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ADVANCING EDUCATION, INCOME, HEALTH, BASIC NEEDS, AND VOLUNTEERISM

2014

Oxford Networks has been a proud corporate supporter of United Way of Eastern Maine for many years. From the annual UWEM Campaign, to the UWEM Pantry Project, to their support of 2-1-1 Maine, Oxford Networks and its employees donate time and money to make the community they serve a better place.

ANNUAL REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY

2013

THIS PUBLICATION MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE GENEROUS SUPPORT OF

GIVE. ADVOCATE. VOLUNTEER. Find out more about our funded programs and the volunteers who help move our community forward at www.unitedwayem.org, through our Facebook and Twitter accounts

United Way of Eastern Maine

Serving Penobscot, Piscataquis, Waldo, Hancock, and Washington Counties

www.unitedwayem.org


LETTER TO THE COMMUNITY United Way of Eastern Maine

BOARD OF DIRECTORS CHAIR Yolanda (Lannie) Moffatt VICE CHAIR Joseph Pratt TREASURER Erin Timney SECRETARY Helen McKinnon Frank Bragg, MD Kristin Coffey Canders Brian Donahue John Dougherty Andy Fitzpatrick Ben Haskell Karen Holyoke Melissa Huston Sgt. Brad Johnston Sarah Newell Tom Palmer Elena Perrello Karen Pomeroy Suzanne Tyler RETIRING MEMBERS Amanda Butterfield P. Andrew Hamilton Susan Faloon Jim Miller Esther Rauch Donald Sturgeon

Dear United Way Supporters and Community Partners, The United Way of Eastern (UWEM) continues to play a very important role in the 5 counties that we serve. Long known as a fund raiser, we have expanded our role and are raising resources of all kinds – financial, in kind donations of food, and volunteer assistance. We are very proud of the work being done by our agency partners, our staff, and our volunteers to address needs in our community around education, income, basic needs, and health. We at the UWEM have a real desire to improve lives here in Eastern Maine and our efforts are making a difference. Over the year, much work went into overhauling our board-driven strategic plan. This plan charts the course for our organization over the next 5 years. It takes an in-depth look at our business model and expands our efforts around the annual campaign, endowment and planned giving, and alternative giving platforms offering options to our loyal contributors. With the continuing tough economic times and the increasing number of lost jobs in the region, food security continues to be a major concern for struggling families and our senior citizens. Through our partnership with Good Shepherd Food Bank, we continue to support backpack food programs established to provide needed meals to young students on weekends when school breakfast and lunch programs are not available. Our United Way Pantry Project, which provides shelves and signage to local organizations to enable them to conduct “mini food drives” at the workplace, continues to be a great success. The non-perishable food is then delivered to Good Shepherd Food Bank for distribution to area food pantries. This is done after the holidays, when food pantries are most in need and the “shelves are bare.” Finally, we continue to support and partner with the National Association of Letter Carriers in our region and aid them with their annual food drive. We also support and collaborate with groups engaged in the Hancock County Food Drive. All of these programs are organized to feed families and seniors in our area and bring an end to hunger. Helping seniors and struggling families work towards acheiving financial stability continues to be a major focus. Through our efforts with Eastern Maine CA$H coalition, our volunteers were able to return over $5,000,000 in earned income tax credits and tax refunds to low to moderate income families. In addition, our financial asset coaching program continues to grow and offer valuable advice to families about banking, budgeting, home foreclosure, and other financial concerns. Fund raising was difficult during these challenging economic times. With the assistance of a core group of dedicated “annual campaign volunteers” we were able to raise funds to support a wide range of services to 68 programs and agencies in the region. Our fund distribution volunteers allocated nearly $1,000,000 to various programs and funded vital initiatives around education, income, basic needs, and health. In addition, we continue to offer a “donor choice program” where our contributors can self direct their gift to specific health and human service organizations in our region.

COMMUNITY SNAPSHOT Eastern Maine is made up of Hancock, Penobscot, Piscataquis, Waldo and Washington Counties; comprising a total land mass of 14,392 square miles which is larger than the states of Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island combined. The total population of Eastern Maine is 297,518. While this region makes up almost half of the state’s land mass (47%) it only represents 22% of the state population making it extremely rural with an average population of 30 people per square mile. Distance, weather and limited public transportation affect access to employment, healthcare and educational resources. There are 124,903 households in Eastern Maine with an average median household income of $41,469, only 86% of the statewide median household income. In 2013 the average unemployment rate of the region was 8.4%, almost 2% higher than the statewide unemployment rate. The highest levels of unemployment were in Piscataquis (9.6%) and Washington (9.8%) counties. Poverty rates have risen over the past several years, on average 16.8% of individuals living in United Way of Eastern Maine’s service area are living below the poverty level compared to the statewide poverty rate of 13%. Predictably the poorest counties are Piscataquis (18%) and Washington (20%). The economic snapshot of the region continues to shift as businesses lay off workers and traditional industries downsize or disappear altogether. The skillset required of today’s workforce is rapidly changing to keep pace with technology and global competition. Job losses greatly impact our region and contribute to many of the challenges we face and seek to address as a community.

United Way of Eastern Maine provides financial support and administration of 2-1-1 Maine for our 5 county service area. 2-11 is a comprehensive statewide directory of over 10,000 health and human services available in Maine. The toll free 2-1-1 hotline is confidential, anonymous, and connects callers to trained call specialists who can help 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Finding the answers to health and human services questions and locating resources is as quick and easy as dialing 2-1-1 or visiting www.211maine.org.

Total Eastern Maine Agencies Listed: 445 Total Calls: 11,063 TOP EASTERN MAINE CALL CATEGORIES: Heating Assistance: 1,883 Utilities Assistance: 774 Housing - Shelter: 644 Mental Health Services: 642 Basic Needs - Food: 638 Health Care: 634 Substance Abuse Services: 476 Tax Services: 411 Health Insurance: 356 Legal Services: 329

We encourage you to review this annual report as it provides valuable information on the accomplishments by our local United Way.

John Kuropchak President, UWEM

1

Yolanda (Lannie) Moffatt Chair, UWEM Board of Directors

2


LETTER TO THE COMMUNITY United Way of Eastern Maine

BOARD OF DIRECTORS CHAIR Yolanda (Lannie) Moffatt VICE CHAIR Joseph Pratt TREASURER Erin Timney SECRETARY Helen McKinnon Frank Bragg, MD Kristin Coffey Canders Brian Donahue John Dougherty Andy Fitzpatrick Ben Haskell Karen Holyoke Melissa Huston Sgt. Brad Johnston Sarah Newell Tom Palmer Elena Perrello Karen Pomeroy Suzanne Tyler RETIRING MEMBERS Amanda Butterfield P. Andrew Hamilton Susan Faloon Jim Miller Esther Rauch Donald Sturgeon

Dear United Way Supporters and Community Partners, The United Way of Eastern (UWEM) continues to play a very important role in the 5 counties that we serve. Long known as a fund raiser, we have expanded our role and are raising resources of all kinds – financial, in kind donations of food, and volunteer assistance. We are very proud of the work being done by our agency partners, our staff, and our volunteers to address needs in our community around education, income, basic needs, and health. We at the UWEM have a real desire to improve lives here in Eastern Maine and our efforts are making a difference. Over the year, much work went into overhauling our board-driven strategic plan. This plan charts the course for our organization over the next 5 years. It takes an in-depth look at our business model and expands our efforts around the annual campaign, endowment and planned giving, and alternative giving platforms offering options to our loyal contributors. With the continuing tough economic times and the increasing number of lost jobs in the region, food security continues to be a major concern for struggling families and our senior citizens. Through our partnership with Good Shepherd Food Bank, we continue to support backpack food programs established to provide needed meals to young students on weekends when school breakfast and lunch programs are not available. Our United Way Pantry Project, which provides shelves and signage to local organizations to enable them to conduct “mini food drives” at the workplace, continues to be a great success. The non-perishable food is then delivered to Good Shepherd Food Bank for distribution to area food pantries. This is done after the holidays, when food pantries are most in need and the “shelves are bare.” Finally, we continue to support and partner with the National Association of Letter Carriers in our region and aid them with their annual food drive. We also support and collaborate with groups engaged in the Hancock County Food Drive. All of these programs are organized to feed families and seniors in our area and bring an end to hunger. Helping seniors and struggling families work towards acheiving financial stability continues to be a major focus. Through our efforts with Eastern Maine CA$H coalition, our volunteers were able to return over $5,000,000 in earned income tax credits and tax refunds to low to moderate income families. In addition, our financial asset coaching program continues to grow and offer valuable advice to families about banking, budgeting, home foreclosure, and other financial concerns. Fund raising was difficult during these challenging economic times. With the assistance of a core group of dedicated “annual campaign volunteers” we were able to raise funds to support a wide range of services to 68 programs and agencies in the region. Our fund distribution volunteers allocated nearly $1,000,000 to various programs and funded vital initiatives around education, income, basic needs, and health. In addition, we continue to offer a “donor choice program” where our contributors can self direct their gift to specific health and human service organizations in our region.

COMMUNITY SNAPSHOT Eastern Maine is made up of Hancock, Penobscot, Piscataquis, Waldo and Washington Counties; comprising a total land mass of 14,392 square miles which is larger than the states of Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island combined. The total population of Eastern Maine is 297,518. While this region makes up almost half of the state’s land mass (47%) it only represents 22% of the state population making it extremely rural with an average population of 30 people per square mile. Distance, weather and limited public transportation affect access to employment, healthcare and educational resources. There are 124,903 households in Eastern Maine with an average median household income of $41,469, only 86% of the statewide median household income. In 2013 the average unemployment rate of the region was 8.4%, almost 2% higher than the statewide unemployment rate. The highest levels of unemployment were in Piscataquis (9.6%) and Washington (9.8%) counties. Poverty rates have risen over the past several years, on average 16.8% of individuals living in United Way of Eastern Maine’s service area are living below the poverty level compared to the statewide poverty rate of 13%. Predictably the poorest counties are Piscataquis (18%) and Washington (20%). The economic snapshot of the region continues to shift as businesses lay off workers and traditional industries downsize or disappear altogether. The skillset required of today’s workforce is rapidly changing to keep pace with technology and global competition. Job losses greatly impact our region and contribute to many of the challenges we face and seek to address as a community.

United Way of Eastern Maine provides financial support and administration of 2-1-1 Maine for our 5 county service area. 2-11 is a comprehensive statewide directory of over 10,000 health and human services available in Maine. The toll free 2-1-1 hotline is confidential, anonymous, and connects callers to trained call specialists who can help 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Finding the answers to health and human services questions and locating resources is as quick and easy as dialing 2-1-1 or visiting www.211maine.org.

Total Eastern Maine Agencies Listed: 445 Total Calls: 11,063 TOP EASTERN MAINE CALL CATEGORIES: Heating Assistance: 1,883 Utilities Assistance: 774 Housing - Shelter: 644 Mental Health Services: 642 Basic Needs - Food: 638 Health Care: 634 Substance Abuse Services: 476 Tax Services: 411 Health Insurance: 356 Legal Services: 329

We encourage you to review this annual report as it provides valuable information on the accomplishments by our local United Way.

John Kuropchak President, UWEM

1

Yolanda (Lannie) Moffatt Chair, UWEM Board of Directors

2


EDUCATION OUTCOME #1 Children enter school ready to learn and succeed.

TARGET POPULATION

Children under age six and their families.

EDUCATION OUTCOME #2

Children and youth increase assets and skills in order to increase their ability to accept and take personal responsibility, plan, and make good choices, resist negative peer pressure and decrease vulnerability to dangerous situations.

INCOME OUTCOME

People access services to achieve stability in their lives and maintain self-sufficiency.

TARGET POPULATIONS

Children & youth ages 5-18 and their families.

EDUCATION The average high school graduation rate in United Way of Eastern Maine’s (UWEM) service area is 86%, on par with the statewide graduation rate. However there is still significant need to raise the graduation rate and ensure that students are not only empowered but also equipped with the tools they need for success later in life. The gap between the percentage of students who graduate and those who are proficient in math and reading is approximately 37%, and a third of graduates who go onto college in Maine need basic remedial courses. Our 2011 Needs Assessment reinforced the importance of education in Eastern Maine, specifically the need for increased youth development which ranked in the top five needs. In an economy where schools are required to serve more with less it is imperative individuals and organizations support, and supplement, the

3

TARGET POPULATION

Adults transitioning from crisis to self-sufficiency and those maintaing their self-sufficiency.

INCOME education system providing youth with as many resources as possible to be successful. Early experiences set the developmental trajectory for lifelong learning and health. We need our youngest children to grow up strong, vital and prepared for the workforce. Research shows that severe poverty and lack of education are common denominators for many problems facing young children and their families. To that end UWEM is also focused on supporting early childhood development and school readiness. Understanding that the areas of education, income, and health are significantly related to and informed by one another, we can see the need to address education needs in our service area to promote education as a pathway to employment and increased health.

SUCCESS STORY Our Backpack Program is designed to meet the needs of hungry children at times when other resources are not available, such as weekends and school vacations. Since 2011 UWEM has supported the launch of 19 programs. During the 2013-2014 school year through our partnership with Good Shepherd Food Bank and Bank of America 9 schools were added.

United Way of Eastern Maine’s (UWEM) 2011 Needs Assessment identified jobs and financial security as the number one need facing our community. Today, basic needs and job security remain as major concerns throughout Eastern Maine. A Basic Needs Budget shows that it takes an income of about 1.5 to 3.5 times the official poverty level to cover the cost of a family’s minimum day-to-day needs. The largest expenses are typically child care, housing, health care and transportation. Almost 50,000 people in Eastern Maine fall below the federal poverty rate and struggle to meet these basic family needs. For families walking a financial tightrope, unable to save for college, a home, or retirement, UWEM is here to help.

UWEM’s goal in our income focus area is to support comprehensive delivery of services and address systemic issues associated with poverty, resulting in a significant positive impact for working-poor individuals and their families. Through this approach, individuals can focus on improving job skills to gain and maintain employment, resulting in greater long-term financial stability for Maine families. Maine families should have adequate food and shelter, and be able to achieve long-term financial stability through educational opportunities and livable wage employment. With a high unemployment rate and an aging population, this is indeed a challenging issue.

SUCCESS STORY In 2014 UWEM led the Eastern Maine CA$H Coalition (Creating Assets, Savings and Hope) in collaboration with AARP, Key Bank, and many more organizations and volunteers to bring nearly 5 million dollars back into our communuity through dozens of free FEBRUARY tax prep sites in 7th 2015 Eastern Maine. This program is FREE TAX PREP designed to serve low to mid-income SUPER individuals like singleSATURDAY working moms, AIRPORT MALL in BANGOR from 10AM to 3PM seniors, and students. (207) 941-2800 or www.unitedwayem.org For all other FREE tax prep sites in Maine dial:

4


EDUCATION OUTCOME #1 Children enter school ready to learn and succeed.

TARGET POPULATION

Children under age six and their families.

EDUCATION OUTCOME #2

Children and youth increase assets and skills in order to increase their ability to accept and take personal responsibility, plan, and make good choices, resist negative peer pressure and decrease vulnerability to dangerous situations.

INCOME OUTCOME

People access services to achieve stability in their lives and maintain self-sufficiency.

TARGET POPULATIONS

Children & youth ages 5-18 and their families.

EDUCATION The average high school graduation rate in United Way of Eastern Maine’s (UWEM) service area is 86%, on par with the statewide graduation rate. However there is still significant need to raise the graduation rate and ensure that students are not only empowered but also equipped with the tools they need for success later in life. The gap between the percentage of students who graduate and those who are proficient in math and reading is approximately 37%, and a third of graduates who go onto college in Maine need basic remedial courses. Our 2011 Needs Assessment reinforced the importance of education in Eastern Maine, specifically the need for increased youth development which ranked in the top five needs. In an economy where schools are required to serve more with less it is imperative individuals and organizations support, and supplement, the

3

TARGET POPULATION

Adults transitioning from crisis to self-sufficiency and those maintaing their self-sufficiency.

INCOME education system providing youth with as many resources as possible to be successful. Early experiences set the developmental trajectory for lifelong learning and health. We need our youngest children to grow up strong, vital and prepared for the workforce. Research shows that severe poverty and lack of education are common denominators for many problems facing young children and their families. To that end UWEM is also focused on supporting early childhood development and school readiness. Understanding that the areas of education, income, and health are significantly related to and informed by one another, we can see the need to address education needs in our service area to promote education as a pathway to employment and increased health.

SUCCESS STORY Our Backpack Program is designed to meet the needs of hungry children at times when other resources are not available, such as weekends and school vacations. Since 2011 UWEM has supported the launch of 19 programs. During the 2013-2014 school year through our partnership with Good Shepherd Food Bank and Bank of America 9 schools were added.

United Way of Eastern Maine’s (UWEM) 2011 Needs Assessment identified jobs and financial security as the number one need facing our community. Today, basic needs and job security remain as major concerns throughout Eastern Maine. A Basic Needs Budget shows that it takes an income of about 1.5 to 3.5 times the official poverty level to cover the cost of a family’s minimum day-to-day needs. The largest expenses are typically child care, housing, health care and transportation. Almost 50,000 people in Eastern Maine fall below the federal poverty rate and struggle to meet these basic family needs. For families walking a financial tightrope, unable to save for college, a home, or retirement, UWEM is here to help.

UWEM’s goal in our income focus area is to support comprehensive delivery of services and address systemic issues associated with poverty, resulting in a significant positive impact for working-poor individuals and their families. Through this approach, individuals can focus on improving job skills to gain and maintain employment, resulting in greater long-term financial stability for Maine families. Maine families should have adequate food and shelter, and be able to achieve long-term financial stability through educational opportunities and livable wage employment. With a high unemployment rate and an aging population, this is indeed a challenging issue.

SUCCESS STORY In 2014 UWEM led the Eastern Maine CA$H Coalition (Creating Assets, Savings and Hope) in collaboration with AARP, Key Bank, and many more organizations and volunteers to bring nearly 5 million dollars back into our communuity through dozens of free FEBRUARY tax prep sites in 7th 2015 Eastern Maine. This program is FREE TAX PREP designed to serve low to mid-income SUPER individuals like singleSATURDAY working moms, AIRPORT MALL in BANGOR from 10AM to 3PM seniors, and students. (207) 941-2800 or www.unitedwayem.org For all other FREE tax prep sites in Maine dial:

4


HEALTH OUTCOME #1

Seniors live productive, acCOMMUNITY IMPACT REPORT

COMMUNITY IMPACT REPORT

tive, healthy lifestyles and have the opportunity to age in place.

TARGET POPULATION

Seniors and caregivers in Eastern Maine.

HEALTH OUTCOME #2

Youth and adults have access to health education and preventative services to avoid risky behavior and achieve optimal physical and behavioral health.

BASIC NEEDS OUTCOME People access services to meet basic needs (food and short-term shelter) and crisis intervention.

TARGET POPULATIONS

Youth and adults in Eastern Maine.

HEALTH Whether it is a neighbor without health insurance, a senior citizen living alone, or someone struggling with mental illness or an addiction, United Way of Eastern Maine (UWEM) is working to ensure everyone has access to information and resources they need to live healthier lives. Maine has the oldest population in the country; it is estimated that by the year 2030 25% of Maine’s population will be over the age of 65. The presence of a large elderly population will undoubtedly have an impact on the health of Maine communities as well as the future provision of health care in Maine. Support for seniors ranked within the top five items of the United Way of Eastern Maine 2011 Needs Assessment. We know that health and health care is not an issue unique to our aging

5

TARGET POPULATION

People needing basic need services, including individuals, youth and families.

BASIC NEEDS population. Poverty, isolation, lack of access to nourishing foods, limited access to fitness and recreational facilities, and long, harsh winter conditions are dominant, pervasive influences in the lives of people of all ages in this region. As they affect and limit the quality of physical, mental, emotional, and social life, these factors create significant health disparities and obstacles to well-being. Maine does not have a traditional, local public health infrastructure to serve all of its residents. Bangor has a public health department, but most of the communities in UWEM’s territory depend on local community coalitions - Healthy Maine Partnerships (HMPs) – as well as hospitals and other social service organizations to address basic public health needs. UWEM provides support these local, grassroots, public health efforts.

SUCCESS STORY UWEM’s Downeast Community Transformation Grant was designed to increase physical activity as well as improve health and nutrition for children in Hancock and Washington Counties. We succesfully served 2,500 children through 45 early childcare centers and 21 schools.

Poverty rates continue to remain above the state and national averages in Eastern Maine. As many as 50,000 individuals in Eastern Maine are living below the federal poverty line and do not earn enough money to meet their basic needs. Wages have not kept pace with the rising cost of housing, health care, and education; many people are working in low-paying jobs without basic health and retirement benefits. Many individuals and families may be living above the poverty line but are still struggling to meet their basic needs; forced to make difficult decisions about how to spend their hard earned dollars. United way of Eastern Maine (UWEM) is here to help. UWEM’s 2011 Community Needs Assessment ranked Food Insecurity as the third greatest need in our region. 54% of Children in UWEM’s service area qualify for free and reduced school lunch and USDA’s Food Desert

Map shows our region amongst the Nation’s most bleak, undernourished regions. Factoring in the additional costs of traveling long distances to work, healthcare appointments and food sources, along with the high cost of heating during Maine’s extremely cold winters, paying for basic needs is a burden for most families, especially those who experience low income and earn slightly above the Federal Poverty Level. Basic needs have long been a priority of the UWEM. We know that people are unable to effectively function unless their basic needs are met. UWEM will continue to support the immediate needs of individuals in our community as we strive to move people from crisis to self-sufficiency and identify long-term solutions to some of our community’s most pressing issues.

SUCCESS STORY In 2014 UWEM partnered with Zone Radio and Good Shepherd Food Bank to produce the bi-monthly radio program Zone in on Hunger featuring our efforts combating hunger and building food security. In 2014 we rasied over 160,000 meals, or $400,000 worth of food, through our annual Pantry Project, the NALC Food Drive, our Backpack Program, the Hancock County Food Drive and basic needs grant from Bank of America.

6


HEALTH OUTCOME #1

Seniors live productive, acCOMMUNITY IMPACT REPORT

COMMUNITY IMPACT REPORT

tive, healthy lifestyles and have the opportunity to age in place.

TARGET POPULATION

Seniors and caregivers in Eastern Maine.

HEALTH OUTCOME #2

Youth and adults have access to health education and preventative services to avoid risky behavior and achieve optimal physical and behavioral health.

BASIC NEEDS OUTCOME People access services to meet basic needs (food and short-term shelter) and crisis intervention.

TARGET POPULATIONS

Youth and adults in Eastern Maine.

HEALTH Whether it is a neighbor without health insurance, a senior citizen living alone, or someone struggling with mental illness or an addiction, United Way of Eastern Maine (UWEM) is working to ensure everyone has access to information and resources they need to live healthier lives. Maine has the oldest population in the country; it is estimated that by the year 2030 25% of Maine’s population will be over the age of 65. The presence of a large elderly population will undoubtedly have an impact on the health of Maine communities as well as the future provision of health care in Maine. Support for seniors ranked within the top five items of the United Way of Eastern Maine 2011 Needs Assessment. We know that health and health care is not an issue unique to our aging

5

TARGET POPULATION

People needing basic need services, including individuals, youth and families.

BASIC NEEDS population. Poverty, isolation, lack of access to nourishing foods, limited access to fitness and recreational facilities, and long, harsh winter conditions are dominant, pervasive influences in the lives of people of all ages in this region. As they affect and limit the quality of physical, mental, emotional, and social life, these factors create significant health disparities and obstacles to well-being. Maine does not have a traditional, local public health infrastructure to serve all of its residents. Bangor has a public health department, but most of the communities in UWEM’s territory depend on local community coalitions - Healthy Maine Partnerships (HMPs) – as well as hospitals and other social service organizations to address basic public health needs. UWEM provides support these local, grassroots, public health efforts.

SUCCESS STORY UWEM’s Downeast Community Transformation Grant was designed to increase physical activity as well as improve health and nutrition for children in Hancock and Washington Counties. We succesfully served 2,500 children through 45 early childcare centers and 21 schools.

Poverty rates continue to remain above the state and national averages in Eastern Maine. As many as 50,000 individuals in Eastern Maine are living below the federal poverty line and do not earn enough money to meet their basic needs. Wages have not kept pace with the rising cost of housing, health care, and education; many people are working in low-paying jobs without basic health and retirement benefits. Many individuals and families may be living above the poverty line but are still struggling to meet their basic needs; forced to make difficult decisions about how to spend their hard earned dollars. United way of Eastern Maine (UWEM) is here to help. UWEM’s 2011 Community Needs Assessment ranked Food Insecurity as the third greatest need in our region. 54% of Children in UWEM’s service area qualify for free and reduced school lunch and USDA’s Food Desert

Map shows our region amongst the Nation’s most bleak, undernourished regions. Factoring in the additional costs of traveling long distances to work, healthcare appointments and food sources, along with the high cost of heating during Maine’s extremely cold winters, paying for basic needs is a burden for most families, especially those who experience low income and earn slightly above the Federal Poverty Level. Basic needs have long been a priority of the UWEM. We know that people are unable to effectively function unless their basic needs are met. UWEM will continue to support the immediate needs of individuals in our community as we strive to move people from crisis to self-sufficiency and identify long-term solutions to some of our community’s most pressing issues.

SUCCESS STORY In 2014 UWEM partnered with Zone Radio and Good Shepherd Food Bank to produce the bi-monthly radio program Zone in on Hunger featuring our efforts combating hunger and building food security. In 2014 we rasied over 160,000 meals, or $400,000 worth of food, through our annual Pantry Project, the NALC Food Drive, our Backpack Program, the Hancock County Food Drive and basic needs grant from Bank of America.

6


VOLUNTEERS = IMPACT

In 2014 United Way of Eastern Maine and our funded agency partners coordinated over 250,000 volunteer hours. That’s almost $4.3 million dollars worth of volunteer work. These hours were spent in the community raising food to feed the hungry, helping victims of domestic violence move forward, making sure our neighbors have heating oil when they need it most, and supporting our outstanding senior programs, homeless shelters and substance abuse centers.

2013-2014 FUNDED AGENCY PROGRAMS EDUCATION

VOLUNTEERS Volunteering is vital to a society that is responsive to the needs of its citizens. It fosters a sense of responsibility and investment. These values have long been reflected in the spirit of community service present in Maine. In 2013, Maine ranked ninth in the nationa in volunteer hours given per resident. In both 2011 and 2012, our state ranked first in time given by young adults. In offering themselves to nonprofits in our state, volunteers enable our partner agencies and programs to provide necessary services. It is through the efforts of volunteers that United Way of Eastern Maine (UWEM) is able to address the underlying root cause issues affecting Education, Income, Health, and Basic Needs in our five-county region. VolunteerMaine.org is one of our most vital tools in addressing volunteer needs in Maine. Any non-profit organization, state or local government organization

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or committee may register opportunities on this site. Any resident of Maine is welcome to visit the site for the purpose of finding a volunteer opportunity, making an in-kind donation, applying for a board of directors position, or seeking training or participation in emergency response opportunities. UWEM manages the opportunities posted in our five county region and collaborates with other partners to determine the site regulations. From board members to hotline staff, committee members to administrative assistants, volunteers are present in all areas of our organization and those we work with. Volunteers are at the forefront of much of the resource mobilization, relationship cultivating, grant and funding decisions, and other key UWEM functions. They are tutors, mentors, coaches, community advocates, and more. They are truly the lifeblood of our organization and the work we do.

SUCCESS STORY UWEM’s 2013 Day of Caring attracted over 100 volunteers (TEAM UNITED) from area businesses to complete 1/2 day service programs at local non profit organizations. The biggest project by far was the clean up effort at the make-shift shelter area known as “The Pines” in Bangor.

Bangor YMCA: Discovery Friends Childcare, Jumpstart - Diversion Program, Y Outreach at Capehart, Youth Development Program, Y-Works Before and After School Childcare Program Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mid-Maine: Youth Mentoring for Penobscot and Waldo Counties Broadreach Family & Community Services: Early Childhood Inclusive Programs Bucksport Area Child Care Center: School Readiness Program Cobscook Community Learning Center: The Community Year Community Health and Counseling Services: Arts ‘N’ Kids Down East Family YMCA: Preschool Downeast AIDS Network: Comprehensive HIV Prevention Program, Outright Downeast Health Services: Downeast Children’s Council, Women, Infants, Children (WIC) Nutrition Program Eastern Maine HomeCare d/b/a Bangor Area Visiting Nurses: Pathfinders: Support for Grieving Children Families And Children Together: Maine Kids-Kin

Good Samaritan Agency: Child Care Program, Single Parent Program Greater Old Town Communities That Care: Math Mentors and Literacy Leaders The Housing Foundation: The Sharing Place Child Care Center KidCare America: After School Program Maine Families: Parents Are Teachers Too: Maine Youth Alliance: The Game Loft MaineStream Finance: Home Ownership & Home Counseling Program New Hope for Women: Waldo County Outreach Next Step Domestic Violence Project: Building Promise & Potential for the Youth of Washington & Hancock Counties Old Town - Orono YMCA: Daycare Program, After School Activity Program Penquis: Journey House, School-Based Prevention Education Services Piscataquis Regional YMCA: Skip’s Kids Therapeutic Pool Club Shaw House: “Streetlight” Street Outreach Program, Basic Center Day Program, On-Site School Program Washington County: One Community: Washington County: One Voice

Womancare: Engaging Youth in Violence Prevention

INCOME Amicus: Bouchea Center for Learning Broadreach Family & Community Services: Literacy Volunteers of Waldo County Literacy Volunteers of Bangor: Adult & Family Literacy Maine Mental Health Connections: Together Place Social Club Next Step Domestic Violence Project: Safety & Self-Sufficiency Penquis: Family Self Sufficiency, Penquis Law Project, MaineStream Finance Spruce Run: Support and Education Groups Wellspring: Outpatient Services Washington Hancock Community Agency: Friendship Cottage, Helping Hands Garage

HEALTH Eastern Area Agency on Aging: Basic Training for the Informal Caregivers & Volunteers of Washington and Piscataquis Counties Community Services, Elder Buddies Program, EZ Fix Program, Nutrition Program

First United Methodist Church: My Friend’s Place & Memory Joggers Friends in Action: Free Transportation for Seniors; Senior Center Legal Services for the Elderly: Law Project Penquis: Foster Grandparent Program, Retired Senior Volunteer Program RSVP Spectrum Generations: Waldo Community Center Adult DayBreak Program Town of Bucksport: Bucksport Bay Healthy Communities Coalition University of Maine Cooperative Extension: Senior Companion Program University of Maine Center on Aging: Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP), Retired & Senior Volunteer Program Bone Builders Washington Hancock Community Agency: Friendship Cottage,

BASIC NEEDS Bangor Area Homeless Shelter: Bangor Area Homeless Shelter Healthy Acadia: Food for All Shaw House: Emergency Youth Shelter Spruce Run: 24-Hour Hotline Program

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VOLUNTEERS = IMPACT

In 2014 United Way of Eastern Maine and our funded agency partners coordinated over 250,000 volunteer hours. That’s almost $4.3 million dollars worth of volunteer work. These hours were spent in the community raising food to feed the hungry, helping victims of domestic violence move forward, making sure our neighbors have heating oil when they need it most, and supporting our outstanding senior programs, homeless shelters and substance abuse centers.

2013-2014 FUNDED AGENCY PROGRAMS EDUCATION

VOLUNTEERS Volunteering is vital to a society that is responsive to the needs of its citizens. It fosters a sense of responsibility and investment. These values have long been reflected in the spirit of community service present in Maine. In 2013, Maine ranked ninth in the nationa in volunteer hours given per resident. In both 2011 and 2012, our state ranked first in time given by young adults. In offering themselves to nonprofits in our state, volunteers enable our partner agencies and programs to provide necessary services. It is through the efforts of volunteers that United Way of Eastern Maine (UWEM) is able to address the underlying root cause issues affecting Education, Income, Health, and Basic Needs in our five-county region. VolunteerMaine.org is one of our most vital tools in addressing volunteer needs in Maine. Any non-profit organization, state or local government organization

7

or committee may register opportunities on this site. Any resident of Maine is welcome to visit the site for the purpose of finding a volunteer opportunity, making an in-kind donation, applying for a board of directors position, or seeking training or participation in emergency response opportunities. UWEM manages the opportunities posted in our five county region and collaborates with other partners to determine the site regulations. From board members to hotline staff, committee members to administrative assistants, volunteers are present in all areas of our organization and those we work with. Volunteers are at the forefront of much of the resource mobilization, relationship cultivating, grant and funding decisions, and other key UWEM functions. They are tutors, mentors, coaches, community advocates, and more. They are truly the lifeblood of our organization and the work we do.

SUCCESS STORY UWEM’s 2013 Day of Caring attracted over 100 volunteers (TEAM UNITED) from area businesses to complete 1/2 day service programs at local non profit organizations. The biggest project by far was the clean up effort at the make-shift shelter area known as “The Pines” in Bangor.

Bangor YMCA: Discovery Friends Childcare, Jumpstart - Diversion Program, Y Outreach at Capehart, Youth Development Program, Y-Works Before and After School Childcare Program Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mid-Maine: Youth Mentoring for Penobscot and Waldo Counties Broadreach Family & Community Services: Early Childhood Inclusive Programs Bucksport Area Child Care Center: School Readiness Program Cobscook Community Learning Center: The Community Year Community Health and Counseling Services: Arts ‘N’ Kids Down East Family YMCA: Preschool Downeast AIDS Network: Comprehensive HIV Prevention Program, Outright Downeast Health Services: Downeast Children’s Council, Women, Infants, Children (WIC) Nutrition Program Eastern Maine HomeCare d/b/a Bangor Area Visiting Nurses: Pathfinders: Support for Grieving Children Families And Children Together: Maine Kids-Kin

Good Samaritan Agency: Child Care Program, Single Parent Program Greater Old Town Communities That Care: Math Mentors and Literacy Leaders The Housing Foundation: The Sharing Place Child Care Center KidCare America: After School Program Maine Families: Parents Are Teachers Too: Maine Youth Alliance: The Game Loft MaineStream Finance: Home Ownership & Home Counseling Program New Hope for Women: Waldo County Outreach Next Step Domestic Violence Project: Building Promise & Potential for the Youth of Washington & Hancock Counties Old Town - Orono YMCA: Daycare Program, After School Activity Program Penquis: Journey House, School-Based Prevention Education Services Piscataquis Regional YMCA: Skip’s Kids Therapeutic Pool Club Shaw House: “Streetlight” Street Outreach Program, Basic Center Day Program, On-Site School Program Washington County: One Community: Washington County: One Voice

Womancare: Engaging Youth in Violence Prevention

INCOME Amicus: Bouchea Center for Learning Broadreach Family & Community Services: Literacy Volunteers of Waldo County Literacy Volunteers of Bangor: Adult & Family Literacy Maine Mental Health Connections: Together Place Social Club Next Step Domestic Violence Project: Safety & Self-Sufficiency Penquis: Family Self Sufficiency, Penquis Law Project, MaineStream Finance Spruce Run: Support and Education Groups Wellspring: Outpatient Services Washington Hancock Community Agency: Friendship Cottage, Helping Hands Garage

HEALTH Eastern Area Agency on Aging: Basic Training for the Informal Caregivers & Volunteers of Washington and Piscataquis Counties Community Services, Elder Buddies Program, EZ Fix Program, Nutrition Program

First United Methodist Church: My Friend’s Place & Memory Joggers Friends in Action: Free Transportation for Seniors; Senior Center Legal Services for the Elderly: Law Project Penquis: Foster Grandparent Program, Retired Senior Volunteer Program RSVP Spectrum Generations: Waldo Community Center Adult DayBreak Program Town of Bucksport: Bucksport Bay Healthy Communities Coalition University of Maine Cooperative Extension: Senior Companion Program University of Maine Center on Aging: Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP), Retired & Senior Volunteer Program Bone Builders Washington Hancock Community Agency: Friendship Cottage,

BASIC NEEDS Bangor Area Homeless Shelter: Bangor Area Homeless Shelter Healthy Acadia: Food for All Shaw House: Emergency Youth Shelter Spruce Run: 24-Hour Hotline Program

89


TOP CAMPAIGNS United Way of Eastern Maine (UWEM) represents the collective power of thousands of people in Eastern Maine working to improve lives. A treasured hallmark of UWEM’s success are our traditional workplace campaigns. For nearly 80 years, the people of Eastern Maine have teamed up to form our area’s strongest and most enduring philanthropic force. We are so grateful for the generosity and support of the companies we work with. Every year we see outstanding efforts and incredibly positive energy. It is because of the great companies and organizations we work with that we are able to accomplish so much.

FUNDRAISING United Way of Eastern Maine (UWEM)was formed 78 years ago, when a group of community members responded to the need for support of the common good. There were many local organizations at the time, each with a commitment to a particular cause—the question was raised: wouldn’t it be a good idea to have one organization to help improve and sustain the quality of life for all—one organization that could accept donations for distribution among a variety of social service organizations? The answer was “yes” and the Community Chest, now UWEM, was founded. Since 1937, UWEM has been the trusted recipient of donations made by individuals across the five counties that we serve today, with a great majority of those donations made in the workplace, through payroll deductions. UWEM’s workplace campaigns are about bringing people in local workplaces together to tackle our community’s most difficult issues in the areas of education, income, health, and basic needs. Whether it is a small business, major corporation or even a nonprofit, these UWEM partners are helping to build stronger communities in which future generations will thrive. Over the decades, our economy has changed. We have experienced the loss of a major manufacturing base in textiles, shoes and paper, that sustained it for generations. UWEM has adapted to these changes with the help of the community volunteers that

9

The follwing three pages reflect on our top campaigns. These campaigns exhibited the extra efforts that have proven to produce the strongest results in terms of total dollars raised and total workforce participation rates.

guide our focus: not to dwell on loss, but to move priorities to keep pace and maintain sight of UWEM’s mission to “improve lives by mobilizing the caring power of communities”.

To start, we would like to recognize the incredible support we receive from our Cornerstone companies.The following companies, together, raised nearly $1,000,000 this year:

The workplace remains the largest and most important part of our annual fundraising effort. It sustains our community impact work and the allocations made each year to community partners whose programs improve lives around us every day.

UWEM CORNERSTONES Dollars 1) Eastern Maine Healthcare System

$150,241

2) Hannaford

$140,331

3) Sargent Corporation

$108,777

confident that education, income, health, and access to basic needs will be the foundation upon which our children’s lives are built.

4) Emera Maine (Bangor Hydro)

$103,341

Our work has been endorsed by several private and corporate foundations, who understand the importance of building the capacity for current and future needs; government grants have allowed the development and expansion of UWEM’s volunteer efforts.

UWEM WORKPLACE CAMPAIGNS: •Offer a convenient and efficient way for employees to support the community and causes they believe in •Allow employees to give in regular increments via payroll deduction through an easy to use system or through paper pledging •Help companies achieve their Corporate Social Responsibility goals •Let employees tap into a wealth of volunteer opportunities via UWEM While UWEM’s workplace campaigns are what we are known for, our fundraising continues to evolve to meet the demands of today’s world, and those of the future. From online giving to the newly established Charles F. Bragg 2nd Society, our endowment and planned giving program, we’re

Fundraising sustains the work of UWEM, and our volunteers sustain our fundraising. Thank you. To the nearly 6000 donors who support the work of UWEM each year, be assured that this is the single most effective and efficient donation you can make to ensure the vibrant health of your community.

5) Bangor Savings Bank

$95,790

6) Bank of America

$94,886

7) Verso Paper

$65,664

8) LL Bean

$62,704

9) General Electric

$56,208

10) Darling’s

$44,645

Additional

TOP CAMPAIGNS

10

>>


TOP CAMPAIGNS United Way of Eastern Maine (UWEM) represents the collective power of thousands of people in Eastern Maine working to improve lives. A treasured hallmark of UWEM’s success are our traditional workplace campaigns. For nearly 80 years, the people of Eastern Maine have teamed up to form our area’s strongest and most enduring philanthropic force. We are so grateful for the generosity and support of the companies we work with. Every year we see outstanding efforts and incredibly positive energy. It is because of the great companies and organizations we work with that we are able to accomplish so much.

FUNDRAISING United Way of Eastern Maine (UWEM)was formed 78 years ago, when a group of community members responded to the need for support of the common good. There were many local organizations at the time, each with a commitment to a particular cause—the question was raised: wouldn’t it be a good idea to have one organization to help improve and sustain the quality of life for all—one organization that could accept donations for distribution among a variety of social service organizations? The answer was “yes” and the Community Chest, now UWEM, was founded. Since 1937, UWEM has been the trusted recipient of donations made by individuals across the five counties that we serve today, with a great majority of those donations made in the workplace, through payroll deductions. UWEM’s workplace campaigns are about bringing people in local workplaces together to tackle our community’s most difficult issues in the areas of education, income, health, and basic needs. Whether it is a small business, major corporation or even a nonprofit, these UWEM partners are helping to build stronger communities in which future generations will thrive. Over the decades, our economy has changed. We have experienced the loss of a major manufacturing base in textiles, shoes and paper, that sustained it for generations. UWEM has adapted to these changes with the help of the community volunteers that

9

The follwing three pages reflect on our top campaigns. These campaigns exhibited the extra efforts that have proven to produce the strongest results in terms of total dollars raised and total workforce participation rates.

guide our focus: not to dwell on loss, but to move priorities to keep pace and maintain sight of UWEM’s mission to “improve lives by mobilizing the caring power of communities”.

To start, we would like to recognize the incredible support we receive from our Cornerstone companies.The following companies, together, raised nearly $1,000,000 this year:

The workplace remains the largest and most important part of our annual fundraising effort. It sustains our community impact work and the allocations made each year to community partners whose programs improve lives around us every day.

UWEM CORNERSTONES Dollars 1) Eastern Maine Healthcare System

$150,241

2) Hannaford

$140,331

3) Sargent Corporation

$108,777

confident that education, income, health, and access to basic needs will be the foundation upon which our children’s lives are built.

4) Emera Maine (Bangor Hydro)

$103,341

Our work has been endorsed by several private and corporate foundations, who understand the importance of building the capacity for current and future needs; government grants have allowed the development and expansion of UWEM’s volunteer efforts.

UWEM WORKPLACE CAMPAIGNS: •Offer a convenient and efficient way for employees to support the community and causes they believe in •Allow employees to give in regular increments via payroll deduction through an easy to use system or through paper pledging •Help companies achieve their Corporate Social Responsibility goals •Let employees tap into a wealth of volunteer opportunities via UWEM While UWEM’s workplace campaigns are what we are known for, our fundraising continues to evolve to meet the demands of today’s world, and those of the future. From online giving to the newly established Charles F. Bragg 2nd Society, our endowment and planned giving program, we’re

Fundraising sustains the work of UWEM, and our volunteers sustain our fundraising. Thank you. To the nearly 6000 donors who support the work of UWEM each year, be assured that this is the single most effective and efficient donation you can make to ensure the vibrant health of your community.

5) Bangor Savings Bank

$95,790

6) Bank of America

$94,886

7) Verso Paper

$65,664

8) LL Bean

$62,704

9) General Electric

$56,208

10) Darling’s

$44,645

Additional

TOP CAMPAIGNS

10

>>


Additional

Additional

TOP 5 LARGE EMPLOYERS*

TOP 5 SMALL BUSINESSES*

TOP CAMPAIGNS

TOP CAMPAIGNS

Dollars

Dollars 1) University of Maine System

$35,000

1) CES Inc.

$15,846

2) City of Bangor

$28,497

2) Morgan Stanley Smith Barney

$11,580

3) Penquis

$15,806

3) Gross Minsky & Mogul

$7,127

4) Bangor Publishing Company

$14,630

4) Berry Dunn

$6,972

5) Hollywood Casino Bangor

$14,475

5) Canteen Service Co.

$5,440 Participation

Participation 1) Quirk

62%

1) Canteen Service Co.

95%

2) City of Bangor

36%

2) Bangor Letter Shop & Color Copy

86%

3) Shaw’s

25%

3) Morgan Stanley Smith Barney

85%

4) Brewer Schools

23%

4) Changing Seasons FCU

78%

5) Bangor Publishing Company

12%

5) Gross Minsky & Mogul

77%

5) CES Inc.

77%

TOP 5 MEDIUM EMPLOYERS** Dollars 1) UPS

$44,236

2) Marden’s

$33,501

1) Amicus

$4,805

3) People’s United Bank

$26,203

2) Bangor Housing Authority

$4,445

4) TD Bank

$19,426

3) Wellspring INC.

$2,544

5) Freightliner of Maine

$17,369

4) WHCA

$1,998

5) YMCA Old Town - Orono

$1,942

Participation

Dollars

1) UPS

80%

2) People’s United Bank

56%

1) Good Samaritan Agency

92%

3) Marden’s

44%

2) Spruce Run-Womancare Alliance

83%

4) Frieghtliner of Maine

38%

3) Friends in Action

75%

4) Key Bank of Maine

38%

4) Hospice Volunteers of Hancock County

75%

4) Dead River Company

38%

4) Bangor Area Homeless Shelter

65%

5) NH Bragg and Sons

32%

5) New Hope for Women

64%

*Employ 200 or more. **Employ between 60 and 199.

11

TOP 5 SMALL NON-PROFITS**

Participation

*Employ less than 60. **Employ less than 150.

12


Additional

Additional

TOP 5 LARGE EMPLOYERS*

TOP 5 SMALL BUSINESSES*

TOP CAMPAIGNS

TOP CAMPAIGNS

Dollars

Dollars 1) University of Maine System

$35,000

1) CES Inc.

$15,846

2) City of Bangor

$28,497

2) Morgan Stanley Smith Barney

$11,580

3) Penquis

$15,806

3) Gross Minsky & Mogul

$7,127

4) Bangor Publishing Company

$14,630

4) Berry Dunn

$6,972

5) Hollywood Casino Bangor

$14,475

5) Canteen Service Co.

$5,440 Participation

Participation 1) Quirk

62%

1) Canteen Service Co.

95%

2) City of Bangor

36%

2) Bangor Letter Shop & Color Copy

86%

3) Shaw’s

25%

3) Morgan Stanley Smith Barney

85%

4) Brewer Schools

23%

4) Changing Seasons FCU

78%

5) Bangor Publishing Company

12%

5) Gross Minsky & Mogul

77%

5) CES Inc.

77%

TOP 5 MEDIUM EMPLOYERS** Dollars 1) UPS

$44,236

2) Marden’s

$33,501

1) Amicus

$4,805

3) People’s United Bank

$26,203

2) Bangor Housing Authority

$4,445

4) TD Bank

$19,426

3) Wellspring INC.

$2,544

5) Freightliner of Maine

$17,369

4) WHCA

$1,998

5) YMCA Old Town - Orono

$1,942

Participation

Dollars

1) UPS

80%

2) People’s United Bank

56%

1) Good Samaritan Agency

92%

3) Marden’s

44%

2) Spruce Run-Womancare Alliance

83%

4) Frieghtliner of Maine

38%

3) Friends in Action

75%

4) Key Bank of Maine

38%

4) Hospice Volunteers of Hancock County

75%

4) Dead River Company

38%

4) Bangor Area Homeless Shelter

65%

5) NH Bragg and Sons

32%

5) New Hope for Women

64%

*Employ 200 or more. **Employ between 60 and 199.

11

TOP 5 SMALL NON-PROFITS**

Participation

*Employ less than 60. **Employ less than 150.

12


STATEMENT of FINANCIAL POSITION

REVENUE and EXPENSES for FISCAL YEAR 2014

ASSETS Cash & Cash Equivalents Pledges Receivable, Net Accounts Receivable & Other Assets Investments Property & Equipment Beneficial Interests in Trusts Total Assets

REVENUE Dollars

% Total

2013

2014

$342,132

$351,464

Individuals

$126,854

3.8%

$1,031,886

$845,480

Company Gifts

$319,631

9.6%

$100,628

$84,245

$1,492,073

44.9%

$1,060,704

$1,067,189

Investments & Miscellaneous

$636,886

19.2%

$62,028

$40,492

In Kind Contributions

$441,875

13.3%

$3,079,107

$3,391,129

Other Grants & Sponsorships

$303,628

9.1%

$5,676,485

$5,779,999

Employee Campaigns

Total Campaign Results and Revenue

$3,320,947

LIABILITIES & NET ASSETS Liabilities

14 Accounts & Accrued Payables

2013

2014

$59,442

$54,394

Allocations Payable

$468,278

$404,900

Designations Payable

$534,383

$447,411

$38,953 $1,101,056

Deferred Revenue & Capital Lease Obligation Total Liabilities

Dollars

% Total

Education

$547,967

18.1%

Health

$386,703

12.7%

$11,613

Income (Financial Stability/Basic Needs)

$926,193

30.5%

$918,318

Donor Directed Gifts - Partner Agencies

$107,781

3.6%

2014

Donor Directed Gifts - All Other 501(c)(3)

$485,228

16%

Net Assets

2013

Undesignated

$208,131

$417,739

General & Administrative Expenses

$162,000

5.3%

$1,083,108

$837,233

Fundraising Expenses

$418,823

13.8%

$614,778

$889,233

Permanently Restricted

$2,669,412

$2,717,476

Total Net Assets

$4,575,429

$4,861,681

$5,676,485

$5,779,999

Board Designated Temporarily Restricted

Total Assets and Liabilities

NOTE: United Way of Eastern Maine (UWEM) is contracted to manage the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) for the State of Maine. The CFC of Maine raised $337,864.44 in 2013 ($76,976.84 of which was campaign expenses). $10,125.61 of the CFC of Maine was designated to UWEM and our partner agencies ($2,296.77 of which was campaign expenses). NOTE: UWEM is committed to ensuring that our donors’ generous contributions are well spent and that overhead expenses remain as low as possible. UWEM does not charge membership dues. A service charge is comprised of the yearly general and administrative expenses of 5.4% and the yearly fundraising expenses of 13.8% for a total 19.2% (see REVENUE and EXPENSES for FISCAL YEAR 2014 on page 14). Financial statement based on FY 2013-2014 audit. Full audit available upon request.

13

EXPENSES

Total Expenses Change in Net Assets

$3,034,695 $286,251

Q: Who decides where the revenue goes? A: Every other year, more than 60 trained United Way of Eastern

Maine community volunteers decide where the dollars can do the most good to keep our health and human service agency network, as well as keeping our community initiatives, strong.

INTERESTED IN VOLUNTEERING? CALL (207) 941-2800 TODAY.

14


STATEMENT of FINANCIAL POSITION

REVENUE and EXPENSES for FISCAL YEAR 2014

ASSETS Cash & Cash Equivalents Pledges Receivable, Net Accounts Receivable & Other Assets Investments Property & Equipment Beneficial Interests in Trusts Total Assets

REVENUE Dollars

% Total

2013

2014

$342,132

$351,464

Individuals

$126,854

3.8%

$1,031,886

$845,480

Company Gifts

$319,631

9.6%

$100,628

$84,245

$1,492,073

44.9%

$1,060,704

$1,067,189

Investments & Miscellaneous

$636,886

19.2%

$62,028

$40,492

In Kind Contributions

$441,875

13.3%

$3,079,107

$3,391,129

Other Grants & Sponsorships

$303,628

9.1%

$5,676,485

$5,779,999

Employee Campaigns

Total Campaign Results and Revenue

$3,320,947

LIABILITIES & NET ASSETS Liabilities

14 Accounts & Accrued Payables

2013

2014

$59,442

$54,394

Allocations Payable

$468,278

$404,900

Designations Payable

$534,383

$447,411

$38,953 $1,101,056

Deferred Revenue & Capital Lease Obligation Total Liabilities

Dollars

% Total

Education

$547,967

18.1%

Health

$386,703

12.7%

$11,613

Income (Financial Stability/Basic Needs)

$926,193

30.5%

$918,318

Donor Directed Gifts - Partner Agencies

$107,781

3.6%

2014

Donor Directed Gifts - All Other 501(c)(3)

$485,228

16%

Net Assets

2013

Undesignated

$208,131

$417,739

General & Administrative Expenses

$162,000

5.3%

$1,083,108

$837,233

Fundraising Expenses

$418,823

13.8%

$614,778

$889,233

Permanently Restricted

$2,669,412

$2,717,476

Total Net Assets

$4,575,429

$4,861,681

$5,676,485

$5,779,999

Board Designated Temporarily Restricted

Total Assets and Liabilities

NOTE: United Way of Eastern Maine (UWEM) is contracted to manage the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) for the State of Maine. The CFC of Maine raised $337,864.44 in 2013 ($76,976.84 of which was campaign expenses). $10,125.61 of the CFC of Maine was designated to UWEM and our partner agencies ($2,296.77 of which was campaign expenses). NOTE: UWEM is committed to ensuring that our donors’ generous contributions are well spent and that overhead expenses remain as low as possible. UWEM does not charge membership dues. A service charge is comprised of the yearly general and administrative expenses of 5.4% and the yearly fundraising expenses of 13.8% for a total 19.2% (see REVENUE and EXPENSES for FISCAL YEAR 2014 on page 14). Financial statement based on FY 2013-2014 audit. Full audit available upon request.

13

EXPENSES

Total Expenses Change in Net Assets

$3,034,695 $286,251

Q: Who decides where the revenue goes? A: Every other year, more than 60 trained United Way of Eastern

Maine community volunteers decide where the dollars can do the most good to keep our health and human service agency network, as well as keeping our community initiatives, strong.

INTERESTED IN VOLUNTEERING? CALL (207) 941-2800 TODAY.

14


ADVANCING EDUCATION, INCOME, HEALTH, BASIC NEEDS, AND VOLUNTEERISM

2014

Oxford Networks has been a proud corporate supporter of United Way of Eastern Maine for many years. From the annual UWEM Campaign, to the UWEM Pantry Project, to their support of 2-1-1 Maine, Oxford Networks and its employees donate time and money to make the community they serve a better place.

ANNUAL REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY

2013

THIS PUBLICATION MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE GENEROUS SUPPORT OF

GIVE. ADVOCATE. VOLUNTEER. Find out more about our funded programs and the volunteers who help move our community forward at www.unitedwayem.org, through our Facebook and Twitter accounts

United Way of Eastern Maine

Serving Penobscot, Piscataquis, Waldo, Hancock, and Washington Counties

www.unitedwayem.org

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Annual report to the community 2013 2014  

Annual report to the community 2013 2014  

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