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Architects: MJM Architects Structural Consultants: Blackwell Engineering Ltd. Mechanical and Electrical Consultants: Leipciger Kaminker Mitelman and Partners Inc. Civil Engineering Consultants: Rand Engineering Corp. Landscape Consultant:Strybos Associates Ltd Location: 1495 Sandalwood Parkway East, Brampton, ON Project Completion: May 2007 Project Cost: $27,000,000 Project Area: 156,000 Sq. ft. Building Capacity: 2679 People Indoor 4 Indoor Field Houses (17 000 sq. ft.) 4 large Change Rooms 4 Spectator Stands 2 Referee Rooms 2 Separate Foyers Youth Lounge Gymnasium Dance Studio 3 Multi-purpose Rooms 1 Cafe Outdoor 4 Soccer Fields 2 Basketball Courts 2 Cricket Fields Splash Pad 709 Parking Spots

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Table of Contents Introduction ............................................................................... 6 Design Intent and Philosophy.................................................. 7 Site Design................................................................................... 8 Massing ........................................................................................ 9 Building Envelope ...................................................................... 10 Building Critique ....................................................................... 10 Sustainable Features ................................................................. 12 Building Systems Structural ........................................................................... 13 Electrical ............................................................................ 13 HVAC ................................................................................. 14 Plumbing ............................................................................ 15 Sprinkler ............................................................................ 16 OBC ............................................................................................ 16-17 Circulation Plans........................................................................ 18 Systems in Context .................................................................. 19 Building Matrix............................................................................ 20 Thermal Calculations ............................................................... 21-25 Comparison Analysis ................................................................ 26-27 Elevations .................................................................................... 28 Interior Renders......................................................................... 29 Perspectives ................................................................................ 30-31 Structural System Render......................................................... 32-33 Conclusion .................................................................................. 34-35 References.................................................................................... 36-37


4 Brampton Soccer Centre


North Perspective Render

Brampton Soccer Centre

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Introduction Located at the busy intersection of Dixie Road and Sandalwood Parkway in Northern Brampton, is the Brampton Soccer Centre. Designed by MJM Architects, the Soccer Centre is a community haven addressing the interests of the growing population of the city, as well as encouraging a strong sense of community. The recreation centre project began in 2003 as a limited competition, with MJM Architects winning the commission. The Soccer Centre was completed in May of 2007, with a 28 million dollar budget, and was an immediate success drawing members of the community from all age groups. The Brampton Soccer Centre is a 152, 000 square foot facility designed as a prototype building for the City of Brampton’s 3 project expansion program of its major recreational centres (MJMA). The adaptability of function of the Brampton Soccer Centre, in creating varying thermal environments, allows for program flexibility.This economical function of the complex’s design is accomplished in its detailing, materiality, and structure. Detailed analysis of Arena B and the corresponding North lobby demonstrate the Complex’s versatility. The Centre was not only a success in terms of attracting community members, but also as a highly successful design that raised the bar for future recreational centres.

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Design Intent The city of Brampton commissioned the construction of the indoor/outdoor recreation facility with the intention of creating a space that promoted community value and encouraged physical activity. Initially, the project was intended to be a generic sports facility, housing sports such as hockey, volleyball, and basketball. However, as a large portion of Brampton’s population is comprised of South Asian Immigrants preferring the sport of soccer, the facility devoted itself programmatically to this particular sport. This decision gained much popularity amongst the community. Nevertheless, to allow for future developments, the centre was designed to convert easily from a warm component to a cold component creating an adaptable space for multiple activities. The high ceilings and field dimensions, of the arenas, also allow for conversion to either a volleyball court or a hockey arena. Furthermore, the gymnasium flooring is easily inserted to accommodate multiple other activities and events. Community value is further promoted through the community wing of the building where numerous multipurpose rooms are used for local programming. Additionally, the client was greatly invested in creating a sustainable building of superior value. This was accomplished through large expanses of glazing, multiple skylights, and the economical flexibility of the arenas, among other things. The Brampton Soccer Centre was designed specifically for the public, providing a space for physical activity as well as creating a strong sense of community all through sustainable design.

Design Philosophy The Brampton Soccer Centre was designed according to a general set of guidelines set by MJM architects for all their projects. This design philosophy of theirs makes optimal use of the space providing an economical layout that benefits both the city of Brampton and the public. A major focus of their designs, especially for the Brampton Soccer Centre, is community connectivity. The building was situated and designed to benefit the public in terms of access and creating a welcoming space. The layout and location of the Complex makes the building accessible for all types of transportation, such as car, public transit and foot, as well as for all people regardless of age or ability. In all cases, MJM Architects take into detail the community when designing a building; they create spaces that are sensitive to the needs and restrictions of the area. As well, they design layouts for the public spaces that are greatly economical, taking all scenarios into consideration. The plans follow a simple, clear, and concise layout, creating clear site lines of all public areas from the lobby, allowing for single point control. This brilliant design layout allows for less staff and therefore less cost. Financial conditions are taken further into account through the design by creating an easily maintained structure with efficient operating costs. This is accomplished through the practice of sustainable design. MJM Architects believe in sustainability through technology and systems, as well as through passive means. The firm’s attentive detailing of the right materials, resulting in the building’s longevity and durability, are also significantly important. Brampton Soccer Centre

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The surrounding community of the Brampton Soccer Centre is diverse in suburban context. Residential houses are placed across two major roads, Dixie Road and Sandalwood Parkway, on the site’s northern and eastern corners. A local secondary school, Harold M.

Braithwaite, as well as a retirement home, Sandalwood Park Village resides on the site’s southern corner. Furthermore, the two masses of the structure visually develop a significant statement towards the traffic flow surrounding the site. As a result, the mass’s shifted position

develops a, ‘shielded’ area for both parking and entry. The two resulting zones develop points of entry with a central lobby from both the parking side and residential side with a childcare centre and multipurpose community rooms.

towards the street intersection of Dixie Road and Sandalwood Parkway. The purpose of this outdoor plaza’s design was to integrate the interior design with that of the exterior. This is done through the philosophy of ‘naturally extending’ the community rooms of the centre with the plaza which opens

up onto it (UrbanToronto.com). The summer months bring much life to this plaza, functioning as a civic court including programming in: playgrounds, stages and a splash pad. There are two professional sized basketball courts, four soccer fields and two cricket pitches located out of doors.

Site Design

With regards to the site design, the interior massing scheme developed two critical outdoor areas: a main arrival area, which faces the interior of the site, as well as an activity plaza. This pedestrianscaled plaza occupies the northeast corner of the Brampton Soccer Centre’s site, with an orientation 8 Brampton Soccer Centre


Massing The most significant design challenge of the Brampton Soccer Centre was the massing of the facilities intended sheer size. This size requirement was necessary for the accommodation of the complex’s ambitious program (UrbanToronto.com). An initial series of massing models were produced of potential variations in structural proportions. The client recognized the need for the influence of urbanism and civic structure to impress itself into the design, therefore favoring the design schematic of creating two separate masses. These masses were to poetically “slide past each other in parallel”, resulting in a 3-part corridor with a compositional layout of an intriguing zigzag layout. (UrbanToronto.com). The Soccer Centre houses 4 field-house arenas including stadium style viewing and 4 main entrances to the building. A community hall wing, three meeting/ community rooms, two boardrooms, as well as a childcare component are located within the structure (Tourism Brampton). Within the internal spaces, the massing is broken down even further through the structure’s accessibility and permeability. Both instances are expressed in the Centre’s multiplicity of entrances located on the south, east and west sides. It should be noted here that the masses are defined by their monolithic northern and porous southern walls. The northern faces are windowed sparingly, housing utility areas as well as blocking noise from the busy street’s intersection. The southern surfaces are almost completely clad in glass. Aluminum louvers are used to prevent direct solar heat gain. Internally, most structural and mechanical systems are exposed. Brampton Soccer Centre

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Building Envelope

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he Brampton Soccer Centre deploys a superior quality of materiality as well as a transparency in its zones. The irregular arrangement of corrugated steel paneling, sunken cedar overhangs, smooth curtain wall systems, as well as bold colourized graphics and imagery all contribute to the structure’s overall authentic building textures. The use of custom graphic and imagery is integrated into the structure as a suburban-style billboard, “a graphic vinyl interlayer sandwiched between laminated glass” (UrbanToronto. com). These billboards are located on the lobby balustrades, as well as on the south and west facades of the building. At night, the imagery is backlit-attracting attention from passers by on Dixie Road. In terms of colour palettes, the Centre predominantly uses white and silver, which is enhanced by the introduction of vibrant saturated colours. This colour palette was chosen with the ideal of communicating the feel of energy and activity associated with both athletics and athletic attire. This philosophy was carried over to the building envelope with the inclusion of horizontal bands of coloured glass, sparingly placed on the curtain walls. This addition enhanced the animation of the facades as well as provided coloured light to protrude through to the interior. The complex’s interstitial area houses angled drywall, mosaic tile and perforated sheet steel walls. The clever use of high contrasting black and white tiles denotes the tiled surfaces of the flooring, artistically personifying both, ‘soccer balls’, and ‘referee jerseys’ (UrbanToronto.com). The City of Brampton’s official brand and colour, ‘Brampton Blue’, was applied liberally to the interior vertical surfaces in pure white and pale blue mosaic tiles. The Centre’s generally cool-toned colour palette was counterbalanced by the warmth of the natural cedar sunken ceiling panels of the public spaces that become both external and internal soffits, which wrap around the building’s perimeter. The Brampton Soccer Centre is, “a landmark building of a high standard and quality”(Urban Toronto).

Building Critique

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he Brampton Soccer Centre is, “a landmark building of a high standard and quality”(Urban Toronto). However, in the analysis of the structure itself, as well as interviews with employees of the Soccer Centre, a deeper understanding of the structure’s hidden faults were revealed. To start, the decoration of the building’s public spaces are quite elaborate, yet the community rooms’ interior space was dark, dull and sparse. As complex manager said, “it seems as though these community rooms were plopped in last minute to meet requirements, an afterthought in design.

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dditionally, roof accessibility comes as both an inconvenience and safety hazard for workers, especially for maintenance. Inconvenience has resulted from the roof accesses being split into two parts, and spaced far apart from one another. The structure has two mechanical rooms, each one servicing one roof area. The safety hazard with regards to roof maintenance has resulted from the roof accessibility which, for each roof has two levels. The second level, the highest level, is only accessible by a small ladder which forces maintenance workers to literally scale the building in order access this point of the structure.

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Curtain Wall with Wood Finish Overhang

Metal Cladding Detail

Extruded Curtain Wall Detail Brampton Soccer Centre

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Radiant Floor Heating

Sustainable Features

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ermeability is outlined in the structure’s transparency throughout, achieved within its volumes. Copious amounts of glazing both internally and externally of the walls, with floor-height windows, offer continual views into the soccer arenas. This encourages the connection of both athletic and community programs. Additionally, the ceilings of the building’s interstitial area is tall, and is both elevated and top-lit as a result of skylights, hooded towers, and clerestories. As a result, this harness of natural light reduces the structure’s overall need for artificial lighting.

passive heating and cooling system is implemented in the Complex through the use of louvers on extensive, southern faced glazing as well as placement of large thermal masses next to the clerestories. Ductwork utilizes passive smoke retardation, which is in the form of layered filters. In the event of a fire, this would prevent fumes from entering the air supply system. The permeable southern faces, clad primarily in glass, utilize aluminum louvers, which prevent direct solar heat gain through the envelope. Additionally, the main lobby has approximately, 9, 000 feet of heating piping, radiant heated floors, resultantly keeping the floors warm as well as contributing to the overall heat within the building. he dual program compatibility for the structure has allowed for the change of the soccer arenas from hot to cold. There are two ‘base’ states of the warm and cold arenas; the arenas are able to convert between a ‘cold’ ice pad and a ‘warm’ turf field. In the warm arena a field is produced with a, floor made up of artificial poly-fibre , with 1 1/2 inch crushed rubber underneath. To convert to a cold climate, the poly-fibre and rubber is removed and the arena is flooded similar to other ice pads. To convert to a gym floor, the turf is covered with plastic sheeting then overlaid with 1, 200 sheets of plywood. The final layer requires the arrangement of approximately 7, 000 tiles producing a gymnasium floor. For cold conversions, however, the ice layer would be the first to go down in the flooring system. Before any layering atop the surface occurred, the maintenance crew would have to scrape down the ice surface, roughening it up so it would be easier to walk and drive on. The next step is to manually lay down ice deck, black 1-inch thick insulated sheeting, which would protect the ice while keeping the cold in. The glass boards and safety nets would then be removed from the ice pad’s perimeter, as well as players’ benches and penalty boxes. For the next step, 12,000 sheets of plywood would then be laid on top of the ice. The final step, same as turf to gymnasium conversions, would be for the 7,000 tiles to be laid atop the wood. 12 Brampton Soccer Centre

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Structural System

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he Brampton Soccer Centre takes advantage of structural opportunities to allow for open spaces while containing the concept of adaptability. The graphic documentation specifically, in the north lobby and arena B, rendered the buildings use of several types of structural systems. In the south lobby, either a wide flange or a rectangular concrete section were utilised as columns. The concrete columns in this area were also connected with rectangular concrete section beams. Arena B uses wide flanges for columns and several different sizes of HSS (hollow structural section), C-channel, double angle, and wide flange steel for the beams, struts and bracing on the load bearing walls. Double angle inverted Pratt joists are used to span the large width of the field. The use of these large spans allows for spaces to open, thus creating visual sight lines between spaces. The versatility of the Brampton Soccer Centre is seldom affected by the structural design as it is more integrated system dependant.

Electrical System

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he electrical system, although minimal, was cleverly organized. As a result of major focus on designing a sustainable structure the lighting was used economically and efficiently. All the lighting within the Brampton Soccer Centre is wired in a mechanical system that can be controlled online and wirelessly. In particular, the arena lighting is set under a time frame, which is controlled through a motion sensor. A 30-minute time frame is established in which if there is no activity occurring within the arena the lighting will shut off in an attempt to decrease unnecessary energy consumption. In conjunction with the motion sensors the field houses have a sign-up system in place. If the arena is not booked then the lighting will automatically turn off. ighting used in the Brampton Soccer Centre is split up based on the specific programming of a space. Within the lobby there is primarily a use of pot lights, which are recessed within the ceiling hiding them from view. In the arena and viewing areas there is a principal use of bowl lights above the field, which illuminate the space. The bowl lights are aligned and integrated within the truss system. The exposed bowl lights compliment the exposed structural truss system. All lighting located within the complex uses florescent bulbs.

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HVAC System The main purpose of a Heating,Ventilation, and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system is to help maintain good indoor air quality through adequate ventilation with filtration and provide thermal comfort. The Brampton Soccer Center’s HVAC was designed with a quality system that has layered filters to prevent fumes from entering the air supply system, while also successfully providing an appropriate quantity and quality of outdoor air, fire safety, lower energy costs, and easier maintenance. The main HVAC units on the roof-top are placed strategically in the center of main areas of the building for minimal air travel through ductwork. Suitably, most of the ducts run along the ceiling of the Soccer Centre. In each of the 4 arenas, the main airflow output is centrally located on the ceilings, and the ducts, which run through the structural truss system, gradually decrease in size as it flows to each end of the arena. As well, to disguise the HVAC system in the arena change rooms, the ducts were placed precisely beneath the bleachers and hence forth in the change room ceilings. In the rental/community rooms there is in-floor ducting hidden along the window sill. In order to maintain the aesthetic appeal of the eye-level ducts of the building, the designer hid the ducts by covering it with beautiful wooden slats which are consistent with the wood used throughout the entire building. As an added feature, there is in-slab heating in the lobby area. Alas, some ducts are cleverly hidden in the highest ceiling areas which can only be seen from roof top access. Additionally, natural heating and cooling is integrated into the building with the effective overhangs blocking sunlight. As well, in the rental rooms, pull down blinds were used to prevent sunlight from entering and heating the rooms in the summer but it also prevents people from looking into rooms such as preschool or yoga classes. While touring the building, the manager mentioned that the HVAC system works extremely well and that in the summer it is always fresh inside. A separate AC system is responsible for cooling the electrical room, which is almost like a large computer system for the entire building. Overall the Brampton Soccer Center is an elegant and well thought out building with an excellent HVAC system. 14 Brampton Soccer Centre


Plumbing System The plumbing system in the Brampton Soccer Centre is very significant in the completion of a proper recreational centre. The total occupancy the centre has is approximately 2,590, with 64,000 soccer players playing during the 8 month indoor season, and 8,700 soccer and cricket players who play during the 5 month outdoor season. The plumbing system of a building includes water supply distribution sub-system; the fixtures and fixture connectors; soil, waste and vent pipes; the building drain and building sewer; the storm water drainage, with their devices, appurtenances and connections within the building and outside the building. The water system in the Brampton Soccer Centre distributes and provides water to the community rooms, the cafe, bathrooms, water fountains, maintenance rooms, and the arena change rooms. This water is used for drinking, cleaning, washing, and culinary use. The drainage system includes sewer pipes and storm drainage pipes. These pipes collect and lead wastewater/rain water away from the building to a point of disposal. Included in the sanitary drainage system is the vent piping system, with the purpose of providing circulation of air within the drainage piping. The pipes modeled in the 3D model include sanitary pipes (green), hot water (red) and cold water pipes (blue), hot water recirculation (red), and storm water pipes (white). Hot water and cold water pipes carry hot and cold water to the change rooms, bathrooms and culinary areas for sinks and showers. The storm water pipe system collects water from the roof and drains it through and away from the building. The special pipe accessories in the plumbing system include interceptors, backwater valves, sumps and ejectors, as well as roof and floor drains. A fitting that was analysised in the Brampton Soccer Centre 3D Model is the P-traps. The purpose of P-traps is to catch water after each discharge from a fixture. This water stops unpleasant odours and gases in a sanitary drainage system to leak through the fixture. Each fixture has their own corresponding trap. Another element included in the plumbing are the roof and floor drains. The roof drains collect surface and rain water and discharges it through the building in a pipe, leading to a catch basin. The floor drain, which is a very important element in the change rooms of the centre, carries water and waterborne wastes out of rooms. The plumbing system is hidden from the public, located underneath the building, under the bleachers, in the floors and in the walls. It is important for this Soccer Centre to have a sufficient amount of bathrooms to accommodate for the large amounts of people that pass through the building.

Brampton Soccer Centre

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Sprinkler System The intent in the design was to hide, when possible, the sprinkler system. Thus, consideration for the sprinkler head was taken into account in order to hide them on the side walls around the skylights. With the substantial size of space, it is hard to notice the sprinklers in the arenas as the truss system acts like a camouflage. For this project, the architect was not the one providing the plans for the piping system given that a sprinkler contractor was in charge of designing these plans. Therefore, the architect only provided the main lines required for each of the zones in his drawings. To describe how the water circulates in the building, the water initially enters the building from the West side of the building directly inside the sprinkler room through a 200mm pipe. Within this room, the water flow goes through the check valves, the flow switches, and all the needed control valves, detectors, and switches necessary. After going through this complex’s circuitry of pipes, the water is spread through the building inside 6 main pipes. Most of the main piping goes through the second floor ceiling to reach the North and East zones of the building. One of these pipes brings the water to a second control zone in the second floor boiler room, where the dry pipe system assembly is located for the exterior soffit. No stand pipes are required for the center since the building’s sprinkler system is installed according to the 3.2.9.1 OBC article.

Ontario Building Code The Brampton Soccer Center seems to follow all of the OBC requirements for its type of occupancy. The Complex’s is major occupancy is a Sport Recreation Centre, which is a Group A Division 3 building. As well, the complex’s minor occupancy is a daycare centre and trade fair building, falling in the Group A Division 2 type of building. For fire suppression/containment strategies placed in the building, a sprinkler system had to be installed because the building is larger than 1500 square meters as seen in the 3.2.2.29 article of the OBC. The Piping system for the sprinklers has been divided in eight zones consisting of one zone for each of the four arenas, one for each of the two mezzanines, one for the lobby and one for the main entrance exterior wood soffit. The entire sprinkler system is a wet system except from the exterior zone since it is not insulated and is therefore subject to freezing weather. 16 Brampton Soccer Centre


Ontario Building Code Continued For the fire resistance, floors and roof were not required to be fire resistant rated, but the mezzanine resists 1-1/2 hour. For fire resistance purposes, the floors and roof were not required to be fire resistant rated. However, the mezzanine resists 1-1/2 hours where the building code asks for a minimum of 1 hour. All walls surrounding staircases are 1 hour fire resistant and the 2 big rooms adjacent to the mechanical rooms are rated for 1-1/2 hours. The lobby, washrooms and corridor walls leading to the day care are all smoke resistant. The wood assemblies, for the ceilings and the soffits, are Fire Retardant impregnated. In the locations where the roof is jointed to the structure, the structure and insulation are sealed with Fire Resistant sealer. Taking into account the large occupancy, the building has been designed with a large number of doors, which can be used as emergency access. At least six doors per arena give direct access to the exterior. Moreover, a staircase is located at each end of the mezzanines while, to provide exterior access, the other two lead to the main lobby where eight doors leading outside are located. For what concerns accessibility, handicap parking is provided: six on the south side and eight on the east side of the building. On the outside, many ramps give access to the main lobby doors. Interior elevators offer access to the second floor mezzanine. Accessible washrooms are available in each public washroom as well as in each locker room.

Maximum Capacity Area/Use Soccer Arena 1 (350 Spectators + teams) Soccer Arena 2 (350 Spectators + teams) Soccer Arena 3 (350 Spectators + teams) Soccer Arena 4 (350 Spectators + teams) Lobby Staff Community Rooms Trade Show Mode (Limit One Arena) Public Skating Mode (Arena 1) Maximum Capacity

Occupant Load (People)

O.B.C 1977 REF. 422 3.1.16.1(1)a 422 3.1.16.1(1)a 422 3.1.16.1(1)a 422 3.1.16.1(1)a 123 3.1.16.1-3.7s.m. 10 By Design 203 3.1.16.1-1.85s.m 1200 400

2679

Brampton Soccer Centre

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Circulation Plans

18 Brampton Soccer Centre


System in Context Sprinkler System

HVAC System

Plumbing System

Structural System

Brampton Soccer Centre

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Building Code Matrix

20 Brampton Soccer Centre


Thermal Calculations

Brampton Soccer Centre

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22 Brampton Soccer Centre


Brampton Soccer Centre

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24 Brampton Soccer Centre


Brampton Soccer Centre

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Niagara Falls Community Centre

South Oshawa Community Centre

Innisfill Recreation Complex

26 Brampton Soccer Centre


Comparative Analysis MJM Architects created a recreational centre that became the new level of design for future centres of its kind. Many of their previous projects, as well future designs, follow their ingenious design philosophy, which has resulted in some very resourceful and successful projects. Designs that stand out the most among their many impressive projects are the Niagara Falls Community Centre, the South Oshawa Community Centre, and the Innisfill Community Centre. All three show some of the impressive qualities and ingenuities of the Brampton Soccer Centre that helped make it the success it is today. In the Niagara Falls Community Centre we see the same simple and concise layout as the Brampton Soccer Centre that contributes to a single point control by clear site lines of all public areas. Additionally, the multi-use programmatic design houses many recreational activities such as multi-purpose rooms, gymnasiums, courts, and aquatic centres. This layout requires extensive systematic planning of mechanical, HVAC, and electrical systems to name a few. The South Oshawa Community Centre shares the same sustainable ingenuity as the Brampton Soccer Centre, which allowed for an economical efficiency of the building with respects to energy use. Both were designed with particular attention paid to solar heat gain reduction as is evident in the analysis of the Brampton Soccer Centre’s south facing arena façade (see…). As well as creating a passive design that relied heavily on daylight to cut down on electricity costs, this is accomplished through the use of wide expanses of glazing in both buildings. Curtain walls were further utilized on both structures to create views that linked spaces between both interior and exterior. Similar to the Brampton Soccer Centre the Innisfill Community Centre makes use of both a warm and cold component within their design plan. However, unlike the Brampton Soccer centre the warm and cold components are used simultaneously. This is accomplished by creating two separate spaces, the cold component housing a twin pad arena complex and the warm component being a swimming pool and a multi-purpose space.

Brampton Soccer Centre

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North Elevation

South Elevation

1m=0.00993mm

1m=0.00993mm

1m=0.00993mm

East Elevation

West Elevation 28 Brampton Soccer Centre

1m=0.00993mm


Interior Renders ofArena B and Lobby

Brampton Soccer Centre

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30 Brampton Soccer Centre


South Perspective Render

Brampton Soccer Centre

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32 Brampton Soccer Centre


Structural System Render

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34 Brampton Soccer Centre


Conclusion

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o conclude, the Brampton Soccer Centre proves adaptability of its function permitting the flexibility of program. The variance of the complex’s thermal environments contributes to the overall economical purpose. Structure, detail and material all support the present and future compliance of the Brampton Soccer Centre’s potential thermal modifications.

Brampton Soccer Centre

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References Archdaily. Architecture Photography: Brampton Soccer Centre / MacLennan Jaunkalns Miller Architects (380541). N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Nov. 2013. <http://www.archdaily.com/380512/brampton-soccer-centre- maclennan-jaunkalns-miller-architects/51a82516b3fc4b90270003 fc_brampton-soccer-centre-maclennan-jaunkalns-miller-archi tects_diagram-png/>. Brampton Soccer Centre. Canadian Architecture. UrbanToronto.com. Thursd. 24 Nov. 2013.<http://urbantoronto.ca/forum/showthread. php/5502-Cdn-Arch-Brampton-Soccer-Centre>. Brampton Soccer Centre. City of Brampton, 2012. http://www.brampton. ca/ EN/residents/community-centres/brampton-soccer-centre/ Pages/ Welcome.aspx Brampton Soccer Centre. N.d. Photograph. Brampton. Archdaily. Web. 12 Nov. 2013. <http://archdaily.com>. Brampton Soccer Centre. N.d. Photograph. Brampton. MJMA. Web. 22 Nov. 2013. <http://www.mjmarchitects.com>. Brampton Soccer Centre. Tourism-Brampton, City of Brampton, 2009. PDF. http://www.brampton.ca/EN/Arts-Culture-Tourism/Tourism-Bramp ton/Sports/Documents/Brampton%20Soccer%20Centre.pdf Canadian Fire safety Association. “Introduction to the new 2006 Ontario Building Code.” CFSA news. October 2006: 8-9. PDF EPA Home. “IAQ Design Tools for Schools: Heating,Ventilation and Air-Con ditioning (HVAC) Systems.” EPA. Environmental Protection Agency, n.d. Web. 20 Nov. 2013. <http://www.epa.gov/iaq/schooldesign/hvac. html>. Harold, Taylor. “Basic Plumbing System.”Basic Plumbing System. N.p.,n.d. Web. 23 Nov. 2013. <http://www.slideshare.net/ haroldtaylor1113/10- basic-plumbing-system>. MJMA. “MJMA - Brampton Soccer Centre.” MJMA - Brampton Soc cer Centre. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Nov. 2013. <http://www.mjmarchitects. com/?mid=Brampton_Soccer>.Support National Fire Code of Canada. Ottawa: Associate Committee on National Fire Codes, National Research Council, 1963. PDF. Ontario Building Code 2006: Containing the Building Code Act and O. Reg. 350/06. Toronto, Ont.: Queen’s Printer for Ontario, 2006. PDF. 36 Brampton Soccer Centre


Brampton Soccer Centre

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MJM Architects Brampton Soccer Centre 1495 Sandalwood Parkway East, Brampton, ON

Brampton Soccer Centre Case Study  

A building system analysis performed by Carleton Students.

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