Page 1

8812 Xentum IFA Brochure 8pp:Layout 5

3/2/10

10:01

Page 1

is for… Xentum How do you find a financial adviser you can trust?

If

marks the spot... First things first, this guide is genuinely intended to be an objective and impartial means to help you find the right IFA. The reason we know so much about it is because we are IFAs. Slightly obsessive ones at that.

...call Dominic on 0845 226 6971 or email dominic.baldwin@xentum.co.uk to arrange a no-strings chat.

We know there’s lots of bad advice out there – we often have to pick up the pieces for clients who’ve been sold products by IFAs with rather less integrity than ourselves. So we’d like to help make sure people like you are well informed enough to make the right decision from the outset, whether you decide to choose Xentum or not. We’re not saying we’re the right IFA for you, but we’ve certainly given you the ammunition to put us to the test, if you want to.

Are we truly independent? Yes, we’re a small (but perfectly formed), ethically minded, Independent Wealth Manager based in Cheshire with no ties to any company; just good relationships.

Do we charge a fee or commission? Actually, the decision is up to you, although we prefer fees so that everything’s clear, transparent and agreed upfront, and you’re never in any doubt that our recommendations are based on what’s in it for you.

Xentum Limited Bridgewater Court, Lymm, Cheshire WA13 0ER. United Kingdom T 0845 226 6971 F 0845 226 6972

www.xentum.co.uk Authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority.

We take a highly ethical stance and will only accept a fee if our recommendations have borne fruit (which, admittedly, is most of the time). Because of the way we work and the relationships we’ve built, we can usually set up the solutions you need for a similar cost to what you’d pay by going direct; with the added bonus that everything’s sorted out for you.

Will you have one single point of contact? Absolutely, and they’ll always be at the end of a phone.

Are we part of a wider network? Yes, and it’s something we’ve developed with particular care. We have very good relationships with other professionals that we would happily recommend and usually take the lead to co-ordinate the various firms.

Are we suitably qualified? Most definitely. Everything we do comes under the scrutiny of one of our Chartered team members. Our experience is wide-ranging and we also have an ex-solicitor on board who is particularly stringent about keeping everything above board.

Do you actually like and trust us? Well, time will tell, but you’ll only find out by giving us a call and by having a no-strings chat face-to-face. Either way, the most important thing is that you feel confident and comfortable that the firm you choose will help you find a little buried treasure of your own.

marks the spot.


8812 Xentum IFA Brochure 8pp:Layout 5

3/2/10

10:02

Page 2

What’s an IFA and why do you need one? An Independent Financial Adviser is an expert in the complexities of planning personal finances, from pensions to mortgages to savings to investments, with a clear focus on helping to manage your money so that you’re well set up for the future. IFAs have a wealth of experience (pardon the pun) in the financial arena; they know how to structure your finances, which products will best suit your circumstances and can often use their contacts to your advantage.

The right IFA is like buried treasure. Not easy to find, but worth their weight in gold. Hang on a sec though… who says you even need financial advice? Chances are, you’re ticking along quite nicely without, thank you very much. Well, financial advice is a bit like Sky Plus. Once you try it, you can’t imagine how you ever managed without it. Even if you don’t think you’ve got enough assets, or you trust your bank or building society, the right impartial advice can put a very different slant on things. It’s about making the most of what you’ve got and ensuring what you do with your money is most definitely in your long term interests, and not lining other people’s pockets unnecessarily. A truly independent financial adviser (IFA), i.e. someone who’s not tied to any other company in any way, uses their experience and knowledge to maximise what you’ve got. They’ll also look objectively at your assets – which can be spectacularly hard to do when you’re the one who earned the pennies. However, not all IFAs were created equal. And when you don’t know what to look for or what questions to ask, it can be hard to know where to turn and who to trust. Compiled with the help of IFAs, business people, solicitors, the odd self-made millionaire and, most importantly, IFA clients, this guide will point you in the right direction and help you put any existing or prospective IFA through their paces.

Is your financial adviser truly independent? There are three types of financial adviser; tied, multi-tied and independent. The first two have links with specific companies and will only offer you their products, which they may well be receiving commission for. This means you’re not getting totally impartial advice, and may be getting a product that suits your financial adviser more than it suits you. Now things get a bit murky. Some firms claim to be independent, and satisfy Financial Services Authority (FSA) requirements for independence, but when you dig a little deeper, you discover that they’re actually owned by insurance companies, banks and stockbrokers, so their advice is not likely to be quite so impartial after all. To find out whether an IFA is truly independent, you need to check the ownership of the company and make sure there are no sneaky hidden ties that will bias the advice you’re given.

Should you pay a fee or through commission? IFAs can be paid via a fee agreed upfront, or by commission from the providers of the services they set up for you. Being paid by commission doesn’t necessarily mean that an IFA isn’t working in your best interests, but you might find yourself always wondering if their advice is at least partly based on what’s in it for them. The best way to ensure the advice you’re getting is absolutely, 100% impartial is to agree a fee upfront.

Will you have one single point of contact? It’s incredibly frustrating when you’re passed from pillar to post, never speaking to the same ‘adviser’ twice and having to go through your details with a raft of nameless (and seemingly uninterested) customer service bods. So the level of customer service you’re being promised should be a deciding factor in your choice of IFA. Having one key contact, supported by a wider team, means you get continuity and a much better personal service. You should expect your IFA to take time to get to know you and understand your circumstances and finances, which will form the basis of a mutually beneficial, long-term relationship that you should actually enjoy being a part of.

Are they part of a wider network? As times goes by, and you go through life changes, such as moving house or getting married, your finances become part of a bigger jigsaw. This means your IFA can’t operate in isolation; they’ll need to work as a team with other professionals, such as solicitors, accountants, stockbrokers and bankers, to come up with the solutions you need. A good IFA will have a strong network of like-minded professionals that they trust to do a good job for you, and will often act as a co-ordinator, taking the lead to make sure everything happens as it should.

Are they suitably qualified? Underqualified IFAs have been getting away with giving half-baked advice for too long. With the introduction of chartered status (the crème de la crème of financial qualifications) it’s now easier for you to establish whether they really are as good as their word. You should expect at least one member of staff to be chartered, so that the other IFAs in the company can discuss issues with them and benefit from their advice. Although, in the words of Sir Francis Bacon ‘By far the best proof is experience’, so really you need a combination of the two.

Do you actually like and trust them? As well as hard facts, you also have to rely on gut instinct to a certain extent. If you simply don’t gel with a particular IFA, then look elsewhere. Ideally you should be entering into a longstanding relationship with them, so you need to connect on a personal level too. Conversely, don’t be swayed by a persuasive personality when the figures just don’t stack up. Put your IFA on the spot… are they…  Truly independent and not owned by any

kind of financial company?  Are they regulated by the FSA?  Paid by commission or pre-agreed fees?  Offering a personal service from one

allocated adviser?  Chartered and fully qualified, as well as

being experienced?  Part of a wider network of professionals?  People you’d want to have a cuppa with?


8812 Xentum IFA Brochure 8pp:Layout 5

3/2/10

10:02

Page 2

What’s an IFA and why do you need one? An Independent Financial Adviser is an expert in the complexities of planning personal finances, from pensions to mortgages to savings to investments, with a clear focus on helping to manage your money so that you’re well set up for the future. IFAs have a wealth of experience (pardon the pun) in the financial arena; they know how to structure your finances, which products will best suit your circumstances and can often use their contacts to your advantage.

The right IFA is like buried treasure. Not easy to find, but worth their weight in gold. Hang on a sec though… who says you even need financial advice? Chances are, you’re ticking along quite nicely without, thank you very much. Well, financial advice is a bit like Sky Plus. Once you try it, you can’t imagine how you ever managed without it. Even if you don’t think you’ve got enough assets, or you trust your bank or building society, the right impartial advice can put a very different slant on things. It’s about making the most of what you’ve got and ensuring what you do with your money is most definitely in your long term interests, and not lining other people’s pockets unnecessarily. A truly independent financial adviser (IFA), i.e. someone who’s not tied to any other company in any way, uses their experience and knowledge to maximise what you’ve got. They’ll also look objectively at your assets – which can be spectacularly hard to do when you’re the one who earned the pennies. However, not all IFAs were created equal. And when you don’t know what to look for or what questions to ask, it can be hard to know where to turn and who to trust. Compiled with the help of IFAs, business people, solicitors, the odd self-made millionaire and, most importantly, IFA clients, this guide will point you in the right direction and help you put any existing or prospective IFA through their paces.

Is your financial adviser truly independent? There are three types of financial adviser; tied, multi-tied and independent. The first two have links with specific companies and will only offer you their products, which they may well be receiving commission for. This means you’re not getting totally impartial advice, and may be getting a product that suits your financial adviser more than it suits you. Now things get a bit murky. Some firms claim to be independent, and satisfy Financial Services Authority (FSA) requirements for independence, but when you dig a little deeper, you discover that they’re actually owned by insurance companies, banks and stockbrokers, so their advice is not likely to be quite so impartial after all. To find out whether an IFA is truly independent, you need to check the ownership of the company and make sure there are no sneaky hidden ties that will bias the advice you’re given.

Should you pay a fee or through commission? IFAs can be paid via a fee agreed upfront, or by commission from the providers of the services they set up for you. Being paid by commission doesn’t necessarily mean that an IFA isn’t working in your best interests, but you might find yourself always wondering if their advice is at least partly based on what’s in it for them. The best way to ensure the advice you’re getting is absolutely, 100% impartial is to agree a fee upfront.

Will you have one single point of contact? It’s incredibly frustrating when you’re passed from pillar to post, never speaking to the same ‘adviser’ twice and having to go through your details with a raft of nameless (and seemingly uninterested) customer service bods. So the level of customer service you’re being promised should be a deciding factor in your choice of IFA. Having one key contact, supported by a wider team, means you get continuity and a much better personal service. You should expect your IFA to take time to get to know you and understand your circumstances and finances, which will form the basis of a mutually beneficial, long-term relationship that you should actually enjoy being a part of.

Are they part of a wider network? As times goes by, and you go through life changes, such as moving house or getting married, your finances become part of a bigger jigsaw. This means your IFA can’t operate in isolation; they’ll need to work as a team with other professionals, such as solicitors, accountants, stockbrokers and bankers, to come up with the solutions you need. A good IFA will have a strong network of like-minded professionals that they trust to do a good job for you, and will often act as a co-ordinator, taking the lead to make sure everything happens as it should.

Are they suitably qualified? Underqualified IFAs have been getting away with giving half-baked advice for too long. With the introduction of chartered status (the crème de la crème of financial qualifications) it’s now easier for you to establish whether they really are as good as their word. You should expect at least one member of staff to be chartered, so that the other IFAs in the company can discuss issues with them and benefit from their advice. Although, in the words of Sir Francis Bacon ‘By far the best proof is experience’, so really you need a combination of the two.

Do you actually like and trust them? As well as hard facts, you also have to rely on gut instinct to a certain extent. If you simply don’t gel with a particular IFA, then look elsewhere. Ideally you should be entering into a longstanding relationship with them, so you need to connect on a personal level too. Conversely, don’t be swayed by a persuasive personality when the figures just don’t stack up. Put your IFA on the spot… are they…  Truly independent and not owned by any

kind of financial company?  Are they regulated by the FSA?  Paid by commission or pre-agreed fees?  Offering a personal service from one

allocated adviser?  Chartered and fully qualified, as well as

being experienced?  Part of a wider network of professionals?  People you’d want to have a cuppa with?


8812 Xentum IFA Brochure 8pp:Layout 5

3/2/10

10:02

Page 2

What’s an IFA and why do you need one? An Independent Financial Adviser is an expert in the complexities of planning personal finances, from pensions to mortgages to savings to investments, with a clear focus on helping to manage your money so that you’re well set up for the future. IFAs have a wealth of experience (pardon the pun) in the financial arena; they know how to structure your finances, which products will best suit your circumstances and can often use their contacts to your advantage.

The right IFA is like buried treasure. Not easy to find, but worth their weight in gold. Hang on a sec though… who says you even need financial advice? Chances are, you’re ticking along quite nicely without, thank you very much. Well, financial advice is a bit like Sky Plus. Once you try it, you can’t imagine how you ever managed without it. Even if you don’t think you’ve got enough assets, or you trust your bank or building society, the right impartial advice can put a very different slant on things. It’s about making the most of what you’ve got and ensuring what you do with your money is most definitely in your long term interests, and not lining other people’s pockets unnecessarily. A truly independent financial adviser (IFA), i.e. someone who’s not tied to any other company in any way, uses their experience and knowledge to maximise what you’ve got. They’ll also look objectively at your assets – which can be spectacularly hard to do when you’re the one who earned the pennies. However, not all IFAs were created equal. And when you don’t know what to look for or what questions to ask, it can be hard to know where to turn and who to trust. Compiled with the help of IFAs, business people, solicitors, the odd self-made millionaire and, most importantly, IFA clients, this guide will point you in the right direction and help you put any existing or prospective IFA through their paces.

Is your financial adviser truly independent? There are three types of financial adviser; tied, multi-tied and independent. The first two have links with specific companies and will only offer you their products, which they may well be receiving commission for. This means you’re not getting totally impartial advice, and may be getting a product that suits your financial adviser more than it suits you. Now things get a bit murky. Some firms claim to be independent, and satisfy Financial Services Authority (FSA) requirements for independence, but when you dig a little deeper, you discover that they’re actually owned by insurance companies, banks and stockbrokers, so their advice is not likely to be quite so impartial after all. To find out whether an IFA is truly independent, you need to check the ownership of the company and make sure there are no sneaky hidden ties that will bias the advice you’re given.

Should you pay a fee or through commission? IFAs can be paid via a fee agreed upfront, or by commission from the providers of the services they set up for you. Being paid by commission doesn’t necessarily mean that an IFA isn’t working in your best interests, but you might find yourself always wondering if their advice is at least partly based on what’s in it for them. The best way to ensure the advice you’re getting is absolutely, 100% impartial is to agree a fee upfront.

Will you have one single point of contact? It’s incredibly frustrating when you’re passed from pillar to post, never speaking to the same ‘adviser’ twice and having to go through your details with a raft of nameless (and seemingly uninterested) customer service bods. So the level of customer service you’re being promised should be a deciding factor in your choice of IFA. Having one key contact, supported by a wider team, means you get continuity and a much better personal service. You should expect your IFA to take time to get to know you and understand your circumstances and finances, which will form the basis of a mutually beneficial, long-term relationship that you should actually enjoy being a part of.

Are they part of a wider network? As times goes by, and you go through life changes, such as moving house or getting married, your finances become part of a bigger jigsaw. This means your IFA can’t operate in isolation; they’ll need to work as a team with other professionals, such as solicitors, accountants, stockbrokers and bankers, to come up with the solutions you need. A good IFA will have a strong network of like-minded professionals that they trust to do a good job for you, and will often act as a co-ordinator, taking the lead to make sure everything happens as it should.

Are they suitably qualified? Underqualified IFAs have been getting away with giving half-baked advice for too long. With the introduction of chartered status (the crème de la crème of financial qualifications) it’s now easier for you to establish whether they really are as good as their word. You should expect at least one member of staff to be chartered, so that the other IFAs in the company can discuss issues with them and benefit from their advice. Although, in the words of Sir Francis Bacon ‘By far the best proof is experience’, so really you need a combination of the two.

Do you actually like and trust them? As well as hard facts, you also have to rely on gut instinct to a certain extent. If you simply don’t gel with a particular IFA, then look elsewhere. Ideally you should be entering into a longstanding relationship with them, so you need to connect on a personal level too. Conversely, don’t be swayed by a persuasive personality when the figures just don’t stack up. Put your IFA on the spot… are they…  Truly independent and not owned by any

kind of financial company?  Are they regulated by the FSA?  Paid by commission or pre-agreed fees?  Offering a personal service from one

allocated adviser?  Chartered and fully qualified, as well as

being experienced?  Part of a wider network of professionals?  People you’d want to have a cuppa with?


8812 Xentum IFA Brochure 8pp:Layout 5

3/2/10

10:02

Page 2

What’s an IFA and why do you need one? An Independent Financial Adviser is an expert in the complexities of planning personal finances, from pensions to mortgages to savings to investments, with a clear focus on helping to manage your money so that you’re well set up for the future. IFAs have a wealth of experience (pardon the pun) in the financial arena; they know how to structure your finances, which products will best suit your circumstances and can often use their contacts to your advantage.

The right IFA is like buried treasure. Not easy to find, but worth their weight in gold. Hang on a sec though… who says you even need financial advice? Chances are, you’re ticking along quite nicely without, thank you very much. Well, financial advice is a bit like Sky Plus. Once you try it, you can’t imagine how you ever managed without it. Even if you don’t think you’ve got enough assets, or you trust your bank or building society, the right impartial advice can put a very different slant on things. It’s about making the most of what you’ve got and ensuring what you do with your money is most definitely in your long term interests, and not lining other people’s pockets unnecessarily. A truly independent financial adviser (IFA), i.e. someone who’s not tied to any other company in any way, uses their experience and knowledge to maximise what you’ve got. They’ll also look objectively at your assets – which can be spectacularly hard to do when you’re the one who earned the pennies. However, not all IFAs were created equal. And when you don’t know what to look for or what questions to ask, it can be hard to know where to turn and who to trust. Compiled with the help of IFAs, business people, solicitors, the odd self-made millionaire and, most importantly, IFA clients, this guide will point you in the right direction and help you put any existing or prospective IFA through their paces.

Is your financial adviser truly independent? There are three types of financial adviser; tied, multi-tied and independent. The first two have links with specific companies and will only offer you their products, which they may well be receiving commission for. This means you’re not getting totally impartial advice, and may be getting a product that suits your financial adviser more than it suits you. Now things get a bit murky. Some firms claim to be independent, and satisfy Financial Services Authority (FSA) requirements for independence, but when you dig a little deeper, you discover that they’re actually owned by insurance companies, banks and stockbrokers, so their advice is not likely to be quite so impartial after all. To find out whether an IFA is truly independent, you need to check the ownership of the company and make sure there are no sneaky hidden ties that will bias the advice you’re given.

Should you pay a fee or through commission? IFAs can be paid via a fee agreed upfront, or by commission from the providers of the services they set up for you. Being paid by commission doesn’t necessarily mean that an IFA isn’t working in your best interests, but you might find yourself always wondering if their advice is at least partly based on what’s in it for them. The best way to ensure the advice you’re getting is absolutely, 100% impartial is to agree a fee upfront.

Will you have one single point of contact? It’s incredibly frustrating when you’re passed from pillar to post, never speaking to the same ‘adviser’ twice and having to go through your details with a raft of nameless (and seemingly uninterested) customer service bods. So the level of customer service you’re being promised should be a deciding factor in your choice of IFA. Having one key contact, supported by a wider team, means you get continuity and a much better personal service. You should expect your IFA to take time to get to know you and understand your circumstances and finances, which will form the basis of a mutually beneficial, long-term relationship that you should actually enjoy being a part of.

Are they part of a wider network? As times goes by, and you go through life changes, such as moving house or getting married, your finances become part of a bigger jigsaw. This means your IFA can’t operate in isolation; they’ll need to work as a team with other professionals, such as solicitors, accountants, stockbrokers and bankers, to come up with the solutions you need. A good IFA will have a strong network of like-minded professionals that they trust to do a good job for you, and will often act as a co-ordinator, taking the lead to make sure everything happens as it should.

Are they suitably qualified? Underqualified IFAs have been getting away with giving half-baked advice for too long. With the introduction of chartered status (the crème de la crème of financial qualifications) it’s now easier for you to establish whether they really are as good as their word. You should expect at least one member of staff to be chartered, so that the other IFAs in the company can discuss issues with them and benefit from their advice. Although, in the words of Sir Francis Bacon ‘By far the best proof is experience’, so really you need a combination of the two.

Do you actually like and trust them? As well as hard facts, you also have to rely on gut instinct to a certain extent. If you simply don’t gel with a particular IFA, then look elsewhere. Ideally you should be entering into a longstanding relationship with them, so you need to connect on a personal level too. Conversely, don’t be swayed by a persuasive personality when the figures just don’t stack up. Put your IFA on the spot… are they…  Truly independent and not owned by any

kind of financial company?  Are they regulated by the FSA?  Paid by commission or pre-agreed fees?  Offering a personal service from one

allocated adviser?  Chartered and fully qualified, as well as

being experienced?  Part of a wider network of professionals?  People you’d want to have a cuppa with?


8812 Xentum IFA Brochure 8pp:Layout 5

3/2/10

10:01

Page 1

is for… Xentum How do you find a financial adviser you can trust?

If

marks the spot... First things first, this guide is genuinely intended to be an objective and impartial means to help you find the right IFA. The reason we know so much about it is because we are IFAs. Slightly obsessive ones at that.

...call Dominic on 0845 226 6971 or email dominic.baldwin@xentum.co.uk to arrange a no-strings chat.

We know there’s lots of bad advice out there – we often have to pick up the pieces for clients who’ve been sold products by IFAs with rather less integrity than ourselves. So we’d like to help make sure people like you are well informed enough to make the right decision from the outset, whether you decide to choose Xentum or not. We’re not saying we’re the right IFA for you, but we’ve certainly given you the ammunition to put us to the test, if you want to.

Are we truly independent? Yes, we’re a small (but perfectly formed), ethically minded, Independent Wealth Manager based in Cheshire with no ties to any company; just good relationships.

Do we charge a fee or commission? Actually, the decision is up to you, although we prefer fees so that everything’s clear, transparent and agreed upfront, and you’re never in any doubt that our recommendations are based on what’s in it for you.

Xentum Limited Bridgewater Court, Lymm, Cheshire WA13 0ER. United Kingdom T 0845 226 6971 F 0845 226 6972

www.xentum.co.uk Authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority.

We take a highly ethical stance and will only accept a fee if our recommendations have borne fruit (which, admittedly, is most of the time). Because of the way we work and the relationships we’ve built, we can usually set up the solutions you need for a similar cost to what you’d pay by going direct; with the added bonus that everything’s sorted out for you.

Will you have one single point of contact? Absolutely, and they’ll always be at the end of a phone.

Are we part of a wider network? Yes, and it’s something we’ve developed with particular care. We have very good relationships with other professionals that we would happily recommend and usually take the lead to co-ordinate the various firms.

Are we suitably qualified? Most definitely. Everything we do comes under the scrutiny of one of our Chartered team members. Our experience is wide-ranging and we also have an ex-solicitor on board who is particularly stringent about keeping everything above board.

Do you actually like and trust us? Well, time will tell, but you’ll only find out by giving us a call and by having a no-strings chat face-to-face. Either way, the most important thing is that you feel confident and comfortable that the firm you choose will help you find a little buried treasure of your own.

marks the spot.


8812 Xentum IFA Brochure 8pp:Layout 5

3/2/10

10:01

Page 1

is for… Xentum How do you find a financial adviser you can trust?

If

marks the spot... First things first, this guide is genuinely intended to be an objective and impartial means to help you find the right IFA. The reason we know so much about it is because we are IFAs. Slightly obsessive ones at that.

...call Dominic on 0845 226 6971 or email dominic.baldwin@xentum.co.uk to arrange a no-strings chat.

We know there’s lots of bad advice out there – we often have to pick up the pieces for clients who’ve been sold products by IFAs with rather less integrity than ourselves. So we’d like to help make sure people like you are well informed enough to make the right decision from the outset, whether you decide to choose Xentum or not. We’re not saying we’re the right IFA for you, but we’ve certainly given you the ammunition to put us to the test, if you want to.

Are we truly independent? Yes, we’re a small (but perfectly formed), ethically minded, Independent Wealth Manager based in Cheshire with no ties to any company; just good relationships.

Do we charge a fee or commission? Actually, the decision is up to you, although we prefer fees so that everything’s clear, transparent and agreed upfront, and you’re never in any doubt that our recommendations are based on what’s in it for you.

Xentum Limited Bridgewater Court, Lymm, Cheshire WA13 0ER. United Kingdom T 0845 226 6971 F 0845 226 6972

www.xentum.co.uk Authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority.

We take a highly ethical stance and will only accept a fee if our recommendations have borne fruit (which, admittedly, is most of the time). Because of the way we work and the relationships we’ve built, we can usually set up the solutions you need for a similar cost to what you’d pay by going direct; with the added bonus that everything’s sorted out for you.

Will you have one single point of contact? Absolutely, and they’ll always be at the end of a phone.

Are we part of a wider network? Yes, and it’s something we’ve developed with particular care. We have very good relationships with other professionals that we would happily recommend and usually take the lead to co-ordinate the various firms.

Are we suitably qualified? Most definitely. Everything we do comes under the scrutiny of one of our Chartered team members. Our experience is wide-ranging and we also have an ex-solicitor on board who is particularly stringent about keeping everything above board.

Do you actually like and trust us? Well, time will tell, but you’ll only find out by giving us a call and by having a no-strings chat face-to-face. Either way, the most important thing is that you feel confident and comfortable that the firm you choose will help you find a little buried treasure of your own.

marks the spot.


8812 Xentum IFA Brochure 8pp:Layout 5

3/2/10

10:01

Page 1

is for… Xentum How do you find a financial adviser you can trust?

If

marks the spot... First things first, this guide is genuinely intended to be an objective and impartial means to help you find the right IFA. The reason we know so much about it is because we are IFAs. Slightly obsessive ones at that.

...call Dominic on 0845 226 6971 or email dominic.baldwin@xentum.co.uk to arrange a no-strings chat.

We know there’s lots of bad advice out there – we often have to pick up the pieces for clients who’ve been sold products by IFAs with rather less integrity than ourselves. So we’d like to help make sure people like you are well informed enough to make the right decision from the outset, whether you decide to choose Xentum or not. We’re not saying we’re the right IFA for you, but we’ve certainly given you the ammunition to put us to the test, if you want to.

Are we truly independent? Yes, we’re a small (but perfectly formed), ethically minded, Independent Wealth Manager based in Cheshire with no ties to any company; just good relationships.

Do we charge a fee or commission? Actually, the decision is up to you, although we prefer fees so that everything’s clear, transparent and agreed upfront, and you’re never in any doubt that our recommendations are based on what’s in it for you.

Xentum Limited Bridgewater Court, Lymm, Cheshire WA13 0ER. United Kingdom T 0845 226 6971 F 0845 226 6972

www.xentum.co.uk Authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority.

We take a highly ethical stance and will only accept a fee if our recommendations have borne fruit (which, admittedly, is most of the time). Because of the way we work and the relationships we’ve built, we can usually set up the solutions you need for a similar cost to what you’d pay by going direct; with the added bonus that everything’s sorted out for you.

Will you have one single point of contact? Absolutely, and they’ll always be at the end of a phone.

Are we part of a wider network? Yes, and it’s something we’ve developed with particular care. We have very good relationships with other professionals that we would happily recommend and usually take the lead to co-ordinate the various firms.

Are we suitably qualified? Most definitely. Everything we do comes under the scrutiny of one of our Chartered team members. Our experience is wide-ranging and we also have an ex-solicitor on board who is particularly stringent about keeping everything above board.

Do you actually like and trust us? Well, time will tell, but you’ll only find out by giving us a call and by having a no-strings chat face-to-face. Either way, the most important thing is that you feel confident and comfortable that the firm you choose will help you find a little buried treasure of your own.

marks the spot.

Guide to finding a good IFA  

A simple easy to read guide on how to find a good IFA