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ADAM BARNSTORFF ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO


How you climb a mountain is more important than reaching the top. Yvon Chouinard


Adam Barnstorff barn0448@umn.edu 920.530.9119

1212 University Ave SE Apt 108 Minneapolis, MN 55455

lake nokomis community center

1

k(Not) architecture

2

heath ceramics

3

materials and methods

4

textile center

5


1

lake nokomis community center

This project called for a new community center for Lake Nokomis in Minneapolis, MN that was designed based on inspiration from the site. When experiencing the site for the first time I became intrigued with the interaction of a walking path along the edge of the lake. The tree line obscured the view of the lake most of the time, but did allow intermittent views to the lake. When designing the community center, I explored how the building could grow out of this edge condition, and incorporate the tree line into the design. The building extends into the landscape to work at a larger scale across the site. Half walls were placed throughout the site to provide seating for users on the walking path and the beach.


above: perforation of edge site scale below: perforation of edge building scale

above: site and building plan


above: view from the beach

above: view from gathering room below: lake elevation


above: experiencing the edge


2

k(Not) architecture

This was a project of interpretation. Starting with a knot and through several different iterations I was able to interpret movement of the knot into organized space, design the underground space, and understand how light affects space. The knot used in this project was a sheepshank. The knot was symmetrical and made up of vertical loops that are held together by horizontal bindings. In my abstraction of the knot, I was able to convey the two main features of the knot throughout the project. I designed an underground space that was inspired by the sheepshank knot. The organization of space and movement through the space was based on the vertical loops and horizontal bindings. As the space was designed, I incorporated the use of natural light within the structure and explored how light interacts with each space making it livable.


above: volumetric of underground space


above: focused light from above

above: movement in section

above: light flooding from above


3

heath ceramics

This project was an exploration in materiality. The project called for a new complex for Heath Ceramics located in the warehouse district of Minneapolis, MN. The complex was to be made up of two buildings, one serving as a showroom and the other a ceramics factory. In the first stage of this project I explored the two buildings as separate entities. I created MDF boxes that later developed into a concrete showroom. The factory was created by using Vierendeel trusses. By exploring these two construction methods, I learned that each material has limitations.


After exploring each part of the complex individually I explored how the two buildings could have a conversation with one another. The two buildings are created on the same grid and joined together by a mass. The mass connecting the two buildings form an outdoor courtyard that serves as the entrance to both buildings. The L-shaped courtyard was created by adding a wall, limiting the street access and directing the users attention to the factory. By creating an entry in the courtyard, it encourages occupants of the complex to interact with both buildings.

above: exterior courtyard spaces


4

materials and methods

This was a precedent study of the Icon Solar House designed by a team from the University of Minnesota for the 2009 solar decathlon. Through this project a classmate and me were able to explore the structural system and the construction methods used. The project called for a series of detailed drawings and one 1’ = 1.5� model. I was interested in how this structure was designed and built in Minnesota, taken apart, and then shipped to Washington DC for the completion. This had numerous impacts on the design and construction of the house. The trusses that supported the roof had to work in compression as well as tension. This also created an interesting joint that had to be resolved where these pieces met. The team created a tongue and grove joint that worked in compression where the roof came down to meet the wall.

1156 sq. in.

Alcove

Mechanical A: 35 sq ft

W/D

A: 35 sq ft

Office A: 31 sq ft

R

Kitchen A: 106 sq ft

DW

Living / Sleeping A: 213 sq ft

Dining A: 92 sq ft


above left: roof structure being compressed above right: roof structure being lifted below: as built photos


60 MIL EPDM OVER ROOF SHEATING FILL WITH CLOSED CELL POLYURETHANE SPRAYFOAM INSULATION LAPPED FLASHING 2X8 WOOD PURLINS @24” O.C. GALVANIZED PITCHED GUTTER

1” FOIL FACED POLYISO WITH FOIL TAPE ON WARM SIDE 1/2” PLYWOOD SILL SEAL

1/2” PLYWOOD 1/2” GYPSUM BOARD

2X4 STAGGERED STUD FRAMING 1” FOIL FACED POLYISO WITH FOIL TAPE ON WARM SIDE FILL WITH CLOSED CELL POLYURETHANE SPRAYFOAM INSULATION 1/2” PLYWOOD SHEATHING WATER RESISTANT MEMBRANE

1” FOIL FACED POLYISO WITH FOIL TAPE ON WARM SIDE FILL WITH CLOSED CELL POLYURETHANE SPRAYFOAM INSULATION 2X4 STAGGERED STUD FRAMING WATER RESISTANT MEMBRANE GALVANIZED FLASHING BELOW MEMBRANE

1/2” RADIANT HEAT SYSTEM 3/4” WOOD FLOORING 2X8 WOOD RIM JOIST WATER RESISTANT MEMBRANE FILL WITH CLOSED CELL POLYURETHANE SPRAYFOAM INSULATION 1” FOIL FACED POLYISO WITH FOIL TAPE ON WARM SIDE ADJUSTABLE STACKED 1 1/8” PLYWOOD

above : wall section left: scaled model 1.5” = 1’ 0”


1/2” GYPSUM BOARD FILL WITH CLOSED CELL POLYURETHANE SPRAYFOAM INSULATION 1/2” TRESPA SLAT RAINSCREEN 1” FURRING STRIPS WATER RESISTANT MEMBRANE 2X6 HEADERS PREFINISHED METAL FLASHING ALUM. GYP. CORNER TRIM

1/2” PLYWOOD JAMB HEAD 1/4” SHIM SPACE

TRI PANE WINDOW LOW E W/ ARGON FILL PREFINISHED METAL SILL

TAPERED, TREATED WOOD BLOCKING 2X6 PLATE CAP

We chose our model section to show how the foundation, walls and roof come together. The team created a tongue and grove joint that worked in compression where the roof came down to meet the wall. Since this building was dismantled and transported, the junction where these partitions came together was an unique design feature of the project.

2X4 STAGGERED STUD FRAMING

1/2” PLYWOOD SHEATHING

above: window detail below: detail model photographs


5

textile center

In this project I explored how programming could shape an architectural project. The project was to redesign the Textile Center of Minnesota that would allow for an expansion of their current facility. While exploring the textile center, I discovered there were three levels of program; public, semi-public, and private. The three different levels of privacy in this project fueled my choices of materials in creating three forms on the site. Each was represented with varying transparencies. The private spaces were organized into a solid mass. Semi-public spaces were elevated off street level, and the public spaces on the street level were an extension of the street.

carve space out of private mass

respond to future growth

insert floor slabs


right: 1st floor plan far right: 2nd floor plan

mask semi-public programming

transparent street level


The facade of this building was designed to mask the majority of the semi-public program in the translucent glass shell. It is only during special occasions and events that the facade of the building would be back lit to begin to reveal the activities within the shell. The back lighting of the facade became a major part of the design of the building. It could become an iconic feature that would attract attention and growth to this revitalizing area of University Avenue.

below: longitudinal section


THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION

Adam Barnstorff Portfolio Spring 2014  
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