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Clarkstown High School North - 151 Congers Road - New City, NY 10956

HUE 2010


hue hue staff 2010 Editor-in-Chief Rachel Mitrani Megan Heckmann Kirsten Young Christina Trizzino Emily Selover Sam Artale Emily McKinstry Amy Sunny Josh Kim Alyssa D’Aquino Zoe Zaiss Tanya Thruthuvelil Tara Thruthuvelil Crissy Ramdat Steni Stephan

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Assistant Editor-in-Chief Adam Leon Associate Art Director Michael Grover Advisors Mr. Wolfson Mrs. Rickli

Alyssa Miller Jennah Shahid Nora Gorman Rebecca Giglio Erika Goldstein Taylor Rockower Kira Bergmann Alina Dvorovenko Lindsay Wasserman Elyse Richter Victoria Skiba Sharfa Hug Samantha Cooper Krista Buschbacher


table of contents Computer Graphics Tim Burton Photography IB Art / Art 4 Musical Masterpiece AP and IB2 Drawing and Painting Avant Garde Fashion Design and Illustation Studio Art Coffee Creations Ceramics Technology Art Deptartment

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Computer Graphics Computer Graphics Computer Graphics Computer Graphics Computer Graphics Computer Graphics Computer Graphics 5


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WARNING! DRINK AT YOUR OWN RISK!

Side effects may include: Worldwide Ice Melting

Rise of Sea Levels Increased Percipitation

Hurricanes Floods and Droughts Decrease in Fresh Water

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12:24

Spread of Diseases

Species Extinction

GLOBAL DESTRUCTION

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Tessa Sprauer Grade 12 Digital Mixed Media Sharfa Hug Grade 10 Digital Mixed Media

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Zoey Michaels Grade 11 Digital Media Neil Bonabon Grade 12 Digital Mixed Media

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Computer Graphics

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FEATURE PRESENTATION: BEST PLACES TO TRAVEL DURING YOUR 2009 SUMMER VACATION. PG. 26

Interview with upcoming surfer, Jessica Parker. PG. 63

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Rachel Mitrani Grade 11 Digital Mixed Media

Daniel DeSarlo Grade 10 Digital Media

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Jessica Parker Grade 10 Digital Mixed Media Emily Selover Grade 12 Digital Mixed Media


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Michael Grover Grade 10 Digital Mixed Media

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Said Tursunov Grade 10 Digital Mixed Media

Alina Dvorovenko Grade 10 Digital Mixed Media

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Many people of our generation are familiar with – if not actually fans of – the bizarre and entertaining films of TimBurton. They know of him as the creator of The Nightmare Before Christmas, Corpse Bride, Edward Scissorhands, and a film adaptation of the Broadway musical Sweeney Todd, among other films. However, there is another side to Burton’s illustrious and successful career. This year, the Museum of Modern Art in New York City held a retrospective

exhibit which shed new light on his career. Although the exhibit does feature artifacts from Burton’s movies, it was intended more to be an exploration of all of Burton’s work. Tim Burton’s world is characterized by weird, macabre, colorful characters;

the variety and sheer volume of his work truly speaks to his innovation and dedication as an artist. The entire exhibit is comprised of several large galleries, featuring everything from movie props and sculptures to quick sketches and large paintings. All of Burton’s work seems to be extensively and carefully planned; for example, alongside each prop from one his movies was a group of detailed sketches and small clay models of the movie’s characters. Each piece that was on display was a radical departure from the one next to it; one would think that multiple artists had contributed to the exhibit, not just one.


The wide range of media that Burton employs to express his weird, whimsical artistic vision is truly impressive; within just a few feet one could see a quirky, motorized sculpture of a robot; animated short films, accompanied by eerie music; and small, colorful paintings on black velvet that resembled stained glass when illuminated with UV lamps. Before I viewed the exhibit, I didn’t understand or particularly like Tim Burton’s artwork: I thought of him only as a bizarre filmmaker whose work didn’t match my taste. After viewing the MoMA exhibit, though, I gained a newfound appreciation for Burton’s creativity, and with this new understanding, I was able to truly enjoy his work. His work, which can be humorous, dark, or both, challenges one’s assumption of “art” and what belongs in a museum. Burton’s works are not traditional still-life paintings or marble sculptures, but they are nevertheless important contributions to the art world. The diversity of Burton’s body of work proves that he is a uniquely innovative artist with a seemingly infinite flow of ideas. His distinctive creations may be outside the confines of traditional art, but Tim Burton has certainly proved that he is an innovative artist who deserves our admiration.

N A m r o Nora G

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Photography Photography Photography Photography Photography Photography Photography Photography

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Adam Leon Grade 11 Digital Image Kristen Martinez Grade 11 Digital Photography

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Julia Brehl Grade 11 Photogram Christina Connor Grade 11 Tri-X 400 Silver Gelatin Print

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Photography

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Gus Tupa Grade 11 Digital Photography

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Meg Lenihan Grade 12 Tri-X 400 Silver Gelatin Print

Emily McKinstry Grade 11 Tri-X 400 Silver Gelatin Print Brandon Aberion Grade 11 Tri-X 400 Silver Gelatin Print


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Alyssa Miller Grade 12 Mixed Media

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Elyse Richter Grade 11 Mixed Media

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Josh Kim Grade 12 Photogram

Samantha Schnapper Grade 12 Digital Mixed Media

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IB Year I Art IV IB Year I Art IV IB Year I Art IV IB Year I Art IV IB Year I Art IV IB Year I Art IV IB Year I Art IV 5


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Nora Gorman Grade 11 Mixed Media Rachel Silverman Grade 11 Watercolor

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Sarah Price Grade 11 Colored Pencil Zoey Michaels Grade 11 Marker and Yarn

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IB Year I IB Year I

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Jackie Siegel Grade 11 Mixed Media Allison Olinsky Grade 11 Watercolor

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Paola Rocco Grade 11 Pastel


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Dana Sassano Grade 11 Mixed Media

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Jennah Shahid Grade 11 Graphite

Rachel Mitrani Grade 11 Markers

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Musical Masterpiece

The question we find ourselves asking when we first view a piece of album artwork created by our favorite band is: what exactly is the allure? In other words, what makes album artwork so appealing and draws us into it? Maybe, it’s because the album artwork helps us to grasp the intangible feel of music that is abstract to us. The truth of the matter is that album artwork has become a personable form of art to us. Although the famous fine art pieces by Monet and Degas are breath taking to look at, can everyone relate to their artwork? Living in this generation, we can attach our emotions to album artwork. Music is a language understood by the world; it is our getaway to places of happiness and tranquility. Furthermore, album artwork plays the role of connecting our emotions to music. We all can relate to the feeling experienced Peter Blake when we ponder and engage in the album artwork while listening to the music.


Album artwork triggers our connection and our feel to music. The powerful impact of the album cover image grasps the viewer’s attention because in a sense, the artwork sets a feeling for the music. Furthermore, art and music express who we are as individuals and what our culture as a whole is interested in. We can see how our culture has evolved over the years by examining the vast art work on album covers. From the hippie fads of the 60s heavily influenced by the Beatles, to the “groovy” disco 70’s, to the rocking 80’s influenced by Journey, to the rocking 90’s dominated by pop groups like The Backstreet Boys , to the music today; pop, rock, hip-hop, jazz… Album artwork has set the mood for the era. Album artwork captures our history in its attempt to be commercially successful. The art form began in an effort to sell more records. Unfortunately, our generation takes it for granted. When we turn on iTunes, a little image of the album artwork pops up in the corner of the screen. Sadly, the powerful album artwork is ignored. Maybe it is because our generation feels the music instead of interpreting it through the image we see. by Jennah Shahid

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AP Art & IB Year II AP Art & IB Year II AP Art & IB Year II AP Art & IB Year II AP Art & IB Year II AP Art & IB Year II AP Art & IB Year II AP Art & IB Year II 5


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Jen Kim Grade 12 Mixed Media Nicole Mellion Grade 12 Acrylic

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Alyssa Miller Grade 12 Mixed Media Alexa Perrone Grade 12 Pastel

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AP Art & IB Year II

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Danielle Pesin Grade 12 Acrylic Rebecca Reilly Grade 12 Mixed Media

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Christina Trizzino Grade 12 Digital Mixed Media Josh Kim Grade 12 Charcoal


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Steffi Stephan Grade 12 Acrylic

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Megan Heckmann Grade 12 Acrylic

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Lindsay Wasserman Grade 12 Acrylic Kirsten Young Grade 12 Oil Paint

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Drawing & Painting Drawing & Painting Drawing & Painting Drawing & Painting Drawing & Painting Drawing & Painting Drawing & Painting AP Art & IB Year II 5


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Allie Trupp Grade 10 Charcoal Mariel Greenberg Grade 10 Mixed Media

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Tara Lambert Grade 11 Mixed Media Ryan Kilgannon Grade 10 Mixed Media

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Drawing & Painting

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Stephanie Yelin Grade 10 Marker Deborah Winograd Grade 10 Watercolor

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Samanta Artale Grade 12 Mixed Media Nicole Cember Grade 10 Colored Pencil


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Karishma Ramdat Grade 10 Watercolor

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Christopher Emch Grade 11 Acrylic

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Erika Goldstein Grade 10 Pastel Jessica Alcheh Grade 10 Charcoal

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G N T V AA ARdE N O I FASHI

t is not uncommon for people Article by to think of clothes as simple pieces Haley Coopersmith of fabric that are used to cover their bodies. But what these people do not realize is that fashion is an art form. Someone who considers fashion as art thinks of his or her body as a blank canvas and the clothes as the paint. These artists also realize that clothing does not only refer to something that is made out of fabric.They understand that almost anything can be used to construct an outfit and if they are brave enough, they may even venture outside in such masterpieces. To some, wearing a certain outfit can be comparable to walking around with a painting from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in their arms and these are the true Fashionistas of the world. Avant-garde loosely translates to “ahead of the movement� and not being associated with the mainstream world is crucial if one plans to use unconventional materials in fashion. From papers to plants to feathers to furs, avant-garde designers have broken all boundaries of the fashion world and have re-written the rules of what is acceptable to wear in society in the process. However the designer isn’t the only one who has to be a non-conformist; the buyers and the people who wear the avant-garde garments have to be unique as well. Only a very confident person who is not afraid of what anyone else thinks can pull off wearing a piece of art and that is how certain supermodels and actresses get away with wearing such amazing creations and others do not. The same can be said for designers: only a designer with the right attitude can pull off making clothes out of unconventional materials and not be criticized for it.


One performer who has done a magnificent job of making a name for herself as a courageous, avant-garde style icon is Lady Gaga. Although Lady Gaga has only been considered a celebrity for about two years she has already gained world fame for her music and her fashion choices. Lady Gaga continuously goes out in outfits made out of human hair, see-though lace, plastic, LED lights, tape and everything else in between. And rather than being splattered across Page Six as a fashion disaster she is all over the pages of the most reputable high fashion magazines and is regarded as the world’s newest Fashion Icon.

Photo Courtesy of GlaadBlog.com

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Design and Illustration Design and Illustration Design and Illustration Design and Illustration Design and Illustration Design and Illustration Design and Illustration Design and Illustration 5


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Colleen Urban Grade 9 Mixed Media Dannielle Colandrea Grade 9 Mixed Media

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Allison Amatuzzo Grade 10 Colored Pencil Celine Nicolas Grade 9 Ink

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Design and Illustration

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Sanju Bose Grade 10 Acrylic Emilia Naranjo Grade 9 Ink

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Lauren Lee Grade 9 Ink Carly Michaels Grade 9 Colored Pencil


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Samantha Streitman Grade 9 Ink Yeji Hong Grade 12 Tempera

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Darra Loganzo Grade 9 Mixed Media Calli Chazan Grade 10 Mixed Media

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Studio Art Studio Ceramics Studio Media Studio Art Studio Ceramics Studio Media Studio Art Studio Ceramics 5


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Joan Lee Grade 9 Ceramics Bill Barry Grade 9 Digital Mixed Media

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Henry Hinojsa Grade 9 Mixed Media Kushal Desai Grade 9 Marker

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Ben Kim Grade 9 Collage Stephanie Choulijan Grade 9 Mixed Media

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Morgan Brill Grade 9 Ink Leila Smiley Grade 9 Marker


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Alexandra Kenney Grade 9 Watercolor

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Lorraine Santiago Grade 9 Tempera

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Caroline Silver Grade 9 Mixed Media Martin Domosi Grade 9 Graphite


Studio Ceramics

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Jenna Weinstein Grade 9 Ceramics Jordan Slattery Grade 11 Ceramics

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Jordan Bergenfeld Grade 9 Ceramics Ivan Bazyuk Grade 11 Ceramics


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Aashika Dhivakara Babu Grade 9 Ceramics

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Celine Li Grade 12 Ceramics Alana Flickinger Grade 9 Ceramics

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Studio Media

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Amila Osmanovic Grade 9 Digital Mixed Media Molly Klein Grade 10 Digital Mixed Media

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Dylan Johnke Grade 9 Digital Mixed Media Richard Mckaba Grade 9 Digital Mixed Media


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Sharfa Hug Grade 10 Digital Mixed Media

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Michael Grover Grade 10 Digital Mixed Media

Mike Glennon Grade 11 Digital Mixed Media

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Coffee Creations By Alyssa Miller

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offee art has become increasingly popular in little coffee shops. People take the time to draw out little designs or pictures with cream to make a latte even more special. Karen Eland has decided to take coffee art to a new level. Karen has taken coffee and made it her he medium of choice instead of watercolors or acrylic paint. Karen started taking art lessons when she was fourteen years old. Her love for coffee developed from her daily trips to Kaldi’s coffeehouse, where she would draw the people around her. One day, Karen made a connection between her art and coffee and decided to paint with it. To further understand the art of coffee, Karen became a barista, but art is her full time job. Karen normally works with oils, water colors and pencils, for job related projects. Coffee art is a fun hobby that Karen uses as a “refreshing break” from the more traditional art. The Girl with a Pear Earring

The Mona Latte


The Creation of Coffee

Besides painting in coffee, Karen adds a new layer of complication to her hobby; she remakes classic paintings in coffee. Karen adds a twist and sometimes tries to incorporate a cup of coffee to physically be in the painting. Karen describes the process as a “slow and sophisticated process” that requires many layers of espresso. Some of Karen’s more known creations are “The Mona Latte,” “The Girl with a Pear Earring” and “The Creation of Coffee. To see more of Karen Eland’s work you can visit her website: coffee-art.com


Ceramics Ceramics Ceramics Ceramics Ceramics Ceramics Ceramics Ceramics Ceramics Ceramics Ceramics Ceramics Ceramics Ceramics Ceramics Ceramics 5


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Shannon Kay Grade 10 Ceramics Marie Giustino Grade 10 Ceramics

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Allison Dibarba Grade 12 Ceramics

Jamie Sheridan Grade 10 Digital Mixed Media

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Ceramics

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Marisa Minoff Grade 12 Ceramics Julia Pietrangelo Grade 10 Ceramics

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Danielle Big Grade 12 Ceramics Karishma Ramdat Grade 10 Ceramics


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Lindsay Carroll Grade 12 Ceramics

Clay as Sculptural Multiples Class Tapecast Installation

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Cassie Livsey Grade 12 Ceramics Yeji Hong Grade 12 Ceramics

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Technology

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Sanju Bose Grade 10 Isometric Drawing


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Thomas Farro Grade 10 Isometric Drawing

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Paul Feilds Grade 11 Picture Frame

Fernando Miller Grade 11 Picture Frame

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Art Department Art Department Art Department Art Department Art Department Art Department Art Department 5


Departme Art Department Art Department Art Art Department

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Mrs. Diamond Photography Studio In Media

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Mrs. McNally IB Art & Art 4 Studio Art

Mrs. Rickli Drawing & Painting Studio Art Design & Illustration

Ms. Dunn Ceramics Studio In Ceramics Clay Multiples

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Mr. Wolfson Computer Graphics Studio In Media Design & Illustration

Mr. Batewell Technology Play Production Studio in Media D.D.P / Material Process

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Colophon HUE was produced using Adobe Indesign CS2, Adobe Photoshop CS2, and Microsoft Word 2003all run on a Dell Optiplex GC620. An Epson Perfection 1250 scanner was aslo employed. Artwork was photographed with a Nikon D60 Digital SLR Camera.

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Special Thanks To: Mr. Leonardatos Principal Ms. Hicks Assistant Principal Mr. Jacob Assistant Principal Ms. Franchi Assistant Principal Clarkstown North Art Department Clarkstown Central School District Bad Company Printing & Graphics


Hue Magazine 2010  

Art department magazine of Clarkstown North

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