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INTERNATIONALE BAUAUSSTELLUNG HAMBURG

World City Spaces

INTERNATIONALE BAUAUSSTELLUNG IBA HAMBURG GMBH AM VERINGHOF 9 21107 HAMBURG

TEL. +49 (0)40.226 227-0 FAX +49 (0)40.226 227-15

INFO@IBA-HAMBURG.DE WWW.IBA-HAMBURG.DE

Projects for the future of the metropolis


FOREWORD

Welcome to the future of the metropolis

Contents

Today’s world is full of challenges that crystallize in the city, in metropolitan spaces.

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FOREWORD

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MISSION: PRESENT THE FUTURE

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IBA HAMBURG AND ITS THREE KEY THEMES

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1. COSMOPOLIS – TURNING DIVERSITY INTO STRENGTH

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Projects for the future of co-existence in the metropolis

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2. METROZONES – BUILDING A NEW CITY WITHIN THE CITY

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Projects for the future of the “inner peripheries” of the metropolis

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3. CITIES AND CLIMATE CHANGE – GROWTH THAT RESPECTS THE ENVIRONMENT

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Projects for an environment-friendly future in the metropolis

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WHERE IT’S AT: THE AREA IBA IS PRESENTING

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IBA CONVENTION: JOINING FORCES FOR THE FUTURE OF THE METROPOLIS

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IBA PLAYERS: CITIZENS, DOERS AND EXPERTS

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IBA PROCESS: SEVEN YEARS, THREE PRESENTATIONS, ONE AIM

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Senator Axel Gedaschko (left) and IBA Director Uli Hellweg

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e now live in a globalized world, full of new opportunities and challenges. They loom largest in the metropolises, in big cities – those places where the strands of globalization intertwine, places like the growing city of Hamburg. These are the points where the opportunities and challenges of globalization crystallize. To find solutions to the issues that immediately concern our future, we must go and look at our metropolises. The Internationale Bauausstellung (International Building Exhibition) does just that – it is focussing on the metropolis of Hamburg. For seven years, from 2007 to 2013, IBA Hamburg will be opening a window on the future. The IBA will show what tomorrow’s metropolis might be like – featuring not only new buildings but also social and cultural projects that aim to answer some of the most urgent questions of our times, which are: what needs to happen if an increasingly international society is to co-exist in peace? How do we overcome the physical and mental barriers in our metropolises? How do we build a new city within the city – and occupy spaces that have not previously been considered suitable living areas? And how to get a grip on the enormous challenges of climate change? In taking up these key issues IBA Hamburg is following the lead of previous building exhibitions; over the past century or so they always pointed the way ahead for their generation.

The IBA location – Hamburg’s Elbe island – is a prime example of the opportunities and problems that become apparent in any debate on the future of metropolises: few districts in our city are as international in character or display so many contrasts in such a small area. But at the same time, few parts of the city offer so many opportunities to try out new ideas - thanks in part to the engagement of local residents, whose input will enrich the IBA Hamburg process. And where in the city, if not on this island in the Elbe, is there greater awareness that even large cities are vulnerable to natural disasters and the results of climate change? Many still remember the great flood of 1962. We have a duty to use methods that have a benign impact on the climate when we build here – just as we must look for new ways to counter the effects of climate change. IBA Hamburg is far more than an exhibition in the conventional sense. It is a seven-year programme of action which involves all levels of municipal politics. The projects presented in this brochure are just the beginning. Many more new ideas will have poured in by 2013 and many will be realized together with the local residents and investors. We must join forces and take longterm action if we wish to deal with the question marks hanging over the future of metropolises. IBA Hamburg is treading new paths: it has put a new type of municipal treaty in place, the IBA Convention, which unites many important institutions and companies in Hamburg in the role of IBA partners. This is a first in the history of building exhibitions. Another innovation is the major role that culture is playing in this IBA. Hundreds of culture events and arts projects, a few of which are presented in this brochure, will open up new perspectives on places that have kept their light under a bushel far too long. Obviously, the future does not end in 2013. And so IBA Hamburg is to provide the impetus to keep on re-inventing the city. The exhibition aims to create a culture of cooperation that will ensure that up to and beyond 2013 people shape the metropolis together, so it can meet all the fresh challenges that lie ahead. This brochure is about the first steps down the road. We hope you enjoy your preview of the metropolis of the future.

Senator Axel Gedaschko, President of the Ministry for Urban Development and the Environment of the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg, Chairman of the Supervisory Board of IBA Hamburg GmbH

Uli Hellweg, Managing Director IBA Hamburg GmbH

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Mission: present the future The Internationale Bauausstellung Hamburg shows projects for the future of the metropolis. There are three different dimensions to this task.

The future bubbles up through the fault lines of the metropolis

Hamburg’s Elbe islands – the other side of the metropolis

The large city, the metropolis, is where the streams of global merchandise and different national cultures intersect, a place offering freedom and opportunity, but also producing contrasts and tensions. The most urgent issues of our time loom larger here, as if under a magnifying glass.

In common with many other European cities, Hamburg has gained the status of international metropolis during the past few decades and its metropolitan contrasts and construction sites are now increasingly evident - especially on and around Hamburg’s Elbe islands, where town and port, marshland and water meld into a unique urban landscape. Their faces deeply lined by road and rail arteries and marked by abrupt cross-overs between milieus and cultures, the Elbe island Wilhelmsburg, the Veddel peninsula and Harburg upriver port are prime examples of the “inner periphery” – a space where the tensions and opportunities of globalization clash with greater force than elsewhere. IBA Hamburg is dedicating its attention to this special metropolitan space, its possibilities and problems and its areas of conflict which form the crucibles to mould the future of society as a whole. But the cracks in the metropolis spread out deep into the country. So every concept for the future of the metropolis also seeks to solve the major social issues of our time. IBA Hamburg addresses these issues, offering new spaces where the freedom and possibilities of the metropolis can unfold. Spaces that help channel the contrasts and tensions within urban communities so that friction becomes a positive force propelling the innovative drive of the metropolis.

What are we going to do about climate change? How can cities cope with the pressures of globalization without sacrificing their traditions? How can a metropolis be an economic success and still remain a place for all cultures and layers of society? How can we prevent the urban community falling apart without completely papering over its cracks and diversity, thereby stifling the fascination and innovative energy of the metropolis? It has been said before: society’s rifts do have value, because often the new first emerges where different cultural or social groups come into contact. This is where bridges must be built and new connections sought - the old recipes are rarely of use here.

IBA Hamburg and its three key themes Seven building exhibitions have been held in Germany since 1901 – but this is the first time for Hamburg. In common with most of the earlier building exhibitions, IBA Hamburg is far more than an exhibition in the classic sense. The aim is to show models for solving cities’ most pressing problems – be they development issues or matters of the municipal economy and urban community. And so the net results of this IBA will be far more than architecture and new buildings. The objective is to seek new forms of social and cultural co-existence in the city – and offer solutions which in turn drive planning and architecture. At the heart of this IBA are the core issues of metropolitan development. IBA Hamburg is seeking concepts for shaping the future of the metropolis, whether they take the form of specific buildings, social and cultural projects, events, dialogues or publications; it has chosen three key themes to guide this search.

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At a sociocultural level, IBA Hamburg will show what benefits the metropolis derives from the international urban community – the COSMOPOLIS. Within the framework of urban development IBA Hamburg will show the “inner peripheries” – the METROZONES – mutating into unique, attractive places. The focus topic CITIES AND CLIMATE CHANGE is about realizing a vision of a metropolis that counters climate change.

Please read on to find out more about the three key themes of this IBA Hamburg and see how the metropolis of the future is taking shape in the centre of Hamburg.


THE THREE KEY THEMES OF IBA HAMBURG

How do we want to share our space?

How m man any Go y fo r the ds are t oo Elbe islan d?

1. Cosmopolis — Turning diversity into strength How can an urban community that is increasingly international realize its full potential? IBA Hamburg gives some answers.

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ur cities are becoming ever more colourful, like a mosaic, increasingly diverse and international - an ongoing enrichment. But diversity also leads to greater conflict: some are pushed aside when new groups move in, their customs appear strange, the neighbours are different. Every community looks for places and space of its own. And segregation is a close companion of diversity. There is tremendous opportunity in the marginal areas, where cracks appear in the urban community, the places where different cultures and lifestyles meet head on. Because it takes the combination of different views and ideas to create something really new – new ideas, new products, new attitudes to life. And this process is not possible unless the threatening divides in the metropolis are bridged – or not allowed to open up in the first place.

The first of IBA Hamburg’s key themes is co-existence in the metropolis. Specific building projects join with social and cultural projects to create a “Cosmopolis” between HafenCity and Harburg: new urban spaces where the cultures that make up the urban community of the 21st century can unfold, and where people are not forced to integrate but given the opportunity to build bridges. New social and cultural programmes develop, new options for making a contribution to the shaping of an urban community. Friction generates energy. That is good for the city – if the energy is used constructively. The following pages present some of the first IBA projects and programmes for Hamburg “Cosmopolis” – the metropolis that harvests its social energy.

More than 40 nationalities on some 28 square kilometres: Hamburg’s Elbe islands mean diversity, internationality, cracks in society and threatening divides; but they also stand for bridges and opportunities. They offer, for example, a chance to show how different cultures and layers of society can develop a common appreciation of their city; for example a chance to create spaces that meet the many demands of an international urban community.

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Street market on Stübenplatz

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THE THREE KEY THEMES OF IBA HAMBURG

What Cosmopolis is about Projects for the future of co-existence in the metropolis

The learning metropolis

Cities4All

“The Learning Metropolis” is a newly launched education drive for the Elbe islands. Its aim is to improve the prospects for the children and young people living in the district. But there is also a desire to attract more young families to live on the island. More than 100 facilities are linking up to form neighbourhood clusters known as “IBA Werften”: community centres with a range of educational, sports and social activities, with theatres or media houses for culture programmes. These new community centres will offer programmes to improve language proficiency, raise the level of school-leaving qualifications gained and better coordinate the wide range of educational opportunities available. Cooperating with children’s day-care centres and schools, new programmes for life-long learning and appreciation of culture are being put in place. Bi- or multilingualism is recognized as an asset worth building on. So the education drive also promotes tolerant co-existence on the Elbe islands.

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Other projects in the pipeline

Education drive for the Elbe islands

Public space belongs to everyone. The multi-field project „Cities4All“ investigates the functional and design requirements of a “cosmopolitan” urban space, in order to dot the Elbe island with spaces that are open to all and may be used to meet a great variety of cultural needs. 03

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Global neighbourhood

Open House The “Open House” programme is a project designed to let people plan their neighbourhood together. Its aim is to create new, flexible types of community residence that meet the varying lifestyle needs of an international urban society.

Veringhöfe This too is part of what Cosmopolis means: diversity among the residents spells diversity in working lives. The “Veringhöfe” project aims to provide opportunities for metropolitan residents to combine the different styles of living and working that result from their cultural backgrounds.

Residents from 31 countries shape their neighbourhood The south Reiherstieg district is one of the Elbe island’s most culturally diverse neighbourhoods. 1500 people from 31 nations live in the 820 apartments owned by the municipal housing society SAGA GWG. This makes it an ideal choice to try new forms of co-existence between the cultures. In the context of the IBA Hamburg this housing complex, which is in need of refurbishment, has been declared a “global neighbourhood” and thus a pilot project for intercultural living – plans include building alterations to meet the varying needs of the residents and programmes that promote inter-cultural exchange. The challenge is to reconcile no fewer than 31 different cultural ideas about neighbourhood relations and lifestyles. A new form of participation has been introduced, called an “intercultural planning workshop”, which is charged with the task of recognizing potential sources of conflict and including specific cultural requirements in the alteration plans.

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Gateway to the world Education for the entire neighbourhood A district that aims to attract families needs good educational facilities. Schools here must become forces for social integration and be turned into community centres for the entire district that remain open all day – offering leisure pastimes and creative activities, providing a centre for events and a meeting point for families. The concept of an educational centre that serves an entire neighbourhood is a core element of the “Education drive for the Elbe islands” and the “Gateway to the world” project is one example of the scheme at work. Among the schools taking part are Buddeschule, the Kirchdorf/Wilhelmsburg grammar school (high school) and the local speech therapy school. The children’s day-care centres, facilities for adult education, advisory services for young people and other groups have joined the schools in creating a programme that meets the needs of people in many different circumstances.

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FOCUS ON CULTURE

Picnic monument Kirchdorf South An installation of intercultural arts and cuisine for a sense of community Every city has them and the Elbe island is no exception: derelict places, intermediate spaces, left-over areas alongside transport corridors, gaps and cracks in the structure of the city – but such places can also offer the local residents free space for spontaneous activities. The picnic monument, one of 22 “Projects of Cultural Diversity” sponsored by IBA is an artist’s take on how such a place can be turned into a special meeting point for the neighbourhood – bang in the centre of high-density Kirchdorf South housing area. The project comes from ProQuartier Hamburg and is one example of the “different take” on urban development topics that artists have. IBA Hamburg has deliberately enlisted their help in order to give a greater sense of identity to places on the island. It is like watching a shimmering new being emerge from its cocoon among the apartment blocks: before residents’ eyes the three-metre sculpture of zinc plate transforms into a huge, translucent,

glowing plastic bubble. Up to 80 residents can gather here on three evenings, out in the open but protected from the elements, to enjoy culinary and artistic treats a celebration of the moment that creates new neighbourliness and offers an unusual view of a part of the metropolis that is normally seen in a completely different light.

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THE THREE KEY THEMES OF IBA HAMBURG

2. Metrozones — Building a new city within the city

Where doe of the m s the future etropol is lie?

What development opportunities are hidden in the marginal and transition zones of the metropolis? IBA Hamburg gives some answers.

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veryone knows the kind of place: traffic arteries, bridges, railway lines, canals. And tucked in between, new office blocks, halls and what’s left of old neighbourhoods. Punctuated by unkempt greenery, scrub, perhaps a forsaken garden. All of a sudden, there’s open country, a wide vista, peace. Followed by noise, traffic, speed. It’s like a ride on an urban roller-coaster.

Many European cities have spaces like this, often on the edges of the inner cities, where the city’s roads and rail lines reach into the suburbs and spread out into the surrounding districts, the places that used to be major industrial sites – many now derelict – where the housing estates once built for the factory workforce are no longer inhabited by industrial workers. These areas offer completely new opportunities for urban development. And Hamburg’s Elbe island is a good example of such metropolitan inner peripheries – an urban patchwork set between city and port, factories and marsh, noise and country idyll, slashed by the major south-bound traffic arteries fanning out from the centre of Hamburg. Very few other places have so many “inner peripheries” on such a small patch of land. And not many other places offer such diversity - nor so much space for a new city within the city: at times countryside, now waterfront, now urban, now green spaces - and never more than a few kilometres from downtown Hamburg.

burg s m l e h l i W What can orf? d n e p p E do for

At the crossing between Neuhöfer Straße and Reiherstieg Hauptdeich

With its second key theme IBA Hamburg seeks to provide a concept for the future of the inner peripheries: the aim is to show that completely new, exciting urban spaces -‘Metrozones’ - can be created on the Elbe island in the centre of Hamburg, i.e. places that build on the cracks and diversity of the inner peripheries and whose harsh contrasts can, however, be bridged with new links and networks. IBA Hamburg presents specific projects to demonstrate a future for these places and suggests some new legal and political instruments to help settle conflicts between neighbours who are often so very different from each other. Because here, in the Metrozones as elsewhere, it is clear that only productive co-existence can turn the diversity of the metropolis into an advantage. Please take a look at the IBA Hamburg projects that are shaping the tension-ridden contrasts in the inner peripheries into a new image of the city – the Metrozones.

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THE THREE KEY THEMES OF IBA HAMBURG

What the Metrozones are about Projects for the future of the “inner peripheries” of the metropolis

Urban compatibilities 07

Making the Metrozones livable The Elbe island offers space for new residents in the centre of the metropolis. Some of the housing sites are very close to motorways and major roads, to wide expanses of railway track or the port, where containers are handled around the clock. How can a way be found to create new living space here, despite the noise and traffic? The multi-field project “Urban compatibilities” investigates intelligent solutions for urban and landscape development, innovative noise protection facilities and new kinds of legal instruments, which are being developed with experts. The aim is to make port and city good neighbours: to ensure that the port continues to flourish – and that the city can continue to grow in the Metrozone of the Elbe island.

New Wilhelmsburg Central From inner periphery to new centre Hardly anywhere in Wilhelmsburg are the Elbe island’s inner peripheries more obvious than at its geographical centre. A major road and a railway corridor have ripped the district apart and created a no man‘s land between the two transport arteries. The IBA projects for Wilhelmsburg Central resemble the interlocking pieces of a puzzle made to fill this gap. An important ministry is being located here and will bring fresh impetus to the district, a navigable waterway will lead from the downtown boulevard Jungfernstieg into the heart of the Elbe island. Above all the park created for the International Garden Exhibition in 2013 will be a tremendous facelift for Wilhelmsburg Central. Plans feature a “new kind of people’s park” offering numerous sports, wellness and leisure facilities, embracing allotments and water courses. The residents of the Elbe island will then have “their own” municipal park, specially designed to appeal to the diverse origins of the local population.

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Opening up Spreehafen harbour Utilizing the harbour as open space for the district A typical problem for Metrozones is the competition for space between leisure pursuits, residential and industrial use – and the Spreehafen north of the Reiherstieg district is no exception. The local residents and visitors have great difficulty in finding any access to the port basin, one of Hamburg’s largest, because it is behind the customs fence separating freeport from city. The residents of Wilhelmsburg themselves have repeatedly called for better access to the water. The “Leap across the Elbe” that is a guiding principle of development in Hamburg will not happen unless barriers like the customs fence come down. Landscaping and town planning measures are to be used to better link Wilhelmsburg as a whole with the surrounding port landscape. This is the only way to ensure that the residents of the district and visitors can experience its special qualities – its setting between downtown, open country and the port.

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Other projects in the pipeline

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New Hamburg Terraces They are widespread in Hamburg, the terrace houses and courtyard buildings dating back to the boom years of the Gründerzeit (late 19th century). In their modern reincarnation they provide space for people to work where they live - an important contribution to the infill process in the inner peripheries and the search for new forms of urban dwelling.

Harburg Schloss Island For some years Harburg upriver port has been North Germany’s up-and-coming high-tech location. A new residential and working neighbourhood adds dwellings to the mix on Harburg’s quaysides – and this part of the Metrozone is to become a genuine waterfront neighbourhood.

Reiherstieg Park This is one of the most unusual sites on the Elbe island: Reiherstieg bend where the vast hulk of the Rethe warehouse stands close to the Rethe lifting bridge. A waterfront port-and-countryside park is to be carved out here, built on the very contrasts of the inner peripheries.

Temporary city Open space in the metropolis is a scarce commodity. Metrozones have derelict areas which provide such space, and the Elbe island has its share of them. On an empty site in Reiherstieg district we shall be experimenting with inexpensive interim uses for the space, which could be the template for other derelict sites.

FOCUS ON CULTURE

FLSHBX 3.0 Floating musical performance and universal art work The idea behind “FLSHBX 3.0” is to play with places in the Metrozone. Places that are really too restricted, in the wrong position or too unfinished to be suitable for any kind of performance – they are left-over spaces and niches under bridges or in buildings that are inaccessible or inconvenient to visit. All the more exciting, therefore, to discover these spaces. For IBA Hamburg FLSHBX 3.0 has taken to the water with a floating pontoon made of recycled planks of wood. Placed under one of the many bridges in the Metrozone Elbe island, it opens the observer’s eyes to a waterscape full of surprises. On the pontoon stands a universal art work made of crates which

form the backdrop to a 30-day long roundthe-clock happening involving performance, music and light shows. And when they start to produce the silk-screen painted t-shirts there too, the atmosphere is a scintillating blend of party and universal art work.

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THE THREE KEY THEMES OF IBA HaMBURG

So wha t’s a bio-hou se then ?

3. Cities and climate change — Growth that respects the environment How may we reconcile growth with sustainability? IBA Hamburg gives some answers.

es Can hous float?

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etropolises – each one is a centre of economic power, trade and transport, a place for major projects and iconic architecture, competing for primacy with other big cities. The metropolis has to be prepared for dynamic growth. And its citizens have to take responsibility for the world we live in. Because the world’s metropolises, by concentrating people, construction work, transport and industry in one area, play a crucial role in climate change. Big cities have to perform a difficult balancing act: they have to keep up with their big city rivals – which calls for the adequate provision of space for infrastructure and investment. But they must also be aware of their special responsibility for the environment - and that means finding ways in which growth can be reconciled with climate protection. Hamburg, as a growing European metropolis, is a prime example of the tensions that build up. On the Elbe island in particular, growth and environmental issues clash head on. On the one side there is the steadily growing port – symbol of Hamburg’s globalized economy – and the desire to boost the Elbe island’s position as a residential part of the growing city by creating new urban neighbourhoods.

Bunthäuser Point

On the other side there is the natural landscape, some of it untouched, with the Elbe island marshlands dotted with old farmsteads and drainage ditches. The conflict is exacerbated by the very location of the Elbe island. Ever since the great flood of 1962, it has been obvious that low-lying areas such as these are very vulnerable to the effects of climate change. IBA Hamburg’s third key theme addresses the major issue of reconciling growth with climate protection by offering a clear vision: “Cities and Climate Change” – shorthand for the climatefriendly metropolis that grows without placing additional strain on the environment. How can the construction industry further reduce consumption of resources? How can a city generate energy instead of merely consuming it? How can the effects of climate change be countered, without having to build higher and higher dykes? The IBA projects dedicated to “Cities and Climate Change” provide some answers. But please see for yourself on the following pages.

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THE THREE KEY THEMES OF IBA HAMBURG

What climate change in the city is about Projects for an environment-friendly future in the metropolis

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Georgswerder Heights New sources of energy

City resources – construction’s carbon footprint

One can’t miss the huge white wind turbines standing on the grassy hills of Georgswerder Heights like sentinels at the gate. The view is wonderful from up here, in the middle of the Elbe island, just two kilometres from downtown Hamburg. This 40-metre high hill was formed by rubbish from the Georgswerder landfill that was closed down more than 20 years ago. Between 1985 and 1995 an exhaustive remediation programme was implemented and now the area is to stand as a symbol of the metropolis that is taking a pro-active approach to climate change. Above ground the small windmills are to be replaced by new turbines with far greater capacity and on the ground a large array of photovoltaic equipment is to be placed in a way that follows the contours of the hillside. Underground, it is possible that the leachate from the landfill could be used to generate heat. The vision: rubbish is turned into energy and the metropolis recycles the detritus of prosperity.

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Other projects in the pipeline

for the metropolis – below, on and above the ground

The IBA Hamburg projects should be climate neutral, meaning that overall they should not increase Hamburg’s output of CO2. The multifield project “City Resources” has made this its aim, seeking to tap the energy resources already in the metropolis and making climatefriendly construction methods the IBA standard. 14

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Energy bunker

Climate-friendly houses, Haulander Weg This housing estate is greener than green: situated next to the park for the International Garden Exhibition 2013, the building plans implement the latest standards for climate-friendly construction methods.

Kirchdorfer Wiesen Can one make the landscape a quality that people experience as part of their home without disturbing the delicate marshlands; is that possible? The “Kirchdorfer Wiesen – Living with the landscape” project is designed to show that a metropolis can indeed reconcile sustainable urban growth with protecting the countryside.

A memorial supplies energy for the neighbourhood The weather-blackened concrete of the Wilhelmsburg flak bunker towers 40 metres above the grass in the south Reiherstieg district. The only surviving such bunkers, remnants of the Second World War, are in Vienna and Hamburg. Today they serve as anti-war memorials and provide an impressive backdrop for new activities. The Wilhelmsburg flak bunker, visible from afar, has become one of the island’s landmarks and is now to be turned into an “energy bunker” and thus a symbol of the Elbe island’s pioneering role in eco-technology. In future it could support 4000 square metres of solar panels and house a gas and wood chip burning furnace that would generate power for the nearby “global neighbourhood”. As part of the structural remediation of the bunker a hall would be created measuring 48,000 cubic metres, a spectacular setting for all manner of events.

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Floating youth hostel Built on water

FOCUS ON CULTURE

Surviving the Suburb A climate machine for survival training Why do discussions about climate change always have to be strictly academic? The Dutch concept artist Ton Matton created his “Surviving the Suburb” project to make an unusual, playful contribution to the topic. The Elbe island’s residents and visitors can manipulate the “climate machine” to influence the local climate of a green space in Wilhelmsburg, for example with bulbs in the street lights, a shower on the edge of the road or a hot air

blower. A piece of public space is set aside for fruit and vegetable beds, and the idea of the project is to tweak the local climate to suit the plants’ needs – dryer, wetter, warmer or colder. In the process, residents who originally come from more exotic climes can talk about their experience of weather conditions with other residents. Discussions, theatre performances and readings provide tips on how to survive the suburbs.

IBA Hamburg will attract many visitors to the Elbe island: tourists, day-trippers, professionals from across the world and students, all eager to see “in situ” how this district is being transformed. Starting in 2009, it is planned to show visitors some unusual dwellings produced in this crucible for the future of the metropolis set in the north of the island, just a brief train ride from Hamburg downtown. Germany’s first-ever floating youth hostel could be anchored in Müggenburg customs port. But this project is more than just one more maritime attraction for Hamburg. Floating buildings are one possible answer to the higher storm tides that many cities must fear as a result of climate change. Hamburg is testing this idea with its floating youth hostel and creating a symbol that will serve a broad spectrum of the public as a potent reminder of the consequences of climate change.

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0 1 Global neighbourhood 02 Gateway to the world 03 Open House 04 Veringhöfe 05 New Wilhelmsburg Central 06 Opening up Spreehafen harbour 07 New Hamburg Terraces 08 Harburg Schloss Island 09 Reiherstieg Park 10 Temporary city 11 Georgswerder Heights 12 Energy bunker 13 Floating youth hostel 14 Climate-friendly houses Haulander Weg 15 Kirchdorfer Wiesen

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Points of reference 01 Wilhelmsburg community centre 02 Wilhelmsburg civic hall 03 WEZ – Wilhelmsburg shopping mall

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Multi-field projects covering the entire IBA area

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19


IBA CONVENTION PUBLIKATIONSREIHE

IBA PLAYERS

Joining forces for the future of the metropolis

Citizens, doers and experts

IBA Hamburg – a framework for cooperation and innovation

Many players support the IBA process

T

he IBA Hamburg offers a unique chance, both for the development of Hamburg itself and for the future of cities in general. Like its famous predecessors, this IBA seeks to provide models to address the issues that currently concern town planners. If it is to act as a guide for others, IBA Hamburg must mobilize all the resources of the city: people from the worlds of business, government, politics, culture and the ordinary citizens. The open structure IBA has created for consultation and organization makes all these groups partners and participants in the IBA Hamburg process. IBA Hamburg is thus continuing on a course already marked out by other building exhibitions: to create a framework for cooperation and innovation that brings together professionals, stake-holders and citizens and makes the future of the city everybody’s business.

The task of organizing this interactive process has been entrusted to a specially established management company, the IBA Hamburg GmbH. It acts as the chief networker and smoothes the way for IBA projects, which are either developed in cooperation with others or at the initiative of private companies. IBA projects have to meet certain criteria – they must set standards in terms of their social, constructional or environmental value. And they must make an innovative contribution to the key themes of the IBA. IBA Hamburg defines the standards for IBA projects and coordinates their implementation: from project development for new or existing properties and undeveloped sites, to clarifying the financial and legal issues to providing financial support for projects – and in individual cases IBA Hamburg GmbH can build on its own account.

IBA Convention A new kind of municipal treaty engages society To concentrate the strengths of the metropolis IBA Hamburg has introduced a revolutionary new idea – the IBA Convention. For the first time in the history of building exhibitions the major players in the city have agreed on specific aims for the IBA. More than 50 companies and institutions from all parts of society signed the IBA Convention on 8 May 2007 at an official reception given in the Town Hall by the city’s First Mayor.

The IBA partners undertake to work together as trusted partners. The aim is to form public private partnerships for joint projects, to engage in mutually supportive PR work and to take steps to assure the quality of the projects. Over and above that the partners are to contribute their professional, constructive advice. Thus an important aim of IBA Hamburg has been attained: to engage society in the process.

From the IBA Convention

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Internationale Gartenschau Hamburg 2013 GmbH

This is where the IBA process takes shape; more than 20 permanent employees and free-lancers work for IBA Hamburg GmbH, coordinating the IBA project from their base on the Elbe island, networking the vast variety of partners with whom the building exhibition maintains a dialogue and informing the general public about the IBA process. Directors of IBA Hamburg GmbH are: Uli Hellweg, Heiner Baumgarten

The International Garden Exhibition (IGS) opens to the public in Hamburg-Wilhelmsburg when the IBA process reaches its climax in 2013 and is an important part of the IBA process. So the two management companies have close links with each other. Directors of the Internationale Gartenschau Hamburg 2013 GmbH: Heiner Baumgarten, Uli Hellweg

Keeping the populace well-informed: Meet the Citizens events Wilhelmsburg community centre, located in the centre of the island, is the venue for Meet the Citizens events organized by IBA and IGS. Several times a year everyone is invited to learn more about the current topics and projects. A Meet the Citizens event is not authorized to take decisions but it does play a vital role in the exchange between citizens and IBA/IGS.

Government and administration have a say too: the IBA Hamburg GmbH Supervisory Board Senator Axel Gedaschko (chairman), President of the Ministry for Urban Development and the Environment . State Councillor Dr. Detlef Gottschalck (dep. chairman), Ministry of Culture . Dr. Bernd Egert, Senate Director in the Ministry for Economics and Labour Affairs . Harald Fritze, Head of the Directorate, Ministry for Social, Family and Health Matters and Consumer Protection . State Councillor Dr. Michael Voges, Ministry for Education & Sports . Prof. Jörn Walter, Chief Building Officer of the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg

Expert advice from all over the world: The IBA Hamburg Advisory Panel Prof. Christophe Girot, Head of the Institute for Landscape Architecture, ETH Zurich . Martin Heller, Managing Director Heller Enterprises, Zurich . Prof. Dieter Läpple, Professor for Urban and Regional Economy, HafenCity University Hamburg . Prof. Saskia Sassen, Professor of Sociology, University of Chicago, and Centennial Visiting Professor, London School of Economics .

Utilizing local knowledge: the participation committee A participation committee consisting of 24 citizens and seven politicians from the IBA area actively assists in the IBA and IGS planning and implementation process and complements the work of the existing advisory councils for rehabilitation and district matters on the island. This method ensures that concepts for the future of the metropolis are built on the foundation of local experience and knowledge.

Prof. Hartmut Topp, Head of the Institute for Mobility and Transport (imove), TU Kaiserslautern . Prof. Kunibert Wachten, Head of the Institute for Urban and Regional planning, RWTH Aachen

»... It is not the number of projects that counts but their quality and suitability as models ... « »... The signatories to this Convention agree that it will not be possible to develop a forward-looking planning culture unless the local residents and businessmen and women are able to play their part and be heard in the process. A planning culture that relies on cooperative action – and not opposition or unilateral action – will therefore be an integrative feature of the IBA process ... «

IBA Hamburg GmbH

Dr. Harald Falckenberg, art collector from Hamburg . Lutz Basse, Chairman of the Board, SAGA GWG . Uli Hellweg, Managing Director IBA Hamburg GmbH . Ole von Beust, First Mayor of the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg . Dr. Karl-Joachim Dreyer, President of Hamburg Chamber of Commerce (from left to right)

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IBA PROCESS PUBLIKATIONSREIHE

Seven years, three presentations, one aim

Acknowledgements

IBA Hamburg’s timeline and highlights

A

building exhibition is far more than what we usually associate with the word exhibition. Between 2007 and 2013 the Elbe island will be the setting for a wide-ranging programme of action taking in every aspect of urban development. IBA Hamburg lasts for seven years - that means seven years of change on the Elbe island, time to transform it from a backyard that is often ignored by the rest of Hamburg into the crucible moulding the future of the metropolis. One of IBA Hamburg’s prime objectives is to direct this process and turn it into something the general public can personally experience. So public relations and meetings with citizens are fundamental to the IBA process – as are the IBA building, social and culture projects. IBA Hamburg was launched in April 2006: a panel of authorities in their professional fields discussed the key themes for the building exhibition. On the basis of that, IBA Hamburg GmbH

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moved into the thick of things and began work in the autumn of 2006 in a commercial centre in Wilhelmsburg. At the beginning of 2007 the IBA logo (which has since received an award) first appeared in public along with the IBA Hamburg website (www.iba-hamburg.de). Since the spring of 2007 the quarterly magazine IBA BLICK has been reporting on IBA’s current projects and topics and the publication also offers those who wish to become involved some interesting pointers to how they can take an active part in the IBA process. Many of the changes on the Elbe island will take time, just as a city always needs time to change. In order to show the general public exactly how far down the line the process of change is, even though it seems slow in parts, the IBA Hamburg period features three presentation years, times when the public relations work of IBA Hamburg is at its most active.

2007

2010

2013

IBA opening year

Visiting building sites

Seeing results

The first highlight in the IBA process is the opening year 2007. The 58 events during the IBA Summer of Arts and Culture bathe more than 40 island venues in a new light. The background story is also told: the central exhibition IBA at WORK presents the topics, plans and projects of IBA Hamburg. The IBA Meets IBA exhibition takes a look at the international building exhibitions held in the 20th century and spells out what an IBA in the 21st century should achieve.

To watch the future growing is one of the most exciting aspects of an international building exhibition. In the presentation year 2010, halfway through the IBA process, IBA Hamburg invites people to come and visit the building sites on the Elbe island for a close-up look at the projects taking shape. This is the time for a review of where we stand: what objectives have been achieved, what new tasks need to be tackled? In the presentation year 2010 there will be numerous events and exhibitions to invite people to the Elbe island and peep behind the scenes of IBA.

By 2013 most of the building sites seen in 2010 will be finished: the new Wilhelmsburg Central, the educational “IBA Werften” around the island, the floating houses, ecohousing estates and much else. In 2013 IBA Hamburg’s grand closing presentation will introduce the finished projects to the public. A festival full of highlights, exhibitions and events is scheduled for the grand finale to mark the climax of the building exhibition and is to provide the impetus to continue with the process of change on the Elbe island long after the seven years of the exhibition are over.

Published by: IBA Hamburg GmbH Am Veringhof 9 21107 Hamburg www.iba-hamburg.de Responsible under German press law: Iris Groscurth Circulation: 3 000 Date: August 2007 Concept and copy: Julian Petrin urbanista – office for the stimulation of space www.urbanista.de Corporate design and layout: feldmann+schultchen design studios, www.fsdesign.de Translation: Angela Weckler Printing: Druckerei Weidmann, Hamburg Photos: Aufwind-Luftbilder.de/Holger Weitzel (p. 16 top) FLSHBX 3.0 (p. 13) IBA Hamburg GmbH/Johannes Arlt (p. 12 bottom, p. 21 left/top) IBA Hamburg GmbH/Felix Borkenau (cover, p. 3, p. 6, p. 8 bottom, p. 10, p. 14, p. 16 centre, p. 21 right/bottom) IBA Hamburg GmbH (p. 21 left/bottom, p. 21 right/centre) IBA Hamburg GmbH/Bert Brüggemann (p. 8 centre) IBA Hamburg GmbH/Falcon Crest Air (belly band, 1st on left) IBA Hamburg GmbH/Oliver Heissner (p. 12 bottom, belly band nos. 2, 6, 12, 16, 17 from left) IBA Hamburg GmbH/Martin Kunze (belly band nos. 3-5, 7-11, 13-15 from left) IBA Hamburg GmbH/Peter Noßek (p. 20) Jo Coenen & Co. Architekten (p. 12 centre) Moritz Kölling (p. 4/5) Mathias Lintl (p. 8 top) Ton Matton/Ton Matton Office (p. 17) Rainer Schlautmann (p. 9) Slawik Architekten (p. 16 bottom) urbanista (p. 12 top) The information contained in this brochure is intended for general consumption; no claim to its completeness or accuracy is made. This information may not be used to assess the risks of an investment or other business decisions in connection with IBA Hamburg or parts thereof.


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