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ADAM BOWEN ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO


This book contains projects done during my academic career at the University of Colorado at Boulder and the University of Oregon in Eugene. There are two things that capture my imagination most in design: (1) The simple and orderly organization of space and ideas and (2) The inimitable deterioration and evolution of those designs as nature, time and people fight the constrains of rigid order. I like to think that my projects balance these two interests. Thank you for your time.

-Adam Bowen


“In anything at all, perfection is finally attained not when there is no longer anything to add, but when there is no longer anything to take away.”

- Antoine de Saint Exupery

“Keep it simple, stupid”

-Unknown


INDEX


01 29 45 59

STUDIO ARTS BOULDER CAMPUS PORTLAND SCHOOL OF THE STUDIO ARTS BOULDER DEMONSTRATION FARM

MIXED MEDIA

13 41 51 63

RIFT: A COLD WAR MUSEUM

CRISSCROSS LOUNGE CHAIR

REFLECTION BRIDGE

ADAM BOWEN INFO


01

STUDIO ARTS BOULDER CAMPUS

VALMONT BUTTE BOULDER, CO, USA PARTNER - COLIN OSTMAN INSTRUCTOR - ROB PAYATT UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO STUDIO 3 - SPRING 2011

Work was done in collaboration with Studio Arts Boulder in order to figure out potential needs and design options for their future campus. Research was done on the sites that Studio Arts Boulder are actively pursuing and student work is to be used to gain community interest and to raise funds for this much needed community program. The first interest building event was held at the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art where this project was on display for hundreds of visitors.


The driving force in this campus design is to create a studio arts campus that encourages creative collaboration between the different studio art disciplines. The site is located on Valmont Butte, east of Boulder, Colorado. The butte is exposed to the harsh year around weather leaving behind an overwhelmingly vast and barren landscape. Also, there is currently an important Native American historical site that sits on the butte just above the studio campus. The courtyard campus is our solution to the needs of the clients, the Native Americans, and the unique site characteristics.


The courtyard is used to create an outdoor space s. t is sheltered from the RAertharsh surrounding landscape t Prin and interact outdoors. The that allows people to work architecture ois d sited to direct circulation and view W o corridors while creating a small micro climate within the al al cs Met Met ami courtyard. The is surrounded by the diff erent Cercourtyard Cafeleaving a void space for collaboration between studios Cafe the different disciplines. People continuing through the campus to the historical preserve are directed past the gallery and courtyard giving them the opportunity to experience the studio arts.

PRIVATE

Metal

3024SF

Ceramics

4032SF

Administration Store Cafe Gallery

500SF 864SF 800SF 2000SF

e/Ga

Stor

SEMI-PUBLIC

llery

y

er

PUBLIC

s. t s. t s. t RertiRsertis Rertis A A A

. s. s. RetsiR ste stRe st Ar Arti Arti t t t in in Pr Pr Prin

d d d Woo Woo Woo al al al MetMet Met

ics icsamics am eram CerC Cer e e e f f f a a a C C C

Stor

Stor

Stor

s. t s. t s. t RertiRs ertis Rertis A A A

t t t PrinPrin Prin d d d Woo Woo Woo al al al MetMet Met e afe Cafe CafC

ics ics ics m m m ra era era e C C C

al al al MetMet Met e afe Cafe CafC

ics ics ics m m am ra ra r Ce Ce Ce

y er all e/G y or er St all y e/G er or all St e/G or

The buildings are split to create a courtyard that frames the western view towards the mountains.

d d d Woo Woo Woo

t t t PrinPrin Prin

St

y er all e/G ry or e St all y e/G er or all St e/G or

St

llery

llery

e/Ga

llery

e/Ga

e/Ga

The required program is organized from public to private and positioned to utilize the topography

Woo

all

3024SF

e/G

Wood

or

1200SF 3024SF

St

Resident Artist Print

PP P

Primary and secondary circulation cut through the campus connecting the parking lot, campus and Native American landmark.


RK

A ICAN LANDM R E M A E IV T NA ACCESS TO

B

A C

RY

N

AI

M A. CAMPUS SITE B. NATIVE AMERICAN LANDMARK C. ABANDONED MINING MILL D. HISTORICAL CEMETERY

TE

SI

T EN

D


SITE PLAN 5’

30’

15’

A

N

50’

D AA

C B F

G E A. ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE B. METAL STUDIO C. WOOD STUDIO D. PRINT MAKING STUDIO E. CAFE F. COURTYARD G. CERAMIC STUDIO H. GALLERY I. STORE

H P

I


SITE SECTION AA

A.

Corrugated metal roof designed to allow northern light to illuminate the gallery

B.

Steel structural system

C.

Load bearing rammed earth walls

D.

Plaster partition walls and built in cherry cabinets


Prevailing winds provide natural circulation

Landscaping provides a micro climate within the courtyard

Rainwater catch basin provides water for landscaping and nonpotable plumbing

Pottery storage shelving diffuses direct sunlight while displaying the artwork outside the studio


Gallery


Cafe and gallery (top left) Wood studio (top right) Typical classroom (bottom right)


13

RIFT: A COLD WAR MUSEUM

TITAN 1 MISSILE BASE CHICO, CA, USA INSTRUCTOR - KEVIN NUTE UNIVERSITY OF OREGON STUDIO - WINTER/SPRING 2012/13

All over the United States are unseen remains of the Cold War. Trapped 60 feet underground are the tunnels, silos and domes of the Titan 1 Missile Program, forgotten monuments to what may have been the most dangerous weeks of human civilization. The cold war is the story of two super powers split by suspicion, competition and propaganda. But it is also the story of the people and smaller countries that got caught up in the fray and trapped on one side or the other. The goal of this design was to tell the story of the events of the cold war in an environment that captured all the tension, uncertainty and scale of the times, while also telling the story of the individuals, citizens and societies that suffered the rippling repercussions of those events. A. Launch Silo B. Propellant Terminal C. Equipment Terminal D. Control Center Dome E. Entry Portal F. Powerhouse Dome G. Powerhouse Air Filtration Facility H. Powerhouse Exhaust Facility I. Personnel Tunnel J. Antenna 1 K. Antenna 2


A

A

A B

C

G

E

F H

D I

J

EXISTING STRUCTURES

K


ENTRY LOOKOUT (VIEW 2)


PROBLEMS... Site is completely land locked on all sides by another piece of property. One easement road is the only entrance and exit onto the site.

The missile silos are by far the most impressive spaces in the complex. They are 40 ft diameter tubes that go 160 ft into the ground. Being in these spaces provides an overwhelmingly beautiful and humbling experience, but fitting usable program into these spaces could be difficult.

The soil on site is heavily disturbed. Almost the entire site was dug up then back filled in when the original complex was built so the top soil has almost no nutrients to support large vegetation. Also, chemical pollution is a concern from activities done in the complex.

There is only one entrance to the existing complex. The existing circulation throughout the complex happens at 60 ft below grade and the hallways are only large enough for two people max. ADA regulations were not taken into account during original construction. There is also no natural lighting in much of the complex. There is only one entry on to the site. The site is close to the airport, but far away from the city center proper and the highway. How do we get visitors to the museum and how do we get them to come back a second and third time? What do we contribute to the community?


30’ 90’

180’

N 300’


PROPOSED SITE


... SOLUTIONS Excavate portions of the existing structure to let natural daylight illuminate some rooms. Terrace the excavations so that when it does rain, water can be collected for landscaping and non-potable plumbing

The personnel tunnels are 60 ft underground... open up slices of tunnels all the way up to the ground level to give visitors an understanding of the depth, lengths and extent that the government went to build the original complex

Use exposed antenna silos, that are far away from main complex, as entry gate. Visitors begin to interact with the existing complex before they even get out of their car

A 3 stage planting plan to add nutrients to the soil, bring back native species and increase stability of soil

STAGE 1: Erosion Control -Geotextile -Monkey Flower

STAGE 2: Small Brush -Coyote Brush -Western Raspberry

STAGE 3: Large Brush -Buck Brush -Toyon


CONCEPT

GEOMETRY OF THE EXISTING

The Cold War was fueled by a gap in understanding and fear between each side. This museum’s goal is to teach both sides of the story so that we may all become more understanding and tolerant.

The geometry of the new built is derived from the existing Titan 1 silo complex

VIEW 1


PROGRAM DISPOSITION

CIRCULATION

USSR GALLERY

WELCOME PLAZA

USA GALLERY WAR IN MODERN TIMES GALLERY

Visitors arrive at the southern most point of the complex where they first get a sense of the enormity of the project. From the welcome plaza they have the option to enter the museum spaces or the administration building.


USSR GALLERY

5

MAIN GALLERY TUNNEL

AUDITORIUM BOOKSTORE CAFE

4 WAR IN THE MODERN DAY GALLERY

1

2

ISOMETRIC PLAN 1”-150’

N

USA GALLERY

P

3

LOBBY ADMINISTRATION CLASSROOMS SPECIAL GALLERY WORKSHOP


The complex is separated into two general program zones. All the administration and educational spaces exist within the first excavation. This allows for quick access and non museum events too all take place in one area and do not interfere with the gallery experience. The gallery spaces now can act alone, allowing the visitor to fully feel the emotional qualities of the spaces and exhibits without any distractions. When the visitor enters the main gallery hall, they are immediately overwhelmed by the scale of the space. The walls begin below them as they move along the walkway and stretch all the way up past the level of grade. These walls are not only tall, but also lean in on the visitor increasing the feeling of tension and uncertainty. Much like during the times of the cold war, the visitor is wary that at any moment everything they know could fall in on them. In this space the visitor looks down on exhibits depicting events of the cold war, exhibits and events that look different depending on which wall you are standing on. If the main gallery space becomes too overwhelming, the visitor can seek retreat in the more human scaled side galleries that run across the main hall. These galleries tell the stories of the characters and citizens affected by the cold war. Here is where visitors learn how people actually felt about the events depicted in the main hall gallery in an attempt to put a human face on the tragedy of war.


SIDE GALLERY (VIEW 4) (above) HOMELAND GALLERY (VIEW 5) (right)


Further down the main hall the visitor can choose to venture down into the gallery spaces dedicated to the homelands of either the USA or USSR. In these galleries there are exhibits depicting how the societies, environments and economies of either nation were affected by the cold war. At the end of the main hall lies the ‘War in the Modern Day Gallery.’ Here visitors interact with ever changing and relevant exhibits that relate what they have previously seen with events and problems that are currently happening in the world around them.


29

PORTLAND SCHOOL OF THE STUDIO ARTS PORTLAND, OR, USA INSTRUCTOR - DONALD CORNER UNIVERSITY OF OREGON STUDIO - FALL 2012

The Portland School of the Studio Arts was an opportunity to build upon ideas and concepts originally explored in the Studio Arts Boulder campus project. The driving force of the design remains constant from one project to another, proving a campus that promotes random interacting and collaborative opportunities. Inside the building this is achieved by having wide halls and common spaces, as well as very transparent studios that allow for process work to be seen by any and all building inhabitants. The idea was always that students could learn and be inspired not only from their teachers, but their peers as well.


Though major themes remained constant between projects, the challenge was realizing them in these two completely different locations and lot sizes. The Boulder project was perched on the side of the Valmont Butte, which provided an abundance of space and views to capitalize on, but faced certain environmental challenges and problems with distance from the city center. The Portland project had quite the opposite site challenges. Located in the middle of downtown, in the historic Pearl Neighborhood, the tiny 100’ x 100’ site had to hold twice the program space as well as respect the neighbors and fit the neighborhood vernacular.


MAIN STUDIO CIRCULATION


SECTION A


SECTION B


B

1ST

1ST MEZ.

NORTH ELEVATION

2ND


3RD

4TH

WEST ELEVATION

5/6TH

7TH

SOUTH ELEVATION

18’

3’ 9’

30’


MAIN ENTRY LOBBY


41

CRISSCROSS LOUNGE CHAIR

INSTRUCTOR - GABRIEL TAN UNIVERSITY OF OREGON FURNITURE STUDIO - SUMMER 2012

The crisscross chair is an attempt to make a chair as simple as possible that gives the most sitting positions to the most amount of people. The design process started from the ground up… literally. The floor is actually one of my favorite places to sit, butt on the ground, back against the foot of a sofa. Its simple, stable, solid and provides an unlimited amount of leg and back positions (depending on pillow options). So when it came time to design a chair, I took these values to create a welcoming and friendly piece of furniture that not only allowed you to cuddle up on it, but also encouraged you to put your feet up. The question I kept asking myself at every design choice was ‘can I crisscross my legs on this thing.’ The materials for the piece were sourced as locally as possible. It is build of Oregon white ash, Oregon white ash veneer, wiggle wood and Pendleton wool from Pendleton, OR.


45

BOULDER DEMONSTRATION FARM In the Renaissance arts, “Arcadia” was celebrated as the

BOULDER MUNICIPAL CAMPUS BOULDER, CO, USA INSTRUCTOR - SHAWN EDMONDS UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO STUDIO 1 - FALL 2010

unspoiled harmonious wilderness, it being the fruitful, beautiful and secluded area that separated the safety and social order of the urban cities from the wild and dangerous Barberia. The Boulder Demonstration Farm is meant to connect the urban core of downtown Boulder, CO with the wild, unkept Boulder Creek. Along with the farmland that makes up the site, the farmhouse it’s self also keeps with the spirit of connecting the urban and wild. The animal pens and human spaces, though in separate structures, share a common roof. Moving glass walls that provide a seamless connection between the food being processed and the land in which it was grown surrounds the lower workspace. And the office is housed in a glass box protruding from the structure to provide and external reflection space that burrs the lines between the build and the wild.


SITE PLAN

15’

80’ 45’

125’


3 PM SHADOW STUDY

Research was done on crops, crop rotation and livestock in order to solve the problems that one might face when laying out an urban farm. This theoretical example is home to pigs, chickens and cows, all with ample living and grazing room. These animals also help to handle the waste of the farm and provide fertilizer for the crops, all in an attempt to make the farm completely self sustainable.

Shadow studies were conducted to assure that all crops and built spaces received ample daylight throughout the day and year.


9 AM SHADOW STUDY


ROOF PLAN

2ND FLOOR PLAN

1ST FLOOR PLAN 1”- 20’


EAST ELEVATION

NORTH ELEVATION

WEST ELEVATION

SOUTH ELEVATION

SECTION A 1”- 20’

SECTION B


51

REFLECTION BRIDGE

BOULDER MUNICIPAL CAMPUS BOULDER, CO, USA INSTRUCTOR - SHAWN EDMONDS UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO STUDIO 1 - FALL 2010

The goal of this project was to create a structure that has two distinct spaces, one for internal reflection and one for external reflection, that are blurred together but still distinctly different. At one point of the day the sun illuminates the part of the structure closest to the walking path encouraging group interaction. In the later part of the day, the further end which extends over the creek below is illuminated. This area is now separate from the walking path by shadow and encourages individual reflection.


SITE PLAN

WEST ELEVATION


53

MIXED MEDIA

ISOMETRIC - INK ON STRAPHMORE SECTION CUT - INK ON MYLAR SPRING 2009


INK & MARKER ON STRAPHMORE SPRING 2009


INK & MARKER ON STRAPHMORE SPRING 2009


59


INFO

Adam Bowen 10606 Woodhaven Lane Bellevue, WA, USA 98004 adam.somers.bowen@gmail.com 206.979.1292


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