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elcome to the July/ August Issue of TownLife Monthly. This is now our 13th issue and I must say that we’ve certainly come a long way with the magazine. TownLife Monthly has grown from strength to strength largely because of the MASSIVE support from all the local businesses who continue to use this publication to promote themselves and of course, our readers. Without you, there would be no TownLife Monthly…. Which really is the plain truth. We would therefore like to say a MASSIVE thank you to everyone who has helped in shaping the magazine into what it is today. You’ve probably noticed that TownLife Monthly has gone through a make-over, which we are very excited about. We’ve enlisted the services of a very skilled and LOCAL graphics designer to help with not only designing our magazine cover but with designing adverts for our advertisers. We’ve also introduced a new section called BASIC LISTINGS, which is ideal for local businesses with very small advertising budgets. The idea behind this section was to provide everyone with the opportunity to promote their businesses as we appreciate that advertising is very essential for Business growth.

Pets Corner Local Feature: Highlights from the Bridgwater College Hair & Beauty Showcase Mum’s The Boss Health & Beauty Your Health: Treating Sunburn Beauty Tips: Summer Hair Care Interiors & Property Maintenance Food & Drink Meals in Minutes Spice of Life– Fennel Working From Home Motoring Review Tech Review Website of the Month Books for the Summer Want the Government to give you some cash? Supermarket opening times What’s on: July—August Local History Useful Community Numbers & Information Quizzes Word Search Spot the Difference Answers to Quizzes

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As always, we have lots of interesting as well as informative articles for you and for those of you with Pets, I hope you enjoy the new section called Pets Corner. Please do send us any feedback or questions you have about the magazine as we’ll be happy to hear from you. Until next time please remain well and healthy. Best Wishes,

Ada Lazz-Onyenobi (Editor)

Publisher: Townlife Monthly Community Magazine Editor: Ada Lazz-Onyenobi T: 01278 588430 E: ada@townlifemonthly.co.uk W: www.townlifemonthly.co.uk

Distribution: Royal Mail Contributors Katherine Sorrell (Home & Interiors articles) James Baggott (Car Dealer Magazine) Ted Bruning (Working from home articles) Ursula Martin (Local History Articles) Karen Nobes (Accounting Articles) To advertise, Contact Ada. T: 01278 588 430. E: ada@townlifemonthly.co.uk W: www.townlifemonthly.co.uk 2


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On the 5th of May 2011, Bridgwater College hosted it’s annual hair and beauty showcase featuring their talented students work. I was thrilled to be invited to this years event and it was evident that a lot of work went into the impressive production of the show. We were blown away by the creativity the students exhibited on the day and it was clear that the students will have great careers in the hair & beauty industry. We have included highlights of the event in this months issue of Townlife Monthly.

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Treating Sunburn Although the obvious way to prevent sunburn is to avoid going out in the heat of the day at all, it is both necessary to have a little sun for our health and a pleasure to feel those rays on your skin. Although most people will use a sun cream or lotion as a preventative measure, studies have shown that many people do not use enough sunscreen to provide adequate protection. If you do find that you have caught more sun than you intended, it’s important to treat your skin to minimise the damage. As with any burn the skin will be overheated, so the first thing to do is to find a way of cooling the area. Apply a flannel soaked in cold water or take a lukewarm shower or bath. Make sure you drink plenty of fluids as dehydration will only make matters worse and avoid alcohol. For mild sunburn using a moisturising lotion which contains Aloe Vera or a specially

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formulated after-sun lotion will both cool and rehydrate the area, and relieve the feeling of tightness. For more intense sunburn ask your chemist about a hydrocortisone cream and take over the counter painkillers such as Paracetamol or Ibuprofen to reduce your temperature. If your sunburn is severe, or it’s on a young child, you should ask for advice from your doctor or – in the worst cases – visit Accident and Emergency. If your sunburn is accompanied by other symptoms such a fever, dizziness or vomiting you could have sunstroke. It is essential in this case that your temperature is lowered and as a minimum you should seek advice from NHS Direct on 0845 46 47.

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First impressions count. And it can be quick and easy to update the front of your property, says Katherine Sorrell, whether you’re thinking of selling or simply want a fresh new look.

Where to start? Step outside your house for a moment and give it a long, hard appraisal. Be honest. What does it look like to someone who has never seen it before? Smeary windows and wonky gutters just won’t cut it. Neither will piles of windswept leaves, dead plants, overflowing bins or grubby net curtains. These are the easy things to fix. Move wheelie bins or recycling boxes out of sight, clean the windows, wash the nets and sweep, mow and trim the garden, replanting window boxes and pots where necessary. Ensure that your gutters and downpipes are properly attached, clip back any flapping aerial cables and align satellite dishes so it all looks neat and tidy.

Masonry in Wimborne White, £45 for 5l; door in Skimming Stone exterior eggshell, £48.50 for 2.5l, both Farrow & Ball, 01202 876141; www.farrow-ball.com.

painted safely, but if they’re letting the house down with blemishes, cracks or bulging render it’s worth tackling them. If you can see damp patches, make sure you know what caused them and fix the problem; blown or missing areas of render should be repaired first, too. If an unpainted brick wall is a problem, it’s best to clean off surface grime and, if necessary, repoint the mortar.

The next step up from renovating and decorating doors and windows is to replace them entirely. This is really most worth doing when they It’s always a good idea to ensure that any paintwork on the front of are either rusted, rotten or otherwise past their sell-by date, or their your house is as pristine as possible. This means paying attention to style is such that they seriously detract from the property as a your gate, railings and/or fence, whole. A 1960s window in a period front and garage doors, windows house, for example, is crying out to and perhaps the façade itself. For wood- and metal-work, remove any be replaced with an elegant timber rust or rotten wood, fill or replace sash, and a solid, panelled front as required, prime and then paint, door would be a great substitute for a flimsy, flat one. In some cirusing appropriate products and ensuring the colours complement cumstances, uPVC windows are inappropriate, and you could enyour property and the street as a whole. A window may require just hance your property enormously by fitting windows that are more a quick sand or a coat of paint, while a front door could require a sympathetic. Replacing windows few coats over several days – either also gives you the opportunity to way, there’s no substitute for that install double glazing, with resulting improvements in energy efficiency. gleaming, fresh look. And you don’t just have to do likeWalls may, depending on their for-like in terms of size and shape. height, need scaffolding to be reWithout any significant structural

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alterations you could make a window higher or lower, and you may even be able to install a projecting bay – stealing a little extra space and masses more light.

While tackling doors and windows, consider how much of a wow factor (or not) is given by their knobs, handles, latches and other ‘furniture’. Architectural ironmongery is relatively easy and inexpensive to replace, particularly if you’re already tackling paintwork and can, therefore, easily cover up holes or gaps left when shapes or sizes change. And the difference can be truly amazing – from uninspiring, old-fashioned or cheap-looking fittings to modern or traditional, high quality, tactile accessories. Finally, polish your knockers for a full frontal with pzazz.

Lion’s head door knocker, £45, Jim Lawrence, 01473 828989; www.jim-lawrence.co.uk.

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Peter Crook Driving Instructor 30 yrs Experience in the driving training industry. No Gimmicks, No flash cars covered with graphics, just honest, Reliable and expert Tuition Nervous pupils welcome

Mob: 07831 672074

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Fennel is a remarkable plant that produces a vegetable, a spice and an herb. All parts of the plant are edible and the flavour is a mild aniseed. The seeds are actually the fruit of the plant and are dried before using. Fennel belongs to the same botanical family as carrot, parsley, coriander and dill. In fact, fennel bears a strong resemblance to dill and is used in similar ways. There are several types of fennel plant but wild fennel has a bitter taste. Cultivated fennel is grown for the swollen base, often incorrectly called a bulb, which is used as a vegetable. Feathery fennel leaves are usually added to most fish dishes. Fennel also flavours gin and is a key ingredient of absinthe. During the first century, Pliny noticed that snakes ate fennel after shedding their skin and decided that they were doing so in order to restore their eyesight. Since then it has been used as a treatment for eye problems, while the Chinese and Hindus apply it as a rather ineffective snake bite remedy. During medieval times fennel was hung on doors to ward off evil spirits. The ancient Greeks believed fennel encouraged weight loss. More commonly, fennel is used as a digestive and breath freshener.

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hen I was a teenager and my elder sister fled the nest, she left behind her portable typewriter. My head then being (as indeed it still is) cluttered with dreams of being a poet one day, I nicked it. A Byron it was (unlike me!), a tiny delicate thing in a hard green leather case that served me as a briefcase long after the Byron itself had tangled with entropy and lost. I had a vision, which with hindsight I think derived from a TV ad, of sitting outdoors on a beautiful day, cross-legged in the dappled shade of the orchard, carelessly churning out deathless verse by the ream. So I gave it a go. Bummer! I soon discovered two things. One: you can’t work sitting cross-legged on the ground with your typewriter on your knees. Every heavy-handed thump on the keyboard transmits a tiny shock that transforms your lap into a pulpy purple bruise in as long as it takes to bash out a sonnet; your calves cramp within seconds of getting settled; and leaning on the knobbly trunk of an old apple tree is much easier in imagination than it is in reality. Two: there is always a breeze, and even on the ostensibly stillest day it is plenty strong enough to blow away the onion-skin typing paper we used for carbon copies (the thinner the paper, the more you could squeeze into the roller of the typewriter) in the days before computers arrived.

the ground, vision version 2.0 involved the use of a garden table and chair; but at, least, no more chasing sheets of paper all over the great outdoors. Only of course, as I soon discovered, on any day sunny enough to be worth being outside in, you can’t actually read a computer screen. I might have been composing iambs of Miltonian sonorousness (I’d moved on from sonnets and was into epics by then), but I had no way of knowing. I’m self-taught, you see: I type like Schroder played the piano in Peanuts, gaze fixed on the keyboard, hammering away like fury with two calloused index fingers. Only after the gush of creativity has subsided do I go over what I’ve written and correct all the myriad typos. Outdoors, in the bright sunshine, on a computer screen, you can’t do that. So I gave up and went back to working in the office/spare bedroom.

So there I was, bruised, cramped, knobblebacked, and chasing sheets of onion-skin all over the orchard. Sonnets? None. So I gave up and went back to working in the bedroom – which wasn’t It may very well be that these days you can half bad, actually, as my window looked out across the Severn to the dramatic wooded hump-back of buy a laptop with an outdoors-on-a-sunny-day compatible screen. But as I no longer possess a the Breidden. But still, it wasn’t what I’d had in laptop of any description (I loathe them – they’re mind. designed the wrong way round for an old-style Then suddenly, many years later, there hunt-and-peck typist like me), I think I shall bow to were laptops, and the vision stirred once more. the inevitable and declare the vision officially dead. Not the original vision, of course: remembering Only, as I write this, it’s gloriously sunny out and the discomfort of trying to type cross-legged on I’m stuck in here with the damned computer...

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The sun may have only been out for a little bit, but with the sunburn and the smell of barbecues comes that annual hankering for a cheap convertible. There’s nothing quite like a spot of topdown motoring when the temperature manages to haul itself into double figures – and the good news is it won’t have to cost you a second mortgage. Here, we delve into the online classifieds to find you five bargain summer sizzlers that you can put on your drive for less than £2,000. Just remember to save some cash for the Factor 50…

The MX-5 is a perennial soft-top favourite and rightly so. It’s been around for 21 years now which means there are plenty of cheaper examples knocking about. Our £2,000 budget can get a well-looked after original model, not an import, with relatively low mileage. The Mazda is brilliant to drive, cheap to run and repair and the perfect entry into convertible ownership.

Yes, you read that right. Saab 9-3 Convertibles can be had for under £1,000. That’s a huge amount of car for the money. You’ll be able to seat four in comfort, it’s built like a tank and will go on forever. And that’s handy because for this money you’re looking at a 150,000-miler plus. We found one with 180k, a 2.0-litre turbo petrol lump, service history, tax and MOT for six months at £850 on Auto Trader. Be quick as we’re tempted ourselves…

This has to be the cheapest way into Italian two-seater softtop ownership. The little Barchetta only

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comes in left-hand drive, which helps bring values down. If you can live with that, you’ll be rewarded with a cracking drive, good looks and a zesty 1.7litre engine. Some drivers will find the cabin a little cramped, but you’ll soon forget that when you’re blasting along country lanes with the top down. A 1998 model with 50,000 miles and service history can be found for £2,000.

You’ll have to hunt pretty hard, but Audi A4 Cabriolet models do occasionally crop up within this price bracket. That might mean looking in the depths of winter when the last thing people want is a soft-top, but canny buyers will be rewarded for their efforts. The A4 is solid, well packaged and usually comes with a high spec. For this money you’ll find a tired petrol model with intergalactic mileage but, have it looked at by an independent, and you could be onto a winner.

Ok, so it might be a little over our budget but we think with a little hard negotiating you could pick up an SLK for under £2k. We spotted an R-reg model in black with 120k miles, 6 months tax and four months MOT at a dealer for £2,295 ono – easily negotiable within budget. The Mercedes is a timeless design, has a folding metal roof and, although not the quickest, is still great to drive.

By James Baggott, editor of Car Dealer Magazine (CarDealerMag.co.uk)

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If you’ve ever scoured the streets of a strange city trying to find a cash machine, found yourself hopelessly lost after taking a wrong turn or wished you knew even a few words of another language, you’ll know that travelling isn’t always easy. Help is at hand, or rather in your pocket: with a few well chosen apps, your smartphone can be the perfect travel companion.

Smartphone apps aren’t just for Facebooking, Tweeting and playing Angry Birds: they can transform the way you travel, too. Some of them concentrate on the nuts and bolts - how to get there, whether your flight is delayed, where the British Embassy is - and others on the bigger picture, with guides to the most interesting attractions and best hotels. Some apps do both, telling you about interesting things and then using GPS and maps to guide you there. Before we get app happy, two quick warnings: remember your charger location-based apps drain batteries very quickly - and watch out for roaming fees. Some apps need an internet connection to function, and you may incur pricey mobile data charges when you use them. On the nuts and bolts side there’s Flight Times UK (iPhone), which you can use to see if your flight into or out of the UK has been delayed; Accuweather (iPhone and Android) for long -term weather forecasts; Tripadvisor (iPhone app, or via your phone’s web browser) to find hotels, flights and restaurants and to

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browse users’ reviews before you book; and a wide range of GPS applications ranging from Android’s free Google Maps to the excellent (and battery-killing) TomTom Europe for iPhone. While most travel apps are free or just a few pounds, TomTom’s European apps are £42.99 for Eastern Europe, £52.99 for Western Europe and £69.99 for all of Europe. Some of the best travel apps come from the Lonely Planet stable (www.lonely planet.com/uk). Its iPhone and Nokia city guides tell you everything you could possibly want to know about your destination and make good use of maps, while Android users can take advantage of Compass, pictured above a city-specific augmented reality app for destinations including Paris, Seoul and London. Compass enables you to point your phone’s camera at something and see relevant information, such as the best nearby sights or restaurants. Lonely Planet also provides phrasebooks for Nokia, Android and iPhone users. Compass isn’t the only augmented reality app:

Wikitude (for iPhone, Android and some Nokia devices) overlays information on real-world footage, so for example you can download an overlay showing you where the nearest Starbuck’s is; Etips City Guides (iPhone) use augmented reality to show places of interest; and Metro AR Pro (iPhone) shows you where the nearest tube or metro stations are. Some apps can act as translators too. Google Goggles (iPhone and Android) can take a photo of a menu or sign in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish and translate it into English, while the Google Translate app (Android and iPhone) can translate written text between 57 different languages, read the results aloud in 23 languages and translate spoken words in 15 languages. And then there’s Word Lens (iPhone) - pictured here, which can recognise text and replace it in real time - so if you point your phone at a menu, sign or billboard, you’ll see the text change from Spanish to English immediately. It’s one of the most extraordinary things we’ve ever seen, and makes us feel like we’re living in the future.

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It’s that time of year again; the kids are off school and if you’re lucky enough to have a holiday coming up, there’s no better way to while away the hours in the sunshine than with a good book. Here we’ve put together a collection of new and recent titles to keep everyone entertained over the summer season, with something for all the family.

Perfect for Dads with a taste for a gripping true story, this is the incredible account of a British soldier who in 1944 marched willingly into Auschwitz to see for himself if the awful rumours were really true. Swapping places with a Jewish inmate, Denis Avey witnessed the horrors of the camp as well as the final Death March. Here he recounts his heartbreaking experience with both courage and wisdom.

The worldwide success of this story confirms that it is one that’s not to be missed. Here we have an unusual account of the WWI trenches, as seen through the eyes of a horse, Joey. Both horrific and powerfully involving, the author has captured hidden tales of friendship and humanity whilst revealing the futility of war in a way which both children and

adults will understand. This special edition from Egmont will make a great gift, featuring beautiful illustrations from François Place.

Mary Gilmour is a frustrated mum with too much to do and too little time. Life is passing her by, she’s missing out on quality time

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with her two young sons and as far as she can see, there’s one thing making it all twice as difficult - and she’s married to him. Compiling a spreadsheet of ‘infringements’, from displaced used teabags to wet towels left on the bed, as well as a few positives to redress the balance, husband Joel unknowingly has six months to correct his score. Or else. Brilliant, funny and sharp – all mums/ partners to untidy spouses will love this.

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Sat 16 July. Time: 10 am - Noon Entry: £1, Kids free, buggies are welcome! Chilton Trinity Sports Centre, Chilton St, Bridgwater Somerset TA6 3JA What is a Baby and Children’s Market? Our markets are a perfect place to stock up on quality gently used clothing, toys, books, nursery furniture, nursery accessories/linen, buggies, cots, car seats, strollers, high chairs, outdoor activity toys, DVD’s and just about anything imaginable for baby and child without spending a fortune! We also have a small selection of unique businesses selling their gorgeous baby and children’s products and services not seen on the high street. It’s a fun day out with other mums and dads, it’s easy and stress free and it promotes recycling at the same time! To book a preloved or business stall for this event contact: Rachael Gadd via email rachaelgadd@babyandchildrensmarket.co.uk or call 07866528654. Web: www.babyandchildrensmarket.co.uk

Sat 16–Sun 31 July (closed Sun & Mon except Sun 31) 10.00–16.00 (Sun 31 14.00–16.00). Bridgwater (Blake) Museum, Blake Street, Bridgwater TA6 3NB Somerset TA6 3NB Discover where the town’s historic buildings and castle stood; enjoy school children’s projects display; find out about the buildings that are still there; examine finds. For more information, call 01278 435599. Web: www.archaeologyfestival.org.uk/whatson

Sat 23 July 14.00–16.30. Fairfield House, Stogursey, Bridgwater TA5 1PU Somerset TA5 1PU Guided tours of Fairfield House; display and finds from recent excavations; finds identification; help dig a test pit; handle artefacts; ‘Buildings Detective’ activities. Part of the UK-wide CBA Festival of British Archaeology 16-31 July 2011. For more information: Bob Croft 01823 278805 (Somerset Heritage Services). Web: www.archaeologyfestival.org.uk/whatson

Fri 5 August. 7.30pm-10pm. Booking Essential. Tel: 0844 249 1895. Adult £14.50 Child £10 + transaction charge of £1.95. Fyne Court, The National Trust, Broomfield Bridgwater Somerset TA5 2EQ. A fantastic outdoor production of this famous play by the Lord Chamberlain’s Men, set in the grounds of Fyne Court. Get here early and enjoy a picnic beforehand. Please meet in the courtyard. Please bring warm waterproof clothing and a rug or chair to sit on. Website: www.nationaltrust.org.uk/events

Sat 6 August. Show opens at 2.00pm and closes 4.30pm Entry just 50p. Holford Village Hall, Holford, Bridgwater TA5 1SD. 7th Annual Show organised by Holford Gardeners Group. Members and non members enter their exhibits in a total of 61 classes in various categories including flowers, vegetables, floral art, baking, preserves, craft, art, photography and children's. Plants and produce will be on sale and cream teas are served in a lovely garden close to the hall. It is a very social and friendly Show.

Sun 7 August. Admission £2.50, Children free Open for charity. Grove Rise, Wembdon, Bridgwater Somerset TA6 7RT. Small, mature garden created over 25yrs. On steep hillside terraced to create an interesting design with variety of shrubs, mature trees, climbers and flowers. Seating areas with distant views of Quantock Hills.

Sun 14 August 2011. 2.30pm. The Walled Gardens of Cannington, Church Street, Cannington, TA5 2HA. For more information, please contact 01278 655042 or email walledgardens@bridgwater.ac.uk. Folksy Theatre presents an open-air production of Shakespeare's 'A Midsummer Night's Dream'. Traditionally seen as one of Shakespeare's more romantic and enchanting plays, A Midsummer Night's Dream is a comical yet dark tale, full of confused identities, youthful love, estranged fairies and thespian mechanicals. Bring along your picnics, blankets and folding chairs and enjoy this truly magical tale, in the beautiful setting of The Walled Gardens of Cannington.

Sun 28 August. 9.30am-12.30pm. £4.50 per person. Great Wood, near Bridgwater. Somerset TA5 1EN. A chance to learn about forest wildlife and meet a rare breeding owl. Suitable for ages 8-14 years. Booking essential - call Somerset Skills & Learning booking line on 0845 6880488 quoting course code NRQ11AOG011.Website: www.forestry.gov.uk/ greatwood.

Mon 29 August. 4pm. Tickets from The Walled Gardens (01278) 655042, Taunton Tourist Information Centre (01823) 336344 or See Tickets (0871) 2200260 www.seetickets.com A fairy tale like no other, this heart-warming story

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of magic, mayhem and mystery will delight and enthral children this summer, and don't forget that everyone is invited to come along to watch in fancy dress and join in with the fairy tale parade during the interval - whether seven or seventy! Adults £11, students and children £7, Families (2 adults and 2 children) £32. Gardens and tea rooms are open from 10am. Performance area open for picnics from 3pm. Please bring your own rugs or low-backed seating. Refreshments available.

Between 9am – 2pm. Bridgwater Town Centre To book a stall, contact Kevin at GPR Traders on 07834 088082. Every Friday

Fri 1 July 8pm. £6; £5 conc. James Franco (127 Hours, Eat Pray Love) stars as Beat poet Allen Ginsberg in Howl (nominated for the Golden Bear at Berlin and the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance), which covers the creation and impact of Ginsberg's most celebrated poem.

Sat 2 July 8pm. £10; £8 conc. The celebrated virtuoso partnership of harpist Máire Ní Chathasaigh (Irish Traditional Musician of the Year 2001), and England’s premier flatpicking guitarist, Chris Newman, has toured in twenty-two countries worldwide. With two new solo albums in the pipeline, the duo returns to BAC!

Thu 7 July 8pm. £5; £3 conc. Paul Bovett presents a slideshow to raise funds for Bridgwater Arts Centre. A portrait of Bridgwater through the years – events, buildings, people, the fair, the docks, BCL, a bit of archaeology, a few ‘before and after shots’.

Sat 16 July 8pm. £6; £5 conc. Oscar nominees Keira Knightley (Atonement) and Carey Mulligan (An Education) star with Andrew Garfield (The Social Network) in this haunting adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro's acclaimed novel.

Fri 8 July 8pm. £10; £8 conc. A glorious combination of gypsy hotclub, flamenco, jazz and contemporary classical influences underpin this funky and absorbing young band, TGC will be launching their new album on this nationwide tour, and will be joined by eminent flamenco dancer Ana Garcia.

Fri 22 July 8pm. £10; £7 conc; £7 friends. An evening of stand-up comedy with two of the UK's most popular rising comedy stars, prior to this summer's Edinburgh Festival.

Advertise your classes & business events in Townlife Monthly’s Next Issue Please mention Townlife Monthly when responding to adverts E: ada@townlifemonthly.co.uk W: www.townlifemonthly.co.uk T: 01278 588430

27


Fri 29 July 8pm. In Blake Gardens. Collection in aid of Bridgwater Arts Centre. Join us for an evening of music in Blake Gardens. Bridgwater Arts Centre’s Voice of the People choir will be joined by the Albion Horns and others to make this an joyful and memorable summer celebration.

Fri 1 - Fri 15 Jul. On Sat 11 June, the Chandos Society of Artists and Bridgwater Arts Centre challenged local artists to produce a piece of work, in situ, somewhere in Bridgwater, in the space of one day. This is your chance to see the completed works!.

Tue 19 - Fri 29 Jul. This exhibition brings together the work of students and teachers in Secondary and Special Schools from the Bridgwater Educational Trust and the Pupils Referral Units. Expect an eclectic mix of exciting multimedia artwork from our talented young people.

Sat 9 July 1.30am-12.30pm.£7; £5 conc. Scriptwriting workshop with our Writer in Residence Sinead Gillespie.

Wed 3 – Fri 5 Aug, 10.30am – 3.30pm. £24; £40 two friends / siblings booking together. For ages 13-16, create fabulous fashions from recycled materials and then strut your stuff in our fashion show on Friday at 7.30pm.

Wed 27 & Thu 28 Jul, Tue 9 & Wed 10 Aug, 10.30am - 3pm. 4 days: £36; £66 two friends / siblings booking together. Single day: £10. For ages 8-12, four fun -filled days of drama, art and craft. More details available on request.

Free art workshops coming to a park near you – dates and venues tba.

Free circus workshops – look out for the Little Big Top, dates and venues tba.

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To advertise, Contact Ada. T: 01278 588 430. E: ada@townlifemonthly.co.uk W: www.townlifemonthly.co.uk


hy do we have names or indeed surnames? Primitive personal labels, or names, originated soon after humans developed the power of speech, before written history, names were the only way to distinguish individuals in a world less crowded than we know today. To start with, only Christian (as we call them) names were used, such as Walscin who held Bridgwater in the Greater Doomsday Book in 1080 A.D. Later when the population began to grow sirenames or surnames were introduced to show the lineage of individuals by linking them to their father. Most people who were documented during this early time may have had a claim to the throne, so documenting their lineage was very important. When you take into account that the indigenous people of Bridgwater were iron age Celts from Central Europe that were invaded by the Romans; and when the Romans left there was no-one to stop the Saxon invasion; you begin to understand the diversity of Surnames associated with Bridgwater. Indeed Spaxton was named after a Dane, Spakr who settled on the knoll to the north of the church in the 9th Century.

Image courtesy of The National Archives 0.001 per million. The surname probably spelt it phonetically (as Hill was originally spelt Hyll, this it sounds), so several scribess is the Germanic influence which would write Hill as Hil, Hell or takes us back to when the Celts Hile. As your research reaches (from Central Europe) landed on back, also the alphabets letters our shores and include or derive change. Then of course you from variations of the Anglohave scribes with bad handSaxon name Hild meaning battle writing skills! or war. Dyment is of AngloWhat do you read on Saxon origin from 'Dayman' rethe image taken from the 1841 taining to 7th Century occupaBritish Census below? Sho Lantions. The first element 'Day' cock and Cliz W? The names are derives from 'Deye', a keeper of in fact Thomas Jancock and Elizalivestock, so Dyment actually beth Jancock means a herder or Sheppard and Sometimes to deduce not, as many believe, Diamond. the correct name it is wise to When people research look at other names written by their genealogy, they often misthe same scribe and make an take or miss vital clues in name informed decision. changes and therefore dismiss an ancestor believing they are By Ursula Martin not related whereas in fact they Bridgwater Gene Pool are. Not only is the variations in www.bridgwatergenepool.co.uk/ names problematic, the fact that whoever wrote those names

So where does our local names come from? Today the most common Surname in Bridgwater is Hill; making up 0.209 per million; and least Dyment, making up

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29


The Bridgwater Rotary Club

01278 424677

Bridgwater wolves F.C.

01278 422098

www.bridgwaterwolves.btck.co.uk Sydenham Family Centre

01278 447153

West Street Westfield United Reformed Church, TA6 7EU

01278 446771

St Mary C Of E Church

Bridgwater & District Choral Society 01278 422132

ST. Mary Street, A6 3EQ

Parallax Youth Dance Theatre

01278 422700

St Josephs R C Church

Sydenham Community Centre

01278 423327

9 Binford Place, Bridgwater, TA6 3NJ

The Royal British Legion Victoria Park Bowling Club

01278 683765 01278 444138

St John The Baptist C Of E Church

Bridgwater Pantomime Society

01278 451733

St Mary Magdalene Stockland

Great Western Railway Staff

01278 21599

27 Brook Street The Rectory, Cannington. TA5 2HP

Association

01278 424972. 01278 422703. 01278 422540

Blake Place. TA6 5AU

Bridgwater Methodist Church

01278 652953 01278 458371

Bridgwater Sports & Social Club

01278 446215

Monmouth Street, Bridgwater, TA6 5EQ-

Bridgwater Model Railways

01278 427646

St Marys Church

01278 66429

Bridgwater Flower Club

01278 722653

Christ Church Unitarian Chapel

01278 459659

Bridgwater Folk Dance Club

01823 491662

Dampiet Street, Bridgwater. TA6 3LZ

robertfolk01@hotmail.com

Third Thursday Club

The League of Friends of the

Chris Church Unitarian Chapel, Dampiet Street, Bridgwater. TA6 3LZ

01278 50827

Bridgwater Hospital and Community Bridgwater Lions Club International 01278-421407

Advertiser Information

Word Search Page 8: Not merely a nation but a nation of nations. ~ Lyndon B. Johnson

30

United Reformed Church .

01278 459659

Quaker Meeting House

01278 671276

Frian Street , Bridgwater, TA6 3LH

Spot the Difference (Page 29) 1. hat 2. starfish 3. bucket 4. flake

5. pattern on shorts 6. cloud missing 7. mouth changed 8. toggle on shorts 9. toe missing 10. belly button

Whilst every care is taken to ensure accuracy, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for loss, damage or omission caused by error in the printing of an advert. All artwork is accepted on the strict condition that permission has been given for use in the publication. Adverts are accepted on the understanding that descriptions of goods and services are fair and accurate. Townlife Monthly does not officially endorse any advertising/ editorial material included within the publication. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in any retrieval system or transmitted in any form-electronic, mechanical, photocopying or otherwise- without the prior consent of the publisher. Publisher: Townlife Monthly. T: 01278 588 430 E: ada@townlifemonthly.co.uk W: www.townlifemonthly.co.uk

To advertise, Contact Ada. T: 01278 588 430. E: ada@t.ownlifemonthly.co.uk W: www.townlifemonthly.co.uk


Ashcott Primary School Brymore School Cannington CofE Primary School Catcott Primary School Chilton Trinity School Cossington County Primary School East Bridgwater Community School Eastover Primary School Elmwood School Hamp Infant School Haygrove School North Petherton Infants School North Petherton Junior School Pawlett County Primary School Penrose School Sedgemoor Manor Community Junior School Somerset Bridge Primary School St John & St Francis CofE VA Primary School Robert Blake Science College

01458 210464 01278 652369 01278 652368 01278 722527 01278 455631 01278 722451 01278 422841 01278 422693 01278 422866 01278 422012 01278 455531 01278 662442 01278 662614 01278 684151 01278 423660 01278 424725 01278 424006 01278 456918

NHS Direct

0845 4647

North Petherton Surgery

01278 662223

Mill Street North Petherton Bridgwater Somerset TA6 6LX

Taunton Road Medical Centre

01278 720000

16 Taunton Road, Bridgwater TA6 3LS

East Quay Medical Centre

01278 444666

East Quay, Bridgwater TA6 4GP

Victoria Park Medical Centre

01278 437100

Victoria Park Drive, Bridgwater, TA6 7AS

Somerset Bridge Medical Centre

0844 4772594

Stockmoor Park, Taunton Road, Bridgwater, TA6 6LD

Cranleigh Gardens Medical Centre

01278 433335

Cranleigh Gardens, Bridgwater, TA6 5JS

Bridgwater General Hospital

01278 451 501

Salmon Parade, Bridgwater, TA6 5AH

Rowlands Phamacy

01278 423015

New East Quay Medical Centre/East Quay, TA6 4GP

01278 456243

Lloyds Pharmacy

01278 445333

Redgate Health Centre, TA6 5BF

Lloyds Pharmacy Avon and Somerset Constabulary Sedgemoor District Council

0845 4567000 0800 585 360 / 01278 552400

01278 444756

14, Taunton Rd, TA6 3LS

Sainsburys Pharmacy

01278 422108

The Clink, TA6 4AB

Lloyds Pharmacy

01278 662288

105, Fore St, TA6 6RY Tel: 01278 455236 Email: advice@sedgemoorcab.org.uk Web: www.sedgemoorcab.org.uk Opening Times: Mon-Sat: 8am - 10am. Mon-Thurs: 1pm4pm

Bridgwater Library. Binford Place,TA6 3LF Mon, Tues, Thurs & Fri (9:00—17:30) Wed (9:00—18:00). Sat (9:30—16:00)

Ian Liddell-Grainger T:01278 458383. W:www.somersetwest.org.uk

Forbouys PLC (Angel Place) - Mon-Fri Post office closes at 17:30. Sat:15:00 Parkay (2-5 Mountbatten House) Mon-Fri Post Office closes at 15:30. Sat: 12:30 Wemdon (26 Wembdon Hill) Mon-Fri Post office closes at 17:30. Sat: 12:30

National Rail Enquiries Eurostar Bristol Airport Exeter Airport London Heathrow National Express Webber Bus

08457 484950 08705 186186 0871 3444344 01392 367433 0870 0000123 08717 81 81 78 0800 0963039

Christmas and New Year 2010/11 February (spring) half term Easter holiday May (summer) half term Summer holiday

20 Dec - 5 Jan 2011 21 - 25 Feb 2011 9 - 25 Apr 2011 30 May - 3 Jun 2011 25 Jul - 31 Aug 2011

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31



July.August Issue: Townlife Monthly