: Boston at Houston x-Saturday, Oct. 20: Boston at Houston x-Sunday, Oct. 21: Houston at Boston x-Monday, Oct. 22: Houston at Boston National League Los Angeles vs, Milwaukee Friday, Oct. 12: Los Angeles at Milwaukee Saturday, Oct. 13: Los Angeles at Milwaukee Monday, Oct. 15: Milwaukee at Los Angeles Tuesday, Oct. 16: Milwaukee at Los Angeles x-Wednesday, Oct. 17: Milwaukee at Los Angeles x-Friday, Oct. 19: Los Angeles at Milwaukee x-Saturday, Oct. 20: Los Angeles at Milwaukee WORLD SERIES (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Tuesday, Oct. 23: at American League Wednesday, Oct. 24: at American League Friday, Oct. 26: at National League Saturday, Oct. 27: at National League x-Sunday, Oct. 28: at National League x-Tuesday, Oct. 30: at American League x-Wednesday, Oct. 31: at American League

College hockey TUESDAY’S SCORES MIDWEST Bowling Green 6, Western Michigan 2

Transactions NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE Bufalo Bills - Added TE Keith Towbridge to the practice squad. Removed DB Michael Hunter from the practice squad. Signed QB Derek Anderson. Waived DB Dean Marlowe. Carolina Panthers - Added LB Brandon Chubb to the practice squad. Removed QB Connor Cook from the practice squad. Cincinnati Bengals - Waived RB Thomas Rawls. Dallas Cowboys - Removed RB Bo Scarbrough from the practice squad. Waived DB Ibraheim Campbell. Detroit Lions - Added TE Hakeem Valles to the practice squad. Green Bay Packers - Added RB Tra Carson and WR Keon Hatcher to the practice squad. Removed RB Joel Bouagnon from the practice squad. Indianapolis Colts - Placed G Matt Slauson on IR. Signed G Evan Boehm and DB Michael Mitchell. Waived DB Lenzy Pipkins. Waived DT Johnathan Calvin. Los Angeles Rams - Added T Rick Leonard to the practice squad. Minnesota Vikings - Cut WR Tavarres King. Waived DB Horace Richardson. New England Patriots - Added RB Kenneth Farrow to the practice squad. New York Giants - Activated T Brian Mihalik from the practice squad. Added K Marshall Koehn to the practice squad. Waived T Ereck Flowers. New York Jets - Added DE Bronson Kaufusi to the practice squad. Removed T Dieugot Joseph from the practice squad. Tampa Bay Buccaneers - Cut DE Will Clarke. Signed G Ali Marpet to a ive-year, $55 million contract extension.

DENNY MEDLEY/USA TODAY

Cleveland Indians left fielder Michael Brantley (23) celebrates in the dugout after scoring in the first inning against the Kansas City Royals at Kauffman Stadium.

enjoy the time you have with them, think back not he times you had with them and relish them as much as you can. But the family aspect of it, the way everybody has treated me, the fans, the people, the city. It’s meant everything to me. Absolutely everything.” Brantley and Tomlin aren’t alone. Andrew Miller and Cody Allen, the backbone of that 2016 bullpen that blazed its way through October, are both eligible for free agency. Allen this season broke the Indians all-time record for saves. Miller will always be remembered in Cleveland for his electric performance in that 2016 postseason, when he briefly became baseball’s biggest, militarygrade weapon. The reliever market this past winter was the one that seemed to spike. Both could find new homes this winter with lucrative deals, part

of the reason why the Indians gave up their No. 1 prospect for Brad Hand, a move that bolstered the bullpen this year but also gave the club some insurance in 2019 and beyond. “It’ll take a few days probably,” Allen said, regarding his time in Cleveland possibly coming to a close. “Right now, I’m just kind of numb to it all. This city means a lot to my family and I. But, it’s part of (the business of baseball). Guys move on. Carlos Santana was here forever. You saw him move on. But, I mean, these places, they become home. My son was born here. So, we’ll see.” Miller was still reeling from the sweep at the hands of the Astros. There’s a lot to sort out before he makes one of the biggest decisions of his career. “I haven’t thought about it from that angle,” Miller said. “I

DAVID RICHARD/USA TODAY

Former major league player and Catskill native Mickey Brantley (right) smiles after a single by his son, Cleveland Indians left fielder Michael Brantley.

know that this sucks right now. This isn’t the way we drew it up. This is 25, 40 guys that have plans of winning the World Series. It obviously didn’t go our way. That’s kind of where my mind is right now. It’s unfortunate. As far as that, every year you have new guys. This orga-

nization is set for a long time. There’s guys that are going to make this team a contender certainly in the near future. Not worried about that right now. Worried about trying to process this and move on from it. It’s just not the ending we wanted.”

Pro football NFL American Football Conference East W L T Pct PF PA New England 3 2 0 .600 133 108 Miami 3 2 0 .600 99 117 N.Y. Jets 2 3 0 .400 123 105 Bufalo 2 3 0 .400 63 118 South W L T Pct PF PA Jacksonville 3 2 0 .600 102 86 Tennessee 3 2 0 .600 87 86 Houston 2 3 0 .400 115 124 Indianapolis 1 4 0 .200 118 138 North W L T Pct PF PA Cincinnati 4 1 0 .800 153 130 Baltimore 3 2 0 .600 132 77 Pittsburgh 2 2 1 .500 143 133 Cleveland 2 2 1 .500 114 113 West W L T Pct PF PA Kansas City 5 0 01.000 175 129 L.A. Chargers 3 2 0 .600 137 130 Denver 2 3 0 .400 100 131 Oakland 1 4 0 .200 107 149 National Football Conference East W L T Pct PF PA Washington 2 2 0 .500 83 87 Philadelphia 2 3 0 .400 103 104 Dallas 2 3 0 .400 83 96 N.Y. Giants 1 4 0 .200 104 128 South W L T Pct PF PA New Orleans 4 1 0 .800 180 140 Carolina 3 1 0 .750 104 91 Tampa Bay 2 2 0 .500 112 139 Atlanta 1 4 0 .200 133 163 North W L T Pct PF PA Chicago 3 1 0 .750 111 65 Green Bay 2 2 1 .500 115 114 Minnesota 2 2 1 .500 113 131 Detroit 2 3 0 .400 125 137 West W L T Pct PF PA L.A. Rams 5 0 01.000 173 98 Seattle 2 3 0 .400 116 114 Arizona 1 4 0 .200 65 112 San Francisco 1 4 0 .200 118 146 Week 6 Thursday’s game Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 8:20 p.m. Sunday’s games L.A. Chargers at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Bufalo at Houston, 1 p.m. Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Chicago at Miami, 1 p.m. Carolina at Washington, 1 p.m. Seattle vs Oakland, at London, England, 1 p.m. Arizona at Minnesota, 1 p.m. Indianapolis at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. L.A. Rams at Denver, 4:05 p.m. Jacksonville at Dallas, 4:25 p.m. Baltimore at Tennessee, 4:25 p.m. Kansas City at New England, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Oct. 15 San Francisco at Green Bay, 8:15 p.m.

College football THIS WEEK’S SCHEDULE FBS Tuesday’s game MIDWEST Appalachian State 35, Arkansas State 9 Thursday’s games SOUTH Georgia Southern at Texas State, 7:30 p.m. Texas Tech at TCU, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s games MIDWEST South Florida at Tulsa, 7 p.m. WEST Air Force at San Diego State, 9 p.m. Arizona at Utah, 10 p.m. Saturday’s games EAST Akron at Bufalo, Noon Rutgers at Maryland, Noon Louisville at Boston College, 12:30 p.m. Troy at Liberty, 2 p.m. Temple at Navy, 3:30 p.m. Western Kentucky at Charlotte, 3:30 p.m. Marshall at Old Dominion, 3:30 p.m. Michigan State at Penn State, 3:30 p.m. Miami at Virginia, 7 p.m. SOUTH Tennessee at Auburn, Noon Florida at Vanderbilt, Noon Duke at Georgia Tech, 12:20 p.m. UAB at Rice, 1 p.m. Southern Mississippi at North Texas, 2 p.m.

NEWSPAPER MEDIA HAS THE POWER TO INFORM, ENTERTAIN AND CONNECT. When you hold your local newspaper in your hands — whether in print or on a mobile device — you hold a powerful tool to inform and inspire.

For centuries in towns and cities across North America, local newspapers have served as the voice for the public good and as a powerful connection between citizens and the communities around them. Oct. 7-13 is National Newspaper Week, a time to salute the dedicated professionals who work hard to bring you the news. In this digital age, the newspaper audience has never been greater, with millions reading in print, online or via mobile. No matter the medium, those millions of readers rely on their local newspaper. Journalism matters. NOW more than ever.

NATIONAL NEWSPAPER WEEK Oct. 7-13, 2018


CMYK

Thursday, October 11, 2018 B3

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

Do ‘knocking on the door’ Yankees need another piece? By Dave Sheinin The Washington Post

NEW YORK — The danger for any newly eliminated postseason team is in going too far in its internal analysis of what went wrong, and in seeing fatal flaws that must be swiftly and aggressively corrected where, in reality, those are just the way baseball goes sometimes. Did the New York Yankees lose the American League Division Series, in other words, because they were a decidedly lesser team than the Boston Red Sox across four games? Or did they lose because of outfield dimensions? That’s an oversimplification of the questions the Yankees now face, of course, but as they pick up the pieces from Tuesday night’s 4-3 loss in Game 4 and head into a difficult and pivotal offseason, amid their painful self-evaluation will be this underlying notion: If Gary Sanchez’s dramatic ninth-inning blast to left field had been hit at Fenway Park, instead of Yankee Stadium, it would have cleared the Green Monster for a go-ahead grand slam instead of dying at the warning track as a long, high out. The flaws-versus-fates ques-

Local From B1

Greenville improves to 103-1 and 10-2 with the win. Coxsackie-Athens 4, Cairo-Durham 4 (2OT) COXSACKIE — Two overtimes were not enough to declare a winner between Coxsackie-Athens and CairoDurham with the two teams battling to a 4-4 draw on Tuesday in Patroon Conference girls soccer action. The Lady Mustangs offense was led by sophomore midfielder Xxaria Makely who finished with a hat trick and Olivia MacGiffert added an assist. For Coxsackie-Athens, Anya Josberger led the way with two goals and an assist, Hannah Crown contributed a goal and an assist, and Grace Mathes finished with a goal. Coxsackie-Athens moves to 5-10-1 and 5-8-1, while CairoDurham is 2-9-1 overall. NONLEAGUE GIRLS SOCCER Chatham 3, Canajoharie 3 CHATHAM — Chatham and Canajoharie played to a 3-3 draw on Tuesday in nonleague varsity girls soccer action. Brooke-Lyn Doyle scored twice for the Lady Panthers as Caroline Paolucci added a goal. Lexi Mickle and Abby Hoag each had an assist. In the net, Chatham keeper Samerpreet Kaur had six saves. Millbrook 4, Germantown 2 MILLBROOK — Germantown fell behind early on and couldn’t dig itself out of the hole, losing to Millbrook 4-2 in nonleague varsity girls soccer Tuesday. Millbrook took a 3-0 lead midway through the first half before coach Mike Pudney made adjustments to stymie the bloodshed. For the Lady Clippers, Riley Gibbons had a goal and an assist. Julia Howard added a goal and an assist, and Emma Howard notched two assists. Millbrook outshot Germantown 13-11. In the net, Clippers keeper Kaitlyn Stagno had four saves and Hannah Hart two. PATROON CROSS COUNTRY CATSKILL — Catskill hosted Germantown, Hawthorne Valley, Rensselaer, and Windham for a Patroon Conference cross country meet on Tuesday. In the boys heat, Rensselaer defeated Germantown 18-37 and Catskill 17-38. On the girls side, all teams were incomplete BOYS: 1. H. Goca, REN, 17:35; 2. Alan Valencia, WAJ, 21:02; 3. Mikai S, HV, 21:13; 4. Devin Kraus, REN, 22:20; 5. Jeremy Hover, REN, 22:35; 6.

tions hang over every good team that sees its season end in October, but they seem particularly acute for the 2018 Yankees, who spent the better part of six months chasing the Red Sox in the AL East, only to lose the division by eight games, then spent the better part of four nights in October being outpitched, outhit and outmanaged by them. But are the Red Sox significantly better than them? Or did they simply enjoy better health across 162 games, then simply outplay them for these last four? Do the Yankees need to get better, or do they need to play better when it matters most? “You’re always chasing Utopia,” Yankees manager Aaron Boone said. “We’re chasing greatness here. . . . Obviously, we have some decisions, a lot of things that are going to happen between now and next year. But I think we’re right there knocking on the door to be that.” At some point, the quest to improve on the margins must almost certainly include some self-examination from Boone, a first-year manager in 2018, over his pitching moves in Games 3 and 4. In two critical

games, the second of which had the Yankees facing elimination, he was slow to pull his starting pitcher and deploy his bullpen — the clearest and most acute advantage the Yankees held over the Red Sox. Boone’s choices didn’t lose either game for New York, but they stood out in this era of bullpen supremacy and were picked apart in the media. A year ago, Boone was in the ESPN booth doing color commentary. As a rookie manager, he surely has room to improve, and before Game 4, he seemed to acknowledge that. The primary personnel decisions the Yankees face this winter are fairly standard. They have pending free agents in starters J.A. Happ and CC Sabathia and relievers David Robertson and Zach Britton. They hold a club option on veteran outfielder Brett Gardner. They will almost certainly target starting pitching this winter, though it is not a particularly deep free agent class. In December, after the Yankees traded for Giancarlo Stanton, the Red Sox signed J.D. Martinez. Stanton struggled in his first season in the Bronx. Martinez became an MVP contender in Boston. In July,

the Yankees acquired Happ for their rotation; the Red Sox picked up Nathan Eovaldi. Happ, after a fine showing in the second half of the season, lasted just two innings against the Red Sox in a Game 1 loss. Eovaldi, in Game 3, pitched seven sterling innings. Some of the Yankees’ personnel questions are deeper and require more self-examination. What happened this season to Sanchez and Greg Bird, two young players considered franchise cornerstones who performed below expectations? How can they coax more production out of Stanton — the hulking slugger and highest paid player in the game who is also a strikeout machine? In one of the most critical atbats of the Yankees’ season, in Tuesday night’s ninth inning, he struck out against Kimbrel, giving a lifeline to a laboring pitcher who desperately needed one. The Yankees hit more homers than any team in history in 2018, 267 of them, but in Games 3 and 4 they were held without one — the first time since early April that had happened. The Yankees were 4 for 26 (.184) in the series with runners in scoring position,

managing only one extra-base hit. Did the Yankees’ hitters choke? Are they too dependent on power? Did the Red Sox’s pitchers shut them down? Or are sudden, team-wide slumps just part of baseball? In 2017, as the Yankees were in the midst of a rebuilding effort the “Baby Bombers,” as they became known, surprised many in the sport by winning 91 games and advancing to Game 7 of the AL Championship Series before falling to the Houston Astros. But this year, expectations were higher, and in many ways the Yankees met them, winning 100 games despite inju-

Nathan Riordan, CAT, 22:36; 7. Andrew K, REN, 22:50; 8. Bryan Bathrick, GTown, 23:18; 9. Caleby Wynkoop, GTown, 23:32; 10. John S., GTown, 23:36. GIRLS: 1. Iram Asif, CAT, 25:50; 2. Savannah V, GTown, 28:05; 3. Elatne Gillan, REN, 30:45; 4. Abigail Davies, REN, 30:58; 6. Aizlyn O’Connell, CAT, 34:30; 7. Emily Smith, WAJ, 35:22; 8. Nicole Neilson, WAJ, 26:25.

the Section II, Class B girls tennis tournament. Ichabod Crane advances to host No.5 Glens Falls today at 4 p.m. Results (ICC listed first): Elise Brennan def. Sarah Eckl 6-4, 6-0; Zoe Geiger lost to Madison Tracey 6-7 (3-7), 1-6; Madeline Grout def. Madison Dutton 6-0, 6-3; Maya Brennan def. Gabriella Ricciardi 6-0, 6-4; Gianna Sandagato def. Mackenzie Jones 6-2, 6-0; Doubles: Katie Barnes/Annabelle Rivero def. Diya Mathai/ Hailey Morgan 6-1, 6-3; Meredith Buono/Shannon Ingham def. Lauren Fennell/Charlotte Snyder 6-0, 6-2.

dians close out their season at 7-9. Results (C-A listed first): Rachael Tyner lost to Maggie Collins 0-6, 0-6; Sarah O’Leary def. Anna Liu 2-6, 6-2, 6-3; Sarah Tyner lost to McKenna Clark 2-6, 2-6; Samantha Karlsson lost to Ella Hartenberg 2-6, 2-6; Carlota Flavia def. Ella Crossman 6-4, 6-2; Doubles: Jazman Carrera/Myesha Alam lost to Margie Layden/Julia Westfall 1-6, 1-6; Rachel Marino/Josie Mantras-Johnston lost to Shyeann Rawson/Faith Stone 1-6, 2-6.

The loss closes the season for the Lady Wildcats at 12-3. Results (MH listed first): Rebecca Roe def. Margot Williams 6-1, 6-3; Callie Haller lost to Alaina Sholtes 3-6, 4-6; Diana Pugliese lost to Misha Carter-Smith 4-6, 6-3, 5-7; Claudia Eckel lost to Mackenzie Diamond 4-6, 2-6; Rachael Adler won by forfeit; Doubles: Lexia Cartwright/Abby Utter lost to Allison Gallagher/Mary Palmeri 2-6, 7-6, 2-6; Paige Bleau/Kyra Price def. Samantha Lawyer/Skyler Willard 6-2, 6-0.

SECTION II, CLASS C TENNIS No.1 Chatham 6, No.4 Greenwich 1 CHATHAM — The Chatham Lady Panthers have successfully advanced to their third straight Section II, Class C girls tennis championship with a 6-1 victory over Greenwich on Tuesday in the semifinals. Chatham advances to play the winner of No.2 Maple Hill or No.3 Schoharie today at 4 p.m. Results (CH listed first): AAliyah Harris def by. Madelyn Brophy 6-7 (6-8), 4-6; Jahnaya Armstrong def. Shea Fortier 6-0, 6-0; Lillian Nowak def. Callagh Mays 6-0, 6-0; Margot Schassler def. Jenna Hogan 6-0, 6-1; Anna Miles def. Katie Snell 6-1, 6-1; Doubles: Sydney Putnam/Sydney Newton def. Brooke Smith/Lilly Smith 6-0, 6-1; Sonam Verma/Han Sook Baneni def. Rachel Mueller/ Ruby Pemrick 6-4, 6-3.

MHAL FIELD HOCKEY Taconic Hills 2, Ellenville 1 ELLENVILLE — Taconic Hills picked up a 2-1 victory over Ellenville in MHAL varsity field hockey Tuesday. Delana Bonci and Sage Pulver each scored a goal for the Lady Titans. Lizzie Beck had an assist. For Ellenville, Anastasia Keener scored her team’s lone goal. TH outshot Ellenville 15-7 and held a 4-3 edge in penalty corners. In the net, Sydney Kiernan had six saves for TH. The Lady Titans improve to 10-3 (8-3 MHAL).

HUNTER — Hunter-Tannersville hosted Taconic Hills, Chatham, and Cairo-Durham on Tuesday for a Patroon Conference cross country meet. The Taconic Hills boys and girls complete the clean sweep. The Lady Titans defeated Cairo-Durham 22-31 and Chatham and HunterTannersville 15-50. The Lady Mustangs defeated HunterTannersville 15-50. In the boys heat, Taconic Hills defeated Cairo-Durham 20-40 and Chatham 15-50. The Mustangs defeated Chatham 15-50. GIRLS: 1. Macayla Sparacino, TH, 17:41; 2. Clare Howard, TH, 17:53; 3. Lauren Madsen, TH, 18:33; 4. Emma Gregg, CH, 18:41; 5. Gabby Meyers, CD, 19:09; 6. Trisha Gagne, CD, 19:12 BOYS: 1. Dante DiGiovanni, CD, 15:31; 2. Eli Russo, TH, 15;44; 3. Langford Maxwell, CH, 15:54; 4. Jesse Hartman, TH, 16:00; 5. Mason Nack, TH, 16:36; 6. Caleb Jeralds, CH, 16:44. SECTION II, CLASS B TENNIS No.1 Ichabod Crane 6, No.8 Ravena 1 VALATIE — The Ichabod Crane Lady Riders defeated Ravena in the quarterfinals of

No.3 Hudson Falls 7, No.6 Hudson 0 HUDSON FALLS — The Hudson Lady Bluehawks saw their season come to a close on Tuesday with a 7-0 loss to Hudson Falls in quarterfinals of the Section II, Class B girls tennis tournament. Hudson finishes the season 2-9. Results (Hudson listed first): Kristin O’Connell def by. Caitlyn Whiting 4-6, 6-3, 4-6; Sarah Li def by. Eliza Hogan 3-6, 4-6; Autum Kudlack def by. Hailie Casey 0-6, 4-6; Melina Juene def by. Vegas Hernandez 1-6, 2-6; Malaysia Singh def by. Skye Krehbiel 1-6, 0-6; Doubles: Monserrat Gomez/ Abada Begun def by. Cassidy Arlington/Nina Daley 3-6, 1-6; Annalise Baker/Samantha Belden won via forfeit. No. 5 Glens Falls 5, No. 4 Coxsackie-Athens 2 COXSACKIE — No. 4 Coxsackie-Athens fell to No. 5 Glens Falls 5-2 in Section II, Class B varsity tennis on Tuesday. With the loss, the Lady In-

*Cart required

No. 4 Schoharie 4, No. 2 Maple Hill 3 CASTLETON — No. 2 Maple Hill was upset by No. 4 Schoharie in the Section II, Class C tennis tournament on Tuesday, losing 4-3.

*Bring ad to redeem

FREE GREENS FEES

*

Sunny Hill Midweek Fall Special

Monday - Friday through October 12, 2018. Simply bring this coupon to the Sunny Hill Clubhouse to take advantage of this great deal!

Best Deal ! CG2018

Albany From B1

served as the Assistant Head Coach of the Jacksonville Sharks of the National Arena League during the 2018 season. The Sharks finished the season with a 10-6 record and boasted multiple league awards, including Assistant Coach of the Year won by Ewart. Ewart’s defense produced

PATROON VOLLEYBALL Catskill 3, Albany Leadership 0 CATSKILL — Catskill blanked Albany Leadership 3-0 on Tuesday during senior night in Patroon Conference varsity girls volleyball. Set scores were 25-12, 25-14 and 25-14.

352 Sunny Hill Rd, Greenville

For Catskill, Lorraine Rich had eight service points, three aces, one kill and 14 digs; Rachel Reed 19 service points, nine aces, 12 kills and 11 digs; Alex Powell five service points, two aces and 19 assists; Samantha Weber 12 service points, one ace, four kills and eight digs; Ami Li one service point and four digs; Nina Campos three service points and two digs; and Molly Conway one kill and three digs. “This was a great win for us with all of our seniors contributing in the effort,” Catskill coach Rocco Cornacchia said, noting seniors include Lorraine Rich, Rachel Reed, Alexa Powell, Samantha Weber, Molly Conway, Nina Campos, Dominica Ward and Ami Li. “I am very proud to have coached this group of seniors, they are an exceptionally gifted, hard-working group of girls with great leadership skills. They will will be missed next season, I wish them the best of luck.” Catskill improves to 15-0 on the year. COLONIAL VOLLEYBALL Mohanasen 3, Ichabod Crane 0 VALATIE — Ichabod Crane fell to Mohonasen 3-0 in Colonial Council varsity volleyball Tuesday. Set scores were 25-12, 25-13 and 25-18. ICC was led by Darby Siver with five kills and seven digs. Kyla Elliott added four kills and Abby Filli 11 digs.

IMBY. It’s where you live. IMBY is a website about your town, created by you. Actually, it’s one big website that contains 22 smaller websites, each one a community in Columbia or Greene County. Sign up and post just about anything. Sign up and get two e-blasts each week – events and stories.

It’s time to get your game on.

(518) 634-7698

five All-NAL players, including the Defensive Player of the Year and the league’s Most Improved Player. “Coach Keefe and Coach Moss are experienced guys who understand the game,” Ewart said. “There are a lot of intricate things in coaching that you can only learn by experiencing them. We have the potential to win a lot of games and bring a championship back to Albany.”

IN MY BACK YARD

SunnyHill.com Clubhouse:

ries to Sanchez, Aaron Judge, Jordan Montgomery and others. Their deep bullpen — arguably the best ever constructed — gave them the sense they could take down the Red Sox in the playoffs. That the Yankees fell short is cause for reflection and selfevaluation over these next few months. But is this a franchise that needs to make massive changes? Or do the Yankees just need to go back to a point in time before Tuesday night’s ninth inning, and bring the leftfield fence at Yankee Stadium in another five feet? On such fleeting, fantastical questions are championships won and lost.

SIGN UP

imby. IMBY.COM


CMYK

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

B4 Thursday, October 11, 2018

Which Eagles runningback is replacing Jay Ajayi? By Zach Berman The Philadelphia Inquirer

Corey Clement, Wendell Smallwood, and Josh Adams worked next to each other at the start of practice on Tuesday, the Eagles’ lone session leading up to Thursday’s game against the New York Giants. Those are the three healthy running backs on the Eagles, and they’ll form a committee to replace Jay Ajayi. The biggest story for the Eagles this week was unexpected when fans awoke Monday: Ajayi, their top running back, is out for the season with a torn ACL. With a quick turnaround, the Eagles are not in the position to make a trade for a running back in time to contribute in the game. So this is the group they’ll go with on Thursday, and perhaps going forward. Clement was a full participant in practice after sitting the past two games with a quadriceps injury. He said he’s ready to play. So are Smallwood and Adams. Darren Sproles remains sidelined with a hamstring injury. Although Clement might be atop the depth chart, the Eagles are expected to rotate three running backs against the Giants. “That’s kind of been our approach, even with Jay, even when he was playing,” quarterback Carson Wentz said. “He was always the starter. He was always the guy. But we’ve always been ‘by committee’ around here.” If one player emerges as the top rusher, Clement is the most likely candidate. The Eagles’ best rushing performance actually came in Week 3, when Ajayi was out of the lineup with a back injury. The Eagles rushed for 152 yards, with Clement and Smallwood each rushing for 56 yards and Adams rushing for 30. Clement’s 16 carries led the group. It was the most carries by an Eagles running back this season. That was also the last game Clement played. “It feels like a long time coming, even though it’s only two weeks,” Clement said. “I

JIM BROWN/USA TODAY

Philadelphia Eagles running back Wendell Smallwood (28) rushes against the Tennessee Titans during the first half at Nissan Stadium.

feel great. One hundred percent. Time to play football.” Clement knows the opportunity in front of him. During a meeting this week, running backs coach Duce Staley asked Sproles how rare it is for a young player to get the chance to take on a big role. His message was that “when the opportunity presents itself, stare it right in the face and take the challenge on,” according to Clement. “It’s deinitely unfortunate to have Jay out, but at the same time, I have to be able to step up,” Clement said. “Whether it’s me taking a bigger role, Wendell taking a bigger role, Josh Adams taking a bigger role, somebody has to take the lead. I think that’s what the front ofice is looking for: Who’s going to be the guy in

this group to bring this pack on?” Offensive coordinator Mike Groh said the Eagles need to “get Corey back to being Corey.” Clement proved to be a valuable part of the offense during the Super Bowl run. Smallwood, whose roles diminished last season after the Eagles acquired Ajayi, has rebounded this season with 6 yards per carry. Adams was a standout at Notre Dame who has size and potential, and Sproles’ versatility could be an asset to the offense when healthy. But they’re different than Ajayi, who had been a Pro Bowler in Miami and has a punishing running style that’s dificult to replicate. “We’re going to miss Jay’s physicality for sure,” Groh said. “To sit here and say we

won’t miss Jay I think isn’t fair. Jay is an excellent running back. But we’ve gotten these guys a lot of experience. They’ve played in enough games to be able to go out there and play well and be able to run our system. We’re conident in what they can do.” Wentz said Ajayi leaves “big shoes to fill” and noted the characteristics that made Ajayi a key part of the offense. As conident as the Eagles are in the other running backs, they have a different style, so the running game might need to adjust. “He was a violent, downhill runner that sought contact and loved to feed off that and really got us going,” Wentz said. “We feel confident in these guys stepping up. We’ve seen Wendell step up the last

couple weeks and make plays. Getting Corey back out there, that will be big for us. Josh is going to have to increase his role as well. Sproles, as well, hopefully coming back sometime soon.” Of course, the Eagles can find that lead running back elsewhere. Last year, they decided to add Ajayi even though they had LeGarrette Blount, Clement, Smallwood, and Kenjon Barner. An argument could be made that the 2017 group was better than what the Eagles have now, especially with Sproles injured. Plus, high-profile players such as Pittsburgh’s Le’Veon Bell and Buffalo’s LeSean McCoy are in trade rumors. There are other potential candidates, such as Atlanta’s Tevin Coleman, who would make sense. Howie

Roseman must decide what draft pick he’s willing to surrender, how much money he’s willing to add, and whether the Eagles need to look elsewhere for a productive running game. It’s up to the running backs on the roster to show the front office that a move doesn’t need to be made. The Eagles will go with this group — likely sans Sproles — on Thursday. Like Staley told them, it will be an opportunity. “I know what we have in this building, I know who we have in our running-back room,” Clement said. “There’s no need to look outside the room. ... I trust in Wendell. I trust in Josh Adams. I trust in Darren Sproles. I trust in position coach3/8 Duce Staley to keep this train rolling.”

NFL players still frustrated with roughing-the-passer rule By Mark Maske The Washington Post

There was ample furor earlier this season when penalty lags were lying during NFL games for roughing-thepasser penalties that weren’t, in many cases, all that rough. The consternation was particularly intense over two calls made against Green Bay Packers linebacker Clay Matthews for what some described as textbook tackles. Many players and fans expressed their dismay that hits on quarterbacks had been all but banned, in their view, by the league. The NFL’s competition committee intervened, issuing a clarification intended by committee members to change the way in which the roughing-the-passer rule was being oficiated and put that enforcement more in line with the committee’s expectations. The lag-fest of the season’s irst three weeks was curtailed in Week 4, and everything calmed down. Some NFL defensive players still are not satisied. The number of roughingthe-passer penalties crept back up during the Week 5 games this past weekend, and members of the Philadelphia Eagles’ defense were particularly miffed about a call against defensive end Michael Bennett for a low hit on quarterback Kirk Cousins that played a part in their loss Sunday at home to the Minnesota Vikings. “I think they just sometimes lack common sense,” Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins, speaking of the rules safeguarding quarterbacks, said after Sunday’s game. “I get it. We want to protect quarterbacks, and I completely understand that. They’re the lifeblood to our game. But it’s really hard to do your job, and it’s having an effect on some

games. But we had plenty of other opportunities to win the game. That was just one play that was a little frustrating.” There were 11 roughingthe-passer penalties assessed in Week 5. That was back near the levels seen in the season’s first three weeks, in which roughing the passer was called 34 times. There were only ive roughing-the-passer calls in the Week 4 games, immediately after the competition committee met by conference call a week sooner than scheduled at the behest of NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell. The big issue in the season’s irst three weeks was related to the competition committee’s directive to game oficials, via a point of emphasis, to enforce an existing rule prohibiting a defender from landing on a quarterback with most or all of his body weight. The second of Matthews’ controversial early-season penalties, for a hit on the Washington Redskins’ Alex Smith, stemmed from that. The irst of the uproar-inducing penalties called on Matthews was for lifting Cousins off the ground in a game against the Vikings before taking him to the turf. There was strong sentiment on the competition committee that neither of the penalties on Matthews should have been called despite the league ofice’s backing of both calls, people close to the situation said. The committee wanted officials to change their enforcement of the rule, and the clarification was issued. All was well, it seemed, in Week 4. The complaints were back in Week 5, although not at the same fever pitch as earlier in the season. The objections to Bennett’s penalty, which aided a Vikings’ touchdown drive during their 23-21 triumph over the Eagles, were not an extension of the earlier body-

weight debate. In this case, Bennett was tumbling to the ground near Cousins, perhaps aided by a shove by Vikings tight end Kyle Rudolph. Bennett appeared to hit Cousins in the upper leg on his way to the turf. While on the ground, Bennett pulled down Cousins by the lower leg. Forcible low hits on quarterbacks have been banned by the NFL since Carson Palmer and Tom Brady were injured on such plays. But some analysts said this penalty shouldn’t have been called because Bennett’s low hit on Cousins did not qualify as forcible. “Even if you hit him at the waist, if you slide down, they’re going to call it,” Eagles defensive end Chris Long said. “But that doesn’t mean that’s a good rule or should have been called. . . . That’s tough.” Said Jenkins: “I don’t know what he’s supposed to do. The quarterback has the ball. I know they don’t want low hits on the quarterback. But if you’re falling down, I guess you’re supposed to let the quarterback go. The explanation from the oficial was, ‘He has to avoid that hit,’ which means that he can’t do his job. He can’t tackle the quarterback while the quarterback has the ball. So obviously that was a big play and that was frustrating. I don’t know what to tell Mike to do on that play.” Long said that the rules regarding hits on quarterbacks “probably” need further adjustment. “A lot of guys are coming in . . . to try to hit the quarterback, and we’re second-guessing ourselves,” Long said. “We don’t know where to hit him or if we should hit him in certain situations. So it’s going to be tough. I guess we’ve got to adapt.” Not everyone seems to be sympathizing with exasper-

ated defensive players. New England Patriots Coach Bill Belichick said during a conference call with reporters Tuesday that there’s nothing new about the roughing-thepasser rules so he doesn’t see what the big deal is. “You’re not allowed to lead with your head,” Belichick said. “You’re not allowed to body-slam the quarterback. You’re not allowed to hit him below the knees. You’re not allowed to hit him above the shoulders. . . . I mean, the rules are the rules. . . . I’m not really sure what new rule it is you’re talking about here. We’ve coached the rules as they’ve been written and as we’ve received them. . . . I’ve never taught anybody to hit a quarterback above the shoulders or hit him below the knees or body-slam him or lead with our helmet and spear him.” Defensive players, in the final analysis, probably will simply have to learn to live with the rules as they are and as they’re being called, without much further tweaking. The NFL certainly doesn’t want to see marquee quarterbacks hurt and, mostly, things are going well for the league this season with the rule as it is. Scoring is up. TV ratings are encouraging. If a couple oficiating controversies are the biggest current problems for the league, the NFL’s leaders can live with that. Even Eagles Coach Doug Pederson did not object too strenuously Sunday. Pederson called it “tough, unfortunate” but quickly added: “The rule is the rule. And we’ve got to abide by it.”

TIMOTHY T. LUDWIG/USA TODAY

Buffalo Bills running back LeSean McCoy (25) makes his way to the field before a game against the Tennessee Titans.

Bills’ McDermott on McCoy rumors: ‘Get calls all the time’ Field Level Media Bills head coach Sean McDermott did not diffuse reports of trade interest from the Philadelphia Eagles in Buffalo running back LeSean McCoy on Wednesday. “We’re just looking forward to the Houston Texans,” McDermott said Wednesday, a day after News 4 in Buffalo reported the Eagles had interest in trading for the six-time Pro Bowler. “LeSean is one of our better players. We get calls all the time. Incoming calls happen all the time. [General manager] Brandon [Beane] and I talk a lot. I won’t get into any more detail than that.” McCoy played the irst six seasons of his career with the Eagles and is the leading rusher in franchise history. The Eagles placed starting running back Jay Ajayi on injured reserve on Monday due to a torn ACL. Veteran thirddown back Darren Sproles is still battling a hamstring injury and hasn’t played since Week 1. McCoy, 30, has two years remaining on his existing contract, a ive-year, $40 mil-

lion deal agreed to with the Bills after being traded from Philadelphia. He was traded to the Bills during the Chip Kelly roster overhaul. McCoy has only 45 carries for 170 yards in four games this season while dealing with fractured rib cartilage. He has 10,262 career rushing yards.

KAEPERNICK SEEKS TRADEMARK FOR IMAGE OF HIS FACE AND HAIR Colin Kaepernick may be the face of a recently unveiled Nike campaign, but he’s taking steps to protect who can capitalize on his likeness going forward. Kaepernick, whose new ad was released as part of the company’s 30th anniversary “Just Do It” ad campaign, has iled for a trademark for a black and white image of his face and hair. The filing, made through Kaepernick’s company Inked Flash, with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Ofice claims the image would be used for various commercial items along with things like classes and seminars and even TV and movies.


CMYK

Thursday, October 11, 2018 B5

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

Open-wheel racing series for women will start in 2019 By Ian Parkes The New York Times

THOMAS B. SHEA/USA TODAY

Minnesota Timberwolves guard Jimmy Butler (23) drives against Houston Rockets guard Chris Paul (3) in the second half in game five of the first round of the 2018 NBA Playoffs at Toyota Center.

Heat preparing for another run at Butler Field Level Media The competition to land Jimmy Butler from the Minnesota Timberwolves could be about to heat up. The Miami Heat are reportedly interested in making another run at Butler, while the Houston Rockets have reportedly turned down an initial offer for the four-time All-Star, according to an ESPN report Wednesday. Miami’s attempt to acquire Butler unraveled last week when the Timberwolves wanted a better player in return than guard Josh Richardson. Meanwhile, the Rockets received an overture in which Minnesota requested shooting

guard Eric Gordon and power forward PJ Tucker, but Houston wasn’t interested in parting with Tucker, per Wednesday’s report. Proposals figure to pick up again this week with Minnesota’s first game looming against the San Antonio Spurs on Oct. 17. Timberwolves Coach Tom Thibodeau has been hoping Butler will drop his trade request, while owner Glen Taylor desires a quick resolution to the deal. Butler has told the organization he will leave as a free agent next summer if he isn’t traded. He showed up to the team facility Wednesday but hasn’t

practiced with the team this season. According to reports, the Los Angeles Clippers, Phoenix Suns, Cleveland Cavaliers, Houston Rockets and Sacramento Kings have also kicked the tires on a Butler deal. The Brooklyn Nets and New York Knicks also could emerge possibilities. Butler, 29, appeared in 59 games last season for the Timberwolves, averaging 22.2 points, 5.3 rebounds, 4.9 assists and 2.0 steals. He is entering the fourth season of a five-year, $92.3 million contract he signed with Chicago in 2015, but he can enter the free agent mar-

ket next summer by opting out of the final year. He is scheduled to earn a base salary of $18.7 million in 2018-19. In July, Butler reportedly turned down Minnesota’s four-year extension offer worth $110 million.

ROCKETS’ ZHOU SPRAINS KNEE IN PRESEASON GAME Houston Rockets 7-foot-2 forward Zhou Qi left a home preseason game against the Shanghai Sharks on Tuesday because of a left knee sprain. Following a collision with Sharks forward Luis Scola near the end of the first quarter, Zhou left the court in a wheel-

chair after he was aided by trainers and other staff members. The 22-year-old Zhou played only four minutes Tuesday night in his first preseason appearance, registering two rebounds and one blocked shot. He is in his second season with the Rockets, having averaged 1.2 points and 1.2 rebounds in 18 games in 2017-18. Zhou was a second-round draft pick out of the Chinese Basketball Association in 2016, and he made his NBA debut on Oct. 21, 2017, with the Rockets.

Watching Nurmagomedov’s victory in Dagestan By Maxim Babenko The New York Times

MAKHACHKALA, Russia — Twelve hours before Khabib Nurmagomedov choked out Conor McGregor to retain his UFC lightweight title in Las Vegas, children nearly 7,000 miles away were beating a punching bag that hung under a sign that read “Knock the chicken’s teeth out!” The bag, attached to a lifelike model of an octagon cage inhabited by likenesses of Nurmagomedov and McGregor, was part of the pre-fight festivities in Makhachkala, the capital of Dagestan. There’s no question who the “chicken” was in this scenario. Nurmagomedov is Dagestani, and the crowd was here to watch their hometown hero fight McGregor, the brash former champ from Ireland who had engaged in a lengthy campaign of verbal and physical aggression toward his opponent leading up to this fight. Nurmagomedov’s father and coach, Abdulmanap, was unable to attend the fight when his visa to enter the United States was denied. So he helped organize a collective viewing of the fight for about 800 fans, government officials and Dagestani athletes here at a theater in the city’s center. Around midnight local time, eight hours before the fight, the theater was full. Hundreds more fans blocked traffic outside and danced to music while the police tried to keep order. Some rode horses and one even clutched an eagle — a symbol of Dagestan, and

MAXIM BABENKO/THE NEW YORK TIMES

Fans watch the match between UFC fighters Khabib Nurmagomedov and Conor McGregor, at a cafe in Makhachkala, the capital of the Dagestan region of Russia, Oct. 6. Nearly 7,000 miles from Las Vegas, fans, government officials and even the fighter’s father gathered in the capital city to watch their local hero, Nurmagomedov, retain lightweight fighting title.

Nurmagomedov’s nickname. The air filled with the smell of burned rubber from the tires of cars squealing on the streets nearby. “Everyone will forgive them today,” one officer said. “Especially if Khabib wins.” Inside the theater, Abdulmanap Nurmagomedov answered questions from the audience before slipping out of the main hall to a nearby room to watch the fight. When McGregor appeared on the main screen, a whistle was heard in

the cinema, followed by loud screams as the fight started. On the screen, the crowd watched as Khabib Nurmagomedov controlled the early rounds. When McGregor tapped out of a choke hold in the fourth round, the audience filled the hall with celebratory screams and people began to dance in the aisles. Many didn’t notice the post-fight melee that occurred in Las Vegas after Nurmagomedov, now 27-0, climbed over the top

of the cage and attacked members of McGregor’s corner, who he said had been taunting him during the fight. While order was restored outside the cage, members of Nurmagomedov’s entourage entered the octagon and traded punches with McGregor. “Khabib did everything right,” one of the spectators said. “A man should be responsible for his words. He made him answer.” Nurmagomedov’s father

didn’t join in the celebration, which soon reached a fever pitch outside the theater. He seemed upset at his son’s actions in the moments after the fight and, after moving to the front of the crowd with a megaphone, he asked the crowd to calmly go home. The square emptied, though a small group of people remained behind to discuss the details of the fight. “If there will be a rematch,” one of them said, “he will destroy the chicken again.”

NFL’s TV-ratings tension cools: ‘This year they’ve got a blockbuster’ By Ben Strauss The Washington Post

For much of this century the NFL seemed impervious to the trends of a fracturing media landscape. While Netflix and YouTube ate into traditional TV audiences, the league remained a rock in the storm for networks and advertisers. But by last winter it was facing back-to-back seasons of tumbling ratings — 8 percent in

2016, then 10 percent the next year — and President Donald Trump had spent months urging his supporters to boycott the league. The quality of play wasn’t inspiring confidence, either, with looming questions about player safety and concussions. By January, ad dollars were declining, and as this season kicked off there were jitters on Wall Street. One research firm,

MoffettNathanson, reported, “Any sign of continued ratings weakness could pose a longterm risk for broadcasters.” For the moment, however, league and TV executives can exhale. Five weeks into the season — a large enough sample size to offer something of a progress report — the returns are plenty encouraging. CBS’ NFL audience is up 7 percent; FOX’s is down 2

percent; NBC’s Sunday Night viewership is basically flat; and ESPN’s Monday Night Football broadcast is down 4 percent, but with several marquee matchups still to come. All told, the league’s ratings are up a few percentage points. Now consider that relative stability in a larger context: In September, the top 15 TV shows were all NFL games.

Cable entertainment programming — not including news and sports — is down 11 percent this fall. And on Monday, the New Orleans Saints and Redskins more than doubled the audience of a playoff matchup between two of baseball’s most iconic teams, the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox.

A new international motor-sport series for women will begin next year, with the goal of finding the first female Formula One champion. Motor sports remain heavily dominated by men, not only behind the wheel but also in the pit lane, garage, workshop and laboratory. While women have had modest success in the top levels of NASCAR and IndyCar racing in the past two decades, a female driver has not started a F1 race since Lella Lombardi in 1976. The new W Series will be free to enter and aims not only to promote female drivers but also to steer girls and women into engineering and science careers. The series is the brainchild of Catherine Bond Muir, a British sports lawyer and corporate financier. She came up with the idea while on maternity leave three years ago. “Many sports in which women and men compete equally also run segregated events purely to increase the numbers of women who participate,” she said in a news release. “Until now, motor racing has been the only sport in which there were no separate series for women.” She added: “There has never been a female Formula One race winner, let alone a world champion. Our mission is to change all of that.” W Series will begin next May and feature six 30-minute races on some of the most famous circuits in Europe, most of which have staged Formula One grands prix for many decades. In coming seasons, the series will include races in North America, Asia and Australia. The cars will be the Tatuus model used in Formula 3, a steppingstone series to F1. There is a total prize fund of $1.5 million, with the overall winner collecting $500,000. There will be prize money awarded down to 18th place in the final standings. The anticipated field of 20 drivers will be chosen during a process involving on-track testing, simulator appraisal, technical engineering tests, fitness trials and media training. “There are just too few women competing in single-seaters series at the moment,” Bond Muir said. “W Series will increase that number very significantly in 2019.” The series has the support of many motor sport figures. Two of its advisory board members are David Coulthard, a winner of 13 grands prix during a 15-year career in F1, and Adrian Newey, the most successful design engineer in British motor sport history, contributing to 20 Formula One drivers’ and constructors’ world championships with Williams, McLaren and Red Bull Racing. “In order to be a successful racing driver, you have to be skilled, determined, competitive, brave and physically fit, but you don’t have to possess the kind of super-powerful strength levels that some sports require,” Coulthard said in a news release. “You also don’t have to be a man.” He said female drivers tended to reach a “glass ceiling” at the Formula 3 level on their learning curve, often as a result of a lack of funding rather than a lack of talent. Stéphane Kox, 24, a female driver currently competing in the GT4 European Series, sees the W Series as an invaluable steppingstone.


CMYK

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

B6 Thursday, October 11, 2018

Antetokounmpo will win MVP, and 8 other bold predictions By Tim Bontemps The Washington Post

Our 10 bold predictions for the upcoming NBA season actually began last week, when we explained why LeBron James and the Los Angeles Lakers will miss the playoffs. But with a week left before the 2018-19 season gets underway, here are nine more predictions, beginning with the ascension of a new star to the top of the league. 1. The Greek Freak will be the NBA’s most valuable player At the start of each NBA season, there are generally a few obvious candidates to win the MVP award. As the season wears on, some are weeded out as narratives emerge dictating which of them will rise to the top. This season is different. James remains the league’s best player, but his team shouldn’t be good enough for him to seriously contend for the honor. Teammates Stephen Curry and Kevin Durant likely will again cancel out each other’s candidacies. Kawhi Leonard and Joel Embiid are both intriguing possibilities, but injury questions cloud their chances. James Harden, last season’s MVP winner, would have to match or exceed his brilliant play to have a chance to repeat, and this Rockets team will be hard pressed to have the same level of success they did in 2017-18. Enter Giannis Antetokounmpo, who is hitting his prime and has the potential along with the arrival of Mike Budenholzer as head coach to lead the Milwaukee Bucks north of 50 wins for just the second time in more than 30 seasons. That is the narrative thrust needed to take home the league’s top honor. Particularly in a season without an obvious front-runner, that should be enough to hand Antetokounmpo the MVP award. Meanwhile . . . 2. The Bucks will win more than 50 games If we are going to say Antetokounmpo will be this year’s MVP, we might as well double down on that prediction by saying the Bucks will ascend into the East’s upper echelon. Having Antetokounmpo is obviously a great place to start. Budenholzer’s arrival from Atlanta, replacing Jason Kidd as head coach, should have a positive impact, as well. Milwaukee’s offseason additions of Ersan Ilyasova (though a questionable signing because he was given a multiyear contract) and Brook Lopez will give the Bucks some desperately needed shooting around Antetokounmpo. Budenholzer also will be expected to revive Eric Bledsoe’s potential after a disappointing season last year and get Khris Middleton even more involved in the offense. The Bucks have lacked cohesion (just ask any of their legions of fans on social media, who were vociferous in their complaints about Kidd). Budenholzer should provide that, and with Antetokounmpo taking another step forward, it should result in them breaking through. 3. LeBron James won’t be named to the all-NBA first team James has made the allNBA first team 11 straight seasons, last missing out in 200607, when he made the second team. That’s how long James has been ensconced in one of those two forward spots, and his 12 total first-team selections are the most all-time. But individual accolades also require team success. And the talent around James with the Lakers will make it difficult for him to make it for a 13th time. While James may be the league’s best player once again, his competition for those two first-team spots is brutal. Between Durant, Antetokounmpo, Leonard and Anthony Davis, there are four top 10 players in the league who, if healthy, should have

outstanding seasons. And those players should be on far better teams. No matter how great James is, the Lakers missing the playoffs - or even barely squeaking in - will make it difficult to put him higher than all of those other stars if their teams perform as expected. 4. The Utah Jazz will finish with the second-best record in the Western Conference Utah was the surprise team in the Western Conference a year ago, recovering from losing Gordon Hayward to free agency by gaining a new superstar to build around in Donovan Mitchell and advancing to the second round of the playoffs. Unlike last season, Utah enters this year with virtually its entire roster returning and an understanding of exactly what coach Quin Snyder wants. That kind of continuity can go a long way over the course of an 82-game season - and over the second half of last season Utah was a dominant team when healthy. If the Jazz can rediscover that form this season, perhaps it will be hosting a the Western Conference semifinal series or even advancing to the West finals. 5. DeMarcus Cousins and Kristaps Porzingis will combine to play fewer than 60 games this season Two of the league’s most talented big men, Cousins and Porzingis, enter the season sidelined with significant injuries (a torn Achilles’ tendon for Cousins and torn anterior cruciate ligament for Porzingis). Though there is fevered speculation over when they will step back on the court, both the Golden State Warriors and New York Knicks have significant incentives to keep them in bubble wrap as long as possible. For the Warriors, the goal is to win a title, not regular season games. With Cousins on a one-year deal and wanting to get paid next summer, taking extra time to strengthen his body and come back after February’s All-Star break is the only path that makes sense. The Knicks, meanwhile, have their eyes on free agency next summer and a high pick in next year’s draft. While there has been talk about Porzingis coming back in December, it makes no sense to rush him back for a season that will undoubtedly be going nowhere. A conservative approach is the right way to go, setting up Porzingis to be paid next summer and for New York to add one more high pick to its burgeoning collection of talent. 6. Trae Young will hit 200 3-pointers and average six assists per game Young’s play at the Las Vegas Summer League in July made it clear there will be growing pains in his rookie season in Atlanta. But he also showed flashes of the talent that made him the No. 5 pick, including a game in which he buried seven 3-pointers. The Hawks are going to give Young every chance to let that talent shine as a rookie. The franchise is gearing its program around Young and will allow him to play through his mistakes and grow into his game. In NBA history, a player has hit at least 200 3s and averaged six assists just 16 times. Fifteen of those seasons belong to Stephen Curry (six), James Harden (four), Damian Lillard (two), Kyle Lowry (two) and Russell Westbrook (one), which is emblematic of the way the game has evolved in recent years. This isn’t saying Young is anywhere near the level of those players - at least not yet. But putting up numbers is as much about opportunity as anything. This season in Atlanta, Young is going to have the opportunity. Expect him to take advantage of it. 7. The Boston Celtics will have the NBA’s best record Things are lined up nicely for Boston. Both Hayward and Kyrie Irving are back from

injury. Marcus Smart was retained in free agency. Jaylen Brown and Jayson Tatum both took huge steps forward last year, as did Terry Rozier. Al Horford remains one of the steadiest big men in the league, and Brad Stevens is one of the NBA’s best coaches. All of that, along with the soft underbelly of the bottom of the East, the murderer’s row that teams are going to have to go through out West and a general state of apathy surrounding the Golden State Warriors, and Boston should steal the regular season crown from the Houston Rockets this season. Those factors, though, will also lead to . .. 8. Four of the top six re-

cords in the NBA will come from the Eastern Conference There has been a lot of discussion about how horrible the East is and why the two conferences need to be abolished to allow for a 1-16 playoff system in the NBA. While that isn’t going to happen anytime soon, that discussion has overshadowed the talent at the top of the East. Boston, Philadelphia and the Toronto Raptors are all loaded, and as laid out earlier, Milwaukee should enter their stratosphere this season. Those teams will benefit from a relatively weak group at the bottom of the East. Their counterparts out West, meanwhile, will spend the season bludgeoning each

CHEVROLET

other as they hope to scrape their way into a playoff spot. 9. Trevor Ariza will be a Houston Rocket by March 1 No, this isn’t saying Houston has some kind of prearranged deal with Ariza, who signed a one-year deal for $15 million with the Phoenix Suns on July 1. But the Suns should be one of the NBA’s worst teams this season (though the arrival of coach Igor Kokoskov, plus the signing of Ariza and the drafting of Deandre Ayton and Mikal Bridges, should still have Phoenix getting better this year). The team, therefore, will have no reason to hang onto Ariza after February’s trade deadline - especially given that the Suns have a plethora of young wings who will need playing

time. Thus, Ariza should be one of the most logical candidates to be bought out. And, if he is, it would make sense for him to return to Houston, where he would provide coach Mike D’Antoni another long-limbed defender and 3-point shooter. This could just as easily wind up being DeMarre Carroll or some other wing player, as the Rockets will need to add depth as the season progresses. But we’ll say that Ariza will be back in Houston and part of a potential Western Conference finals rematch with the Warriors next spring.

SAVINGS

ON THESE GREAT PRE-OWNED VEHICLES 2013 TOYOTA TACOMA

2012 CHEVY TRAVERSE

4.0L V6, 4WD 16K Miles

LT AWD

$

27,995

84K Miles $

14,950

Stk# 7654U

Stk# 7587U

2015 NISSAN MURANO

2015 KIA SORENTO

S AWD 70K Miles

LX AWD 55K Miles

$

19,995

$

17,595 Stk# 7660U

Stk# 7679U

2015 GMC TERRAIN

2016 DODGE DART

AWD SLE-1 35K Miles

4dr SXT 6K Miles

$

18,950

$

14,995

Stk# 7331UA

2017 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN GT Wagon Fleet 34K Miles $

21,995

Stk# 7636U

2017 HONDA RIDGELINE 4x4 Crew Cab 34K Miles $

33,995

Stk# 7684UA

Stk# 7682U

2017 CADILLAC XT5

2017 GMC SAVANNA CARGO VAN

Premium Luxury AWD, 10K Miles

4.8L V8, RWD 7K Miles $

$

42,950 Stk# 7646UA

24,550 Stk# 7423UA

CHEVROLET

Catskill • sawyerchevy.com • 518-943-1007 Tax, Title, DMV and dealer fees extra. All previous sales excluded. Not responsible for typographical errors. Photos for illustration use only. #7037747. Consumers may check for recall status at SaferCar.gov. See dealer for details.


CMYK

Thursday, October 11, 2018 B7

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

Williams ‘dumbfounded’ by NCAA’s refusal to allow benefit game By Cindy Boren The Washington Post

Never let it be said that the NCAA doesn’t stick to its rules. This time, though, North Carolina coach Roy Williams said he was “dumbfounded” by college sports’ governing body. The NCAA last week denied a waiver that would have allowed North Carolina and South Carolina to play a benefit exhibition basketball game with the proceeds going to Hurricane Florence relief, a decision that Williams admitted left him in disbelief. “I was dumbfounded when the waiver was not granted,” Williams told reporters during the team’s media day in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The stumbling block is that the NCAA allows schools to play two exhibition games, one public and one “secret” (in a closed gym with no reports, no acknowledgment by coaches and no stats listed). The NCAA had approved several hurricane relief games

last season and approved a game between Clemson and North Carolina-Wilmington this year. But South Carolina is already hosting Augusta University in an exhibition game later this month and will face Virginia Tech in its “closed scrimmage.” North Carolina plays Mount Olive in an exhibition next month and its secret scrimmage is later this month at Villanova. Neither school wanted to change its plans, which meant a waiver was needed for a third game. That wasn’t the only charity game the NCAA put the kibosh on, for the same reason. It won’t allow Kentucky and Notre Dame to play a third game, ESPN’s Jeff Goodman reported. Kentucky already has two exhibitions scheduled. Last year, the NCAA granted Kentucky a waiver for a third charity exhibition game and the Kentucky Cares Classic. against Morehead State raised nearly $450,000. “Our state and South Carolina had a terrible tragedy, a

JEREMY BREVARD/USA TODAY

North Carolina Tar Heels head coach Roy Williams during the second half against the Texas A&M Aggies in the second round of the 2018 NCAA Tournament at Spectrum Center.

horrific storm come through, whatever you want to call it,”

Williams said (via the Observer). “And I called [Gamecocks

known to look for any kind of competitive advantage, but Williams swears that wasn’t his motive. “If you guys can convince me how that was going to help North Carolina’s basketball team or South Carolina’s basketball team over somebody else, then I’ll listen to it. But that was not the intent. “When you see the scenes of people’s stuff out on the street, you want to do something. And that’s sadly what we saw. We saw so many situations, people losing everything they have. And we had what I thought was one of the few good ideas I’ve ever had.” Fifty-one people lost their lives when Florence, a Category 1 storm, brought devastating floods to the region in mid-September. Residents in flooded neighborhoods are still struggling and the area is expected to get more high winds and flooding from Hurricane Michael this week.

coach] Frank [Martin] to see if he would be interested in playing a game [in Charlotte]. “I called him and said, ‘Nobody’s been hurt as badly as we have, North Carolina and South Carolina, with Florence.’ And we asked for a waiver to see if we could play. I’m not trying to gain an advantage on anybody, I don’t think we can gain an advantage on anybody, but we were willing to play each other. “I wanted to take it to Charlotte because it would be closer between the two schools, and play a game and give all the money - all the money - to [charity].” Williams even had a pretty powerful and persuasive ace up his sleeve: potential involvement by Michael Jordan, owner of the Charlotte Hornets and former UNC star. “I was going to try to convince a guy that I know pretty well that owns the building in Charlotte to give us a great rate,” he said. Now, coaches at all levels and in all sports have been

RED APPLE REALTY, INC. Licensed Real Estate Broker • State of New York • 518-851-9601 396 Rte. 23 B • Claverack • www.redappler.com

JUSY LISTED!

Call 518-828-1616 to list your property today!

PRIVACY!

Restoration/Investment

CLAVERACK | $189,900

COPAKE | $279,155

VIEWS, VIEWS, & VIEWS!!! Now sprinkle in 6.57 Acres of Privacy and a comfortable Ranch styled home and you’ve got an unbeatable value! Long tree-lined drive • Gorgeous Catskill Mountain Views • Large Living room • Dining room • Kitchen • 2 Bedrooms • 1.5 Baths • Built-in Garage • AG Pool • Sheds • Generator and Privacy!

Escape to a world of your own in this unique Open concept contemporary that boasts country charm and elegance. Beamed ceilings • gleaming wide plank wooden loors • French doors • Open Living spaces and more! 2 Bedrooms • 1 ¾ Baths • Screened Porch • Deck and 3.165 Acres of Peace and Quiet near Copake Lake!

Visit www.hvpropertysearch.com and ind your new home!

2

1.5

2

HUDSON | $285,000 We’ve found it…the “Diamond in the Rough” Perfect Restoration project in the exciting City of Hudson! Be a part of it, live it! Walk to Amtrak location • Brick Construction • 3 loors • Antique Fireplace mantels • wooden loors • good proportions throughout! Included are two vacant lots next door to build upon, garden, or sell. Call for your special viewing and own Hudson affordably!

1.75

Call Us….you Know Us All! Barbara Robinson, Bob Weinman, Nancy Randall and Jenna Rossman

Call us: 518-851-9601 www.redappler.com

the

LOCAL EXPERTS

VILLAGE GREEN REALTY

#1

in Homes Sold 2011-2017 * PRICE REDUCED

MAIN STREET MUST-HAVE

RENT, RELAX, REJOICE

EXPLORE POSSIBILITY

COZY IN KINGSTON

DESIRABLE DUPLEX

A rare double lot in the heart of Catskill! Great deck w/seasonal Hudson River views, of-street parking, & it’s close to beauiful downtown & the Lumberyard! Loved for the past 45 years - bring your vision and make this fabulous house your own! Catskill $185,000

Escape from NYC to this super-cozy & easily maintained 2-family on a cul-de-sac. Located between Phoenicia for dining, tubing, & ishing, & Hunter for skiing & snowboarding. Rent one unit, or both, or keep it to yourself & enjoy stunning mountain & creek views. Lanesville $169,000

The perfect backdrop for a secluded Catskill Mountain retreat! 56.06 acres located in the heart of the coveted Beaverkill Valley. This wooded parcel is adjacent to thousands of acres of protected state land w/ electric located on the same side of the street. Andes $329,000

Cute & cozy w/2 bedrooms on the irst loor. The open kitchen & window-illed dining area give a beauiful airy feeling. 320 sq. t. of inished basement space provides extra room for an oice or storage. Across the street from Huton park, perfect for picnics or play. Kingston $170,000

Just Reduced! Priced to Sell! Thinking of buying a full ime residence or weekend home? This is the perfect place - a duplex where you can live in one side & rent out the other! Ample of-street parking is located in the rear along with a small yard. Catskill $199,000

BRICK BEAUTY

PRIVACY & VIEWS

SKI & SUN RETREAT

EVERYTHING YOU NEED

SKI SEASON GETAWAY

Charming and sturdy, this brick home has a relaxing three season room surrounded by a tree-lined backyard, perfect for privacy. Ameniies include a cozy wood burning ireplace, a full basement, walk-up aic, & a two car garage w/covered walkway. West Hurley $229,000

A unique home that exudes comfort. This wonderfully located home has a gorgeous stone ireplace in the living room to keep you warm on cozy winter nights. Set on over 5 charming acres so there’s plenty of room for outdoor fun. Jewet $295,000

Looking for a secluded country retreat in the middle of the ski resorts & all the Catskill’s atracions? This 4BD contemporary home has a lot of charm and “je ne sais quoi”. 2 BD suites, soaring ceilings in the LR w/a wood burning ireplace, & a large deck w/jacuzzi. Windham $375,000

This beauifully maintained 3BD/ 2BA ranch is privately nestled on 5 nature-packed acres. Nice open loorplan. Step out onto the wraparound deck, listen to the birds, and enjoy the peaceful sounds of the country life. Move right in! Pratsville $225,000

This Hunter Mt chalet hit the market just in ime for ski season! Super close to the base lodge, and movein ready. This 4BD/2BA is easy to maintain and close to all the acion. Fantasic deck where you can enjoy the mountain breezes and a morning cofee. Hunter $369,000

Catskill 518-625-3360 Rhinebeck 845-876-4535

Kingston 845-331-5357 Windham 518-734-4200

New Paltz 845-255-0615 Woodstock 845-679-2255

*According to Hudson Valley Catskill Region MLS. ©2016 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act. Each Oice Is Independently Owned And Operated. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker Logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.

LE

BRAT

G IN

search homes | community proiles | market news | advice

CE

v i l l a g e g r e e n r e a l t y. c o m

27 YEARS


CMYK

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

B8 Thursday, October 11, 2018

Register-Star

·

The Daily Mail

·

The Ravena News-Herald

·

Shop & Find

Reach our readers online, on social media, and in print - RUN IT UNTIL IT SELLS FOR ONLY $25!

MEDIA

Columbia-Greene

Classifieds Place your classified ad online at: www.hudsonvalley360.com

(518) 828-1616 Please select option 5

Fax 315.661.2520 email: classifieds@registerstar.com

NOTICE TO ALL ADVERTISERS

Open Monday-Friday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Report errors immediately. To ensure the best response to your ad, please take time to check that your ad is correct the first time it appears. If you see an error, please call immediately to have it changed. We can correct any errors in the next day’s p aper. (except Sunday and Monday). If Columbia-Greene Media is responsible for the error, we will credit you for the cost of the space occupied by the er ror on the first day of publication. However, the publishers are responsible for one incorrect day only, and liability shall no t exceed the portion of the space occupied by the error and is limited to the actual cost of the first ad. The publishers shall not be liable for any adver tisement omitted for any reason.

Legals 130 BROAD STREET CATSKILL LAND LLC Filed 7/17/2017 Office: Greene Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 1100 Main Street, Leeds, NY 12414. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Community Action of Greene County, Inc. is required by NYS HCR to rebid for the 20182019 insulation contract due to lack of bid packages sent out. Community Action of Greene County, Inc. Weatherization Assistance Program is soliciting bids for the installation of blown cellulose insulation in Greene County homes. A bid package may be obtained at the offices of Community Action of Greene County, Inc., 7856 Route 9W, Catskill, New York, Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:30a.m. And 4:30pm. Or by calling 518-9439205. Your bid package must be returned to our office no later than 10:00 a.m. on Friday, October 26, 2018. The bid opening will be conducted at 1:30 pm 10/26/18. All bids must be sealed and marked "Insulation Bid". The Weatherization Program receives funding through the U.S. Department of Energy and The Home Energy Assistance Program. The funding is distributed through New York State Division of Housing and Community Renewal, and is monitored by the Energy Service Bureau. Community Action of Greene County, Inc. reserves the right to reject any or all bids. DELBOY INDUSTRIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 07/19/17. Office: Greene County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, c/o Spiegel & Utrera P.A., P.C., 1 Maiden Lane, 5th Floor, New York, NY 10038. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. NOTICE OF FORMATION OF A DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC) The name of the LLC is CATSKILL LIFE, LLC. The Articles of Organization of the LLC were filed with the New York Secretary of State, under Section 203 of the Limited Liability Law of the State of New York on August 16, 2018. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. The office of the LLC is to be located in Greene County. The latest date on which the company may dissolve is August 14, 2118. The Secretary of State is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is 88 Bay 10th Street, Brooklyn, New York, 11228. NOTICE of formation of Climax Creek Distilleries, LLC, a Limited Liability Company (the "LLC). Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of NY ("SSNY") on June 05, 2018. Office location is Greene County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC, those whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any such process that is served to the address of the LLC, 233 County Route 26 Climax, NY, 12042. The purpose of the LLC is to engaged in any lawful purpose.

LEGAL Notice of Public Hearing on the Budget NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Proposed Budget of the Ancram Fire District of the Town of Ancram, State of New York, will be presented to the Board of Fire Commissioners of the Ancram Fire District, for its consideration. A PUBLIC HEARING will be held at 6:00 p.m. at the Ancram Fire House, County Route 7 and Route 82 Ancram, New York 12502, in the Town of Ancram, State of New York on the 16th day of Oct., 2018. (The Budget hearing must be held annually on the third Tuesday in October.) Pursuant to Town Law S181.3(a), the Board of Fire Commissioners must hold a public hearing on the budget, make the proposed budget available to the public prior to the public hearing, allow the public to comment on the budget at the public hearing. This public hearing must be held to allow maximum public participation in the hearing. The purpose of the public hearing is to allow any person to be heard in favor of or against the proposed budget as it is submitted, or for or against any item or items contained in the proposed budget, and hearing all persons interested in the subject concerning same. That a copy of the proposed budget is available at the Office of the Town Clerk(s) of the Town(s) of Ancram and Gallatin at (Gallatin Town Hall, 667 County Route 7, Ancram NY) and (Ancram Town Hall 1416 County Route 7, Ancram NY) and Ancram Fire District Secretary at (Ancram Fire District office, County Route 7 and Route 82, Ancram, New York) where it may be inspected by any interested person during office hours (First and Second Tuesdays of the month 6 to 8 P.M.). Dated: 10-11-2018 Board of Fire Commissioners Ancram Fire District P.O. Box 163 Ancram, NY 12502 Legal Notice: under provisions of Article 182-7 of the Lien Law of the State of New York, Spot on Storage, 61 Maple Ave Catskill, NY 12414 Phone number 518-943-5400, will sell the personal property contained within the following units for cash only, Unit #337 Jennifer Sweeney, Unit #510 Gilbert Martin, Unit #520 Jamie McGee, Unit #524 Ashley Hallock, Unit #559 Jonathan Welsh, Unit #309 Erica Tedesco. Public sale will be held on Oct 25, 2018 at 11:00 am or next day that weather permits at Spot on Storage 61 Maple Ave Catskill, NY 12414. Spot on Storage reserves the right to refuse any and all bids, remove units from auction list and to cancel the auction at any time for any reason. New formation of a Limited Liability Corporation (LLC), Sombrero Scapes LLC. Articles of organization have been filed with the Secretary of State on 08/24/2018 to operate a business of property maintenance out of Greene County. The SSNY is designated as agent of the LLC and shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC @ 1 Commerce Plaza, Albany, NY 12260. Notice of formation Kiskatom Gardens, LLC for any lawful purpose. Articles of Org. filed w/ NY Sec'y of State (NS) 9/7/18. NS designated as agent upon whom process served & shall mail service of process to prin-

cipal business location 35 S Franklin St Athens Greene County NY 12015. Notice of Formation of 1658 PLATTE CLOVE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 9/11/18. Office: Greene County. SSNY designated as agt upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 7001 Brush Hollow Rd, Westbury, NY 11590 Purpose: any lawful activity NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 475 Main St. Catskill, LLC A DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC) Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York on September 26, 2018. New York Office Location - Greene County. Secretary of State of the State of New York is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. Secretary of State of the State of New York shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to: c/o LLC, P.O. Box 493, Catskill, New York 12414. PURPOSE: To engage in any lawful act or activity.

NOTICE OF Formation of a Limited Liability Company (LLC): R & D CURB APPEAL LLC, Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on July 23, 2015. Office Location: Greene County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/OR&D CURB APPEAL LLC, 1213 High Falls Road Catskill, NY 12414. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. Notice of Formation of EJM MANAGEMENT HOLDINGS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/23/17. Office location: Greene County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o J. Sullivan, 65 Woodcrest Avenue, White Plains, NY 10604. Purpose: any lawful activity.

NAME: Roe Jan Brewing Company LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on August 27, 2018. Office location: Columbia County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC to Mark P. Cawley, Esq., 175 Hunt Road, Hillsdale New York 12529. Mark P. Cawley, Esq., 175 Hunt Road, Hillsdale New York 12529 is the registered agent. The registered agent is the agent of the LLC upon whom process against the LLC may be served. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY Ryan Housekeeping LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on AUGUST 27,2018 Office location: Greene County SSNY has been designated as agent of the Ryan Housekeeping LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the Ryan Housekeeping LLC, 81 Spahmer road, Leeds NY, 12451 For any lawful purpose.

Notice of Formation of GREATEST TOP LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/05/18. Office location: Columbia County. Princ. office of LLC: 39 Bate Rd., Craryville, NY 12521. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be NOTICE OF FORMA- served. SSNY shall mail process to the TION OF 8223 Main St. Hunter, LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: LLC Notice of Formation of A DOMESTIC LIMITED Any lawful activity. Limited Liability ComLIABILITY COMPANY Notice of Formation of pany (LLC). (LLC) Articles of Organiza- H U C K L E B E R R Y Name: EXEMPLAR FItion filed with the Sec- G R O U N D S W O R K S NANCIAL, LLC - Artiretary of State of the LLC Art. of Org. filed cles of Organization w/Secy. of State of NY filed with Secretary of State of New York on Septem- (SSNY) on 5/03/2018. State of New York Office location: Greene (SSNY) on July 24, ber 24, 2018. New York Office Loca- County. SSNY desig- 2018. Office location: tion - Greene County. nated as agent for ser- Greene County. SSNY Secretary of State of vice of process. SSNY Designated as agent of the State of New York shall mail process to LLC upon whom prois designated as agent 88 High Acres Lane, cess against it may be served. SSNY shall upon whom process Greenville, NY 12083. against the LLC may Purpose: Any lawful mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 11 Wayne be served. Secretary activity. Avenue, Coxsackie, of State of the State of New York 12051. PurNOTICE OF FORMANew York shall mail a pose: any lawful purTION OF illhook, LLC a copy of any process Limited pose. against the LLC served domestic upon him/her to: c/o Liability Company orLLC, P.O. Box 493, ganized under the laws NOTICE OF FORMAOF LIMITED Catskill, New York of New York whose Ar- TION ticles of Organization LIABILITY COMPANY. 12414. PURPOSE: To engage were filed on August NAME: The Makery, in any lawful act or ac- 29, 2018 with the New LLC. York Secretary of Articles of Organizativity. State. The Secretary tion were filed with the Notice of Formation of of State has been des- Secretary of State of MNB Consulting LLC ignated as agent upon New York (SSNY) on MNB Consulting LLC. whom process may be August 15th, 2018. Art. Of Org. filed with served and shall mail a Office location: Greene the SSNY on copy of any process County. 8/30/2018 Office: served on him or her to SSNY has been desigGreene County.SSNY 199 Schoolhouse nated as agent of the designated as agent of Road, Stuyvesant LLC upon whom proLLC upon whom pro- 12173. New York Of- cess against it may be cess against it may be fice Location: Colum- served. SSNY shall served. SSNY shall bia County. Purpose: mail a copy of any promail process to the All lawful activities. cess against the LLC LLC, 2445 Old Kings to Lindsey E Carroll Road Catskill NY NOTICE OF FORMA- 384 State Route 296 12414. Purpose: Any TION OF LIMITED LI- Hensonville NY, lawful purpose. 12439. ABILITY COMPANY.

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MarKarma, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on July 27, 2018. Office location: Columbia County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. The Post Office address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon her is UNITED STATES C O R P O R AT I O N AGENTS, INC. 7014 13TH AVENUE, SUITE 202 BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, 11228. The principal business address of the LLC is 114 Millbrook Road, Hudson, NY 12534. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Notice of formation of Olde Orchard, LLC, a Limited Liability Company (the "LLC). Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of NY ("SSNY") on June 05, 2018. Office location is Greene County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC, those whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any such process that is served to the address of the LLC, 233 County Route 26 Climax, NY, 12042. The purpose of the LLC is to engaged in any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of Rebecca Fogg Jewelry LLC. Articles of Org. filed with Sect. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/10/2018. County: Columbia County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy

of process to the LLC, 57 Frese Road Hudson, NY 12534. Purpose: Any lawful purpose NOTICE of Formation of Sheep Skins and More, LLC. Articles of Org. filed with Sect. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/31/18. County: Columbia. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served & shall send mail to: Sheep Skins and More LLC, PO Box 313 Stottville, NY 12172 Any lawful purpose. NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SOLO VINO CATSKILL, LLC A DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC) Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York on August 27, 2018. New York Office Location Greene County. Secretary of State of the State of New York is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. Secretary of State of the State of New York shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to: c/o LLC, 354 Main Street, Catskill, New York 12414. PURPOSE: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Notice of formation of The Marble Rock House, LLC, a limited liability company Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of NY ("SSNY") on 8/29/18. location is Greene County and t h e SSNY has been designated

as agent of t h e LLC, upon process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any such process served PO Box 659, Leeds, NY 12451 The purpose of t h e LLC is to engage in any lawful purpose. NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY FIRST:The name of the Limited Liability Company is BACH EAST, LLC (hereinafter referred to as the Company) SECOND:The Articles of Organization of the Company were filed with the Secretary of State on September 11, 2018. THIRD: The County within the State of New York in which the office of the Company is located is Columbia. FOURTH: The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail process is P.O. Box 1040, Hudson, NY, 12534. FIFTH: The Company is organized for all lawful purposes, and to do any and all things necessary, convenient, or incidental to that purpose. Dated: September 11, 2018 FREEMAN HOWARD, P.C. 441 East Allen Street P.O. Box 1328 Hudson, New York 12534 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY FIRST:The name of the Limited Liability Company is GKL AC-


CMYK

Tuesday, October 9, 2018 B9

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

Lehner, Islanders cruise past Sharks, 4-0 Field Level Media Robin Lehner recorded 35 saves in his first start Monday afternoon with the New York Islanders, who cruised to a 4-0 victory over the visiting San Jose Sharks. Lehner, who signed with the Islanders in July, recorded his ninth career shutout in his first start since undergoing alcohol rehab and being October 5, 2018. New York office location: 8 Broad Street, Village of Kinderhook, County of Columbia and the State of New York. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The post office address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her is: The Three Sisters Tavern, LLC; P.O. Box 17, Kinderhook, New York 12106. Purpose/Character of business: Any lawful business purpose permitted under the New York Limited Liability Company Law. This notification is made pursuant to Section 206 of the Limited Liability Company Law. Public Notice Residents of the Craryville Fire District Towns of Claverack, Copake, Hillsdale and Taghkanic Notice is Hereby Given that the Proposed Budget of the Craryville Fire District, of the Towns of Claverack, Copake, Hillsdale and Taghkanic, State of New York will be presented by the Board of Fire Commissioners of the Craryville Fire District for its consideration. A Public Hearing will be held at 7:00pm at the Craryville Fire House 4210 Cty. Rt. 7, Craryville , New York, Town of Copake, State of New York, on the 16th of October, 2018. Copies of the Craryville Fire District proposed budget for 2019 may be obtained by contacting Craryville Fire District secretary at 518 325 4454 or by contacting the Town Clerk in respective towns. Individuals may offer oral or written comments in favor or against any items or items herein contained. Barbara L. Scutt, Secretary Craryville Fire District, Board of Fire Commissioners Request for Proposal (as amended) Energy Performance Contract Services The Board of Education of the CoxsackieAthens Central School District, Greene County, New York, hereby solicits Requests for Proposals for the selection of an Energy Performance Contracting firm to implement district-wide energy conservation measures. Proposals must be received by 4:00 PM on November 30, 2018 at the Coxsackie -Athens District Office, Attention Leslie Copleston, 24 Sunset Boulevard, Coxsackie, NY 12051. Two additional copies must also be submitted to Daryl Mastracci, CS Arch, 40 Beaver Street, Albany, NY 12207. Specifications may be obtained from our website at www.cacsd.org, under District Office then Business Office. A preproposal review of the proposal requirements and walk-through of the facilities will be held at the District Office on October 18, 2018 at 2:00 PM. The Board of Education reserves the right to reject any or all proposals. Leslie Copleston Asst. Superintendent of School Services Coxsackie-Athens Central School District

diagnosed with bipolar disorder following his final season with the Buffalo Sabres. Anders Lee, Scott Mayfield, Matt Martin and Casey Cizikas all scored for the Islanders, who have opened the season with two wins in three games. New York recorded just two shutouts last season, when it allowed an NHL-high 293 goals.

Summons, Notice and Brief Statement of the Object of the Action as Published Summons and Notice Gary R. Harvey and Patricia Harvey, Plaintiff against Effie Carnwright also know as Effie May Carnwright, if living and if she is dead her respective heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, executors, administrators, trustees, devisees, legatees, assignors, lienors, creditors, and successors in interest, and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through such defendants who may be deceased, by purchase, inheritance, lien or otherwise of any right, title or interest in and to the premises described in the complaint herein, and the respective husbands, wives or widows of her (or him) if any all of whose names are unknown to plaintiff. Index No. 18-0324 To the above named defendant: You are hereby summoned to appear in this action by serving a notice of appearance on the plaintiff's attorney within thirty days after service of this summons is complete, and in case of your failure to appear, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint filed herein Dated September 26, 2018. To the defendants Effie Carnwright also know as Effie May Carnwright, if living and if she is dead her respective heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, executors, administrators, trustees, devisees, legatees, assignors, lienors, creditors, and successors in interest, and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through such defendants who may be deceased, by purchase, inheritance, lien or otherwise of any right, title or interest in and to the premises described in the complaint herein, and the respective husbands, wives or widows of her (or him) if any all of whose names are unknown to plaintiff. The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of Honorable Lisa M. Fisher , a justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, signed the 13th day of August, 2018, at Catskill , New York, and filed on the day of September 20, with the complaint in the office of the clerk of the County of Greene , at the county court house, in the Town of Catskill, New York. The object of this action to determine a claims to real property located in Greene County in the Town of Catskill State of New York Attorney for Plaintiff: William H. Bradt Address120 East Washington Street, Syracuse, NY 13202 Telephone Number315-214-5017

VEATRIX LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 9/04/18. Office in Columbia Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 254 Manhattan Ave Ste. 4B New York, NY 10026. Purpose: Any SWEET CITY ENTER- lawful activity. TAINMENT LLC Articles of Org. filed NY SUPREME COURT Sec. of State (SSNY) COUNTY OF COLUM8/29/18. Office in Co- BIA lumbia Co. SSNY de- WELLS FARGO BANK, sign. Agent of LLC NATIONAL ASSOCIAupon whom process TION, AS TRUSTEE may be served. SSNY FOR MASTR ASSET shall mail copy of pro- BACKED SECURITIES 2003-OPT1, cess to The LLC 376 TRUST PASSPresident ST 2F MORTGAGE CERTIFIBrooklyn, NY 11232. THROUGH Purpose: Any lawful CATES, SERIES 2003OPT1, Plaintiff against activity.

Martin Jones made 26 saves for the Sharks, who have lost two of three. The Islanders snapped a scoreless duel with a powerplay goal with 5:26 left in the second, when Lee put back the rebound of Josh Bailey’s shot. It was the third straight game in which New York scored a power-play goal and the second consecutive con-

JESSICA L. LOOS A/K/A JESSICA LOOS, KENNETH LOOS, JR. A/K/A KENNETH LOOS, et al Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered on September 12, 2018. I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Columbia County Courthouse, 401 Union Street, Hudson, N.Y. on the 7th day of November, 2018 at 9:00 a.m. premises described as follows: All that certain plot, piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the Town of Livingston, Columbia County, New York. Said premises known as 18 & 19 Pine Tree Lane, Livingston, N.Y. 12590. (Section: 192.2, Block: 3, Lot: 21 & 22). Approximate amount of lien $ 76,806.39 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed judgment and terms of sale. Index No. 11053-17. Max N. Zacker, Esq., Referee. McCabe, Weisberg, & Conway, LLC Attorney(s) for Plaintiff 145 Huguenot Street Suite 210 New Rochelle, New York 10801 (914) 636-8900

Real Estate 220

Houses for Sale Other Area

311

Apts. for Rent Other Area

CAIRO: LARGE renovated 2 bdr Apt. Quiet location w/park like grounds w/picnic & walking areas. Seniors welcomed. Section 8 accepted. Security & references required. Sorry no pets. $750/mo + utilities. Call details. Landlord/Broker: 518622-3214. No realtor fee.

395

Want to Rent

SENIOR CITIZEN, wife & support dog (w/ Dr's letter) need to find an apartment ASAP in the Hudson/Greenport area. On Section 8, can only spend $775/mo. Call 518-822-1021 or 518-2298803

Employment 415

Commercial Property

Ravena, NY 28 UNIT MOTEL, + 12 apartments, also 4 bdr house. By owner. 518-369-2002. 255

Lots & Acreage

BANK ORDERED LAND SALE! Oct 13th & 14th! 21 acres - was 69,900, SALE $49,900 42 acres - was 89,900, SALE $64,900 35 acres - 5 acre POND was 199,900, SALE $129,900 Gorgeous No. Catskills location less than 3 ½ hrs NY City! Views, State Land, Low Taxes, 100% Buildable! Special Bank terms Avail! Call 888-644-0366 NewYorkLandandLakes.com

CAMP LOTBarnes Corners NY. Corner of Williams Rd & Rt 177. Borders state land & Snowmobile trails. PRICE REDUCED! 315-783-9720.

Rentals Apartment for Rent 295

Columbia County

GENT-1 BDR, newly painted 800 sq ft, incls: all utils. & laundry, no smoking/pets, plenty parking, sec req. & 1st mo, $1100 (518)610-0913

Apartment for Rent 298

Greene County

ATHENS, 2 bdr., kitch. & DR. No pets, Very good condition. Call 518-9451659

over led to Martin’s goal with 6:58 remaining. Valtteri Filppula swiped the puck from defenseman Erik Karlsson and passed to a wide-open Martin, who beat Jones from point-blank range. It was Martin’s first goal for the Islanders since Apr. 10, 2016. He spent the previous two seasons with the Toronto Maple Leafs after playing his first

445 Situations Wanted

Miscellaneous

AILRINES ARE HIRING Get FAA approved hands on Aviation training. Financial aid for qualified students - Career placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-296-7094 AIRLINE CAREERS Start Here –Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM for free information 866296-7094. EXP. ROOFERS/ROOFER HELPERS. Must have own transportation. $$$ Top Pay $$$ 518-828-7302 HOME HEALTH Aide wanted in the Hillsdale NY area. Call Mariam @ (518)7554822 JOB OPPORTUNITY: $17 P/H NYC - $14.50 P/H LI If you currently care for your relatives or friends who have Medicaid or Medicare, you may be eligible to start

working for them as a personal assistant. No Certificates needed. ( 3 4 7 ) 4 6 2 - 2 6 1 0 (347)565-6200 JOB OPPORTUNITY: $17 P/H NYC - $14.50 P/H LI If you currently care for your relatives or friends who have Medicaid or Medicare, you may be eligible to start working for them as a personal assistant. No Certificates needed. (347)4622610 (347)565-6200

DIVORCE $349 - Uncontested divorce papers prepared. Only one signature required. Poor person Application included if applicable. Separation agreements. Custody and support petitions. - 518-2740380

DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Channels $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Call 1-855-401-9066

Struggling with DRUGS or ALCHOHOL? Addicted to PILLS? Talk to someone who cares. Call The Addiction Hope & Help Line for a free assessment. 1-855995-2069

Services 5 14

Services Offered

Do you use a CPAP machine for sleep apnea? Get your FDA approved CPAP machine and supplies at little or no cost! Free sleep supplement and sleep guide include! Call 866-4306489! Guaranteed Life Insurance! (Ages 50 to 80). No medical exam. Affordable premiums never increase. Benefits never decrease. Policy will only be cancelled for non-payment. 855-6865879. REVERSE MORTGAGE: Homeowners age 62+ turn your home equity into taxfree cash! Speak with an expert today and receive a free booklet. 1-877-5803720

0

Medical Aides & Services

LUNG CANCER? And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call 866951-9073 for Information. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. VIAGRA & CIALIS! 60 pills for $99. 100 pills for $150 FREE shipping. Money back guaranteed! Call Today: 800-404-0244 564

Services Wanted

DENTAL INSURANCE. Call Physicians Mutual Insurance Company for details. NOT just a discount plan, REAL

GREENVILLE CENTRAL SCHOOL is accepting applications for substitutes in all areas. Please visit www.greenvillecsd.org for more information or call 518966-5070, Ext. 525.

Professional & Technical

Bulk Carrier looking for CDL-A Drivers. Will train on modern Specialized Equipment. Mostly under 100 Air Miles! Excellent Pay/Benefits. Email for application: cscott@lynnhscott.com or 888-339-2900 x12 HOME SECURITY - Leading smart home provider Vivint Smart Home has an offer just for you. Call 877480-2648 to get a professionally installed home security system with $0 activation. Thousand Islands CSD - is accepting applications for a FT School Psychologist. Duties include serving as a K-12 School Psychologist·and Chair for CSE/CPSE. This is a ten-month position with approximately 10 additional days paid per diem during July and August. Must be NYS certified. Electronic submission through www.pnwb oces.org/olas

coverage for 350 procedures. 866-679-8194 or http://www. dental50plus.com/41 Ad# 6118

F rm & Garden 656

Livestock Buy/Sell

3 GRASS fed Black Baldies- 18 mos old, real nice, priced to sell $1.30/lb. 5 Hereford cows calving in April & May. Call 518-7318884

M rhandise

seven years with the Isles. The Sharks pulled Jones with more than four minutes remaining but could not score on Lehner, who recorded his first shutout since Jan. 25. Cizikas scored a shorthanded, empty-net goal with 56 seconds remaining.

for Sale

Buying Diamonds, gold, silver, antique and modern jewelry, better furs, U.S. and foreign coins, paintings, bronzes, complete estates. Highest prices paid. Call 914-260-8783 for appointment.

SUBSTITUTES NEEDED IN ALL AREAS

435

73 0

A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. Call: 1-800-404-8852

General Help

104 acres farm land, orchards, woods, 2 houses, several barns, greenhouse, beautiful catskills mountain views, close to Hudson, NY State Thruway, Taconic Parkway. Email: apples@gtel.net for more information. 232

test in which Lee scored on the man-advantage. The Sharks opened the third period with six unanswered shots, but the Islanders doubled their lead on their first opportunity, when Mayfield’s shot trickled past a gaggle of players in front of Jones and into the net at the 5:16 mark. An untimely Sharks turn-

Do you owe more that $5000 in Tax Debt? Call Wells & Associates INC. We solve Tax Problems! Personal or Business! IRS, State and Local. 30 years in Business! Call NOW for a free consultations at an office near you. 1-888-7429640 Earthlink High Speed Internet. As Low As $14.95/month (for the first 3 months.) Reliable High Speed Fiber Optic Technology. Stream Videos, Music and More! Call Earthlink Today 1-877-933-3017 Earthlink High Speed Internet. As Low As $14.95/month (for the first 3 months.) Reliable High Speed Fiber Optic Technology. Stream Videos, Music and More! Call Earthlink Today 1-855-970-1623 GOT SOMETHING TO SAY? Be heard with a statewide ad in the New York Daily Impact from NYNPA! Put your 25-word ad in front of MILLIONS of people with a single order for one great price. Call 315-661-2446 or contact this paper today! Have a CPAP machine for sleep apnea? Get replacement FDA approved CPAP machine parts and supplies at little or no cost! Free sleep guide included! 1877-411-9455 IF YOU own a home, you need Homeowners Insurance. Protect your house, belongings, valuables & more. Call now for a free quote. Don’t wait! 844-338-3881

OXYGEN - Anytime. Anywhere. No tanks to refill. No deliveries. The All-New Inogen One G4 is only 2.8 pounds! FAA approved! FREE info kit: 866-9412913 PRIVACY HEDGES SPRING BLOWOUT SALE 6ft Arborvitae Reg $179 Now $75 Beautiful, Nursery Grown. FREE Installation/FREE delivery, Limited Supply! ORDER NOW: 518536-1367 www.lowcosttreefarm.com REACH NEW YORK STATE with an ad like this in the New York Daily Impact from NYNPA! Put your 25-word ad in front of MILLIONS of people statewide with a single order for one great price. Call 315661-2446 or contact this paper! Save on your utility bill with Solar! Strong return on investment; Safe for the Environment. Reliable Energy with Little or No Out of Pocket Costs. See your estimated savings today! Serving Orange, Putnam & Westchester. 1-877-4353660. Mon-Fri: 12:00 to 8:00pm EST. SAWMILLS FROM only $4397.00- MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own

bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 800-567-0404 Ext.300N.

Spectrum Triple Play! TV, Internet & Voice for $29.99 ea. 60 MB per second speed. No contract or commitment. More Channels. Faster Internet. Unlimited Voice. Call 1-855-977-7198

VIAGRA & CIALIS! 60 pills for $99. 100 pills for $150 FREE shipping.Money back guaranteed! 1-800-7589761

W anted 795

to buy

SAFE BATHROOM Renovations in just one day! Update to safety now. Grab bars, no slip flooring & seated showers. Call for a free in-home consultation: 844782-7096

Transportation

Automobiles 9 30

for Sale

DONATE YOUR car to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting Make-A-Wish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call 315-400-0797 Today!

Autos/Trucks 995

Wanted

DONATE YOUR car to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting Make-A-Wish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call (855) 376-9474 SELLING YOUR CLASSIC CAR? Get your 10-word ad in daily and weekly papers across New York State and reach MILLIONS for just $199. Call 315-661-2446 or contact this newspaper's classified's department today!

Quick & EEasy asy One-Stop-Shopping

That’s &ODVVLÀHGV &ODVVLÀHG V

START EARNING EXTRA CASH TODAY!

$100 BONUS 30 DAY STAY ON

EARN EXTRA CASH AS A TIMES UNION NEWSPAPER CARRIER. ROUTES AVAILABLE IN COLUMBIA AND GREENE COUNTY

CONTACT US TODAY AND GET STARTED www.timesunion.com/carriers or call (518) 454-5689


CMYK

Thursday, October 11, 2018 B9

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY COURT: COUNTY OF GREENE THE BANK OF GREENE COUNTY, Plaintiff, -against ERIC ARMSTRONG, et al., Defendants. Pursuant to a judgment of foreclosure and sale duly signed on September 11, 2018 and entered thereafter, I, the undersigned Referee, will sell at public auction at the Second Floor Rotunda of the Greene County Court House, at 320 Main Street, Catskill, New York on November 14, 2018 at 1:00 p.m., the premises known as 32 Princess Drive, in the Town of Athens, County of Greene, State of New York, Tax ID # 120.18-3-4 and more fully described in said judgment. The premises will be sold subject to the provisions of said judgment. Dated: October 2, 2018 JON KOSICH, ESQ., Referee WHITBECK BENEDICT & SMITH LLP, Attorneys for Plaintiff 436 Union Street NOTICE OF OR- Hudson, New York GANIZATION OF LIM- 12534 ITED LIABILITY COM- (518) 828-9444 PANY FIRST:The name of NOTICE OF SALE the Limited Liability SUPREME COURTCompany is Taghkanic COUNTY OF GREENE Diner LLC (hereinafter WELLS FARGO BANK, referred to as the N.A., Plaintiff, "Company"). AGAINST SECOND:The Articles ANTHONY PORTER of Organization of the AKA ANTHONY J. Company were filed PORTER, ERIN PORTwith the Secretary of ER AKA ERIN C. State on September PORTER, et al. Defen25, 2018. dant(s) THIRD: The County Pursuant to a judgwithin the State of New ment of foreclosure York in which the of- and sale duly entered fice of the Company is on August 7, 2018. located is Columbia I, the undersigned RefCounty. eree, will sell at public FOURTH: The Secre- auction at the The tary of State has been Greene County Courtdesignated as agent house, 320 Main St, upon whom process Catskill, NY 12414 on against the Company October 18, 2018 at may be served. The 9:30 AM premises post office address to known as 253 KING which the Secretary of HILL ROAD, FREEState shall mail pro- HOLD, NY 12431. cess is P.O. Box 386, All that certain plot Claverack, New York piece or parcel of land, 12513. with the buildings and FIFTH: The Company improvements thereon is organized for all law- erected, situate, lying ful purposes. and being in the Town DATED: Septem- of Greenville, County ber 25, 2018 of Greene and State of GUTERMAN SHALLO New York. Section 52, & ALFORD, PLLC Block 3 and Lot 42. 21 North Seventh Approximate amount Street of judgment Hudson, New York $277,543.94 plus inter12534 (518) 828-5400 est and costs. PremisNOTICE OF OR- es will be sold subject to provisions of filed GANIZATION OFTONY'S PIZZA & Judgment. Index #16371. PASTA, LLC Under Section 203 of VERONICA M. KOthe Limited Liability SICH, ESQ., Referee, Aldridge Pite, LLP - AtCompany Law 1. The name of the torneys for Plaintiff limited liability compa- 40 Marcus Drive Suite Melville, NY ny is: TONY'S PIZZA 200 11747 & PASTA, LLC. 2. The Articles of Organization were filed in NOTICE OF SALE COURT the Office of the New SUPREME York Secretary of COUNTY OF COLUMBIA, KEYBANK, N.A. State on May 9, 2018. 3. The office is to be S/B/M TO FIRST NIlocated in the County AGARA BANK, N.A., S/B/M HUDSON RIVof Greene. 4. The Secretary of ER BANK & TRUST Plaintiff, State of New York COMPANY, State has been desig- vs. CHARLES MANG nated as agent of the A/K/A CHARLES ROBlimited liability compa- ERT MANG, ET AL., ny, upon whom pro- Defendant(s). cess against it may be Pursuant to an Order Referee served. The Secretary Confirming may send process to Report and Judgment the company at: 9495 of Foreclosure and State Route 32, Free- Sale duly filed on August 17, 2018, I, the hold, NY 12431. Referee 5. The Company is or- undersigned ganized to carry on all will sell at public auction at the Columbia lawful activities. County Supreme Notice of Qualification Courthouse, 401 Union of Global Lending Ser- Street, Hudson, NY vices LLC. Authority 12534 on November filed with NY Secy of 07, 2018 at 10:00 a.m., State (SSNY) on premises known as 9/27/18. Office loca- 193 County Route 7-A tion: Greene County. a/k/a 193 Main Street LLC formed in Dela- Copake, NY 12516. All ware (DE) on 10/28/11. that certain plot, piece SSNY is designated as or parcel of land, with agent of LLC upon the buildings and imwhom process against provements thereon it may be served. erected, situate, lying SSNY shall mail pro- and being in the Town cess to: 10 E. 40th St, of Copake, County of Fl. 10, NY, NY 10016. Columbia and State of DE address of LLC: New York, Section 850 New Burton Rd, 187.1, Block 1 and Lot Ste 201, Dover, DE 26. Approximate 19904. Cert. of Forma- amount of judgment is tion filed with DE Secy $18,029.40 plus interof State, 401 Federal est and costs. PremisSt, Ste 4, Dover, DE es will be sold subject 19901. The name and to provisions of filed address of the Reg. Judgment Index # Agent is Cogency Glo- 2017-12048. bal, Inc., 10 E. 40th St, Virginia D. Benedict, Fl. 10, NY, NY 10016. Esq., Referee Purpose: any lawful Schiller, Knapp, Lefkoactivity. witz & Hertzel, LLP, THE TOWN OF 200 John James AuduGREENPORT WILL BE bon Parkway, Suite FLUSHING HY- 202, Amherst, New York 14228, Attorneys DRANTS September 23, 2018 for Plaintiff through October 19, Smiths Mills Antiques 2018 Sunday through Thurs- LLC. Filed with SSNY 5-1-18. Office Greene day 9 PM - 5 AM Flushing will com- County. Untied States Agents, mence 9 PM Sunday Corporation Inc. Designated as September 23, 2018. Flushing may be ex- agent for process and tended if needed dur- shall mail to 7014 13th Suite 202 ing the week of Octo- Avenue, ber 22 through Octo- Brooklyn, NY 11228. Agent shall mail copy ber 26 (daytime hours) of process to Smiths Mills Antiques 270 NOTICE OF SALE County Route 405 Index No. 18-00015 Hon. Charles M. Tail- Greenville, NY 12083. leur Purpose: Any lawful.

QUISITIONS, LLC (hereinafter referred to as the "Company") SECOND:The Articles of Organization of the Company were filed with the Secretary of State on September 25, 2018. THIRD: The County within the State of New York in which the office of the Company is located is Columbia. FOURTH: The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail process is 255 Konig Road, Ghent, NY, 12075. FIFTH: The Company is organized for all lawful purposes, and to do any and all things necessary, convenient, or incidental to that purpose. Dated: October 2, 2018 FREEMAN HOWARD, P.C. 441 East Allen Street P.O. Box 1328 Hudson, New York 12534

NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF GREENE JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., Plaintiff AGAINST Charles Cordle a/k/a Charles David Cordle; et al., Defendant(s) Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated July 12, 2018 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Greene County Courthouse, 320 Main Street, Catskill, New York on November 2, 2018 at 11:00AM, premises known as 375 Main Street, New Baltimore, NY 12124. All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the Village and Town of New Baltimore, County of Greene, State of NY, Section 7.12 Block 3 Lot 6. Approximate amount of judgment $144,078.98 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index# 1700130. John Hilscher III, Esq., Referee Shapiro, DiCaro & Barak, LLC Attorney(s) for the Plaintiff 175 Mile Crossing Boulevard Rochester, New York 14624 (877) 430-4792 Dated: September 17, 2018 For sale information, please visit www.Auction.com or call (800) 280-2832

Attorney for Plaintiff(s) Fein, Such & Crane, LLP 28 East Main Street, Suite 1800, Rochester, NY 14614 Attorney (s) for Plaintiff (s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale Entered April 9, 2018 I will sell at Public Auction to the highest bidder at the Greene County Courthouse, 320 Main Street, Catskill, NY 12414 on November 5, 2018 at 1:00 PM. Premises known as 214 CR 67, Leeds, NY 12451. Sec 102.00 Block 4 Lot 3. All that certain piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the Town of Cairo, on Sandy Plains Road, County of Greene and State of New York. Approximate Amount of Judgment is $63,276.30 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index No 2016-307. James M Wagman, Esq., Referee FKNC2933

Public Notice CLAVERACK FIRE DISTRICT Please take notice that the Board of Fire Commissioners of the Claverack Fire District shall hold a public hearing at the A.B. Shaw Firehouse, 67 Route 23, Claverack, at 7pm on Tuesday, October 16, 2018. The purpose of said meeting is to discuss the proposed 2019 Budget. Copies of this document will be available at the hearing. NOTICE OF SALE Franceschi SUPREME COURT: Rich GREENE COUNTY. C h a i r m a n / C l a v e r a c k U.S. BANK TRUST, Fire District N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR LSF9 MASTER SUPREME COURT OF P A R T I C I P A T I O N THE STATE OF NEW TRUST, Pltf. vs. CLIF- YORK - COUNTY OF FORD SIMMONS; GREENE FINANCIAL GEORGIA JONES, DITECH Defts. Index LLC, #1153/2009. Pursuant V. to judgment of foreclo- DAWN TELLER, AS sure and sale entered EXECUTRIX OF THE Dec. 21, 2016 and a LAST WILL AND TESsubsequent order dat- TAMENT OF DICK D. ed Sept. 10, 2018, I BRUSH, ET. AL. will sell at public auc- NOTICE OF SALE tion at Greene County NOTICE IS HEREBY Courthouse, 320 Main GIVEN pursuant to a Judgment of St., Catskill, NY on Final dated Nov. 7, 2018 at 12:30 Foreclosure p.m. prem. k/a 12225 April 11, 2018, and enRoute 23, Ashland, NY tered in the Office of 12407-1007. Said the Clerk of the County property located in the of Greene, wherein DIcenter of the State TECH FINANCIAL LLC Highway at the NE is the Plaintiff and corner of premises DAWN TELLER, AS conveyed by Berta L. EXECUTRIX OF THE Jeralds and others to LAST WILL AND TESRoy Cornell by deed TAMENT OF DICK D. recorded in Book 298 BRUSH, ET AL. are the I, the of Deeds at page 212; Defendant(s). Referee thence running south- undersigned erly or southeasterly will sell at public aucalong the east line of tion at the GREENE COURTsaid Cornell premises COUNTY and passing through a HOUSE, 320 MAIN CATSKILL, large maple tree on the STREET, the south side of said NY 12414, on October highway and continu- 25, 2018 at 10:00AM, ing along the east line premises known as of said Cornell premis- 843 IRVING ROAD, NY es a total distance of GREENVILLE, 189 ft. to an iron stake 12083: Section 12.04, at the SE corner of Block 1, Lot 5: said Cornell premises; ALL THAT CERTAIN thence easterly or PLOT, PIECE OR PARsouthesterly 25 ft. in CEL OF LAND, SITUan extension of the ATE, LYING AND BEsoutherly line of said ING IN THE TOWN OF Cornell premises to an G R E E N V I L L E , iron pin in the docking COUNTY OF GREENE of the embankment on AND STATE OF NEW the westerly or north- YORK, Premises will be sold westerly side of the Batavia Kill; thence subject to provisions northerly or northeast- of filed Judgment Inerly along the edge of dex # 904/2016. Vesaid docking 110 ft. to ronica M. Kosich, Esq. an elm tree at the cor- - Referee. RAS Boriner of lands Harry skin, LLC 900 MerConcourse, Neubert; thence north- chants erly or northeasterly Suite 310, Westbury, along lands of Harry New York 11590, AtNeubert 129 ft. to an torneys for Plaintiff. elm tree on the south For sale information, side of said highway at please visit www.aucor call a corner of lands of tion.com Harry Neubert; thence (800) 280-2832. northerly to the center SUMMONS, NOTICE of said hightway; AND BRIEF STATEthence westerly along MENT OF NATURE OF the center of said high- ACTION CONSUMER way 274 ft. to the NE CREDIT TRANSACcorner of said lands of TION SUPREME Cornell being the point COURT OF THE and place of begin- STATE OF NEW YORK ning. Approx. amt. of COUNTY OF GREENE judgemt is Index No. 18-252 $188,293.11 plus HUDSON VALLEY costs and interest. FEDERAL CREDIT UNSold subject to terms ION, Plaintiff, -againstand conditions of filed JASON A. FRANCESE; judgment and terms of ET AL. Defendants. TO sale. JON KOSICH, THE DEFENDANT(S): Referee. COHN & JASON A. FRANCESE ROTH, LLC, Attys. for YOU ARE HEREBY Pltf., 100 East Old SUMMONED and reCountry Rd., Mineola, quired to serve upon NY. #95707 plaintiff's attorneys an answer to the comSmitten For Kitten plaint in this action LLC. Filed 6/12/18. Of- within twenty (20) days fice: Greene Co. SSNY after the service of this designated as agent Summons, exclusive of for process & shall mail the day of service, or to: 323 Broadstreet within thirty (30) days Hollow Rd, Shandak- after service is comen, NY 12480. Pur- plete if the Summons is not personally delivpose: General. ered to you within the State of New York. The NOTICE OF SALE SU- United States of AmerPREME COURT ica, if designated as a GREENE COUNTY defendant in this acKEYBANK NATIONAL tion, may answer or ASSOCIATION, Plain- appear within sixty (60) tiff against days of service hereof. ROBERT HENRY IV In case of your failure A/K/A ROBERT C. to answer, judgment HENRY, IV, et al De- will be taken against fendants you for the relief de-

manded in the complaint. Trial is desired in the County of GREENE. The basis of venue designated above is that the real property, which is the subject matter of this action, is located in the County of GREENE, New York. NOTICE: YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME IF YOU DO NOT RESPOND TO THIS SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE MORTGAGE COMPANY WHO FILED THIS FORECLOSURE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT A DEFAULT JUDGMENT MAY BE ENTERED AND YOU CAN LOSE YOUR HOME. SPEAK TO AN ATTORNEY OR GO TO THE COURT WHERE YOUR CASE IS PENDING FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON HOW TO ANSWER THE SUMMONS AND PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY. SENDING A PAYMENT TO YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY WILL NOT STOP THIS FORECLOSURE ACTION. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. HELP FOR HOMEOWNERS IN FORECLOSURE New York State Law requires that we send you this notice about the foreclosure process. Please read it carefully. Summons and Complaint You are in danger of losing your home. If you fail to respond to the summons and complaint in this foreclosure action, you may lose your home. Please read the summons and complaint carefully. You should immediately contact an attorney or your local legal aid office to obtain advice on how to protect yourself. Sources of Information and Assistance The State encourages you to become informed about your options in foreclosure. In addition to seeking assistance from an attorney or legal aid office, there are government agencies and non-profit organizations that you may contact for information about possible options, including trying to work with your lender during this process. To locate an entity near you, you may call the toll-free helpline maintained by the New York State Department of Financial Services at 1-800-342-3736 or visit the Department's website at w w w. d f s . n y. g o v. RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS YOU ARE NOT REQUIRED TO LEAVE YOUR HOME AT THIS TIME. You have the right to sta y in your home during the foreclosure process. You are not required to leave your home unless and until your property is sold at auction pursuant to a judgment of foreclosure and sale. Regardless of whether you choose to remain in your home, YOU ARE REQUIRED TO TAKE CARE OF YOUR PROPERTY and pay property taxes in accordance with state and local law. Foreclosure rescue scams Be careful of people who approach you with offers to save your home. There are individuals who watch for notices of foreclosure actions in order to unfairly profit from a homeowner's distress. You should be extremely careful about any such promises and any suggestions that you pay them a fee or sign over your deed. State law requires anyone offering such services for profit to enter into a contract which fully describes the services they will perform and fees they will charge, and which prohibits them from taking any money from you until they have completed all such promised services. The foregoing Su mmons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of HON. Thomas A. Breslin, Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, signed on September 25, 2018 in Catskill, New York and to be duly entered in the Greene County Clerk's Office, in Catskill, New York. The Nature of this action pertains to a note and

mortgage held by Plaintiff on real property owned by the above named defendants as specified in the complaint filed in this action. The above named defendants have failed to comply with the terms and provisions of the said mortgage and said instruments secured by said mortgage, by failing and omitting to pay the balance due and owing and the Plaintiff has commenced a foreclosure action. Plaintiff is seeking a judgment foreclosing its mortgage against the real property and premises which situates in the Town of Coxsackie, County of Greene, and State of New York and is commonly known as 53 Brom Bones Lane UNIT 1225, Athens, New York 12015 and all other relief as to the Court may seem just and equitable. DATED: October 1, 2018 SCHILLER, KNAPP, LEFKOWITZ & HERTZEL, LLP BY: WILLIAM B. SCHILLER, ESQ. Attorneys for Plaintiff 950 New Loudon Road Latham, New York 12110 Telephone: (518) 786-9069 58017

COLUMBIA COUNTY Civil Service Commission announces an OC exam for: Correction Officer #68667 Applications must be postmarked by 10/12/18 For additional information please go to: https://sites.google.com/a/columbiacountyny.com/ civilservice/open-competitive-examinations or call Civil Service at 518-828-6622. Office hours 8am - 4pm -401 State St., Hudson NY.

HOME HEALTH Aide wanted in the Hillsdale NY area. Call Mariam @ (518)7554822 VOLLEYBALL COACH Boys Varsity and JV teams. First aid and CPR certified. Apply to T. Nash, Coxsackie-Athens CSD; 518-731-1722, nasht@cacsd.org

220

Houses for Sale Other Area

Professional & Technical

Bulk Carrier looking for CDL-A Drivers. Will train on modern Specialized Equipment. Mostly under 100 Air Miles! Excellent Pay/Benefits. Email for application: cscott@lynnhscott.com or 888-339-2900 x12

104 acres farm land, orchards, woods, 2 houses, several barns, greenhouse, beautiful catskills mountain views, close to Hudson, NY State Thruway, Taconic Parkway. Email: apples@gtel.net for more information. 255

Lots & Acreage

BANK ORDERED LAND SALE! Oct 13th & 14th! 21 acres - was 69,900, SALE $49,900 42 acres - was 89,900, SALE $64,900 35 acres - 5 acre POND was 199,900, SALE $129,900 Gorgeous No. Catskills location less than 3 ½ hrs NY City! Views, State Land, Low Taxes, 100% Buildable! Special Bank terms Avail! Call 888-644-0366 NewYorkLandandLakes.com

CAMP LOTBarnes Corners NY. Corner of Williams Rd & Rt 177. Borders state land & Snowmobile trails. PRICE REDUCED! 315-783-9720.

Rentals Apartment for Rent 295

Columbia County

GENT-1 BDR, newly painted 800 sq ft, incls: all utils. & laundry, no smoking/pets, plenty parking, sec req. & 1st mo, $1100 (518)610-0913

HILLSDALE AREA- 2 bdr, laundry rm, appliances included, lg yard, off st parking. (518)329-0933.

Apartment for Rent 298

Greene County

ATHENS, 2 bdr., kitch. & DR. No pets, Very good condition. Call 518-9451659

311

Apts. for Rent Other Area

CAIRO: LARGE renovated 2 bdr Apt. Quiet location w/park like grounds w/picnic & walking areas. Seniors welcomed. Section 8 accepted. Security & references required. Sorry no pets. $750/mo + utilities. Call details. Landlord/Broker: 518622-3214. No realtor fee.

395

Want to Rent

SENIOR CITIZEN, wife & support dog (w/ Dr's letter) need to find an apartment ASAP in the Hudson/Greenport area. On Section 8, can only spend $775/mo. Call 518-822-1021 or 518-2298803

Employment 415

General Help

AILRINES ARE HIRING Get FAA approved hands on Aviation training. Financial aid for qualified students - Career placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-296-7094 AIRLINE CAREERS Start Here –Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM for free information 866296-7094. JOB OPPORTUNITY: $17 P/H NYC - $14.50 P/H LI If you currently care for your relatives or friends who have Medicaid or Medicare, you may be eligible to start working for them as a personal assistant. No Certificates needed. (347)4622610 (347)565-6200 JOB OPPORTUNITY: $17 P/H NYC - $14.50 P/H LI If you currently care for your relatives or friends who have Medicaid or Medicare, you may be eligible to start working for them as a personal assistant. No Certificates needed. (347)4622610 (347)565-6200 EXP. ROOFERS/ROOFER HELPERS. Must have own transportation. $$$ Top Pay $$$ 518-828-7302

REVERSE MORTGAGE: Homeowners age 62+ turn your home equity into taxfree cash! Speak with an expert today and receive a free booklet. 1-877-5803720

Medical Aides 550

435

Real Estate

Benefits never decrease. Policy will only be cancelled for non-payment. 855-686-5879.

HOME SECURITY - Leading smart home provider Vivint Smart Home has an offer just for you. Call 877480-2648 to get a professionally installed home security system with $0 activation. Thousand Islands CSD - is accepting applications for a FT School Psychologist. Duties include serving as a K-12 School Psychologist·and Chair for CSE/CPSE. This is a ten-month position with approximately 10 additional days paid per diem during July and August. Must be NYS certified. Electronic submission through www.pnwb oces.org/olas

445 Situations Wanted A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. Call: 1-800-404-8852 DIVORCE $349 - Uncontested divorce papers prepared. Only one signature required. Poor person Application included if applicable. Separation agreements. Custody and support petitions. - 518-2740380 OPWDD-TACONIC DDSOO is hosting an Open House on 10/18/18 6pm to 8pm, for people interested in opening their homes and providing care to individuals with intellectual disabilities. Providers receives multiple financial stipends. Please call (518) 784-2441 Ext. 1003 to RSVP.

Struggling with DRUGS or ALCHOHOL? Addicted to PILLS? Talk to someone who cares. Call The Addiction Hope & Help Line for a free assessment. 1-855995-2069

Services 514

Services Offered

Do you use a CPAP machine for sleep apnea? Get your FDA approved CPAP machine and supplies at little or no cost! Free sleep supplement and sleep guide include! Call 866-4306489! Guaranteed Life Insurance! (Ages 50 to 80). No medical exam. Affordable premiums never increase.

& Services

LUNG CANCER? And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call 866951-9073 for Information. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. VIAGRA & CIALIS! 60 pills for $99. 100 pills for $150 FREE shipping. Money back guaranteed! Call Today: 800-404-0244 564

Services Wanted

DENTAL INSURANCE. Call Physicians Mutual Insurance Company for details. NOT just a discount plan, REAL coverage for 350 procedures. 866-679-8194 or http://www. dental50plus.com/41 Ad# 6118

Farm & Garden 656

Livestock Buy/Sell

3 GRASS fed Black Baldies- 18 mos old, real nice, priced to sell $1.30/lb. 5 Hereford cows calving in April & May. Call 518-7318884

Garage Sales STUYVESANT FALLS- 917 Co Rt 25., Sat. 1-5, Sun 9-2. Moving Sale/Barn Sale! Household & Farm goods.

Merchandise Miscellaneous 730

for Sale

Buying Diamonds, gold, silver, antique and modern jewelry, better furs, U.S. and foreign coins, paintings, bronzes, complete estates. Highest prices paid. Call 914-260-8783 for appointment. DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Channels $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Call 1-855-401-9066 Do you owe more that $5000 in Tax Debt? Call Wells & Associates INC. We solve Tax Problems! Personal or Business! IRS, State and Local. 30 years in Business! Call NOW for a free consultations at an office near you. 1-888-7429640 Earthlink High Speed Internet. As Low As $14.95/month (for the first 3 months.) Reliable High Speed Fiber Optic Technology. Stream Videos, Music and More! Call Earthlink Today 1-877-933-3017

START EARNING EXTRA CASH TODAY!

$100 BONUS 30 DAY STAY ON

EARN EXTRA CASH AS A TIMES UNION NEWSPAPER CARRIER. ROUTES AVAILABLE IN COLUMBIA AND GREENE COUNTY

CONTACT US TODAY AND GET STARTED www.timesunion.com/carriers or call (518) 454-5689


CMYK

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

B10 Thursday, October 11, 2018 Earthlink High Speed Internet. As Low As $14.95/month (for the first 3 months.) Reliable High Speed Fiber Optic Technology. Stream Videos, Music and More! Call Earthlink Today 1-855-970-1623 GOT SOMETHING TO SAY? Be heard with a statewide ad in the New York Daily Impact from NYNPA! Put your 25-word ad in front of MILLIONS of people with a single order for one great price. Call 315-661-2446 or contact this paper today!

Have a CPAP machine for sleep apnea? Get replacement FDA approved CPAP machine parts and supplies at little or no cost! Free sleep guide included! 1877-411-9455 IF YOU own a home, you need Homeowners Insurance. Protect your house, belongings, valuables & more. Call now for a free quote. Don’t wait! 844-338-3881

VIAGRA & CIALIS! 60 pills for $99. 100 pills for $150 FREE shipping.Money back guaranteed! 1-800-7589761

OXYGEN - Anytime. Anywhere. No tanks to refill. No deliveries. The All-New Inogen One G4 is only 2.8 pounds! FAA approved! FREE info kit: 866-9412913

REACH NEW YORK STATE with an ad like this in the New York Daily Impact from NYNPA! Put your 25-word ad in front of MILLIONS of people statewide with a single order for one great price. Call 315661-2446 or contact this paper!

PRIVACY HEDGES SPRING BLOWOUT SALE 6ft Arborvitae Reg $179 Now $75 Beautiful, Nursery Grown. FREE Installation/FREE delivery, Limited Supply! ORDER NOW: 518536-1367 www.lowcosttreefarm.com

SAWMILLS FROM only $4397.00- MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 800-567-0404 Ext.300N.

Save on your utility bill with Solar! Strong return on investment; Safe for the Environment. Reliable Energy with Little or No Out of Pocket Costs. See your estimated savings today! Serving Orange, Putnam & Westchester. 1-877-4353660. Mon-Fri: 12:00 to 8:00pm EST.

795

Wanted to buy

SAFE BATHROOM Renovations in just one day! Update to safety now. Grab bars, no slip flooring & seated showers. Call for a free in-home consultation: 844782-7096

Automobiles 930

for Sale

DONATE YOUR car to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting Make-A-Wish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call 315-400-0797 Today!

Autos/Trucks 995

Spectrum Triple Play! TV, Internet & Voice for $29.99 ea. 60 MB per second speed. No contract or commitment. More Channels. Faster Internet. Unlimited Voice. Call 1-855-977-7198

SELLING YOUR CLASSIC CAR? Get your 10-word ad in daily and weekly papers across New York State and reach MILLIONS for just $199. Call 315-661-2446 or contact this newspaper's classified's department today!

Transportation Please Recycle

Wanted

DONATE YOUR car to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting Make-A-Wish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call (855) 376-9474

CLASSIFIEDS GET THE JOB DONE!

No. 6 West Virginia note Cyclone warning in Ames Field Level Media Even as Will Grier’s touchdown-slinging reputation precedes him, it’s the other quarterback who makes West Virginia-Iowa State intriguing Saturday. True freshman Brock Purdy dazzled in his first extended action by accounting for 402 yards and five touchdowns when the Cyclones upset thenNo. 25 Oklahoma State 48-42 on the road. Now Purdy goes for an encore against No. 6 West Virginia (5-0, 3-0) in a Big 12 showdown in Ames. It’s another validation opportunity for the rookie who spurned scholarship offers from Texas A&M and Alabama. “He’s got a cannon,” said Iowa State receiver Tarique Milton, who caught a 60-yard scoring pass from Purdy last week. “Having him back there doing what he does helps our offense,” said Cyclones running back Sheldon Croney. “He gives us another threat, another guy the defense has to pay attention to. All the things he can do with the ball in his hands – pass with the ball and run with the ball – helps everyone else on the offense.” Iowa State (2-3, 1-2) had been averaging fewer than 18 points per game when Purdy sparked last week’s barrage in Stillwater. Some wonder whether he can be as successful in his second appearance, now that West Virginia intensely studied his first game, erasing the element of surprise. “We’ve been here three years,” coach Matt Campbell said. “We have a vast playbook; we do a lot of things. ... We’ll continue to grow offensively as we continue to find an

ROB FERGUSON/USA TODAY

Iowa State Cyclones quarterback Brock Purdy (15) passes while defended by Oklahoma State Cowboys defensive end Mike Scott (91) during the second half at Boone Pickens Stadium.

identity to who we are and who we want to become.” Grier likely wants to burn film of his last game, a fourturnover anomaly that included three end-zone interceptions. Yet he also threw four touchdowns and West Virginia downed Kansas 38-22. “It’s going to be important for us to not hurt ourselves and

finish drives,” said Grier, who ranks sixth nationally in passing efficiency and second in passing yards per game. West Virginia has won all three meetings in Ames, most recently 49-19 in 2016, which was Campbell’s first season with the Cyclones. Since then his teams have gone 4-2 against ranked opponents, fair

warning to a Mountaineers team that stands as the final unbeaten in the Big 12. “I know Matt has kind of taken over the play-calling, and he’s obviously as good of a coach as there is out there, so they’ll keep getting better with it,” West Virginia coach Dana Holgorsen said. “I think they’ve found a

good, young quarterback that can make plays. (Purdy) ran around, he can make guys miss. He was accurate when he was throwing the ball.” Cyclones running back David Montgomery produced back-to-back 100-yard performances against Akron and TCU before missing last week’s win over Oklahoma

State. His return could be pivotal this week considering he tore through West Virginia for 141 yards in 2016 and 115 more last season. “He’s an All-American, NFL-type player, and he’s been banged up as of late,” Holgorsen said. “But we’re expecting him to play.”

No. 12 Michigan, No. 15 Wisconsin in big fight at Big House Field Level Media Wisconsin is out to make a big statement at the Big House in a game that will go a long way toward determining the pecking order in the Big Ten. No. 12 Michigan and No. 15 Wisconsin look alike – experienced quarterbacks, a hot running back and physical defenses. They also have a non-conference blemish on their records and their rankings reflect how closely matched the Big Ten rivals appear on paper. But only one will emerge from their showdown in Ann Arbor on Saturday night with an undefeated record in Big Ten play. The Wolverines (51 overall, 3-0 Big Ten) are tied with Ohio State in the East Division, while the Badgers (4-1, 2-0) lead the weaker West Division. After losing to Notre Dame in the season opener, the Wolverines have ripped off five straight wins to jump back into talk for landing one of the four playoff spots. Michigan, unlike last season, isn’t dealing with a quarterback controversy. Ole Miss transfer Shea Patterson has thrown 10 touchdown passes, including three against Maryland last week, while getting picked off just three times. “Shea’s playing really well,” coach Jim Harbaugh said. “Everybody can see that.” He’s been supported by a strong running game, spearheaded by senior Karan Higdon. He’s rushed for more than 100 yards in the last four games he’s played, including a 25-carry, 103-yard effort in the 42-21 win over the Terra-

RICK OSENTOSKI/USA TODAY

Michigan Wolverines defensive back Brandon Watson (28) is congratulated by teammates after making an interception for a touchdown in the second half at Michigan Stadium.

pins. Patterson hasn’t run much

but he’s mobile and can scramble for a first down if

necessary. “You’ve got to defend the

whole offense first and then you know a big part of that is

his ability to threaten you in a number of different ways,” Wisconsin coach Paul Chryst said. “He’s continuing to get better and better and he sure has been good this year.” Badgers quarterback Alex Hornibrook has been efficient, if unspectacular, this season. He has thrown for seven touchdowns while getting intercepted just twice, but hasn’t passed for more than 205 yards over the past four games. “He’s got really good stature in the pocket,” Harbaugh said. “He can get hot. He throws those intermediate dig routes at times as well as anybody can. He’s a very experienced guy and played in a lot of big games. A really good quarterback, and really good quarterbacks pose really big problems.” Sophomore running back Jonathan Taylor has posed even bigger problems for opposing defensive coordinators. He’s rushed for 849 yards and eight touchdowns, including a 221-yard, threetouchdown performance in a 41-24 victory over Nebraska last week. He’ll be pitted against the Wolverines top-ranked defense, which is giving up just 230.5 yards per game. “They do a great job in the design of it,” Chryst said. “What you’ve got is a really good scheme and really talented players. They trust it, they trust themselves and they’re playing really well right now.”


CMYK

Thursday, October 11, 2018 B11

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

‘Perfect’ man turns into a loose-lipped lush I have been dating the most amazing man for the past 11 months. As we approach the one-year anniversary of the day we met, this “perfect” man is showing some not-so-perfect traits. I was unlucky in love for DEAR ABBY many years until he swept me off my feet. We have both become extremely close with each other’s respective friends and family. He’s everything I have been searching for in a life partner and husband. But when he drinks, he confides his deep fears of dating me and enumerates each and every one of my relationship insecurities — nagging, anxiety, loneliness, etc. The next day he acts like nothing happened! He swears up and down that it was the alcohol talking and he doesn’t mean any of the harsh words he spoke the night before. Should I believe him? Please don’t let me be the naive girl traveling down a dark rabbit hole. Self-Conscious Girlfriend

JEANNE PHILLIPS

Your “amazing” man appears to be a looselipped lush. Not knowing him, I can’t guess the degree to which he blacks out when he’s been drinking. Some alcoholics don’t remember what happened the night before. Others simply don’t WANT to remember, so they claim amnesia. Regardless of how you feel about him, for your own well-being, draw the line and tell him he needs to stop drinking. If he’s as alcohol-dependent as I suspect he is, he will give you an argument or an outright refusal. And that’s your cue to tell him if he wants a future with you, he will have

to make a choice. My in-laws are angry that I have declined to host them over the holidays this year. My husband is never helpful. When company comes, he sits on his mobile phone while I do everything. I told his parents I can’t have them over because all the responsibility falls on me. My “no” should suffice, but my mother-in-law hopes to argue me into hosting. We don’t have children because I knew I would end up raising them alone. I don’t want the in-laws here “hinting” that they need us to help them when my husband won’t lift a finger. I recently became disabled, and my in-laws keep pressuring me to share my diagnosis with them. They think I should cheerfully do all the work of hosting them as a way to fight my disability! They are extremely nosy. I am now blocking her calls. I know they will spend their time here trying to get a look at my medications and any financial information left out. What else can I do? Unmerry In Louisiana

DR. KEITH ROACH

There is no age limit on donating blood. That is, if you are healthy and have no medical conditions that would keep you from donating. If you are borderline on iron in the blood, it could be that you are donating more often than is optimal for you. I also have been trained to think of the worst possibility, which is that you might have hidden iron loss, so I would want to be sure you have had your colonoscopy as recommended (colonoscopies are generally recommended against in people over 85, and given only after careful consideration after age 80). About six months ago, I was told I needed a hip replacement, but they were unable to do surgery because of my medical conditions. I am

Garfield

Blondie

78 years old, weigh 240 pounds, have diabetes, sleep apnea, mitral valve prolapse and congestive heart failure. The doctor said I had only a 50/50 chance of coming out of the surgery OK. A hip replacement is a big, invasive surgery that most people do well after and that improves quality of life for mos t people who need it. However, it isn’t right or safe for everyone. Some of the issues you have are found routinely in people your age. Diabetes, sleep apnea and mitral valve prolapse are, in most cases, able to be kept under control around the operative time and do not prevent a person from getting surgery. Congestive heart failure, however, is a very broad diagnosis that can include people with a very mild decrease in their heart function to people with acutely life-threatening disease to people with severe chronic disability. Congestive heart failure isn’t a specific diagnosis, it’s a syndrome with many possible causes. I don’t know enough about you to comment on the “50/50” comment, but it is certainly true that many people with CHF are not considered safe for an elective surgery. However, there are many new treatments for CHF, and if it’s the CHF that makes your doctors hesitate about surgery. It’s possible that with more aggressive treatment, your CHF would be better controlled, possibly enough to reconsider surgery. Although mild cases of CHF often can be managed by a generalist, more severe cases benefit from the experience of a cardiologist, or even a cardiologist with specific expertise in CHF.

Horoscope By STELLA WILDER Born today, you do all you can to promote an open-minded, tolerant and accepting way of dealing with the world at large. You have no patience for those who seem to have made up their minds before all the evidence is in — no matter what is being judged, be it people or ideas. The only “rule” you live by, and insist that others live by, is that all should enjoy the same treatment and the same opportunities. The golden rule, to you, is all that anyone need follow in life, and you believe that by treating people fairly and well you derive strength and satisfaction. You are a hard worker, and you will never let up until you know that your efforts have reaped some kind of profit — but that needn’t be monetary! Indeed, as far as you are concerned, the greatest possible good is one that cannot be measured in currency, but that works its particular magic on the soul. Also born on this date are: Luke Perry, actor; Eleanor Roosevelt, U.S. first lady; Steve Young, football player; Daryl Hall, singer; Jane Krakowski, actress; Dottie West, singer; Jerome Robbins, choreographer; Elmore Leonard, author. To see what is in store for you tomorrow, find your birthday and read the corresponding paragraph. Let your birthday star be your daily guide. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12 LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Be a good sport today, and don’t rain on someone else’s parade. You can deal with not being the center of attention right now, surely. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — The cancellation of one thing and the swift promotion of something else quite different has you wondering what other

Classic Peanuts

You should all try to achieve a workable compromise, if that’s possible. Ask your MIL if she’s prepared to take some of the responsibility off your shoulders if she and her husband visit. Suggest they stay in a hotel or motel rather than burden you. And your husband (their son) should back you up on this.

There’s no upper age limit on donating blood I have been a pretty regular blood donor for decades. At times, I’m rejected because I just miss the minimum iron count necessary. My question at this time is if I should continue to be a blood donor, as I am 84 years of age. My health is excellent, and I’m not taking any medications for any TO YOUR ailments. I have no blood GOOD HEALTH pressure problems or diabetes. I still work part time in a job that keeps me on my feet all day. I know the system takes a few weeks to “replenish” after giving blood, and that has started to concern me, considering my age. Being a regular donor, all the information is in the record, but no one has ever said anything about an age limit. What is your opinion?

Family Circus

Hagar the Horrible

Zits

Baby Blues changes are coming. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — You’re likely to get more done, more quickly and more efficiently, during morning hours than at any other time during the day. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Are you fully equipped to deal with what you know is coming your way? This will require emotional as well as physical stamina. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — You have a few decisions to make today that are likely to affect others even more profoundly than they do yourself. Go over things twice! PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) — You’ll be excited by the start of something new, but you will also harbor some doubts about whether you can see it through to the end. ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Contact with an old friend may not be as pleasurable today as you had hoped. Is this because you have changed in ways you did not suspect? TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — You’ll have more questions than usual today, and you’re likely to come up with fewer answers than you had hoped. Still, progress can be made. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — You may be wondering why you were “cut off” in some way, but the truth comes to light late in the day: This was likely your doing entirely. CANCER (June 21-July 22) — You must trust that things will work out well today even though you are not playing a central role. A friend stands up for you just in time. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — You may find yourself tangled up in details that you don’t know how to sort out. A professional colleague offers a suggestion that works wonders. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — You know that you don’t yet have all the information you need to make a key decision, but the decision may have already been made, yes? COPYRIGHT 2018 UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE, INC.

Beetle Bailey

Pearls Before Swine

Dennis the Menace


CMYK

COLUMBIA-GREENE MEDIA

B12 Thursday, October 11, 2018 Close to Home

SUPER QUIZ

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME By David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

UNSGW LATLY LARLET GRIFDI ©2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

Yesterday’s

Score 1 point for each correct answer on the Freshman Level, 2 points on the Graduate Level and 3 points on the Ph.D. Level.

Get the free JUST JUMBLE app • Follow us on Twitter @PlayJumble

Unscramble these Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

One-word book titles Level 1 2

3

The meaning of the one-word title is given. Provide the title and author. (e.g., An imaginary ideal place. Answer: “Utopia,” by Thomas More.) Freshman level 1. Took a person away illegally to obtain a ransom. 2. The bony structures that border the mouth. 3. A military dictator of early Japan. Graduate level 4. A mass departure to escape a hostile environment. 5. Inhabitants of the capital city of Ireland. 6. A state of great unhappiness and emotional stress. PH.D. level 7. Inducement to act by reasoning or entreaty. 8. To get in touch with someone. 9. The whole masonry substructure of a building.

4

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: VOICE FLOCK STIGMA SPRING Answer: When asked if the sandpaper was rough enough, he said — OF “COARSE” IT IS

SOLUTION TO WEDNESDAY’S PUZZLE

10/11/18 Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit

Heart of the City

sudoku.org.uk © 2018 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency. All rights reserved.

SUPER QUIZ ANSWERS 1. “Kidnapped,” by Robert Louis Stevenson. 2. “Jaws,” by Peter Benchley. 3. “Shogun,” by James Clavell. 4. “Exodus,” by Leon Uris. 5. “Dubliners,” by James Joyce. 6. “Misery,” by Stephen King. 7. “Persuasion,” by Jane Austen. 8. “Contact,” by Carl Sagan. 9. “Foundation,” by Isaac Asimov. 18 points — congratulations, doctor; 15 to 17 points — honors graduate; 10 to 14 points — you’re plenty smart, but no grind; 4 to 9 points — you really should hit the books harder; 1 point to 3 points — enroll in remedial courses immediately; 0 points — who reads the questions to you?

Mutts

Dilbert

Pickles For Better or For Worse

Get Fuzzy

Hi & Lois

Crossword Puzzle Mother Goose & Grimm ACROSS 1 Shoelace problem 5 Piece of prose 10 So. Calif. univ. 14 Friendly 15 Temporary, but severe, as pain 16 Men 17 “__ upon a time…” 18 Department store employee 20 Actress Arthur 21 Soft-furred weasel cousin 22 Hemingway’s “The Sun Also __” 23 __ Ste. Marie 25 Tiny 26 Rather; somewhat 28 Rough-textured 31 Shed crocodile tears 32 Darkness; sadness 34 “London __ Fallen”; Gerard Butler film 36 Sunbathes 37 Implore 38 Like takeout food 39 As pretty __ picture 40 Mean 41 Merchandise 42 Zigzag skiing 44 Small restaurant 45 Flat cap 46 Actress Delta 47 Hate 50 Forest tree 51 Org. for Eagles & Ravens 54 Completely covering 57 Mah-jongg piece 58 “The __ Ranger” 59 Military attack 60 Change for a five 61 Breakfast order 62 Fling 63 Grows gray

Bound & Gagged

Created by Jacqueline E. Mathews

DOWN 1 Door handle 2 Reasonable bedtime 3 Occurring now and again 4 20th letter 5 With little effort 6 Meager 7 Pout 8 Feasted 9 Affirmative 10 More hideous 11 Signals to actors 12 Harp of old 13 Invites 19 Dairy product 21 Stubborn animal 24 Carney & others 25 Mahogany or walnut 26 Greek cheese 27 Pile up 28 Fuel, for some 29 Crisco product 30 Enthusiastic 32 Dreary; morose 33 Actor Marvin 35 Average 37 School dance

10/11/18

Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

Non Sequitur

©2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

38 Chore 40 Dick or Petula 41 Metal thread 43 Makes amends 44 Elasticized cord 46 Pig out 47 Capable 48 Personal web page

10/11/18

49 __ tough; refuse to quit 50 Dock 52 Escape 53 Not as much 55 Feminine suffix 56 Waiter’s hope 57 __ man; unanimously

Rubes

eedition dm 1011  
eedition dm 1011  
Advertisement