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ADAM BUEHLER


 

 



 







AS AN ARCHITECT, CURIOUS THINKER, AND ENGAGED CITIZEN, I WANT TO DESIGN AND BUILD ARCHITECTURE THAT HAS MEANING, FUNCTION, BEAUTY, AND POSITIVE COMMUNITY PURPOSE.


STATEMENT

Evolving architectural aspects important in my design process: FACING

SIMPLICITY OF FORM AND ARCHITECTURAL GESTURES

FEDERAL

Doing more with less. Instead of trying to make so many design moves or make a project be too many things, my intention (and challenge) is to exercise restraint and simplify the signals that I give to the person experiencing the architecture, reserving significant gestures for special moments so that they are appreciated, and giving space to breathe in between.

MATERIAL INTEGRITY AND HONESTY I appreciate projects that feel real and I hope to practice that awareness of material integrity. Walking through a stone colonnade and knowing it is stone vs. wondering if it is a synthetic material that just looks like it might be stone are two very different experiences. I want to be a part of experiences that feel real.

EXPERIENTIAL RESPONSIVENESS IN DESIGN Designing for the experience of the client, the user, instead of for myself or other architects/designers. I hope to focus more of my design thinking on the feeling of the space, what it does to people and why. The experience of looking through a window is more important than what the window looks like itself.

COLLABORATION

LOW LEVELS OF PRESCRIPTIVENESS, MINIMAL ARCHITECTURAL INTERVENTIONS We, as architects can design too much. We can solve the “problem” too well in that our clients and users of our buildings don’t have the opportunity to choose their own way to interact with the spaces and built structures. Offering areas of openness where there is not a prescribed way to circulate or use the space opens up a higher sense of engagement and participation within an architectural experience.

SOCIAL CONNECTION/COLLABORATIVE DESIGN As architects and designers I believe that we have a responsibility to engage in social issues and to use our knowledge and skills to better the lives of others. I am particularly interested in the power of collaborative design especially with low income and socially marginalized and disinvested communities where architect and user engage in creative dialogue to come to a solution together, learning from each other in the process.

ALLIED LIVING


CONFLUENCE HALL

PROJECTS

HOUSE FOR AN ARCHITECT MUSEUM OF PROJECTION ART

NEXT STAGE COLLABORATIVE ABSTRACT


design/build

Instructor: Rick Sommerfeld | Studio IV (ARCH 5140 ) | Spring/Summer 2017

CONFLUENCE


HALL

shelter. rejuvenate. connect.


Just south of Moab, Utah the Colorado Outward Bound School (COBS) has a hub where staff work and rejuvenate between their expeditions leading youth on hiking and rafting trips. We designed and built the Confluence Hall community center with a focus on linking the interior and outdoor spaces. Confluence Hall allows for programmatic flexibility, shields from the sun and wind, uses structure efficiently, and highlights a palette of honest materials while linking contextually with the rest of the site.


window detail

dining area, kitchen beyond

north patio, ďŹ re pit and oculus above

west concrete wall


west concrete wall construction

cantilevered concrete patio slab process

shade structure, hung stair, and roof waterprooďŹ ng

getting dusty cutting in score lines


FACING FEDERAL

Instructor: Chris Koziol | Studio IV (ARCH 5140 ) | Spring/Summer 2017


džOWHU. activate. connect.


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Addressing issues of gentrification as our city densifies is a challenge. In Villa Park, just west of Sun Valley the neighborhood is changing. This project is a mixed use development with commercial and community spaces on the th he ground g ound floor gr floo oor and oo and “missing mis issi sinng ng middle” midddle le m multi-unit ulti ul ltii uni n t housing h us ho u inng abbov ove. ee.. The com mmu muni nity ni tyy pla lazaa andd roo ooft ftop ft opp zon ones es con es onne nectin ne ctingg to the he act ctivvatted ctiv ed allley eywa w y aree me wa m annt to ser ervee the nee eeds d andd ds desi de siirees of the ressid i en ents ts and sur ts urro roun ro undi un ding di ng pub u lil cc.. 1

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“You start to see the loss of historic and special places that made a neighborhood unique. We lose the soul of our city or at least those areas of town, and when those things are threatened, you begin to lose a little bit of who you are as a city.� -Mayor Michael Hancock on gentrification in Denver

Morphology

Opening Sides to Pedestrians

Screening from Federal

Circulation and Views Through

Entrance from Federal

Letting Sunlight In

Open Space Programmable in Multiple Ways

Garden

Food

Art

Film

Commercial/Community

Community Pop Up Space


competition

ALLIED LIVING

inspire. express. connect.

Collaboration: Joel Miller, Stacy Ester, Nora Bland, Will Dolenshek HUD Innovations in Affordable Housing Design Competition | January-April 2018


Just outside downtown Dover, New Hampshire an innovative community of seniors and persons with disabilities knows the meaning of home. Within this space residents connect with each other and with the larger Dover community. Allied Living pushes the boundaries of what is commonly thought of as affordable housing.

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1. Residences (180 1br + 14 2br = 194 total units) 2. Community gardens 3. Dining patio 4. Outdoor amphitheatre 5. Walking path from Court St. to Cricket Brook 6. Sensory garden 7. Rain garden amphitheatre and gabion walkway 8. Cricket Brook canopy bridge 9. Resident gathering/flex spaces and enclosed greenhouses 10. Local nonprofit meeting and work spaces and activity corridor 11. Primary vehicular drop-off and parking (125 spaces) 12. Unprogrammed green/open space 13. Interior Community Social Node



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View looking south (1) from Edgar Bois Terraces towards the bridge over Cricket Brook and the gabion wall rain garden and seating area below the overlooking community/events space.

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Community Garden view looking north towards Edgar Bois Terraces (2). Raised planter beds are easily tended to by residents in wheel chairs. The green house area, events space, and surrounding indoor/outdoor spaces change and flex depending on the needs of the community.

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Community Building entry view (3). The large glass entry and gable roof lines are intended to represent “home” for residents as well as connect with the historical architecture of the area and the Edgar Bois Terraces to the north.

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simplify. open. expand.

design/build Instructor: Rick Sommerfeld | Intro to Design/Build (ARCH 6370) | Fall 2017

NEXT STAGE


COLLABORATIVE


Across from the Buell Theater in the Denver Performing Arts Complex, our team of design/ build students worked to transform a small rundown commercial space into the Next Stage Collaborative art gallery. This was my ďŹ rst design/build project and it opened my eyes to the challenges of translating design into construction. I learned the importance of simple, clean design- and only making things complex when it is necessary and meaningful to do so. We stripped the carpet and resurfaced the concrete oors, created movable display wall and kiosks, designed and installed new lighting, fabricated the signage, developed a new ceiling grid with Dibond paneling- all while taking into consideration the building code requirements and a short 3 month time frame.

art gallery in use with digital work by students of CU Denver’s College of Arts + Media

entryway with sign/light connection


before

during

after


The crafts of model making and hand drawing offer a different understanding of space and form beyond what can be expressed via computer. I strive to keep these analog skills in practice alongside their digital counterparts.


COLLABORATION IS HARD Within the design/build projects our teams frequently ran into hurdles around communication, group work dynamics, and perceived expectations. I am curious about how creative teams work best and what skills/practices yield positive results. I reached out to colleagues for their thoughts:

“I have found that I tailor my communication style and expectations of people depending on their personality since you can only change how you react/what you do as opposed to trying to change them.”

“From experience, I have found that design by committee is pretty inefficient. What you need is a design by platoon, by which I mean there has to be someone at the top acting as ‘captain’.”

Levi Jette, SHKS

“I think collaboration is especially difficult amongst architects/space designers, due to the thick thread of art woven into an architect's duty and mindset, not to mention there really are as many solutions as there are eventual/potential users.”

Cynthia Fishman, KTGY

“Establish roles and responsibility boundaries but allow as much latitude as possible within those roles.”

Andy McRae, 4240

Tim Gemperline, 4240


MUSEUM

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Instructor: Rick Sommerfeld | Studio III (ARCH 5130) | Fall 2016


OF PROJECTION ART


CONTEXT: DENVER PUBLIC SPACES

CONNECTING THE DOTS

PROGRAM ANALYSIS engaging public spaces between two parks

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all along the cherry creek trail there are highly

the site lies between two major public spaces in denver- Confluence park and civic center park. There is an opportunity to engage another public space along the cherry creek trail where many locals and visitors walk and bike.

public along visible public artmurals pieces. mainly murals, these artworks show denver’s civic pride in creativity and outside public artCherry viewable by all. Creek

office rest room rest room rest room rest room gift shop

VIEW CORRIDORS

GATHERING lobby

reading room

cafe/ catering

natural convergence node

ence and gathering space exists for te. In this area there is a strong public convergence.

cherry creek long,reetomshort, heading both utheast. A thin slit wide, and des a view to the have front narrowuildings views site as well.

community room

PUBLIC SPACES


The Museum of Projection Art located at 14th and Wazee, Denver, celebrates the mediums of film, video, and light projection by engaging public and private audiences both inside and outside. Jenny Holzer’s large scale works projected onto sides of buildings influence the public exterior spaces on the site. Bill Viola’s videos inspire galleries that enclose the viewer and let one focus inward.

public spaces + PROGRAM

MUSEUM OF SPATIAL ARTS: PHASE 2.1 INTERPRETATION ADAM L BUEHLER, ARCH 5130, SOMMERFELD, FALL 2016

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the natural convergence of circulation in the northwest area of the site provides an ideal location for an outdoor gallery space. the public spaces within the museum lend themselves to border the outdoor public zone and the creekfront. Private spaces fill out the rest of the site.

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outdoor public space opportunity demands a larger outdoor gallery outdoor gallery rest room rest room

outdoor gallery

PUBLIC SPACES + PROGRAM

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gallery

gallery

gallery

work/prep room

gallery

gallery

conference room

gallery storage

PRIVATE SPACES

GALLERY SPACES

gallery

LOBBY RECEPTION OFFICE ELEVATORS PUBLIC RESTROOMS FREIGHT ELEVATOR COMMUNITY ROOM GIFT SHOP CAFE CATERING small GALLERIES large GALLERY OUTDOOR GALLERY OFFICES CONFERENCE ROOM WORK/PREP ROOM PRIVATE RESTROOMS STORAGE

opaque indifferent TRANSPARENT

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PRIVATE NEUTRAL PUBLIC

office

scatter indifferent gather

gallery

dim indifferent brigth

office

enclosure indifferent exposure

gallery

short term occupancy flexible long term occupancy

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PROCESS

site analysis and strategy

site modeling

oorplan iterations

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ABSTRACT


I feel that the power of abstract art is in its openness- its ability to welcome each person- whoever they are. and wherever they are coming from. Bring that person in and offer them a chance to look back at themself. My paintings evolve as I work- I rarely start a painting with an idea in mind. One step leads to the next. One color suggests another color to follow. One shape calls for another one to overlap it. I look for shapes. colors. textures and spaces that compliment each other. that work well together to form a cohesive and balanced whole. For me this process and action of putting marks on the canvas surface is just as important as the finished piece. In studying and practicing architecture I try to bring in this intuitive and open process that I practice while painting.


a nine panel mixed media piece for Hampton Inn/Homewood Suites hotel, Denver (10’ x 32’)


ADAM BUEHLER

adam.buehler@gmail.com 303.847.8473 www.artistadambuehler.com

Profile for adam.buehler

Adam L Buehler print portfolio april 2018  

Adam L Buehler print portfolio april 2018  

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