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ARCHITECTURE Adam Andrejasich University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Table of Contents Program Types -Theater for Performing Arts -Boutique Hotel -School of Art and Design -Fish and Algae Farm -Institute for Environmental Biology -Museum -Culinary Arts College Work Experience -Civil Engineering -Energy Auditing -Sustainable Thinking Other Skills -Sketching -Photography Summary -Resume -Structure Classes

Undergraduate and Graduate Work

Fall 08 - Spring 12

U.S.A., South Korea, France

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Paris, France

Chicago, Illinois

Seoul, South Korea

Ithaca, New York

Empire, Illinois


Paris - Performing Arts Theater

Chicago - Boutique Hotel

Ithaca - School of Art and Design

Seoul - Fish and Algae Farm

Chicago - Institute for Environmental Biology

Empire - Museum of the Grain


Round Theater

Theater for the Performing Arts

This was the first long-term project of my undergraduate education. Given ten weeks to complete, a fellow classmate and I had to create a theater for the performing arts in the 14th district of Paris able to seat 200 people. Besides some zoning regulations, the only other main restriction was the largest tree on the site had to remain. Rather than let this be an obstruction, it became one of the main influences for our theater, allowing for a better integration of the public space with the private space of the theater. The act of building around the tree is what inspired the curve forms that make up the theater. Of this partner project, I was responsible for the making of the models (study and final), helping clean up some CAD drawings, in designing the exterior public spaces, and helping lay out the final board. All of the renderings shown were done by my partner.

Todd Mackinson - UIUC

Fall 08

Paris, France

Professor Alejandro Lapunzina


Public Improv

Boutique Hotel

This last project of my undergraduate education was the capstone project. Within this one project, much of the knowledge I have obtained up until this point in my undergraduate education was summed up and tested. The assignment was to create a boutique hotel in the Edgewater neighborhood of northern Chicago. Located a block away from the beach and surrounded by several types of residential buildings, the program for our hotel had infinite possibilities for my peers and I to choose from. The program I chose was music based. One of Chicago’s contributions to society is its role in the music culture. From jazz festivals to performances held at bars downtown, music of some form plays a role in daily life. However, since the site is located in such a residential section, music venues are harder to come by without having to travel farther into the city. So in turn, I created a space that serves not only as a hotel, but also as a performance area for local groups.

Fall 09

Chicago, Illinois

Professor James Warfield


By having three different modules be the controlling factor of the form of the building, the slight shift in their orientation produces slits in between each space. These slits allow light from the outside to come in. To continue the movement that can be associated with music, circulation changes per floor. Lastly, to add a sense of improvisation to the hotel, the jazz musicians perform in a different location every day. It is the room itself that helps create this sense of improvisation. By having operable walls located in all of the large rooms, the hotel user has the opportunity to create their room space within a certain limit, thus creating several varieties of room layouts. Lastly, by allowing the user to control the amount of light that can enter their room, the movements created with the change in shading systems create an ever changing facade for the hotel.


With light openings from all angles, the atrium will always have some daylighting. Then at night, in the absence of daylight, the atrium is still lit up, with the light coming in from the rooms that surround it.

South Elevation

East Elevation


As seen in the plans above, the small performance nook is at a different location per floor. From the atrium, this room appears to be just another hotel room, but when it comes time for a performance, the walls will slide away, revealing the performance nook and allowing the music to be heard all throughout the atrium.


The fifth floor differs than the rest by having more than one performance nook. This allows larger performances to take place.


The New Tompkins School of Art and Design (TSAD) This studio examined how adaptive use design and sustainability can help transform the post-industrial landscape into new centers for the innovation economy. This studio used the abandoned Ithaca Gun Factory on Gun Hill in Ithaca, New York. The factory was adapted for a new use—the Tompkins School for Art and Design. The new program featured studio spaces for industrial art and design, shops, display galleries, lecture class rooms, an auditorium, a dining hall, and residential apartments for faculty and students. The site and building allowed for opportunities to develop site design skills as well as new ways to explore both materials and structure. The factory is located near the top of Gun Hill adjacent to Fall Creek Gorge and Ithaca Falls and there is a hundred feet grade difference between the top of the site and the bottom of Fall Creek. Some of the main principles explored in this studio were preservation, sustainable and urban ideas, such as ecological urbanism, closed-loop design and urban metabolism. The Ithaca Gun Factory will be adapted into TSAD. TSAD is a newly established art and design school whose mission is to teach fine arts and industrial design while respecting the natural scenery of Ithaca and the factory’s industrial heritage . TSAD aspires to be an accredited college providing bachelor degrees in the fields of Communication Design, Drawing, Illustration, Painting, Industrial Design, Fabrics, Ceramics, Sculpture, Printmaking, Digital Design and Interior Architecture. They are interested in teaching students to create in environmentally sensitive ways. Their motto is: “Nature leads, art follows.”

School of Art and Design

Fall 10

Ithaca, New York

Professor Paul Kapp


The one element of the studio, which we discovered within the first week of class, was that the actual site no longer existed. It was destroyed a year earlier, to make room for an apartment housing complex that was being developed. So while this did take some of the exictement out of working with an abandoned building, the destruction brought about a new element to the studio, that of forensic investigation. As we did not have any floor plans or sections for the building, it was mine and two others responsibility to determine the exisitng structure based off of the following photos we found.


Scaling Infrastructure

Fish and Algae Farm

This advanced studio focused on emerging technology of large‐ scale symbiotic fish‐algae plants and was developed on a maritime site in South‐East Asia. The first half of the semester focused on creating a Master Plan for all infrastructural and program components of a symbiotic plant. Algae-Fish Symbioisis “If we intend to be serious about a sustainable nutritional future for humankind, we need to consider the partial replacement of meat products with seafood. Additionally, seafood cultivation needs to shift from feeding technologies currently focused primarily on fish products, so‐called by‐catch (small fish), to those that provide fishmeal by algae and their byproducts. Algae are best produced in a “factory” environment where not only clean, controlled conditions can be assured, but where the plant is exposed to the most favorable temperature range, carbon dioxide supply, and pH level. The dried algae plant material will be used as algae feed for large‐scale aqua cultures. The farming of fish is the most common form of aquaculture. It involves raising fish commercially in tanks, ponds, or ocean enclosures. Fish species raised by fish farms include salmon, bigeye tuna, carp, tilapia, catfish, and cod.”

Eric White - UIUC

Spring 11

Seoul, South Korea

Professor Ralph Hammann


Modular aquaculture in Seoul, Korea, emphasizes in creating an economical, aesthetic, and productive aquaculture fish farm. Through analysis of the site and climate conditions, the orientation and footprint of the building became apparent. The layout of the building allow for the fish halls to be split up into two communities in case of any infection or impurities in one area. The admin section is placed within the algae and fish hall areas to overlook production and allow for the labs to have continuous quality control over the algae being fed to the fish and the fish being shipped for processing. The algae bioreactors only need 10% of the sun’s light to produce at maximum level; however, we wanted to provide as much sunlight across a large area making our building angled toward the south. Raising up the Algae pods with the drying beds inside allow for the fish halls to be below them for easy distribution to the tanks. Economy appears in the project when comes to construction. Precast concrete is the main material in construction of the build making it a quick process and quality ensured. The system comprises of hollow core slabs that are .3m thick and span for 11m. The bay sizes in the structure are 8m by 11m. This bay size allows for easier access to the fish tanks with mechanical equipment. The exception is where the algae pods are on the second floor making a smaller 4m by 11m bay. The exterior facade of the uilding incorporates a precast concrete panel system into a curtain wall type of facade. The facade opens where the building needs more light and closes on the north facade to let light in without sacrificing energy loss. This allows for a nice aesthetic on the exterior of the building giving a modular look to the precast concrete structure. Together seeing the fish halls, algae pods and green roof from the road, will make any person wonder what is going on in this facility. Since the facility is open to all guests, there is a large open space in the first floor that allows people to walk around and become educated on the aquaculture fish farm. People will be able to see in and see the mechanized process of feeding, growing, sorting, and processing fish is handled.


Influx

Institute for Environmental Biology The site for the Institute for Environmental Biology occupies a strategic position on Lake Michigan and adjacent to the city of Chicago. Arguably, it is connected to a lively cultural area -- museums, conference halls and sports stadia – and concurrently sited adjacent to an expansive inland sea. Initially, this project consisted of a series of formal experiments to discover how complex relationships between parts to a whole can emerge, mainly through the use of Ur-forms, which are the elemental building blocks of structure found in material systems, mathematics and musical compositions. Ur bears the connotation of basic, elemental, archetypal. For this assignment, it was assumed that Ur-forms are simple one-celled or multi-celled organisms. For the second portion of the project, each team presented their vision for a master plan for Northerly Island in Chicago.

Fall 11

Chicago, Illinois

After midreviews, a more detailed program was supplied and the focus of the studio changed from the master plan to a functional building.

Brian Albrecht - UIUC

Professor Therese Tierney


For the initial portion of the studio, the structure and beauty of the butterfly egg became the inspiration for my pavilion project. The goal was to create a self supporting structure.


Upon completion of this first project, I decided to incorporate this structure into my Seismic Analysis class, to see if a self supporting structure such as this could exist. The site which was used for analysis is DuSable Park in Chicago, Illinois. As seen below, by using reasonable sized members, a structure such as this can hold itself up.


The second portion of the project, the master plan of Northerly Island, began with a site visit. We treated the visit as a forensic investigation, trying to find remains of what events have gone on as well as who uses the island. Near the southern tip of the island, while standing on a concrete pier, I ended up capturing the image as seen on the left. Even though I was on this rigid, grid of the metal grate, below me was this organic chaos that was happening. The photo captured showed the combination of the two: the rigid grid being disrupted by the organic wave. This became the main inspiration for our Master plan as well as future building.


Many different iterations of patterns are generated by parametric ripple effects. We studied different spatial relationships created by the positive and negative spaces. Eventually control points afforded a way to pull the surfaces into working forms. Combinations of digital and analogue modeling provided a full and extensive search into form and perception. We explored ripple patterns as a way to create extrusions to generate from. We also looked at how patterns could shape and guide forms through various interpretations of porosity.


Museum of the grain Through the deconstructioin of a hundred year old grain elevator with cribbed bin construction and through the analysis of its parts and their tectonic relationships, this becomes a starting point for form generation applied to new designs at many scales, with varying program, using four basic materials - wood, concrete, steel and glass. With a focus on energy, materiality, and tectonic expression, students will explore the conditions and potential for environmentally responsible building designs that can make constructed contributions to man-made landscapes. Students will use a deconstructed one hundred year old grain elevator as inspiration and as a datum to reference designs of new objects and artifices. The method is one of exploration through multiple iterations within a framework of four consecutive studio projects. Project one (site) and three (precedence) are group projects lasting two weeks each, with four competing teams. Project two (pods) and four (museum) are individual projects lasting 4-5 weeks each. Master plan and site to be developed at an urban scale as a linear development along rail lines. Each student will then design four pods, each at about 2,000 sq ft of gross floor area. The final project (also individual) requires the skills to create a composition of the four pods integrated with additional program elements into a 30,000 sq ft museum. Energy performance will be analyzed using a direct computational link established between an energy modeling program and digital three-dimensional models. Each student shall construct 3-4 physical models (tectonic detail, pod, museum, site).

Museum

Spring 12 (present)

Empire, Illinois

Professor Vidar Lerum


2012 ACSA/AISC Steel Competition Culinary Arts College

Culinary Arts College

CATEGORY 1 - CULINARY ARTS COLLEGE This project category is to develop a design for a Culinary Arts College. Steel construction offers students great benefits in this endeavor, as it is ideal for covering long-spans without sacrificing flexibility and aesthetic lightness, multi-story buildings, and quick delivery and assembly in congested urban environments. Steel must be used as the primary structural material and contain at least one space that requires long-span steel structure, with special emphasis placed on innovation in steel design. The Culinary Arts College will draw from local restaurants for some of its faculty and will use them to provide externships for students. “On-location” sessions and walking tours will allow its students to experience everything from the behind-the-scenes action in the city’s kitchens to the bustle of seasonal and farmers markets. Students will need to conduct research in the design of culinary arts educational facilities.

Eric White - UIUC

Spring 12 (present)

Chicago, Illinois

Professor Marci Uihlein


City of Peoria - Public Works

Engineering Technician

MISSION STATEMENT The Public Works Department is committed to maintaining and enhancing the City’s public infrastructure and traffic systems, providing refuse/yard waste collection and disposal services, managing the City’s Peoria, Peoria Heights & Western Railroad, and managing the 27 City-owned buildings and grounds. Our department also oversees the operation of the Peoria City/ County Landfill. The services provided include street sweeping and other maintenance measures including snow removal, traffic control systems, city buildings and grounds, sidewalks, fleet services, storm sewers and detention basins, CSO compliance and city parking lots, to name a few. Public Works also administers contracted trash, yardwaste, recyclable material collection and partners with Peoria County in overseeing the operation and maintenance of the Peoria City/County Landfill in Edwards, Illinois.

Summers 07-10

Peoria, Illinois


STATE OF ILLINOIS

INDEX OF SHEETS

1 2 3 4 5-7 8-10 11-13

CITY OF PEORIA

COVER SHEET TABULATION OF QUANTITIES TYPICAL SECTION OVERALL REMOVAL PROPOSED DETAILS

701301-03

LIST OF STANDARDS

LANE CLOSURE 2L 2W SHORT TIME OPERATIONS LANE CLOSURE 2L 2W, UNDIVIDED, FOR SPEEDS < 45 MPH LANE CLOSURE MULTILANE 1W OR 2W CROSSWALK OR SIDEWALK CLOSURE TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES

701501-05

ENGINEERING DIVISION

701801-04

PLANS FOR PROPOSED

701901-01

N. ROCKWOOD RD. RECONSTRUCTION GENERAL NOTES 1.

(W. SCENIC DRIVE TO N. BIG HOLLOW RD.) SECTION # 09-00317-00-PV

ALL UTILITY INFORMATION SHOWN ON THESE PLANS ARE FROM SURVEY'S CONDUCTED AT THE TIME OF PROJECT DEVELOPMENT AND RESPECTIVE UTILITY COMPANIES ARE SHOWN FOR REFERENCE ONLY. IT SHALL BE THE CONTRACTOR'S RESPONSIBILITY TO DETERMINE THE ACTUAL LOCATIONS OF ALL UNDERGROUND UTILITY FACILITIES. THE CONTRACTOR SHALL ALSO OBTAIN FROM THE REPECTIVE UTILITY COMPANIES DETAILED INFORMATION RELATIVE TO THE LOCATION OF THEIR MARKING OF THE EXACT LOCATIONS. UTILITY OWNERS: ELECTRIC & GAS - AMERENCILCO (PH. 672-5271): TELEPHONE COMPANY -AT&T TELEPHONE COMPANY (PH. 800-892-0123): McCLEOD COMMUNICATIONS (PH. 677-5495): WATER - ILLINOIS AMERICAN WATER COMPANY(671-3700) SANITARY - GREATER PEORIA SANITARY DISTRICT (PH. 637-3511): TELEVISION - COMCAST COMMUNICATIONS (PH. 686-2600).

2.

ALL PAVEMENT, CURB, SIDEWALK AND DRIVEWAYS TO BE ADJUSTED SHALL BE SAWCUT AT THE LIMITS OF THE ADJUSTMENT AND TRANSITION. PAYMENT FOR THE SAWCUT SHALL BE INCIDENTAL TO THE ITEM BEING REMOVED. ADDITIONALLY FOR CURB AND COMBINATION CURB AND SIDEWALK: THE EXCAVATED SPACE ADJACENT TO THE EXISTING PAVEMENT SHALL BE FILLED WITH VIBRATED CLASS SI PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE WITHIN 2.0" OF THE FINAL GRADE, WHICH IS TO BE INCIDENTAL TO THE COST OF THE ITEM OF WORK.

3.

THE CONTRACTOR, AT HIS OWN EXPENSE, SHALL BE REQUIRED AS DIRECTED BY THE ENGINEER TO RELOCATE OR TO REMOVE AND REINSTALL ALL ROAD SIGNS WHICH INTERFERE WITH THE CONSTRUCTION OPERATIONS AND TO TEMPORARILY RESET ALL SUCH SIGNS DURING CONSTRUCTION.

CITY OF PEORIA

PROJECT LOCATION

ALL WORK INVOLVING SIGNS SHALL BE GOVERNED BY THE FOLLOWING REQUIREMENTS: A. SIGNS SHALL NOT BE MOVED UNTIL PROGRESS OF WORK DEMANDS. B. EVERY SIGN REMOVED MUST BE RE-ERECTED AT A TEMPORARY LOCATION, APPROVED BY THE ENGINEER, IN A WORKMANLIKE MANNER AND BE VISIBLE TO ROADWAY TRAFFIC. ALL SUCH SIGNS MUST BE MAINTAINED STRAIGHT AND NEAT FOR THE DURATION OF THE TEMPORARY SETTING. 4.

ALL DISTURBED EARTH AREAS SHALL BE SODDED UNLESS OTHERWISE DIRECTED.

5.

ALL SIDEWALK RAMPS SHALL BE CONSTRUCTED IN ACCORDANCE WITH HIGHWAY STANDARD 424001-04.

6.

THE QUANTITY FOR SUB-BASE GRANULAR MATERIAL, CA-6 HAS BEEN CALCULATED WITH THE FOLLOWING AVERAGE GRADE CHANGES: 4" FOR SIDEWALK, DRIVEWAY, CURB, CURB & GUTTER AND GUTTER FLAG. GRANULAR BACKFILL, CA-6 IN EXCESS OF THIS QUANTITY WILL NOT BE PAID FOR AND SHALL BE CONSIDERED INCIDENTAL.

7.

ANY PROPERTY PINS DISTURBED OR DESTROYED BY THE CONTRACTOR SHALL BE RESET BY AN ILLINOIS PROFESSIONAL LAND SURVEYOR AT THE CONTRACTOR'S EXPENSE.

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS ENGINEERING DIVISION CITY OF PEORIA PREPARED BY DATE APPROVED DATE

CITY ENGINEER APPROVED

NOT TO SCALE

DATE

TRAFFIC ENGINEER APPROVED

GENERAL LOCATION TOTAL AND NET LENGTH = 1895 FT=0.36 MI

BEFORE YOU DIG, CALL J.U.L.I.E. NO. 1-800-892-0123 or 811 PEORIA COUNTY, RICHWOODS TOWNSHIP, NW & SW 1/4, SEC. 19,

SIGNATURE DATE LICENSE EXPIRES 11-30-2011

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE

DATE

NORTH ROCKWOOD ROAD RECONSTRUCTION CADD FILE: ROCKWOOD.DWG JOB #: 208-M09317

DATE: JULY 22, 2010 PM NUMBER: 1190

1 13


WA RM EM

OR

OR

IAL

SHELL GAS STATION

IAL

DR

REMAINING LANE TO BE USED FOR ONE WAY TRAFFIC GOING SOUTH

IA MB T LU CO ARPE C

S AN T EV AN B UR BO STA RE

CONSTRUCTION PROCESS NORTH ROCKWOOD ROAD RECONSTRUCTION - CITY OF PEORIA

.

SURVEY: N/A NOTEBOOK: N/A CITY PROJECT NO.: 208-M09317

EM

EXTERNAL REF. FILES: N/A

RM

DRAWN: AJA CHECKED: APPROVED: JS

CAD FILE:

X:\Design\Transfer\Rockwood Road\Rockwood Road.dwg

WA

REVISIONS:

STREET ACCESS CLOSED

4

www.ci.peoria.il.us

SHOPPING OUTLET PREPARATION DATE: 7-22-2010

SHELL GAS STATION

PH 309-494-8801 FAX 309-494-8658

.

IA MB T LU CO ARPE C

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT

STREET ACCESS CLOSED VE DA AN HL RT NO

W. GLEN AVE.

W. FARRELLY AVE.

HEARTLAND VISION

FULL DEPTH

3' SAWCUT

Engineering Division 419 Fulton Street, Suite 307 Peoria, IL 61602

REMAINING LANE TO BE USED FOR ONE WAY TRAFFIC GOING SOUTH S AN T EV AN B UR BO STA RE

PIZZA HUT

W. EUGENIA AVE.

SHOPPING OUTLET

. VE DA AN HL RT NO

W. GLEN AVE.

W. FARRELLY AVE.

AVAN TI'S REST AURA NT HEARTLAND VISION

W. EUGENIA AVE.

RED LOBSTER

SCENIC DR.

AVAN TI'S REST AURA NT

PIZZA HUT

RED LOBSTER

SCENIC DR.

STAGE CONSTRUCTION PHASE I

REMOVE EXISTING PAVEMENT

PHASE II

DR .

REMOVE EXISTING PAVEMENT

13


Quantities Report

Volume Report Project: X:\Design\Transfer\INTERNS\2009 How-to Notes\Corridors & Quantity Calculation\Volume Example.dwg Alignment: HickoryGroveCL Sample Line Group: Ditch Section Start Sta: 2+98.000 End Sta: 31+89.000 Cut Cut Fill Reusable Area Volume Area Station Volume (Sq. (Cu. (Sq. (Cu.yd.) ft.) yd.) ft.)

Fill Volume (Cu. yd.)

Cum. Cum. Cut Reusable Vol. Vol. (Cu. (Cu. yd.) yd.)

Cum. Fill Vol. (Cu. yd.)

Cum. Net Vol. (Cu. yd.)

2 +98.000

3.55

0.00

0.00

3.55

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

3 +00.000

3.56

0.26

0.26

3.48

0.26

0.26

0.26

0.26

0.00

3 +10.000

2.15

1.06

1.06

3.17

1.23

1.32

1.32

1.49

-0.17

3 +20.000

0.96

0.58

0.58

4.01

1.33

1.90

1.90

2.82

-0.93

3 +30.000

0.63

0.30

0.30

6.03

1.86

2.19

2.19

4.69

-2.49

3 +40.000

0.00

0.12

0.12 11.56

3.26

2.31

2.31

7.94

-5.63

3 +50.000

0.00

0.00

0.00 11.10

4.20

2.31

2.31

12.14

-9.83

3 +60.000

0.00

0.00

0.00 11.97

4.27

2.31

2.31

16.41 -14.10

3 +70.000

0.00

0.00

0.00 12.74

4.58

2.31

2.31

20.99 -18.68

3 +80.000

0.00

0.00

0.00 13.38

4.84

2.31

2.31

25.82 -23.51

3 +90.000

0.00

0.00

0.00 14.22

5.11

2.31

2.31

30.93 -28.62

file:///C|/Documents and Settings/EngIntern/Local Settings/Temp/QuantityReportTemp.xml (1 of 16) [8/11/2009 9:14:52 AM]


Furnace Inventory Survey

0211632346 361689714 361700714 361757714 361715714 361715714 361906714 361717714 361758714 361905714 361988714 361716714 361904714 9807615352 9807615355 9807615360 9807615353 9607615354 9807615359 0211604914 0209642426 0211604919 0211604918 0209642425 0211604915 0209642630 0209642429 0211604916 0211604917 0210637027 0210637024 0210639786 0210637026 0210637025 0210639287 0303602664 0303602658 0303602652 0303602654 0303602657 0303602655 0303602661 0303602656 0301615330 0301615333 0301615332 0301615331 0211602677 0211602678 0211602675 0301615334 0211602673 0211602674 0209625885 0211602676

Input Capacity (in Btuh) 115,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 75,000 75,000 75,000 75,000 75,000 75,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 70,000 45,000 45,000 45,000 45,000 45,000 45,000 45,000 45,000 45,000 45,000 45,000 45,000

Output Capacity (In Btuh) 92,000 80,000 80,000 80,000 80,000 80,000 80,000 80,000 80,000 80,000 80,000 80,000 80,000 60,000 60,000 60,000 60,000 60,000 60,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 56,000 36,000 36,000 36,000 36,000 36,000 36,000 36,000 36,000 36,000 36,000 36,000 36,000

Thermal Efficiency 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80% 80%

Apartment

Make

Model Number

Serial Number

Mason Court Community Center 106 Garfield Apt. A1 106 Garfield Apt. A2 106 Garfield Apt. A3 106 Garfield Apt. A4 106 Garfield Apt. B1 106 Garfield Apt. B2 106 Garfield Apt. B3 106 Garfield Apt. B4 106 Garfield Apt. C1 106 Garfield Apt. C2 106 Garfield Apt. C3 106 Garfield Apt. C4 427 Haish St. Apt. A 207 Garden Apt. A 207 Garden Apt. B 234 Garden Apt. B 234 Garden Apt. F 234 Garden Apt. G 428 Haish St. Apt. B 430 Haish St. Apt. C 432 Haish St. Apt. D 427 Haish St. Apt. E 234 Garden Apt. A 234 Garden Apt. C 234 Garden Apt. D 234 Garden Apt. E 506 Leonard Apt. A 506 Leonard Apt. B Mason Court Apt. 101 Mason Court Apt. 102 Mason Court Apt. 107 Mason Court Apt. 108 Mason Court Apt. 109 Mason Court Apt. 110 Mason Court Apt. 201 Mason Court Apt. 202 Mason Court Apt. 209 Mason Court Apt. 210 Mason Court Apt. 211 Mason Court Apt. 212 Mason Court Apt. 215 Mason Court Apt. 216 Mason Court Apt. 103 Mason Court Apt. 104 Mason Court Apt. 105 Mason Court Apt. 106 Mason Court Apt. 203 Mason Court Apt. 204 Mason Court Apt. 205 Mason Court Apt. 206 Mason Court Apt. 207 Mason Court Apt. 208 Mason Court Apt. 213 Mason Court Apt. 214

Goodman General Electric General Electric General Electric General Electric General Electric General Electric General Electric General Electric General Electric General Electric General Electric General Electric Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman Goodman

GMT 115-5A BWE918G100CA BWE918G100CA BWE918G100CA BWE918G100CA BWE918G100CA BWE918G100CA BWE918G100CA BWE918G100CA BWE918G100CA BWE918G100CA BWE918G100CA BWE918G100CA GMT 075 - 3 GMT 075 - 3 GMT 075 - 3 GMT 075 - 3 GMT 075 - 3 GMT 075 - 3 GMT 070 - 3A GMT 070 - 3A GMT 070 - 3A GMT 070 - 3A GMT 070 - 3A GMT 070 - 3A GMT 070 - 3A GMT 070 - 3A GMT 070 - 3A GMT 070 - 3A GMT 070-3A GMT 070-3A GMT 070-3A GMT 070-3A GMT 070-3A GMT 070-3A GMT 070-3A GMT 070-3A GMT 070-3A GMT 070-3A GMT 070-3A GMT 070-3A GMT 070-3A GMT 070-3A GMT 045-3A GMT 045-3A GMT 045-3A GMT 045-3A GMT 045-3A GMT 045-3A GMT 045-3A GMT 045-3A GMT 045-3A GMT 045-3A GMT 045-3A GMT 045-3A

9 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 13 13 13 13 15 13 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 8 9 9 9 9

Adjusted AFUE (based on age) 73% 69% 69% 69% 69% 69% 69% 69% 69% 69% 69% 69% 69% 70% 70% 70% 70% 69% 70% 73% 73% 73% 73% 73% 73% 73% 73% 73% 73% 73% 73% 73% 73% 73% 73% 74% 74% 74% 74% 74% 74% 74% 74% 74% 74% 74% 74% 73% 73% 73% 74% 73% 73% 73% 73%

Eligible for replacement Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible Eligible

Age (in years)

Notes

Replacement Model AFUE 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 95%

Estimated Annual Savings (therms) 545 474 474 474 474 474 474 474 474 474 474 474 474 355 355 355 355 355 355 332 332 332 332 332 332 332 332 332 332 332 332 332 332 332 332 332 332 332 332 332 332 332 332 213 213 213 213 213 213 213 213 213 213 213 213

Values

Row Labels

Count

Average of Age (in years)

Average of Input Capacity (in Btuh)

Average of Output Capacity (In Btuh)

Average of Thermal Efficiency

Average of Adjusted AFUE (based on age)

Average of Replacement Model AFUE

Sum of Estimated Annual Savings (therms)

Sum of Estimated Annual Cost Savings

Sum of Incentive Amount

Average of Payback (years)

Eligible Recommended Not Recommended Grand Total

55 43 12 55

12 13 9 12

72,455 80,116 45,000 72,455

57,964 64,093 36,000 57,964

80.0% 80.0% 80.0% 80.0%

71% 71% 73% 71%

95% 95% 95% 95%

18,876 16,318 2,558 18,876

$16,989 $14,687 $2,302 $16,989

$155,630 $124,310 $31,320 $155,630

9.73 8.65 13.60 9.73

Estimated Annual Cost Savings $490 $426 $426 $426 $426 $426 $426 $426 $426 $426 $426 $426 $426 $320 $320 $320 $320 $320 $320 $298 $298 $298 $298 $298 $298 $298 $298 $298 $298 $298 $298 $298 $298 $298 $298 $298 $298 $298 $298 $298 $298 $298 $298 $192 $192 $192 $192 $192 $192 $192 $192 $192 $192 $192 $192

Incentive Amount $3,170 $3,050 $3,050 $3,050 $3,050 $3,050 $3,050 $3,050 $3,050 $3,050 $3,050 $3,050 $3,050 $2,850 $2,850 $2,850 $2,850 $2,850 $2,850 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,810 $2,610 $2,610 $2,610 $2,610 $2,610 $2,610 $2,610 $2,610 $2,610 $2,610 $2,610 $2,610

Payback (years) 6.47 7.15 7.15 7.15 7.15 7.15 7.15 7.15 7.15 7.15 7.15 7.15 7.15 8.91 8.91 8.91 8.91 8.91 8.91 9.42 9.42 9.42 9.42 9.42 9.42 9.42 9.42 9.42 9.42 9.42 9.42 9.42 9.42 9.42 9.42 9.42 9.42 9.42 9.42 9.42 9.42 9.42 9.42 13.60 13.60 13.60 13.60 13.60 13.60 13.60 13.60 13.60 13.60 13.60 13.60

Recommended for funding Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Recommended Not Recommended Not Recommended Not Recommended Not Recommended Not Recommended Not Recommended Not Recommended Not Recommended Not Recommended Not Recommended Not Recommended Not Recommended


Smart Energy Design Assistance Center

PHA: Efficient Living Program

The Smart Energy Design Assistance Center (SEDAC) provides advice and analyses enabling private and public facilities in the State of Illinois to increase their economic viability through the efficient use of energy resources. SEDAC is sponsored by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) in partnership with investorowned utilities in Illinois. SEDAC provides valuable services at no cost to Illinois businesses and public facilities. SEDAC is managed by the School of Architecture at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, in partnership with the 360 Energy Group, LLC. SEDAC collaborates with the Energy Resources Center at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Under Illinois Public Act 95-0481: DCEO, ComEd, Ameren Illinois, Nicor Gas, North Shore Gas, and Peoples Gas are required to develop a portfolio of energy efficiency programs to achieve certain annual energy savings goals in Illinois buildings. Improving energy efficiency in low income housing is another goal of the programs. Both DCEO and SEDAC believe that housing must be energy efficient to be truly affordable and livable. The Efficient Living Illinois PHA Energy Project initiated in 2009 provides grants to Illinois Public Housing Authorities to upgrade and/or include energy efficient building practices in their buildings.

January 2011 - Present

Champaign, Illinois

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Standard Common Area Worksheet Type Replacement Item (ERCM) Screw In Lamp CFL Screw In (1-26W) Screw In Lamp CFL Screw In (≥ 27W) Incandescent Fixture CFL Fixture (≤ 29W) Incandescent Fixture CFL Fixture (≥ 30W) Fluorescent Lamp 4' T8 Lamp Fluorescent Lamp 8' T8 Lamp Fluorescent Lamp 4' T8 Lamp, Ballast Fluorescent Lamp 8' T8 Lamp, Ballast Delamping 4' T8 Lamp, Ballast Delamping 8' T8 Lamp, Ballast Delamping 4' T8 Lamp, Reflector Delamping 8' T8 Lamp, Reflector Occupancy Sensor Connected Watts Controlled Plug Load Occupancy Sensor Sensor

Quantity

Unit Lamps Lamps Fixtures Fixtures Lamps Lamps Lamps Lamps Lamps Lamps Lamps Lamps Watts Controlled Sensors

Incentive $1.50 $2.00 $45.00 $82.00 $1.50 $1.50 $11.00 $16.00 $10.00 $13.00 $20.00 $26.00 $0.20 $30.00

Incentive Amount $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

Bi-level Stairwell/ Hall/ Garage Fixtures w/ Integrated Sensors

Fixture

Fixtures

$70.00

$0.00

Vending Machine Sensor Vending Machine Sensor Vending Machine Exit Sign Exit Sign Outdoor Lighting Outdoor Lighting Outdoor Lighting Outdoor Lighting

Beverage Snack Energy Star Rated LED Exit Sign LED Lamp Metal Halide Pulse Start (≤ 100W) Pulse Start (101-200W) Pulse Start (201-350W)

Machines Machines Machines Signs Lamps Fixtures Lamps Lamps Lamps

$150.00 $45.00 $150.00 $25.00 $15.00 $7.50 $33.00 $57.00 $66.00

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

Variable Frequency Drive (VFD) on <200 HP Motors

VFDs which are installed on existing chillers, fans, and pumps are eligible for this incentive

Controlled HP

$200.00

$0.00

High Efficiency Boiler

Energy Star Rated or Better

($3,600 + ($250 x (AFUE - 85)) + $20 x MBH) per Boiler

$0.00

Indoor/Outdoor Reset Controls

Electronic Replacement unit EER > 13.08 0.2256*Capacity (in MBH)

$1,500.00

$0.00

Units

$750.00

$0.00

Units

$975.00

$0.00

PTHP (replace PTAC) Commercial Washing Machine

Number of Units AFUE MBH Units

CEE Tier 3 Total Incentive (Common Areas):

$0.00

Hauling & Recycling Replacement Item (ERCM)

Quantity

Unit

Hauling & Recyling Incentive

Refrigerators Window A/C Units PTAC Units

0 0 0

Units Units Units

$30.00 $10.00 $10.00

Total Incentive (Hauling & Recylcing):

Electric Incentive Amount $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00


 



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 

 

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

 











 



           

           































    

   







  

        

     

            



       

  

       

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    

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

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     

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 

 

 

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

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

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The Workshop on Architecture and Engineering of Sustainable Buildings Project Description


THE ARCHITECTURE AND ENGINEERING OF SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS WORKSHOP MAY 16-19, 2011, ISTANBUL, TURKEY

PROGRAMME May 16, Monday 08:00 09:00 09:00 10:30

Breakfast OPENING SESSION S1 Sustainability in Buildings: Facts and Figures

10:30 11:00

11:00 11:30 11:30 12:30 12:30 13:00 13:00 14:30

14:30 17:00

17:00 17:30 17:30 18:00 18:00 18:30 19:00 22:00

Lisa SHPRITZ Rachel MICHELIN Ajla AKSAMIJA Pınar ÖZUYAR Derya OKTAY Haluk SUR Markus LEHTO

May 17, Tuesday

May 18, Wednesday

Breakfast

Breakfast

S3 Sustainability Through Integrated Design, Construction and Operation of Buildings -1

S5 Assessing Building Sustainability: Design vs. Operation

Abbas AMINMANSOUR Sinem KORKMAZ Deborah OAKLEY Ahmet İĞDİRLİGİL Selçuk AVCI

Duygu ERTEN Jale AKYEL Övünç BİRECİK Break

Breakout Session

Breakout Session

Summary

Summary

Lunch

Lunch

Lunch

S2 Sustainable Energy for Buildings

S4 Sustainability Through Integrated Design, Construction and Operation of Buildings -2

S6 Policies and Practices for Sustainable Buildings

Kirsten RITCHIE Serdar ÇELİK Mary Lynn REALFF

Emre ÇAMLIBEL Katalin ZAİM Mustafa TIRIS Musa YETİMOĞLU Sibel SEZER ERALP

M. Pınar MENGÜÇ Nilgün KIRAN CILIZ Nilüfer EĞRİCAN Kemal BAYRAKTAR

Tamer ATABARUT Cem AVCI Sibel BÜLAY Birgül ÇOLAKOGLU

Breakfast

Godfried AUGENBROE Atha FORSBERG Helen BOUSSALIS

Break

Donald COLLIVER Gail BORTHWICK Angus ROCKETT

May 19, Thursday

Omnia El-HAKIM Tony CHIOCETTI

Break

Break

Break

Breakout Session

Breakout Session

Breakout Session

Summary

Summary

Conclusions and Action Items

Boat Dinner

Dinner on Your Own

Dinner on Your Own

City Architectural Tour


Study Abroad Media

Sketches & Photography

My junior year, I was given the opportunity to study abroad for the whole academic year with forty seven of my peers. From September 3rd until May 15th, Europe was where I resided. Based in Versailles, travelling Europe was a mere train ride or short plane ride away. In turn, I had the opportunity to travel to ten different countries.

Fall 08 - Spring 09

Some trips were strictly for the chance to see a new culture and travel the country, while other trips were academic based. With the main focus of this study abroad program being the chance to improve oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s skills at sketching through several site visits, I spent hours upon hours sketching. As a result, I do have a better appreciation for drawing by hand. It gives one the opportunity to remember a place through drawing. Some of my favorite memories are from sketching. However, sketching took time, and sometimes, time was not a luxury. In turn, photography became my second passion. It allowed me to capture the moments I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have time to capture through sketching. While sometimes I did point and shoot, other times, as in the photo used for the cover, I tried to find pictures that would be unique, something I could call my own.

Europe


Paris, France

Mykonos, Greece


Florence, Italy Delos, Greece

Mykonos, Greece

Sistine Chapel, Vatican City Prague, Czech Republic


(309) 643-4810 Email: aandrej2@gmail.com EDUCATION

(309) 686-9100

Master of Architecture - Structures Option, Expected May 13, 2012 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign GPA: 3.60/4.00 Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies, 2010 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) GPA: 3.61/4.00 Versailles Study Abroad Program, Fall 2008 – Spring 2009 • Studied architecture through extensive site visits • Traveled through 10 European countries

AWARDS & HONORS

Participated in The Architecture and Engineering of Sustainable Buildings Workshop in Istanbul, Turkey, May 2011 • Sole student from the School of Architecture at UIUC invited to participate Cyrus E. Palmer Award, April 2011 • Recognizes consistent good performance by students in the Structures option

SOFTWARE SKILLS

AutoCAD, AutoCAD Civil 3D, Revit Architecture, Google Sketch Up, Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator, Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, and Excel, Trane Trace 700

DESIGN SKILLS

Sketching, modeling, photography, photographic manipulation

EXPERIENCE

Smart Energy Design Assistance Center – Research Assistant, Champaign, IL, August 2011- Present – Building Energy Specialist, Champaign, IL, January 2011- August 2011 • Model buildings in Trane Trace 700 to find energy usage • Analyze energy usage for public housing in Illinois • Recommend alternatives to save clients money on energy costs City of Peoria - Engineering Technician I, Peoria, IL, Summer 2007-2010 • Drafted construction plans for four major roadway improvement projects, seven storm sewer and drainage projects, three school sidewalk projects, and several neighborhood sidewalk projects • Organized data and created maps on GIS and ACAD • Cleaned up survey data and analyzed earthwork from it • Helped gather and prepare data for the city’s Combined Sewer Overflow study • Digitized old plans and documents • Helped gather data for an EPA study with regards to pollution in the creeks • Aided in the survey process of a site

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS

Team Leader, LEED Project for YMCA, 2009-2010 Member, Structural Engineers Association of Illinois, 2010-present Member, Ecological Design Consortium, 2007-present Member, American Institute of Architecture Students, 2006-2010


ARCH 553 ARCH 556 ARCH 559 ARCH 560 ARCH 595 ARCH 550 ARCH 552 ARCH 554 ARCH 551 ARCH 555 ARCH 452 MATH 225 ARCH 451 ARCH 352 ARCH 351

SPRING 12 Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design Advanced Structural Planning Structural Masonry Design FALL 11 Advanced Structural Analysis Spec. Prob. Struct. Theory & Design (Seismic) SPRING 11 Reinforced Concrete Design Soil Mechanics and Foundations Advanced Steel Design FALL 10 Structural Analysis Prestressed Concrete Design SPRING 10 Theory of Reinforced Concrete Introductory Matrix Theory FALL 09 Theory & Design Steel & Timber SPRING 09 Mechanics of Material & Design Application FALL 08 Statics & Dynamics

B B+ A AA A+ A+ A+ CR A+ A A+


Graduate Portfolio  

My work and experience from the 6 years of my college education

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