Issuu on Google+

ADAM MCGUIRE


CONTENTS


4

10

16

22

28

34


JULIA CARSON COMMUNITY CENTER Gresham-Smith Competition 2011 Indianapolis, IN Arch 303 Prof. Michele Chiuini

4


The Julia Carson Community Center project, developed for the 2011 Gresham-Smith Competition, was proposed with the hope of revitalizing a struggling neighborhood in urban Indianapolis. Although the size of the site was generous, the needs of the project were many, requiring a careful balance of programmatic functions and spacial uses.

My proposal sought to heavily integrate the building with its site, using the edges of the building to define interesting outdoor spaces which would create a sense of comfort and relief for the surrounding neighborhood. A sloping green roof provides an interesting form of access to to the building’s second floor (right).


ADMIN

DEPUTY DIRECTOR

CONFERENCE

SELIN G COUNSELING

COUNSELING

CO UN SELIN G

CO UN

CO UN SELIN G

CONFERENCE

MULTIGUIDANCE

CO UN SELIN G

EXEC. DIRECTOR

STORAGE

SCREENING

FOYER

SCRE ENING

SCREENING

SCRE

JCCC THEATER

MEDIA CONTROL

ENING

SCREENING

TICKETS

STAGE

GALLERY

SCREENING

LOUNGE/ AUDITORIUM VIEW

RECORDS

MULTI-PURPOSE ACTIVITY

WOMEN’S LOCKER

LEGACY OF LOVE CAFE

ATRIUM

MEN’S LOCKER

SUPPORTIVE SERVICES RECEPTION

LOUNGE

JULIA CARSON MEMORIAL LIBRARY KITCHEN

STORAGE

MEN

RESOURCE ROOM/ COMPUTER LAB

WOMEN

OUTDOOR PATIO

GYMNASIUM SECURITY

ATRIUM MINDFULNESS DINING

MEN

MASSAGE

WOMEN LOUNGE

CLUB/ MEETING

CLUB/ MEETING

CONFERENCE

MULTI-SENSORY THERAPY

SLEEP SLEEP

ADMIN CONFERENCE

RECEPTION

INHALATION THERAPY

SLEEP SLEEP

MINDFULNESS KITCHEN

FITNESS ROOM

MENW

OMEN


A defining goal of my proposal was to unify the various spaces and functions with a sense of transparency. Different spaces are integrated and mixed amongst each other, often revealing their inner functions through open floorplans or carefully placed glass walls. As a result, their respective functions would be revealed to other spaces so that guests of the center would be further aware of its full range of offerings. All spaces are centered around a central atrium, through which many of the building’s spaces can be seen (right).

TRANSPARENCY TRANSPARENCY TRANSPARENCY

8


CHRISTY WOODS CANOPY TRAIL Muncie, IN Arch 401 Prof. Wes Janz

10


The Christy Woods Canopy Trail was created to heighten awareness of a forest near Ball State’s campus through a kind of permanent outdoor installation. Early concepts of my project (top left, opposite page) sought to elevate visitors to allow them to explore the different levels of the forest environment.

PROCESS

However, as the project developed, a major emphasis was also placed on lightness, or a project that would leave minimal impact on the ground. By the time my process stage was completed, I had mapped out every tree in the area, and created a proposal for a walk-through which could be built while leaving every tree in place.


The final proposal involves three separate trails through the forest, which converge at a central elevated experience. Each of the trails allows for a different study of the forest environment: the northern trail passes at close range to only a few trees, allowing for a close examination of each. The eastern trail passes through a small grove and allows one to study the spacial relationship of the trees within. The southernmost trail, and the only without stairs (allowing for full accessibility) offers a more gradual study of the forest, and a slow immersion into the forest canopy. Once visitors have fully ascended the installation, they are presented with a series of viewports which allow for more defined “snapshots� of the forest environment.


16


CACHE CANYON HOTEL Yolo Valley, CA Arch 303 Prof. Michele Chiuini


18


The Cache Canyon Hotel was designed as a retreat among the mountains of northern California, overlooking Yolo Valley. The complex is broken up into a series of modular cabins, deliberately composed in a way which would create the community of a campground while allowing for the privacy of a resort. The cabins are arranged around many shared common areas with seating and landscaping, while the rooms themselves are each oriented outward from a central point so that no other cabins are visible. Each cabin features a series of moveable partition walls and windows, which can opened or adjusted to create connections with outdoor patios or with adjacent cabins, or closed

Upper floor cabin

to enhance feelings of privacy.

Outdoor common spaces


At the center of the complex is a community hall, which houses dining facilities and recreational spaces, and is the primary center for circulation between the levels of the hotel. The dining facilities allow access to both interior seating and an elevated exterior patio during appropriate weather.

Directly in front of the community hall is an adobe fire pit, which can provide opportunities for guests of the hotel to convene for activities. Many of the building’s construction practices take cues from the region’s historic Native American tribes, such as the use of local woods and adobe construction.

20


Central gathering area


ACRYLIC STUDY Arch 301 Prof. Janice Shimizu

22


Students of Prof. Shimizu’s studio were encouraged to choose a material, and explore its sculptural and tectonic possibilities through a series of small models. For my project, I chose to study acrylic, which allowed for interesting studies in transparency and malleability. The results included the 14 models pictured here, many of which required digital modeling, laser cutting, and various forms of melting and hand-molding to complete.


24


The study culminated in another use for our selected material, in which we proposed an occupiable installation utilizing a second chosen material. For my project, I decided to contrast the flexible and transparent qualities of acrylic against the opacity and sturdiness of wood.

After experimenting with digital models and concepts that would push the forms of the materials to their limits (far left), I went with the idea of a pattern of alternating wood and acrylic layers, combining to make a single and continous form, based specifically on the curves of a violin. The final product (next page) features a kind of gradient in solidity, from most transparent (on left) to most opaque (on right).


Final product 26


URBARN Indianapolis, IN Arch 402 Prof. Timothy Gray

28


For the final semester of our under-

the Ball State University College of Ar-

graduate studies, my studio sec-

chitecture and Planning. Development

tion sought a project that could be

began with a series of proposals from

physically built and fully useful to the

small teams of Ball State students

community. The result was UrbaRn, an

(my team’s proposals featured here),

“urban farm” project seeking to edu-

although input from the younger

cate children about urban agriculture

students of the Indianapolis Project

and adaptive reuse, in part through

School was also taken into account

the repurposing of two former ship-

(upper left). As the proposals finalized,

ping containers into classrooms. The

construction drawings and physical

project was a collaboration between

models were underway (far right).

the Indianapolis Project School and

30


The UrbaRn project was heavily collaborative, with each student assisting in a variety of roles. I assisted in managing material orders, sanding and cleaning for reuse (as pictured in large image on right), painting, and furnishing the container, among other tasks.

32


Buy the book! http://ow.ly/rNx6W

Chief among my contributions to the project was through its documentation and publication in a 106-page book, available online. I was also in charge of promotional efforts attempting to secure additional fundraising.

The final outcome features both completely repurposed shipping containers, one as a classroom with desks and one as a more open play area, each with large sliding doors. A spacious wooden deck connects the two spaces.


WALT DISNEY IMAGINATIONS Walt Disney ImagiNations Competition 2011 + 2012 2011 - Semi-Finalist “Arabian Nights: The Tales of Scheherazade” 2012 - Semi-Finalist “Lunacy: A Space Club and Bar”

34

Teammates: Justin Gross Tiffany Lim Rachel Martinelli


As an attempt to try something far removed from the traditional architecture curriculum, a small team of three other students and I set foot into thematic design as we entered Walt Disney Imagineering’s ImagiNations competition. In the 2011 competition, we proposed an elaborate “dark ride” (an indoor ride featuring staged scenes in controlled environments) for Disneyland Paris, based on the tales of the 1001 Arabian Nights. The ride sought to entrench itself into the existing Middle Eastern theming in Disneyland Paris’ Adventureland, as well as into the long connection with Middle Eastern folklore in French culture. Our ride featured a flying dhow, or Arab sailboat, moving through physical scenes representing the tales told by Scheharazade to the cold-hearted King Shahryar (left).


Work on the ride quickly proved the need for surprising amounts of research into Arab culture and the origins of the 1001 Nights, as we sought to evoke traditional Irani/Persian architecture in the facade of King Shahryar’s palace (opposite). Also necessary were human designs for many of the characters in the ride, which would be depicted through the use of advanced A-100 Audio-Animatronics (left).

As the proposal had to be physically shipped to Walt Disney Imagineering’s campus in Glendale, California, we chose to package our flash drive in a custom-designed box which would begin the story of our attraction from the moment it was opened (below).


COLORED PENCIL The images above were created in 2010 as part of a study in different visual media, all examining Oscar Niemeyer’s Niterói Contemporary Art Museum outside Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

40

WATERCOLOR


GRAPHITE

INK


TRAVELS + PHOTOGRAPHY


Pictured, from top left: Antelope Canyon, UT London, United Kingdom Sorrento, Italy Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Inside Passage, AK Berlin, Germany


Adam McGuire 218 Royal Ave. Evansville, IN 47715 armcguire12@gmail.com 812-228-9359


Undergraduate Portfolio