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Adam Hewgill Academic Portfolio 2011-2013


Adam Hewgill Academic Portfolio 2011 - 2013


07 INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION ARB CRITERIA 11 STAGE 5 STUDIO CHARRETTE: POLITICAL SENSORIUM ARC8050:CURATING MUSEUM ISLAND ARC8052:DETAIL, NARRATIVE & MEMORY 57 STAGE 5 RESEARCH

Contents

ARC8051: TOOLS FOR THINKING 63 STAGE 6 STUDIO CHARRETTE: ANIMATE SPACE ARC8060:STRANGE PLACES 133 STAGE 6 RESEARCH ARC8058: LINKED RESEARCH


Studio


Introduction

Intro

This portfolio is a record of the work undertaken whilst on the MArch program at the University of Newcastle. It demonstrates the various aspects of architectural design and research that each project has involved. The work shown is in line with the criteria specified in by the Architects Registration Board. The projects are arranged chronologically within subject area and display the brief and thesis behind each piece of work. Each drawing within this portfolio is used to help describe the project it relates to in a clear and succinct way, displaying the narrative and intention of the design.

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Ability to create architectural designs that satisfy both aesthetic and technical requirements.

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Adequate knowledge of the histories and theories of architecture and the related arts, technologies and human sciences.

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Knowledge of the fine arts as an influence on the quality of architectural design.

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Adequate knowledge of urban design, planning and the skills involved in the planning process.

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Understanding of the relationship between people and buildings, and between buildings and their environment, and the need to relate buildings and the spaces between them to human needs and scale.

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Understanding of the profession of architecture and the role of the architect in society, in particular in preparing briefs that take account of social factors.

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Understanding of the methods of investigation and preparation of the brief for a design project.

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Understanding of the structural design, constructional and engineering problems associated with building design.

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Adequate knowledge of physical problems and technologies and the function of buildings so as to provide them with internal conditions of comfort and protection against the climate.

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The necessary design skills to meet building users’ requirements within the constraints imposed by cost factors and building regulations.

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Adequate knowledge of the industries, organisations, regulations and procedures involved in translating design concepts into buildings and integrating plans into overall planning.


ARB criteria

Intro

This portfolio demonstrates work within the criteria outlined by the Architects Registration Board (ARB). The General Criteria at Part 1 and Part 2 levels are now explicitly linked to the 11 points that form a part of Article 46 of the Directive. These points are stated on the opposite page and are labelled throughout this document. Parts 1 and 2 are differentiated by Graduate Attributes, which reflect the level of learning which must be exhibited by students. The subsequent pages will display a bar across the top of the page with tabs naming the ARB criteria. The relevant criteria will be highlighted when the work on that page corresponds to and demonstrates the qualities outlined by that specific principle.

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Stage 5 Studio Sept 11 - June 12


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Project Title: The Ambient Voting System Location: Byker, Newcastle Date Started: Sept 2011

The political sensorium

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The model of democracy has gone through distinct changes in recent times. The growth in scientific advances mean that digital technologies offer us unprecedented information on political decisions, and online forums provide a platform for political engagement. However recent polls suggest that as access to these advances increase, voter turn-out is decreasing. This highlights the importance of physical meeting places and solutions. The Political Sensorium is a way of enquiring into ‘situated’ technologies to enable political action to take place at local level. Ralph Erskine’s Byker housing scheme was the test bed for speculation of what role technology could play in emerging local democracies. The project is week long charrette, a group exploration of ideas and solutions to digital democracy.

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APPROACH The political sphere within the Byker housing scheme is currently under a period of change with the newly elected Byker Trust now at the helm. The socio-political issue highlighted in the brief was that of a lack of cohesion between the decisions made and the wants/needs of the community. Within a group of 4 we decided to challenge the culture of activist led politics and provide easily accessible routes to making community decisions. The brief stressed exploration into testing ideas and we decided to push this project to an extreme in order to make a uniquely architectural and critical dimension of approach.

IDEA: THE AMBIENT VOTING SYSTEM Our aim was to increase the poor Voter turnout of the Byker wall residents, include everyone and create a system to catalogue and represent the issues of priority. The original idea saw the Byker wall as a body, with the five senses picking up the complaints of the Byker residents and acting with a self regulating unconscious system to target problems as they occurred. To create a fully ambient system all inputs sensors would be undetectable and cover every inch of the Byker public realm. How would people alter their behaviour if every action became a vote?

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RESIDENT JARVIS HEIGHT 6 FT 2 IN MOOD: NONCHALANT


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A short film was produced as a marketing tool to show the benefits of The Ambient Voting system. The film centres on a Byker resident with ‘loads of problems’ how could the Ambient Voting System help this often overlooked resident without him having to do anything? Individual issues in the Public realm with even the smallest annoyance would be sensed and recorded; these individual issue molecules would then cluster with similar issues to form a larger vote cell. The vote cell would have a magnitude and a specific target location. The vote cells could then be prioritised and acted upon by the appropriate service team on the ground. Every action would become a vote, from talking about fly tipping issues with your neighbour to tripping over an uneven paving slab.

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The film is a day in the life styled documentary of a Byker resident’s trials and tribulations. The film goes on to describe the positive effects the Ambient Voting System could bring to this individuals life, narrated in a hypnotic and disturbing voice. The film is portrayed as if it were a propaganda commercial and purposely displays a dystopian world where an extreme idea somehow subtly become a reality.

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The project is a comment on how the digitalisation of space could also throw some disquieting but plausible turns. This project facilitated a creative freedom to play around with an idea which is architectural in its theory of dynamic space and sociological impact. The design is a dystopian tool to create new instant built environments.

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Project Title: Citizenbook Location: Museum Island, Berlin Date Started: Oct 2011

Curating museum island Stage 5 - Semester 1

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This project is about how people compete to use history – and the traces of history apparent in urban and architectural fabric – to shape the future This project asked to think about the values at work on Museum Island. What kinds of history are being promoted? What kinds of history are being suppressed? What does this mean? In terms of memory politics, who is remembering what, when, how and for whom? The brief asked to re-imagine the Museumsinsel, making new proposals about its future, remembering its past and considering its symbolic role as a cultural centre for Berlin, for Germany, and perhaps even for Europe as a whole. The extent the proposal, its program and accommodation, and its accompanying values, were for us to decide.

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APPROACH The brief was to create an urban scaled intervention which responded particularly to the complex challenges the site held; contextual and historical. Through a process of analysis and documentation I determined that the former site of the Palast der Republik was the zone I would like to work with due to its controversial nature and loaded historical past. These histories were specifically political issues. The site used to host the imperial palace named the Stadtschloss. After WWII the palace had to be demolished due to war damage, and in a divided East/West Berlin this site fell on the communist territory. The central location made the site a great candidate for the new political seat of the GDR. Thus, the Palast der Republik was built there to house the parties headquarters. It also contained many other public functions, a civic centre for events, weddings, parties, there was even a bowling alley. After the reunification of Germany the function for the Palast was no longer needed. City planners deemed the building to be unsafe and evocative of difficult past. In 2008 it was disassembled. Currently there are proposals to reinstate the former Stadtschloss on the site. A move which could be seen as historicist; favouring one history over another. My intervention issues.

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CONFLICTING HISTORIES

The Stadtschloss

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INITIAL CONCEPTS Due to the site’s difficult past it was my intention to keep the space a political realm but instead of it being about the conflicting presence of the past, it would be about using the space for the promotion of current politics and the documentation of self written histories. My initial impression was to create an interactive zone for the public realm. I wanted the space to be in someway about expression, transient and open. A park of interactive screens and recordable footage was my first concept.

The former Palast der Republik

Studio Stage 5

Current proposal: The Humboldt Forum

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PROGRAM Finally, my proposal was to create a central node for political expression, I wanted to create a place where the people of Berlin could tell of there own personal histories, thoughts and opinions, possibly surrounding topical issues. After studying interactive architecture I thought of the internet as a platform for input into my built architecture. An online debate to feed a live exhibition of personal histories. A zone dedicated to expression would be dynamic,fluctuating and indicative of emotion or opinion.

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LOG IN

Username

berlincitizen1

Password

***********


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HOW IT WORKS

Stage 5

Berlin citizens create an account on Citizenbook Online Forum. From here they access a range of debate topics, to add their opinion.

The information is sent to the server building to be processed.

The Message would then be relayed to the exhibition space for public display.

As new messages get input older messages are sent to the archive building to be stored and accessed in exhibitions of opinion and personal history.

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DESIGN The central ‘political’ node for my scheme I determined as a plaza, a gathering space for political action, a meeting place for the citizens of Berlin, and a dedicated space for political impact. I decided to create 2 sloped plazas with a central exhibition area, where the thoughts and feelings of the public could be displayed in a transient and emotive area. A live feed from an online forum. The Plazas would act as the gathering space, to give opportunities back to Berliners, with a stadium-esque quality for events hosted in the exhibition zone. The design also seeks to generate a connection through the island and promote movement through the site. Stage 5

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Stage 5

This diagrammatic section demonstrates the way the sloped plazas meet at the central exhibition zone, providing an unbroken connection right through Museum island

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EXHIBITION ZONE AXO Organisation of debates

THE PULPIT

DEVELOPMENT AXIS

HISTORY AXIS

SOCIAL AXIS

ECONOMIC AXIS

PROJECTION AREA

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EXHIBITION ZONE The exhibition zone is the most dynamic area of The Citizen book plaza, with translucent sliding screens that each represent online debate topics. The screens are arranged in axes and slide along the axis depending on the positivity or negativity of the comment.

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THE ARCHIVE BUILDING: FROM SPEAKERS PLATFORM

TYPICAL EXHIBITION SCREEN As messages age they move outward from the centre until they are sent to the archive.

MATERIALITY AND FLOOR ANIMATION

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studio Stage 5

Presentation was projected onto a sectional model with the Citizenbook website as a tool for describing the project.

As different areas of the project were explained various parts of the model lit up to help the view locate the subject matter.

The highlighted area on the model refers to the image on the website screen.

Presenting the project in this way demonstrated the dynamic nature of the project.

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studio

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Project Title: Fame Game Location: Hartwood, North Lanarkshire Date Started: Jan 2012

Detail, narrative & memory Stage 5 - Semester 2

studio

This project asked to design a detail. To design that detail, we were asked to design a building. A clear narrative – expressed through the cutting, joining and forming of materials – should link the detail with the strategies for the building. The same narrative will thread the proposal’s environmental, structural, climatic, lighting and energy strategies together into a coherent whole.

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Glasgow Edinburgh

Hartwood

APPROACH The initial step was to find an existing building to make our intervention. The program of this intervention was to be decided as part of the procedure of unlocking the key factors of our selected site. I chose the former mental health institution of Hartwood Hospital in North Lanarkshire, Scotland. This Location was particularly remote, which relates to the old ideas of separating the mentally ill away from society. With this no longer the attitude towards mental health patients the building was shut and consequently fell into disrepair. Having analysed the history of the site I discovered that the hospital had a tumultuous past with the local village. I wished to reestablish this connection in a positive way.

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Hartwood hospital used to be the largest mental heath hospital in the world with over 500 permanent residents. Now much of the outer buildings have been demolished. What is now left was once the main hall for the complex, complete with its domineering towers. It is now a shell as fire destroyed much of the inside structure.

studio Stage 5

The site has a particular spooky quality as it currently stands my plan was to re-address this, making it retreat of a very different kind to its original purposes.

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studio Stage 5

This was my original concept of juxtapositions and transformations, taken from the remaining features of the old. Idea to contrast with the new, a reversal, mirroring.

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Through this concept I hoped to unlock the detail and program of my building. I looked at precedents such as Rachael Whiteread’s art in order to develop my own techniques for creating reversals from space.

Concrete casting from a modelled window recess,

The remaining features of the hospital had a fascinating quality and history behind them, I wanted to use these remaining features in my design.

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This process led me to start playing with voids and solids. The program for my structure was becoming more evident through this modelling. I believed that my program could also about reversal or more precisely rehabilitation.

studio Stage 5

Concept model was begging to indicate the kinds of spaces that could work in a built structure.

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PROGRAM

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There were two themes developing in this project. Firstly there was the theme of isolation and the tenuous history the hospital had with its surroundings. Secondly there was the idea of reversal and rehabilitation. I felt that both factors together could create a great opportunity for a unique structure with two complimentary programs. I felt that by integrating the themes into a dual programme that a function could manifest, one that was both fun restorative. My two ideas to integrate were a leisure centre for the local community and a rehabilitation centre for C-list celebrities that were on the road to ruin due to their obsession with fame. Their process of rehabilitation would be sold to them as a reality TV contest, but in reality would be a process of therapy.

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The celebs enter under the false pretence they are enrolling in the latest reality TV show, in fact they are entering a process of therapy to guide them back to a stable lifestyle. The scheme hosts two overlapping programs; the therapy centre entwined with a leisure centre for the local community. The programs meet at certain ‘challenge’ spaces where the celebrity’s involvement helps to run and maintain the leisure centre. The inhabitants of each program are unaware of each other, but clues to the presence of the other side are evident at certain moments, but never clear. This idea sets up a juxtaposition of community fellowship vs individual gain. It helps the people with the heightened notion of self involvement make a difference to everyday people, and through a process of realisation about their actions allows them to make a clear decision regarding their future.

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studio Stage 5

celeb rehab phase 1 spaces

Leisure Centre Spaces

celeb. rehab phase 2 spaces 41


This time line of phase gives an indication of the intended rehabilitation program for the Celebrities.

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Stage 5

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Washing Challenges/ Changing Room

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Kitchen Tasks/ Cafe

Twister/ Scoreboard Sorting Game/ Vending Machine Stage 5

This drawing is mapping the celebrity program, where cross-over activities such as playing twister controls the scoreboard of the gym below. Each of these games are Crystal Mazeesque challenges that also help function the workings of the leisure centre it is entwined with.

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ANALYTIQUE This drawing places all of the key themes into one collage.

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Zoom of corridor, hosting running track.

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Zoom of circulation space, new slide crashing through the space. Stage 5

Integrated Section Shows crossover space of the locker room and laundry room. Lift lockers control the laundry process, public opting for the service when leaving their clothes. 47


SECTION EAST/WEST

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SECTION NORTH SOUTH

Stage 5

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Water Level

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Details were the culmination of this project. They document the key cross-over spaces so important in my design.

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1. Cast Nylon 2. Stainless Steel 317 3. 50 mm Glass 4. 100 mm aerogel 5. Cast in situ Concrete

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1. Cement screed 2. Pre-cast Concrete 3. Brick

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

6. Insulation

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1. Existing masonry 2. Pre-cast concrete

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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1. Corrugated plastic

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3. Stainless Steel 317

3. Timber spacing

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4. Runners

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5. Glazing 6. Cast-in-situ concrete

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Highlighted are the main structural elements of the building. Predominantly these were the thick existing load bearing walls, coupled with steal beams for lateral support.

Typical ventilation floor detail

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Stage 5

Rainwater harvesting detail and implementation

This project incorporated many environmental features in order for it to function sustainably and cost effectively. This part of Scotland sees a lot of rain, therefore rain water harvesting systems are used to capture water for use in the building. Because of Hartwood’s extensive grounds it was possible to use this vast area to generate heat for the building via ground source heat pumps, implemented on the playing fields.

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stage 5 research Jan 12 - Jan 13


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Project Title: The Fashion of Erasure Location: Berlin Date Started: Oct 2011

tools for thinking stage 5 semester 1

This module was based on seminars and lectures with the final outcome being a written piece about an aspect of the theory of architecture. The investigation started with the study of Berlin subsequent to a study trip there. Following this we continued to follow our own individual strains of architectural theory, related to any area of choice. I developed my essay on the architecture of the former German Democratic Republic and the former current city planning within the city of Berlin.

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ABSTRACT

5. Research

The Fashion of Erasure: The Selective Remembrance of the German Democratic Republic It was the intention of this article to discuss erased layers of history, why certain histories are promoted or adopted whilst others are removed; a selective remembrance in the scope of architecture. To explain, concisely, these complexities I used Berlin and its urban fabric to exemplify how some facets of the past have evident favouritism whilst other elements of history are disrespected and/or disappeared. This notion, coupled with the idea of gifting futures to selected new developments contributes to planners portraying a desired image of the city.

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Stage 6 Studio Sept 12 - Jan 13


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Project Title: Animate Space Location: Newcastle University Date Started: Sept 2012

ANIMATE SPACE stage 6 semester 1

This project was a week long intensive charrette. The aim was to design and build a machine of the likes made famous by Heath Robinson and Rube Goldberg. Through a process of inventive thinking and experiments the machine was developed in compartments to work as one successive knock-on domino-effect. The outcomes were a live performance to the School of APL and a feature film later uploaded to Youtube.

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This project mainly concerned thinking outside the box and problem solving skills. This collaborative task helped to promote a great dynamic across the school, particularly as there were wide age range across the year. Seen as this was my first project as a 6th year it was a good experience leading the team of students in creating this project together.

Stage 6

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Project Title: Economic Eye Location: City of London Date Started: Oct 2012

thesis: strange places stage 6 semester 1

This studio offered an opportunity to investigate a strange, distinctive, unique place that interests you – somewhere so particular that architecture made there cannot be like architecture that would be made anywhere else. The strange place selected should be somewhere that is not only spatially distinctive but which also has cultural resonances – literature, history, film, art, photography – and/or political resonances – palpable inequalities or strange relationships – which you can tap-into when you design.

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Initial research This studio focuses on strange places, my strange place is the City of London, the oldest part of London, with famous landmarks such as St Paul’s Cathedral, the Bank of England and the Gherkin. Strangeness The unique qualities of this place become apparent firstly when seeing the place from a political point of view. In a sense the City of London is an entity outside of democracy, it acts almost as a autonomous state. This is because it is in the most part company controlled and has specific rights and privileges dating back to the time of the Magna Carta. It is a place outside common law, and often omits itself from certain laws such as taxing laws and voting reforms. For this reason it has become a haven for business and economics, it is the capital of the world’s financial industry. The City’s autonomous nature is cemented when considering the fact it is governed separately from the rest of London, with separate mayors, police and electoral processes.

Political framework in the city

The City’s notoriety it has been subject to negative attention in the past. Terrorist attacks in the heart of London have promoted a culture of ultra-security within the square mile. There is a protective barrier called the ring of steal that circles the City, each major institution also has its own defences. This type of fortress urbanism is also unique within the UK. Finally, a further strange quality to the City is its transient and dramatic changes in volume of foot traffic, movement and activity. This is because the square mile is commuter central. Over 300,000 people travel into the city to work every week. This is in sharp contrast to the number of people who live there, at only 9000. In effect the City can go from being one of the most bustling places in the world during working hours, to virtually empty within a few hours.

STAGE 6

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Banker residence in greater London

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Researching the importance of London on a global and local scale gave an insight into the reasons behind the identity of the City being such a unique place.

The Big Four

Financial Capital Index

Av. Building Height The UK’s Financial Positing

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Within Greater London the City stood out as a unique commuter hub right at the centre. It became apparent that the city was not only unique in terms of lack of residents but also in terms of politics. The City acts outside of the democratic system and is exempt from certain voting and taxation laws. This is arguably one of the reasons why the City hosts so many financial institutions, as the graphs below demonstrate.

Residents

Commuters

Population/Commuter

Manufacture and Retail Admin and Education

Accommodation and Food Service Activities

information and communication

STAGE 6

Professional and Estate

Finance

City of London Industries

Greater London - Population High/Low

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Street Plan

The City of London - Layers Study of the City of London exposed its unique political and historical framework, much of which is still maintained today. This framework enabled financial institutions to flourish here, the main concentration of these institutions are within the eastern wards.

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Wards/population


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Historic London

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Ring of Steel

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Financial Industries

STAGE 6

Layers of the City

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Landmarks

City of London Site and Ring of Steel Highlight

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Site and High-Rise Banks

Prominent Axes of Site

STAGE 6

Mass/Void Diagram

Eastern Cluster Centre of the high-rise banks in the City.

This area is dedicated to high-rise banks and currently has a number of construction projects underway. The area features landmarks such as The Gherkin and the Lloyds Building.

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Element Study A study of the cityscape reveals the in place Fortress Urbanism in the City

PROTECTIVE BARRIER Security + Paranoia = Battlements

ivory tower Monolithic structures demonstrate a corporate image but add to the story of “banker� mystery and exclusivity. 80


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RING OF STEEL Explorations into the architectural language of the City began to set the parameters for my thesis. The main observations I made were of the security systems in place in this area, the so called ring of steel that encloses the City was put in place to protect the many financial institutions from terrorist attacks, but in doing so the area takes on the stigma of a hyper-controlled area. The Ring of steel includes elements such as bollards, blocked routes, innumerous CCTV cameras and number-plate recognition devices.

Vertical schism Another interesting point of study for me was of the multiprogrammatic nature of the skyscraper, the various functions existing within a monolithic skin.

STAGE 6

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SURVEILLANCE The first phase of developing my observations into a thesis was when I decided to look more closely at surveillance. Documenting (partially intuitively) the surveillance within a high rise bank I used this information to begin to rationalise a new program for an alternative financial institution.

CONTROL PANEL I developed this thinking into a made piece that summarised my findings in the City. This would be a security control panel that I would initially exhibit to introduce other studios to my site but would also travel with me to all my crits to help introduce the complexities of the Square Mile.

STAGE 6

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PRIMER The Primer was essentially a presentation of the key themes starting to emerge from our project as we discovered more about our sites. The control panel was my made piece, it displayed 5 videos of I had created when exploring the themes of my project. The 6th screen was a live feed CCTV camera focusing on the viewer of the piece. This was to strike home the notion of surveillance in as a key interest to take into my design. I determined 6 particular themes of interest; the culture of finance, security, paranoia, movement, power and surveillance. The Primer piece itself was designed as a security control panel. The idea was that you would sit in place of the “controlsâ€? of the City to observe the many aspects of this unique place. The unit was painted a military grey and adopted the persona of a sinister booth of surveillance. Set within the desk section of the piece of joinery was a cut out of the square mile. This map of the city indicated where certain features were most prominent with the use of computer keyboard pieces, replicating the security desk once more. For example, the Ctrl key sat over the bank of England, whilst the ÂŁ key sat over the main highrise financial hub.


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VIDEOS

The Culture of Finance - this video portrayed many cut scenes from the news, revealing a unsustainable financial system.

Movement - this video documented commuters journey into work. There were also arguable moments of paranoia reveal as well.

Paranoia - this video was a short walk along bishops gate, the video would go into slow-mo at any indication of paranoia in the area.

STAGE 6

Observation - the primer piece was set up with a CCTV camera facing the viewer of the piece. This placed the onlooker within the piece.

Security - this video highlights the extent of the ring of steal and the many other security feature of the City.

Power - this video aimed to demonstrate the architectural language of power adopted by many of the financial institutions.

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PROXIMITY OF THE SITE TO THE BANK OF ENGLAND Closest underground station and direct axis to the site.

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THE STUMP - BIRD’S-EYE

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VIEW ALONG THREADNEEDLE ST.

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VIEW ALONG BISHOPSGATE

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THE PINNACLE PROPOSAL

SITE During the initial stages of my thesis a particular site was brought to my attention by a news story concerning the voids in the City of London. Due to the recession, arguably caused by the bankers, their were telling traces left in the epicentre of their industry. One particular void was located on Bishopsgate and was to be the latest jewel in the crown of the high rise bank - nicknamed “The Pinnacle”. Due to lack of investment however the project had barely got off the ground and only the beginnings of a concrete core has been undertaken. Local commuters have begun calling the concrete block “The Stump”.

STAGE 6

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Thesis development


SITE - FINANCIAL EPICENTRE With my chosen site at the centre, outlined are the main financial institutions in the Eastern Cluster.

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PROGRAMME AND OPPORTUNITIES It was fundamental for me that my thesis focused on addressing the financial monopoly found in the City and the culture of banking that is almost a product of itself. The timing seemed about right for a financial shake up, with reform legislation being processed currently and with the opportunities of failed capitalist developments prominent in the City. Therefore I decided my proposal would be a financial institution at the heart of the city that focused on social values rather than straight up profit. The Co-operative Bank was a model for the kind of institution I was planning, with ethics central to its policy. The main question I wished to address however was how could these principles be architecturally interpreted into a working building? Could my building be a counter active component against its surroundings.

PROPOSAL OF DEMOCRATIC INTENTIONS - AGORA

CO-OPERATIVE BANK AS MODEL SYSTEM

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INITIAL SKETCHES Thoughts on how a democratic ethical bank could work, focusing on microeconomics, shared communal space and intimacy reinvigorating the area.

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INHABITED WALLS AROUND AGORA?


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PERMEABILITY - AGORA CENTRE The analogy of a cell helps demonstrate my initial thoughts of a permeable border between the cityscape and a central node.

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panopticon With surveillance being so prominent in my studies of the City there had to be a counter proposal within my building, this however would have to be a low tech response and open to everyone. I wondered if “The Stump� could become a viewing tower to unlock key views into the financial institution I created.

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typologies I played with many typologies of form to try and discover the best solution to the developing brief I was writing.

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Connection of views ULTRA HOMELINESS

porosity

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The power of everyday people Starting to emerge at this time in my thesis was the notion that everyday people could in fact have a positive impact on the area. I had theorised that the culture in the City had developed with little social responsibility partially because it is so separated from society. What if the people were reintroduced to this area.

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INTENTIONS During the development of my thesis these intentions were the most prominent in describing the concepts fundamental to the final proposal.

Regular Typology

Democratic Space - Agora

Bank to Public Space

Literal Transparency

Transparency Conversion 98

Mono-culture of Finance

Multi-culture of Society

Exclusive to Inclusive

Metaphorical Transparency

High Tech Materials

Expensive to Cheap

Cheap Effective Materials


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High Tech Bankers Watching Public

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Low Tech - Public Watching Bankers

Surveillance Reversal

Mechanisms to Prevent Flow

Control to Autonomy

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Blocked Routes of Ring of Steel

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Permeable Space

Barriers to Borders

Minimal obstruction

Literal Transparency

Phenomenal Transparency

Transparency Application *Apologies to Colin Rowe and Robert Slutzsky 99


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Precedents At various stages throughout my thesis development and building design precedents have been the key to unlocking the technique to achieve the desired effect. Here are a selection of precedents that I was influenced by in the making of my project.

Precedent #1

Precedent #2

ANZ Bank - New Zealand Bank’s HQ offers open space and views throughout the bank.

The principles behind Herman Herzberger’s Centraal Beheer building offered techniques on how to create an open and comfortable work place for my bank.

Precedent #3

Precedent #4

Precedent #5

Ralph Erskine’s Byker Wall Scheme guided the idea of realising an ultra homely presence to my residential block.

Will Alsop’s Sharp Centre for design enabled me to recognise the potential of a raised mass in terms of prominence and structure.

The Barbican centre is one of the only residential areas in the City, I used this seemingly utopian project to help guide the nature of my accommodation as an island in the City.

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Proposal


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Proposal This thesis is centred on the culture of banking in the City of London, culminating in the design of an ethical bank, that focused on social values, democratic systems, and transparency in the metaphorical sense.

Surveillance Section Diagram

The building is the headquarters of a co-operative bank that has been commissioned in order to restore trust in the banking industry after the failures and scandals that have come to the fore in the aftermath of the economic downturn. My proposal offers an alternative to the kinds of institutions that caused the crash. It uses the current architectural and idealistic visions of the City as a base point to set a new series of intentions. Reversing or altering this language to create a new dynamic institution out of the ashes of the crisis. To name a few, these intentions include surveillance reversal, inclusive instead of exclusive architecture, metaphorical transparency and diversity of user groups; averse to the mono-culture currently in place in the City. The project looks towards sustainable and ethical banking, that involves people from many backgrounds, offers a place for these people on site, in either residencies or business opportunities, using this presence to help set up the notion of the connectedness between financial decisions and the impact this can have on communities and their everyday lives.

Vertical Circulation Diagram

Mass 2 Diagram

STAGE 6

The bank focuses on giving people an alternative, in terms of its policies on ethical investment, democratic principles and socially driven funding. The architecture offers an open and transparent view into the banking world that does not currently exist within the financial industries in the Square Mile.

Mass 1 Diagram

Social Market Souks Diagram 105


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parti diagram

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Surveillance in proposal

Bank

Residential

Panopticon SECTION

INTENDED SURVEILLANCE

The building section is key to understanding how the building works.

This diagram is how surveillance works in my building, The larger bubbles reflect where the most surveillance happens. Here you can see that unlike the previous diagram of surveillance the boardroom and management is under the greatest surveillance of all.

From here you can see how from the ground floor the viewing tower of “The Stump� can be accessed. From the tower, views in and through the building are revealed through strategically placed glazed floor openings, The section also demonstrates how the banks tiered form allows views across and down through the building.

STAGE 6

The major surveilled programmes are feature on the lower floor of the bank. To take the boardroom for example, views in to the boardroom are possible from all upper levels and from below through floor openings. Also being on the first floor it is open directly to the public, so in theory anyone could literally go and knock on the door.

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MASSING The building sits at the epicentre of the financial high-rise cluster to the east of the Bank of England. When determining the proportions of the building it was essential that the building typology spoke a different architectural language to the surrounding institutions, It was important that it didn’t become another unapproachable monolithic tower with little character of place, but at the same time it could not be too gentle as to disappear amongst its context. LEVELS The ground plane is open and unobstructed by the mass of the building. It could easily work as my agora space explained previously in the document, and would host a market for the businesses invested in by the bank. The first raised mass from the ground level is a residential block, this contains social housing and has a public garden roof terrace. The roof is an important zone of encounter between the residents and the bank workers. The upper block is dedicated to the financial institution, the bottom floor of this block acts as a public deck for investor exhibitions, the middle floors are open office space for the pragmatic functions of the bank. The upper most floor is a retail branch of the bank, encouraging the public up and through the building.

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PUBLIC ROUTE TO RETAIL BRANCH Axo reveals route through the building, demonstrating the points of engagement between the various parties that use the bank. The Multi-programmatic aspect of the bank inherently condenses people into a define space. I was interested in what impact these groups can have on each other and what way it could be used to change the culture of finance in the City.

STAGE 6

SOCIAL HOUSING The residential scheme would work as social housing. The bank would lend money to the prospective home owner with the option to eventually pay off their mortgage.

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1. Bishopsgate and Social Market Agora

3. Bank - Public Exhibition Plaza 2. Social Encounter Level

UNWRAPPED ROUTE The route through the building is a key aspect of the design. This building ask the questions about whether our trip to work can indeed effect the way we work. It can be said that our environment can alter the way we behave, the idea of the ever present public, people going about their everyday lives, is something that the commuter hub of the City is lacking. Introducing a route that puts people at the fore enables a mind-set, conscious or subconscious, that the decisions made internal have an impact that reaches beyond it’s walls.

Public space

Bank Worker

Public

This daily route is a reminder of exactly that. Resident

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4. Bank - Retail Bank Branch

Social Encounter

space

Bank - Workplace and Exhibition

Bank - Office Levels

Roof Terrace

Bank - Exhibition Level

Public service

STAGE 6

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Bank - Retail Branch

Viewing Tower Home

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Public Access Diagram Blue indicates general public access

VERTICAL CIRCULATION AXO The vertical circulation building is concentrated primary cores.

of the into 5

As it appears on the AXO the 2 cores to the left of the drawing are the main circulation to reach the bank from the ground level. The other cores are until the residential roof plane serve the residence of the building.

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INVASION

SOCIAL MARKET AGORA

It was import for me that the project had a wider influence than that of its site boundary. The difficulty was that whatever intervention was made it had to also cater for the functions that currently existed in the area. My idea was to take advantage of the changing use of the urban fabric in weekday compared to the weekend.

The Marketplace would originate from the open space underneath the raised forms of the bank and residencies. It will be hosted here during the week and expand during the weekend attracting different user groups to the site, including tourists and shoppers. This will help diversify the area and create a use for the area out of working hours.

During the weekend the City is under used due to it’s commuter hub status. Therefore a expanding market could be undertaken in the streets surrounding the Ethical Bank. This would work by affording the businesses financed by the bank a stall in which to offer their product of service. This would see a dramatic change in the area as the temporary and informal structures expand along Bishopsgate and toward the Bank of England down Threadneedle Street.

VIEWS AXO

STRUCTURAL AXO

The bank level is design to enable views across the building but also up through the building from the residential deck and the viewing tower of the Stump.

This axo reveals how the primary structure works. A series of columns support the residential and bank blocks.

The board room appears at the centre of the Bank Exhibition Plaza and can be viewed by all workers, the public who travel to the top level retail bank branch or from below due to a floor opening. Surveillance determining building.

is a key feature of behaviours in the

STAGE 6

A transfer structure is in place at the bank level to carry loads through to the ground plane. This was important to enable the structural grid to be altered for the bank block, allowing an optimum arrangement for surveillance, transparency and openness.

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MARKET EXPANSION

WEEKDAY

As the bank grows in popularity this will be apparent by the size of the market place, offering a different means of being transparent about the banks success.

The Marketplace could offer commuters services and products that will be much appreciated by workers on the way to work. The location of the bank is key to this success as it’s central location could offer the perfect opportunity for someone to pick up a coffee on the way to work, or a lunchtime snack during a break.

PROGRAMME BANK AXO The upper block of my building is functionally a financial institution, headquarters of the Ethical Bank. It deals with investment banking, trading and stocks. It’s approach to this is directed by the stakeholders in the bank, the people with accounts with the bank, working much like the Co-operative Bank. Customers decide who is invested in. Other programmes in the top block include, a retail branch of the bank, a cafe, an exhibition floor for seasonal exhibitions and cinema for similar exhibits. 114


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WEEKEND

PROGRAMME RESIDENTIAL AXO

The ambition of the weekend market is a foreseeable outcome for this location. The City of London is crying out for more use during off-peak hours, serviced excellently by the transport network in London there is no reason why people from all over Greater London should come to the market. Alongside this there is a lack of places for tourists to spend money in the City during the weekend when most people visit. St Paul’s is just a short distance away so crowds of people from that location could gravitate towards the market.

The residential block sits below the bank. It offers social housing of varying sizes to families in need of housing in the London housing crisis. Each apartment has its own basic functions and includes a generous balcony as a garden area. There is also a small primary school at the centre of this block providing education for local children, the school has optimally arranged classroom for good light and views. The school also has a library that is used by the children during school time, but is open to the residents after hours, it is accessible from both sides. This level also has a roof terrace that works as a route to the upper bank but also provides school children with a unique playground and the residents a great external space for out door activities such as gardening or walking the dog.

STAGE 6

BUILDING AXO Combined the building offers a unique 2 tiered architecture that uses the program of each block to compliment or stand against the other. In a way they are juxtaposed to clearly symbolise their internal difference, a criticism that is levelled at many of the neighbouring buildings. However, the idea of travelling through one to get to the other sets up a connection to the everyday life that is lacking in financial institutions. 115


1. APPROACH AND MARKETPLACE AGORA

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STAGE 6

2. Social Encounter Level

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3. Bank - Public Exhibition Plaza

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STAGE 6

4. Bank - Retail Bank Branch

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Roof

68m

Lv. 13 64m

Lv. 12 60m

Lv. 11 56m

Lv. 10 52m

Lv. 09 48m

Lv. 08 44m

Lv. 07 40m

Lv. 06 36m

Stump 32m

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Lv. 5

24m

Lv. 4

21m

Lv. 3

18m

Lv. 2

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Lv. 1

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North Eastern Elevation


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STAGE 6

North Eastern Section

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LEVEL 0 - Entrances - Social Market Agora

Stump viewing tower

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LEVEL 1 - Residential and School (Classrooms)

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LEVEL 5 - Roof- Social Encounter Level

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LEVEL 6 - Bank - Public Exhibition Plaza

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LEVEL 2 - Bank

LEVEL 1 - Bank

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1

2 5

3 4 Bank Material Use 1. Roof glazing system on aluminium upstands. 2. Aluminium panel frame 3. Corrugated polypropylene 4. Aerogel fill 5. Concrete downstand beam 6. TROX floor diffuser 7. Aluminium Bracket 8. Cable tray STAGE 6

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LEVEL 9 - Bank

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LEVEL 5 - Roof

LEVEL 4 - Resi.

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LEVEL 2- Resi. 2 1

3

Residential Material Use 1. Breeze block 2. Scotswood pine timber cladding 3. Electronically operated blind 4. Rockwool Insulation 5. Ceramic spacer and steel reinforcement STAGE 6

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LEVEL 1 - Resi.

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VENTILATION - RESIDENTIAL The residential block will work with natural ventilation via operable windows. Note that the windows also have electronic blinds for solar shading.

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VENTILATION - BANK The financial block will work with mixed ventilation, fresh air will be introduced via diffusers in the floor and extracted through vents into a double skin facade.

STAGE 6

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stage 6 research Jan 12 - Jan 13


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Project Title: Learning Environments Location: Gosforth Wood/Longbenton Date Started: Jan 12

linked research stage 5&6 semester 2&1

Learning Environments is a Linked Research module. This research was initiated by the Natural History Society of Northumbria who approached Newcastle University in the view of discovering if a learning facility could be established within Gosforth Park Nature Reserve. The fundamental idea of the learning facility would not be about promoting the popularity of the reserve, but rather to use the reserve to foster budding wildlife enthusiasts, and stewards of the precious land within the NHSN’s care. A research team consisting of Master of Architecture students established to discover the potential of the envisaged space within the reserve.

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The team established a connection with Longbenton Community College where it was possible to engage first-hand with educators, and most importantly, children, who were deemed the most significant user group. This contact was an opportunity to discover the parameters and potential for an appropriate facility in Gosforth Park Nature Reserve. The research team adopted a cyclic methodology within the scope of participation action research. This entailed working collaboratively and reflectively with the parties involved to seek to understand the needs particular to learning environments. “…inquiry and action evolve and address questions and issues that are significant for those who participate as co-researchers” (Reason and Bradbury, 2008, p. 1) It was essential that a concerted effort was made to integrate participation (life in society and democracy), action (engagement and experience) and research (soundness in thought and the growth of knowledge) in our work. A cyclic process was established by the team that initially took to designing the workshops, and then putting those plans into action. Upon obtaining feedback from the various parties involved, a period of reflection would ensue, discerning the factors of the experience to influence the design of the subsequent engagement. 6. Research

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To this end a series of workshops were designed and delivered at the school and at the nearby reserve. The focus was to engage children spatially, in order to determine their behaviour, abilities, knowledge and responses in both locations. The workshops were designed with the intention of learning from the children and their inclinations in the space; observing their engagement in a range of environments, but particularly in the classroom and the nature reserve. This method would enable us to observe the children’s actions and simultaneously use the engagement to impart our understandings of architecture and the natural world as a means of education. Often the location of the workshop itself would facilitate the potential for learning, for example workshops based in the reserve could be inherently learnt from through exposure to them. This first-hand research was the first step in defining exactly what a facility could be and what the next appropriate step was for the future development of the reserve. The challenge lay in translating their actions into an understanding of required architecture. Was it an outdoor classroom, for example, or a changing facility, perhaps simply a light-touch shelter? Or maybe it was inappropriate to build anything. 6. Research

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The focus of my own particular research is to examine and establish connections between the Biophilia Hypothesis, popularised by Edward O. Wilson, and spaces for learning, particularly an environment for young children. This essay intends to: 1. Establish the current understanding of biophilia and how it can be implemented to enhance the understanding of the natural world. 2. Draw from research and first-hand field work to found my own evidence of biophilic and biophobic tendencies in children. 3. Use this knowledge to make design suggestions on how learning environments can be positively impacted by the biophilic process. The outcome of this research is a book documenting our experiences and subsequently makes suggestions combining knowledge from the engagement and from individual areas of research and findings. research

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M.Arch Academic Portfolio