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Adam Feldman

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Portfolio of Works 2009-2013

university at buffalo b/a+p


[Works] Performance Spectacles MACKAY

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Pathways of Uncertainty GAMBETTA

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CURT

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ARC

302

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SPRING

2012

Main St, USA KENNY CUPERS | ARC 201 | FALL 2011

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KEN

ARC

403

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FALL

2012

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Striated Deformation

MICHAEL ROGERS | ARC 301 | FALL 2011

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[Info] adam feldman eight waydale drive dix hills, ny 11746 (631)4553490 adamfeld@buffalo.edu buffalo school of architecture and planning bachelor of science in architecture

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UB 2020

Introspective Perceptibility

NEREA

FELIZ

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KENNY CUPERS | ARC 201 | FALL 2011

The Living Wall

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WILL RANSOM | ARC 102 | SPRING 2011

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ARC

202

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SPRING

2011

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[Performing Spectacles] Prof. Ken Mackay | Arc 403 | Fall 2012

Given the task of designing residential units in the center of one of Buffalo’s thriving districts, we were asked to think of a secondary program which could be incorporated into the design process, leading to a residential space fit for an intended user. After creating said environment, we were then asked to resolve fundamental issues within an actual built project, such as structure, fire rating, and heatling/ cooling systems. The result, a space which both functions successfully, but is also conceptually sound. Looking into the Elmwood site, a lively art scene is apparent. But after closer analysis of the overall Buffalo area, it is clear that a performing arts center is missing. Studio spaces, galleries and even music halls are already present in Buffalo but there are minimal spaces devoted to theater, performace art and the visual spectactle that is engrained in “art�.

typology

spatial platforms

I also began to question the relationship between performer and audience and how many new performances are doing just the same, and need a space which allows for them to raise such a question. As a member of the audience, we are expected to act a certain way both physically and mentally. But these walls, which have been built up over decades, are all figments of our imagination, cast upon us by social norms. What type of space would be necessary to allow the performer to interact with the audience, or quite possibly switch roles with the audience, allowing performer to become spectator, and spectator take center stage?

proposal


[TYPOLOGY]

Delving deeper into the idea of performace, I began to look at the theater typology and the needs of a performer within said space. From proscenium to arena, a large portion of the past has been devoted to the fixed placement of seats which force the theater-goer to experience the event in a specific manner. But just as the typology has evolved, so has the idea of a “performance” and the visual spectacle that comes along with it.

Architecture cannot inherently contain performance. Performance itself is a spatial containment. - Dorita Hannah

[Spatial Platforms ] With performer in mind, I developed a platform system which allows for ultimate flexibility for both peformer and audience, the main goal remaining to give the performer as much freedom as possible for his or her performance. With a fluxuating grid system, platforms can be combined to create large stages or separated to create multiple performance spaces OR viewing platforms. These platforms can also be manuevered to accomodate traditional theater, such as proscenium seating if need be. Movable benches and bleachers can then be configured on top of these platforms in order to allow for the audience to comfortably enjoy the show. The platforms are also designed in a way in which they can be separated to be used as completely segregated practice spaces when a performance is not going on. A traditional catwalk complete with theatrical lighting is at the top of the grid system, allowing every performance to be displayed accordingly.


[Design Proposal ]


[Pathways of Uncertainty] Prof. Curt Gambetta | Arc 302 | Spring 2012

Site(South Park)

Focusing on systems and organizations in architectural design, we were asked to consider the growing and evolving roles of time itself in the design process, planning, construction and use of complex, often hybrid programmed buildings. The Buffalo Botanical Gardens, located in Buffalo’s South Park, is in need of more space to fulfill their ever-growing needs. As an institution which prides itself not only on its extensive collection, but also its ties to the surrounding community, the BECBG plans to expand into South Park and further its interactions with the overall Buffalo/Niagara region. Unfortunately, over the past several decades South Park, like many of the parks associated with the Olmsted Parks System in Buffalo, has faced several challenges, forcing the “Olmstedian mindset” to dissipate. But the need for a mental and physical escape from the constant stresses of daily life has not.

olmsted’s process

Green Space

centrifugal centripetal Waterways

point/path What does it mean for one to be able to meander through

nature as means of escape? Once-prevalent ideas of South Park being treated as one cohesive garden, with specified programs (BECBG) intertwining in order to make up a larger programmatic network, must be reconsidered. Using these original ideas of Olmsted, which are already ingrained in the foundation of the park, and amending them to fit the needs of today’s society allows for the pathways of connection to take priority, establishing a set of rules for future additions in order to form a “dialectical landscape” once again.

Railways

becbg proposal Olmsted Park System


The Olmsted Parks System is an extensive plan which spans over the entire city of Buffalo, connecting five major green spaces to one another through a parkway system which interweves throughout the cityscape. Looking into the history of South Park and the overall city of Buffalo, one can start to see Olmsted’s mindset take shape. A city once plagued by the effects of industrialization was in need of a place which can allow for a tranquil experience within the typical hectic day. In order to resolve these issues, Olmsted created “worlds-within-worlds” in which one can experience “nature”.

1869

Olmsted’s ideas would later become the ideal example of one of two major city/park planning strategies; “The Centripetal City” and “The Centrifugal City”. Although Olmsted and his followers(centripetal) believed that their resultant parks and cities aquired the most unique identities and experiences, their oponents(centrifugal) argued that “nature” cannot be created and an attempt to do so is creating a mockery of something that was once so beautful.

PHASE ONE

1915

PHASE TWO

[OLMSTED ’S PLAN ] Transition from the City

Variation of Topography

[OLMSTED ’S STRATEGIES] Separation of Program

Incorporating Building Form


A park can no longer be seen as a “thing-in-itself”, but rather a process of ongoing relationships existing in a physical region - the park becomes a “thing-for-us. - Robert Smithson


[CENTRIFUGAL]

manhattan “The grid is not only predictable but indeterminate, not only precise but ambiguous. It is capable of sustaining an order (urban or otherwise) that is simultaneously strong and weak.” - Albert Pope

CENTRIFUGAL GRID : shows an infinite and unlimited expansion in all the directions. It is basically termed as an open system and assumed to not be or have a form of itself. It has an explosive character. It is considered to be a fragment of an vast expansion and can never be understood entirely. The centrifugal city allows for an excape from city life with the placement of parks in the most conjested of areas in order to give immediate relief nearby.

buffalo

RECONFIGURING THE GRID

CENTRIPETA

“In the cul-de-sac city we are right where we have always wanted to be, at the very origin of the spiral, each of our delicate egos seated at the base of a - Albert Pope

CENTRIPITEAL GRID : an enclosed figure. The limits of this grids are known and has an implosive character. The main characteristic of this grid is that has boundries and has an symbolic form and hence is interpreted as a strong icon. The centripetal city provides relief from city life by placing multiple parks on the outer edges of the city in order to create a pull-effect that removes people from the most congested of areas and potentially brings them into the suburbs

[CENTRIFUGAL]

terminal destination.”

CENTRIFUGAL


AL

Point Path

Point

Looking at the current circulation condition at the BECBG, one can argue that the means of progression through the overall space is extremely linear with minimal means of altering the given conditions. Moving from one exhibit to the next is often predetermined and unfortunately results in an experience that is extremely directed.

The intertwining of paths allows for points of destination/program to gain much more importance. Each point of program has multiple means of entry/ exit, leaving the inhabitant capable of altering one’s experience upon each visit. The pathway itself begins to garner a new sense of importance as well.

+

Path

Point Path The pathway, now intertwined with program, begins to create the spaces for specified use within the confines of the given circulation route. The path is now, not only a means of passage, but a destination as well, depending on its placement within the overall BECBG. Just as the path meanders through a typical Olmsted park, the path now has the capability to meander upwards in order to create inhabitabal spaces. The path is converted into a formal constraint for the overall building, rather than simply an area within the constraints of the predetermined building form


KITCHEN

GARDENS

ORANGERY/ EVENT SPACE CAFE

GARDENS EVENT SPACE/ CLASSROOM

GROWING SPACES/ GARDENS GROWING SPACES/ GARDENS INFORMATION AREA/ CHANGING EXHIBIT GARDENS

CLASSROOM

LIBRARY

GROWING SPACES/ GARDENS

GARDENS GARDENS

GARDENS

CLASSROOM

GIFT SHOP GARDENS

GARDENS

GROWING SPACES/ OFFICES


GARDENS

ORANGERY/ EVENT SPACE CAFE

GARDENS EVENT SPACE/ CLASSROOM

GROWING SPACES/ GARDENS GROWING SPACES/ GARDENS INFORMATION AREA/ CHANGING EXHIBIT GARDENS

CLASSROOM

LIBRARY

GROWING SPACES/ GARDENS

GARDENS GARDENS

cuba

florida

cuba

panama

peru

galapagos mongolia malaysia

yangtze

thailand

indonesia

temperate

PARK

climate climate

PARK

geographical location CLASSROOM GIFT SHOP

TR

GA

G R D E N SA R D E N S

E E T A N SI R A NSSPI A C S P A C TIO N TIO N

geographical location florida

GARDENS

temperate tropical

panama

peru

galapagos mongolia malaysia

yangtze

thailand

PLAN A

indonesia

GARDENS

GARDENS

tropical dry

dry

GROWING SPACES/ OFFICES

temperate

tropical sub-tropical temperate

KITCHEN

SECTION B

dry GARDENS

tropical sub-tropical ORANGERY/ EVENT SPACE

dry

breakdown of garden space

interior circulation pathways

CAFE

exterior circulation pathways GARDENS

EVENT SPACE/ CLASSROOM

breakdown of garden space

interior circulation pathways

exterior circulation pathways

GROWING SPACES/ GARDENS GROWING SPACES/ GARDENS INFORMATION AREA/ CHANGING EXHIBIT GARDENS

CLASSROOM

LIBRARY

GROWING SPACES/ GARDENS

GARDENS GARDENS

GARDENS

CLASSROOM


[Striated Deformation] Prof. Michael Rojers | Arc 301 | Fall 2011

Beginning with two textile patterns, one of which found in nature, the other man-made, we are asked to design a functional facade system which could omit light when needed, but allow for natural ventilation and daylight when acceptable as well. Using my interpretation of the textile pattern, I began to analyze “the line� and how a simple curve can form extreme complexities when forced to do so. Rules set in place form concrete standards; a predetermined level of achievement that must be met in order to obtain a specific desired outcome. Once that standard is set, the limitations of this predetermined system, caused by extreme situations become the primary concern.

a set of rules

limits/function


[A Set of Rules ] How can the system react to different environmental conditions? Can this system begin to accomodate realistic human needs and concerns? To begin, I tried to create a series of varying voids based on different regulations set in place. These early tests not only established the assumed result of varying sizes of voids, but revealed a type of reverb effect which occurs through the system. In order to make room for the initial reaction, the system expands and contracts, leaving large gaps as well as areas of high density. To begin defining these limits I looked towards my second pattern to find a simplistic yet effective answer. The apparent grid-like network formed by the interconnection of nodes and glands exemplifies how the simple task of joining points results in a fairly complex visual form. Using this idea of “the grid�, I experimented with boundary points in order to test how the line will react when given a specific command with pre-established limitations.


Section A

Primary/Secondary Systems

Structural Grid


[Limitations/Functionality ] In order to expand upon these basic sets of parameters, I started to look into finding not only the capabilities of the system, but its boundaries as well. Learning what the limits of extremities may be enables me to have better control of the system overall. While studying how light would react with the system, the idea of achieving 100% darkness as well as complete brightness brought me to twisting the strip, allowing for light to be both blocked and diffused. This addition brought about a new set of questions which resulted in new moves as answers. The question of vertical vs. horizontality arose as well as the idea of the transition between the two. What types of moves are needed in order to create the intended effect and how many different moves are available through the system in order to achieve that specific result?


[Introspective Perceptibility] Prof. Nerea Feliz | Arc 202 | Spring 2011 With lack of limitation being the primary design concern, we were asked to rethink space and develop a set of rules which emphasize how a concept can morph and evolve depending on size and scale, all while avoiding any programmatic or site elements which generally have an effect on design. Using the efficiency of one material, I begin experimenting with the characteristics of tinted glass and the ability to layer multiple panels in order to create a transition from total transparency (the outside world) to complete opacity (the inner room). Depending on the size of the space, more layers equated to a larger transition, which resulted in a darker space. These “skins within skins”, or “onion-like” casings also allowed for a form of directed circulation, emphasizing the importance of the passageway itself and where this corridor could lead the inhabitant.

society of rooms

After creating a set of regimented instructions for design, the idea of the Mosque as a typology was introduced. Although “the Mosque” has its own set of rules for which one must abide, most do not concern form, which allows the two sets of rules to merge cohesively. Beginning with the idea of “suggested” circulation paths that guide the user, layers are added in order to establish a hierarchy of program, as well as a transition from exterior to interior. The importance of the corridor becomes more apparent as the layers of glass multiply and split in order to establish endless choice, rather than guided paths. Instead of forcing those inside, the user can now choose which passageway suites him or her best, making the basic idea of circulation an experience in itself. Once inside, the multiplication of layers also allows for a transition from public to personal/private space.

mosque proposal


[Society of Rooms] Each room introduces new unforseen qualities. As the scale of the room increases, so does the quantity of layers surrounding the inner space. Ultimately, “the room” , which started as simply a space with four walls , transforms in a series of corridors, connecting to make up a greater whole; one continuous pathway. The addition of new layers and increase in area creates new spatial affects, changing the way one experiences the innermost space, which now becomes a room-within-a-room. More importantly, the idea of the spatial effets of the transitional space prove to be just as interesting as the inner room, if not more crucial. Visually, the passageway from exterior to interior begins to reveal the innermost space while slowly removing the user from the exterior world they came from. Just as the innermost areas begin to gain detail as the user indulges on one’s curiousity, the exterior world, once familiar to the user, starts to lose visual detail and become less clear.


Exterior Views of Site

ACTIVITY/ COMMUNAL

582

PRAYER

55 584 586 588

Student Body

Student Body

TRANSITION sPACE

590

592 594 596

S eSeparation p a r a t i o n ooff Space Space

Implications of the Site

Form through Program

of Buffalo City Cofi t y Buffalo

READING

BATHROOM

BATHROOM

MULTI PRAYER SHOE

ABLUTION

COURTYARD

KITCHEN

SHOE

ABLUTION

Importance through Layering

Section A

Layers of Program

Layers of the Roof


[Mosque Proposal]

Set in Buffalo State College, the plot of land is sloped downhiill towards a major parkway, but is situated alongside Elmwood Avenue, a thriving district of the City of Buffalo, NY which is full of stores, restaurants and lively people. Across the street from the site one can find a prominent art gallery(Albright-

Knox), as well as a major public park(Delaware Park) designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. Form is derived through an analysis of the site, along with the basic pre-set rules. A courtyard is positioned as the entryway, connecting Buffalo State College and the City of Buffalo to the mosque as well as making a

transition space which begins the passage from exterior daily life, into tranquil prayer. The angled roof condition continues this idea of hierarchy through layering, with sharply angled spaces indicating importance. The angle of each roof is based on the original slope of the site, multiplied.


+ 16 + 12

+ 12

+9

+ 12

+ 16

+ 12

+ 11

+6 + 12

+ 12 + 11

+9

+6 +6

1 16 1 12

1 16 1 12

Axonometric of Levels To p o g r a p h y o f S i t e

Axonometric of Levels

Possible Routes of User

Possible Pathways

Split Section of Possible Passageway

Split section of possible passageway

+6

+1

+1

Circulation Axonometric Circulatory Pathways

Circulation Axonometric


Subtle, but crucial, details allow for the idea of layering to inevitably take shape. No longer is the concept simply “layering of material�, but the effect of that layering and the resultant layering of experience is questioned and emulated, whether it be social or personal. A slit in the roof allows for light to trickle into each pathway, once again emphasizing the importance of circulation as it flushes the walls with a slight glow. Glass panels are cut and mullions are placed in a progression from exterior to prayer space with the spacing gradually shrinking towards areas of importance(prayer). Although the space is defined by the ability to choose, each passage still revolves around the prayer space and inevitably ends in the primary area designated for religious purposes, once again physically expressing how important this journey to introspection truly should be.

Entry A: Circulation through Program

Entry B: Circulation through Program

Circulation through Program


[

]


Current Si


R

S OCIAL :

programmatic spaces inside. The book wall stays continuous, but has enough openings to provide for easy circulation and passageways throughout the library. Structurally, the inverted dome roof passes the major loads down through the bookwall.

Benches are used throughout the market area in order to make an area for rest and relaxation, all while maintaining the hill-like atmosphere created through the landscape entryway. Structurally, the roof is made up of a series of trusses which go from the column to the roof of the marketplace.

ESEA R CH : The basic geometric form of the oval is obscured to create functional spaces within. Generic bookshelves are kept out and the monumental form of a “book wall” creates a new experience along the interior. This wall then curves

The function of the rectangle portion of the building is solely social. Program is represented by one long warped rectangle, which holds shops for

physically relevant as well. Fogged glass around the inverted dome roof allows for light to pass into the center of the “drum”.

S h a p i n g o f B o o k Wa l l


Socia l

Resources/Study

Resources/Study

Resources/Study Entry

Shifts in Form


[Main St, USA] Prof Kenny Cupers | Arc 201 | Fall 2010

Questioning

just how powerful a diagram can be, we were asked to explore the City of Buffalo solely through visual graphics. From infrastructure to population density, what makes Downtown Buffalo “tick”? How does a city accomodate mass influxes of people, commerce and automobiles, or does the city fail to effectively handle these primary concerns? Unraveling the basic elements of Buffalo, I begin to analyze “the city” from districts and transportation, to circulation and population density. After closer analysis, it is not hard to argue that the City of Buffalo is unfortunately far from thriving. A city once known for its grain elavators, steel trade and cultural heritage is often left in decay in certain areas, and even completely vacant in others. What’s even more surprising is that one does not even have to venture out of the primary districts of the city in order to find mass vacancy. In fact, streets which should be successful, based on elementary factors of urban planning, are left in despair.

“Main St, Buffalo” is far from being the ideal “Main St,

USA”. As one ventures into the heart of Buffalo, it is apparent that this street in itself has all of the makings of a successful city-center: 3 primary districts(Theater, Business and Entertainment), Buffalo’s only subway line and closed off to automobiles witihin “primary” areas. But instead of being filled with businessmen, theater-goers and high real estate, Main St. is used more like a NYC subway station. Rather than considered a place of comfort, those in suits flee to sidestreets and those who are attending plays prefer using side-entrances and alternate exits. What is left, the occasional freindly homeless person and an otherwise completely vacant space. Large buildings which should be prime real estate front large “for lease” signs, with the majority of storefronts underneath left completely bare. One can’t help but wonder, why?


[The Living Wall:Eileen] Instructor Will Ransom | Arc 102 | Spring 2010 Team Eileen: Pooja Bhatt, Danielle Andrews, Thomas DeGraff, Juan Andres DeRisio, Adam Feldman, John Lynch

One-hundred first year architecture students designed and fabricated 14 full-scale structures that they occupied for a period of 24 hours. Together these structures form a 100 foot long wall that was subsequently opened to the public. This experience of designing, building and then inhabiting has enabled the students to better understand the consequences of their decisions and to explore the successes and shortcomings of their designs. Each unit was designed to accomodate a simple program; a minimum of three sleeping areas, enough space to walk around and stand upright, and an entry condition. The Living Wall as an educational project was an explortaion into lightweight wood-frame construction, modularity, prefabrication and minimal/temporary living conditions. The finished Wall has acted as a social sponge as it invites visitors to explore every facet of its dense layering of inhabitable spaces that aggregate to suggest a slice of urban fabric in a sparsely populated context.


1”=1’ Modular Model 1”=1’ Modular Model

Massing Axonometric

[Initial Design ] Given a 6’ x 6’ x 8’ box, we are asked to explore the effects of a single cut or shift on an overall mass. The objective is to create a fully occupiable living area capable of holding at least three people all while only using a maximum of two formal shifts. Working in groups, we are pushed to rethink the basic geometry of “the cube” in order to invent new ways of entry, as well as incorporating several suitable sleeping areas within the confined area.

Foam Study Model


West Elevation

Neigboring Section

Massing Axonometric

Neighboring Plan


[Collaboration ] We then begin to experiment with modularization and prefabrication. Each modular must be structurally sound, yet lightweight in order to properly transport the building for reassembly. Although our initial cut in the massing form is extremely complex, the building is broken up into eight simple modules. Each Module is then built in full scale at the University at Buffalo Materials Workshop prior to on-site installation. Not only must we take into account weather conditions, transportaion is an issue in itself. Units must be properly shrink-wrapped and strapped to flat-bed trucks for security.


Section A

Section B

Section C

Weight Diagram

Neighbor Roof Plan


[Design/Build ] Each module must be light enough in order to be easily moved, but sturdy enough to survive the trip to the site. After repositioning, wrapping and loading onto the flat-bed, the project is finally ready for travel. Once the units arrive at Griffis Sculpture

Park, the units are then taken out of their shipping form and rebuilt, module by module. Due to weather conditions and the nature of wood, some modules need to be forced back into place. 1/4� lag screws secure the base module to salvaged railroad ties, which are used as foundation. Once all the modules

are stacked, screwed and bolted together, a final coat of wet-seal is applied in order to help the project maintain harsh conditions. The installation is set to remain at Griffis for the entire Summer season, but we are hopeful the projects are strong enough to remain at the park for seasons to come.

Exploded Structural Axon


88'-0"

6'-0"

48'-0"

6'-0"

6'-0"

6'-0"

6'-0"

6'-0"

4'-0"

6'-0"

6'-0"

6'-0"

6'-0"

6'-0"

6'-0"

6'-0"

2'-10"

36'-0" 6'-0"

East 2'-0"

8"

1'-10"

1'-2"

2'-0" 6'-0"

5'-9"

5'-5"

5'-4"

3'-6"

1'-0"

10"

7"

10"

2'-0"

2'-8"

4'-1"

4'-0"

3'-6"

2'-0"

1'-2"

C

2'-3"

2'-2"

10" 2'-10"

B North

3'-4"

10"

1'-4"

A

D

Fracture (AC)

(Push)+Roll (AC)

ANNEX STUDIOS

2'

3'

Tri-Plex (KC)

The Sheild (KC)

S.S. Hover (WR)

I-Lean (WR)

Triple Double (SL)

Acute House (SL)

Angle Fish (JG)

"Z" (JG)

Akomeogi (NN)

PARKER STUDIOS 1/2" = 1'-0"

1 A01

1'

Twister (JD)

West

F o u n d a t i o nFoundation P l a n Plan 0'

Naterior (JD)

4'

N

5'

1st Floor Cladded Shop Drawings

1st Floor Shop Drawings

2nd Floor Shop Drawings

Neighboring Condition

Weight Analysis/Shop Drawing

The Cobra (NN)

South


Left: Croffead House_Charleston, S.C._Architects, Clark and Menefee Right: Pierce County Environmental Services Building_Chambers Creek, WA_Architects, Miller Hull.


[Construction Tech] Prof Annette LeCuyer | Arc 442 | Spring 2013



Portfolio of Works