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Media Kit 2013 – 2014 School Year


SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS DR. JAMES R. HINES, JR. Our mission is to produce high-achieving students. Our vision is that our system will be world class.

Beliefs

Safety is our number one priority.  Failure is not an option. We do expect that all children can learn.  We will not be satisfied until all of our schools meet or exceed the highest academic standards.

 We are committed to determining what each child needs to fulfill his potential.

 We take responsibility for learning, for both our students and ourselves.  We are not afraid of change and will embrace change that is research-based and proven to be effective.

The Houston County Way  Strive for excellence in all that we do.  Have a professional attitude.  Go the extra mile.  Base decisions on what’s best for the child.  Provide quality customer service.  Hard work, dedication and love for children.  Approach work every day with a positive attitude, hope, enthusiasm and compassion.  Do things right; do the right thing. This Media Kit is provided by the Houston County Board of Education Community Relations Department. For more information, please contact: Mrs. Beth Conley McLaughlin Director, Community & School Affairs 1100 Main Street, P.O. Box 1850, Perry, Georgia 31069 478-988-6390, ext. 0; 478-988-6143 FAX Beth.McLaughlin@hcbe.net www.hcbe.net


Table of Contents Page Number Working Together: Schools & the Media ........................................ 1 System Quick Reference ..................................................................... 3 Houston County Board of Education Members .............................. 4 Board of Education Meeting Schedule.............................................. 6 Central Office Staff .............................................................................. 7 Schools, Addresses, Phone Numbers, Principals & E-mails ......... 8 School System Calendar ...................................................................... 9 Test Schedule ...................................................................................... 10 Report Card Dates .............................................................................. 11 Special Dates........................................................................................ 12 Graduation ........................................................................................... 13 Criterion-Referenced Competency Test Scores ........................... 14 5th and 8th Grade Writing Assessments .......................................... 15 Georgia High School Writing Test ................................................... 16 Advanced Placement ........................................................................ 17 Accreditation ....................................................................................... 17 School Start and End Times.............................................................. 18 School Zones........................................................................................ 18 Enrollment History ............................................................................. 19 FY 2013 Budget ................................................................................... 20 ESOL Program ...................................................................................... 21 Student Services ................................................................................. 22


Table of Contents, Continued Page Number Facilities................................................................................................ 24 Transportation .................................................................................... 25 Map of School Locations ................................................................... 26 School Mascots and Colors ............................................................... 27 Exemplary Awards ............................................................................. 28 Georgia Schools of Excellence ......................................................... 31 School Bell Awards............................................................................. 32 Teachers of the Year .......................................................................... 33 Employees of the Year ...................................................................... 34 Educational Web Sites........................................................................ 35 Georgia Department of Education .................................................. 36 Georgia Board of Education.............................................................. 36 Education Acronyms ......................................................................... 38 Education Definitions ........................................................................ 44


Working Together: Schools & the Media Relationship with the Media The Houston County Board of Education invites and welcomes the active participation of newspapers, magazines, radio, television and other mass media of communication in promoting the cause of good education. Our school system appreciates the local media and their interest in our schools. Our system views reporters as representatives of the public at large. We understand that reporters have an important job, and we do our best to be responsive and respectful of deadlines. Our goal is to provide accurate information in a timely manner. Board of Education policies and procedures and federal and state laws govern the system’s public information program. Key HCBOE Policies and Procedures  Board policy requires that requests for interviews with pupils, teachers and school system employees be approved by the Community Relations Department.  In the event of approval for an interview with a student, the parent must be present for the interview or provide written consent.  All visitors, including media representatives, are to report immediately to the principal’s office upon arrival and to report again to the principal’s office as he/she leaves the building. References: KB, Community Relations, Public Information Program and KM-R, Community Relations, Visits To The School

Federal Law: FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act) School systems have a legal and ethical responsibility to protect the privacy of students and their education records. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) is a federal law that protects the privacy of student education records and limits information a school system may release about a student without parental or legal guardian consent. For example, school personnel may not disclose students’ grades, disciplinary record or academic program (such as if the student receives special education services). Georgia Law Regarding Employees Likewise, the Houston County School System has a responsibility to protect the rights of its employees, especially those who may be in the public spotlight. For example, employee home telephone numbers and addresses are exempt from release and would be redacted from files before made available for the public.

taken action.

Media often request a personnel file or ask for comments about an employee who is facing a disciplinary hearing. The school system follows the Open Records Act, Official Code of Georgia Annotated (O.C.G.A.) § 51-18-70 et seq., and discloses information that is legally releasable. At the same time, the system is bound by law to not disclose certain information. For example, per O.C.G.A. § 20-2-210, performance evaluations are confidential and not considered open records. Also, documents used as part of an employee investigation also are not releasable until 10 days after the investigation has concluded or, if necessary, after the Board has

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Working Together: Schools & the Media, cont. Georgia Law Regarding Visitors to Schools Maintaining a safe, orderly educational environment on campus and in the classroom is the most important consideration for a principal, including when working with the news media. The principal’s judgment will be the primary factor in determining the extent to which the news media will be allowed access to Houston County schools. O.C.G.A. § 20-2-1180 requires school visitors to check in at the designated location and give the reason for their visit. As reporters are visitors to the campus, they are required to sign in at the school’s main office. Media representatives will be escorted by the principal or designee while they are in the building. Schools may refuse access to media representatives on school property if their presence or behavior would be disruptive to the school environment. The Georgia Legislature strengthened the law regarding visitors on school property: O.C.G.A. § 202-1181 prohibits disruption of a public school. Crisis or Emergency Situations During a crisis or an emergency, media access to schools and other facilities may be limited to ensure student and staff safety or to maintain order. Administrators, however, may designate an area on school property to conduct news briefings on the crisis or emergency. In these situations, normal access procedures for media and other visitors may be suspended in the interest of student and staff safety and an orderly emergency response. Media Requests for Public Records The Houston County Board of Education fully complies with the Open Records Act (O.C.G.A. § 51-18-70 et seq.), which exists to foster confidence in government through transparency. Open records requests should be submitted in writing to the Director of Community and School Affairs, the media’s official point of contact for requesting the release of public records. She will share requests with the appropriate department, help arrange inspection of records and assess staff time and copying costs, when necessary, in document retrieval and reproduction. During her absence, forward any requests to the Superintendent of Schools. As required by law, a response will be provided within three business days. Interviews, Photography and Videography Interviews, photographing or videotaping on school system property must be approved by the Community Relations Department. Requests for interviews are generally granted if the individual from whom the interview is being sought agrees to participate. Students may not be photographed or interviewed without parental permission. General images of children in which no one student is identifiable (such as backs of heads or shots of legs and feet) do not require parental permission. Media Liaison The media liaison for the Houston County School System is the Director of Community & School Affairs, Beth C. McLaughlin. Mrs. McLaughlin may be contacted by e-mail at Beth.McLaughlin@hcbe.net, by telephone at the office at (478) 988-6390, ext. 0, or by cell phone at (478) 256-8550. E-mail is best. When calling, please try the office number first.

Suggestions to improve the flow of information are always welcome. 2


System Quick Reference

 Enrollment as of October 2012: 27,610

 38 Schools:

 23 elementary schools (grade ranges Pre-K through 5)  8 middle schools (grades 6-8)  6 high schools (grades 9-12)  1 alternative school

 Economically disadvantaged: 53.65%

 Students with Disabilities: ~11%  Enrolled in Gifted Program: ~14%  Ethnicity as of October 2012:   

Asian American Indian Hispanic

2.74% .22% 7.02%

  

Black 35.68% White 50.2% Multiracial 4.14%

Female/Male: 48.61% / 51.39%

 

English Language Learners: 2.8% 34 different languages are spoken as our students’ native language.

2012 graduation rate: Houston County = 75.6%; Georgia = 69.7%

Pupil-Teacher Ratio: 13:1 (total number of teachers divided into enrollment)

 Of our 3,793 employees, 2,163 are certified, with 2,006 serving as teachers. Of our 2,163 certified staff members:  3 hold a teaching permit;  589 have a bachelor’s degree;  889 a master’s degree;  580 a specialist degree; and  102 a doctorate degree. 100% of Houston County teachers and paraprofessionals are deemed Highly Qualified by the Georgia Department of Education.

  

FY 2014 General Fund Budget: $221,674,706 Average Expenditure per Pupil FY12: ~$10,922

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Board Members

Dr. Marianne Melnick, Chairman, District 2

105 Molded Stone Place, Warner Robins, GA 31088 (478) 953-3209 (home) post2@hcbe.net Term expires Dec. 31, 2014; Member since January 2007 District 2, Represents Lake Joy Elementary, Lake Joy Primary, Quail Run Elementary, Shirley Hills Elementary, Feagin Mill Middle, Warner Robins Middle, Houston County High, and Houston County Career & Technology Center

Mr. Fred Wilson, Vice Chairman, District 4

114 Palm Drive, Warner Robins, GA 31088 (478) 929-0605 (home) post4@hcbe.net Term expires Dec. 31, 2014; Member since January 1995 Represents Northside Middle, Lindsey Elementary, Linwood Elementary, Pearl Stephens Elementary, Huntington Middle, Crossroads Center and Warner Robins High

Mr. Skip Dawkins, District 3

2031 Hwy. 41 South, Perry, GA 31069 (478) 988-1333 (home); 951-8381 (cell) post3@hcbe.net Term expires Dec. 31, 2016; Member since 1996 Represents Matt Arthur Elementary, Kings Chapel Elementary, Morningside Elementary, Perry Primary, Tucker Elementary, Perry Middle, Mossy Creek Middle and Perry High

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Board Members

Mrs. Helen Hughes, District 5

112 Country Lane, Kathleen, GA 31047 (478) 987-4829 (home) post5@hcbe.net Term expires Dec. 31, 2016; Member since June 2009 Represents David Perdue Elementary, David Perdue Primary, Bonaire Elementary, Bonaire Middle, Russell Elementary, Hilltop Elementary, Miller Elementary and Veterans High

Mr. Jim Maddox, At Large, District 6

107 Quail Run Drive, Warner Robins, GA 31088 (478) 953-3406 (home) post6@hcbe.net Term expires Dec. 31, 2014; Member since January 2011 Serves at large, so represents all schools

Mr. Dave McMahan, District 7, Warner Robins, GA 31088 229 Tucker Road, Warner Robins, GA 31088 (478) 953-5020 (home) post7@hcbe.net Term expires Dec. 31, 2016; Member since December 2012 Serves at large, so represents all schools

Dr. Rick Unruh, District 1

102 Durango Drive, Centerville, GA 31028 (478) 923-7999 (home) post1@hcbe.net Term expires July 2014; Member since March 2013 Represents Eagle Springs Elementary, Centerville Elementary, Northside Elementary, Parkwood Elementary, Westside Elementary, Thomson Middle and Northside High

In Houston County, we are fortunate to have the best Board of Education that one could find anywhere in the U.S.! 5


Board of Education Meetings, 2013-14 The Houston County Board of Education typically meets twice a month. The formal session is held the second Tuesday of the month at 1:00 p.m. at the Board of Education located at 1100 Main Street in Perry. The work session is held the Monday evening prior to the second Tuesday unless that Monday falls on a holiday. The work sessions are held at 6:30 p.m. at various schools. (The meetings shown below in bold for July and October are scheduled other than the second Tuesday.) Special meetings are called as needed. The purpose of the meetings is to discuss any lawful business that should come before the Board. Meeting dates, locations and times are listed below. Please note that all meetings are subject to change.

2013 – 2014 Houston County Board of Education Meetings August 12, 2013 August 13 2013

Work Session – HCBOE, Perry – 6:30 p.m. Meeting – HCBOE, Perry – 1:00 p.m.

September 9, 2013 September 10, 2013

Work Session – Parkwood Elementary – 6:30 p.m. Meeting – HCBOE, Perry – 1:00 p.m.

October 21, 2013 October 22, 2013

Work Session – Pearl Stephens Elementary – 6:30 p.m. Meeting – HCBOE, Perry – 1:00 p.m.

November 11, 2013 November 12, 2013

No Work Session Meeting – HCBOE, Perry – 1:00 p.m.

December 9, 2013 December 10, 2013

Work Session – David Perdue Elementary – 6:30 p.m. Meeting – HCBOE, Perry – 1:00 p.m.

January 13, 2014 January 14, 2014

Work Session – David Perdue Primary – 6:30 p.m. Meeting – HCBOE, Perry – 1:00 p.m.

February 10, 2014 February 11, 2014

Work Session – Perry High – 6:30 p.m. Meeting ��� HCBOE, Perry – 1:00 p.m.

March 10, 2014 March 11, 2014

Work Session – Perry Middle – 6:30 p.m. Meeting – HCBOE, Perry – 1:00 p.m.

April 7, 2014 April 8, 2014

Work Session – Perry Primary – 6:30 p.m. Meeting – HCBOE, Perry – 1:00 p.m.

May 12, 2014 May 13, 2014

Work Session – Quail Run Elementary – 6:30 p.m. Meeting – HCBOE, Perry – 1:00 p.m.

June 9, 2014 June 10, 2014

Work Session – HCBOE, Perry – 6:30 p.m. Meeting – HCBOE, Perry – 1:00 p.m.

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Central Office Staff Superintendent of Schools: Dr. James R. Hines, Jr. Assistant Superintendent for Finance & Business Operations: Stephen Thublin Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources: Mark Scott Assistant Superintendent for School Operations: Cindy Flesher Assistant Superintendent for Student Services: Paula Dougherty Assistant Superintendent for Teaching & Learning: Dr. Eric Payne Executive Director for Elementary Operations: Supt. Dr. Hines and his executive cabinet Lazunia Frierson Executive Director for Secondary Operations: Anthony Lunceford Director of Accounting: Michelle Morris Director of Career, Technical & Agricultural Education: Dr. Barbara Wall Director of Community & School Affairs: Beth McLaughlin Director of Employee Benefits: Chris Gibson Director of Facilities: Jason Daniel Director of Federal Programs: Jennifer Birdsong Director of Gifted Education: Jan Jacobsen Director of Information Technology: Sharon Lunceford Director of Maintenance: Cecil Parker Director of Personnel: Paige Busbee Director of Professional Learning: Sharon Moore Director of Purchasing: Becky Daniel Director of School Nutrition: Meredith Potter Director of Special Programs: Ron Wilson Director of Student Services: Dr. Zabrina Cannady Director of Testing & Instructional Technology: Rose Powell Director of Transportation: Tom Walmer Coordinator of Language Arts, K-5: Nancy Richardson Coordinator of Language Arts 6-12, ESOL, & World Languages: Dr. Amy Fouse Coordinator of Mathematics K-5 & School Improvement Specialist: Nikki Cooper Coordinator of Mathematics, 6-12: Dr. Cassie Rape Coordinator of School Nutrition: Shana Wood Coordinator of Science: Dr. Ann Williams-Brown Coordinator of Social Studies: Pam Knauer Coordinator of Special Education for Instruction: Dr. Shirley Randall Coordinator of Student Services: Kathy James

Any of these staff members may be contacted at (478) 988-6200. 7


School List

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School Calendar

2013 July 25 - 31

Pre-Planning (Opening Session July 25)

August 1

First Day of School

September 2

Labor Day Holiday

October 7 -10

Fall Holiday, Students & Teachers

October 11

Columbus Day Observed

October 14

Professional Learning, Parent Conferences, Student Holiday

November 11

Veterans Day Holiday

November 25-29

Thanksgiving Holiday

December 20

Last Day of 1st Semester

December 23 – January 2 Christmas Holiday

2014 January 3

Teacher Work Day, Student Holiday

January 6

2nd Semester Begins

January 20

Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday

February 17

Presidents’ Day Holiday

February 18

Winter Holiday

February 19

Professional Learning, Student Holiday

March 31-April 4

Spring Break

May 23

2nd Semester Ends, Last Day of School

May 23 - 24

High School Graduation

May 26

Memorial Day Holiday

May 27 – 28

Post-Planning

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Test Schedule Elementary School Assessments August 1 - May 9 September 3 – March 28 January 21-March 4, 2014 March 5, 2014 March 6, 2014 March 17–28, 2014 April 8-10, 2014 April 11-14, 2014 April 14–18, 2014 April 21-24, 2014 May 19-22, 2014

GKIDS Georgia Alternative Assessment (GAA) ACCESS for ELLs Grade 5 Writing Assessment Grade 5 Writing Assessment Make-up Grade 3 Writing Assessment CRCT-Modified (M) CRCT-M Make-up CRCT Administration CRCT Make-up CRCT-M and CRCT Retest

Middle School Assessments September 3 – March 28 September 16-Oct. 1, 2013 December 2-19, 2013 January 21-March 4, 2014 January 22, 2014 January 23, 2014 February 24- March 14, 2014 March 2, 2014 April 8-10, 2014 April 11-14, 2014 April 14–18, 2014 April 21-24, 2014 May 19-22, 2014

Georgia Alternative Assessment (GAA) Grade 8 Technology Literacy Exam Grade 8 Technology Literacy Exam ACCESS for ELLs Grade 8 Writing Assessment Grade 8 Writing Assessment Make-up Grade 8 Technology Literacy Exam ACCESS Ends CRCT-Modified (M) CRCT-M Make-up CRCT Administration CRCT Make-up CRCT-M and CRCT Retest

High School Assessments September 3 – March 28 September 9-13, 2013 September 16-20, 2013 September 25, 2013 September 26, 2013 October 16, 2013 October 21-25, 2013 November 4-8, 2013 November 18-22, 2013 December 9-13, 2013 January 21-March 4, 2014 January 27-31, 2014 February 10-14, 2014 February 26, 2014 February 27, 2014 March 3-7, 2014 March 17–21, 2014 April 28-May 2, 2014 May 5-6, 2014

Georgia Alternative Assessment (GAA) Georgia High School Graduation (GHSGT) Fall Retest End-of-Course Tests (EOCT) Mid-month Georgia High School Writing Test (GHSGWT) GHSWT Make-up PSAT End-of-Course Tests (EOCT) Mid-month GHSGT Winter Retest EOCT Mid-month EOCT Winter ACCESS for ELLs EOCT Retest EOCT Mid-month GHSWT Retest GHSWT Retest and Make-up EOCT Mid-month GHSGT Main Administration EOCT EOCT Make-up

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Report Card Dates

Report cards are issued as follows, based on 180 days of school:  Elementary School: every nine weeks (about 45 days)  Middle school: every nine weeks (about 45 days) with progress reports issued mid-way.  High School: every 18 weeks at the end of the semester (about 90 days), with progress reports issued at six and 12 weeks. Nine Weeks Period Progress Report, Day 22 1st 9 weeks, Day 45 Progress report, Day 67 2nd 9 weeks, Day 89 Progress report, Day 111 3rd 9 weeks, Day 135 Progress Report, Day 157 4th 9 weeks, Day 180

Elementary School End Date Date Report Issued Fri - August 30 Wed - September 4 Thu - October 3 Wed - October 16 Wed - November 13 Fri - November 15 Fri - December 20 Fri - January 10 Wed - February 5 Fri - February 7 Fri - March 14 Fri - March 21 Tue - April 22 Thu - April 24 Fri - May 23 Fri – May 23

Nine Weeks Period Progress Report, Day 22 1st 9 weeks, Day 45 Progress report, Day 67 2nd 9 weeks, Day 89 Progress report, Day 111 3rd 9 weeks, Day 135 Progress Report, Day 157 4th 9 weeks, Day 180

Middle School End Fri - August 30 Thu - October 3 Wed - November 13 Fri - December 20 Wed - February 5 Fri - March 14 Tue - April 22 Fri - May 23

Date Report Issued Wed - September 4 Wed - October 16 Fri - November 15 Fri - January 10 Fri - February 7 Fri - March 21 Thu - April 24 Wed - May 28

Semester Progress Report 1.1, Day 29 Progress Report 1.2, Day 58 End 1st Semester, Day 89 Progress Report 2.1, Day 118 Progress Report 2.2, Day 149 End 2nd Semester, Day 180

High School End Date Mon - September 9 Mon - October 28 Fri - December 20 Mon - February 11 Mon - April 7 Fri - May 23

Date Reports Issued Wed - September 11 Wed – October 30 Fri - January 10 Wed - February 14 Wed - April 9 Wed - May 28

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Special Dates

SEPTEMBER 2013 11 Patriot Day 8 Grandparent’s Day 17 Constitution Day 22 First Day of Autumn OCTOBER 2013 National Physical Therapy Month 1 FTE Count 6-12 Fire Prevention Week 14-18 National School Lunch Week 16 National Boss’ Day 16 Health (Med.) Tech Appreciation Day 21-25 National School Bus Safety Week 28 School Bus Driver Appreciation Day 23-31 Red Ribbon Week NOVEMBER 2013 3 Daylight Savings Time Ends (fall back) 4 Custodian Appreciation Day 5 Election Day 11-15 School Psychology Awareness Week 21 Thanksgiving lunch in schools DECEMBER 2013 12 Christmas lunch in schools 15 Bill of Rights Day 21 First Day of Winter JANUARY 2014 21 100th Day of School FEBRUARY 2014 Black History Month Career, Technical & Agricultural Education Month American Heart Month Children’s Dental Health Month 2 Groundhog Day 3-7 School Counseling Week 10-14 National FCCLA Week 15-22 National FFA Week

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MARCH 2014 Exceptional Children’s Month Music in Our Schools Month Social Work Month Youth Art Month 3 NEA’s Read Across America 6 FTE Count 9 Daylight Savings Time Begins (spring forward) 11 Paraprofessional Appreciation Day 20 First Day of Spring 22 Teacher Recruiting Fair, VHS TBA School Board Member Appreciation Week TBA National Agriculture Day 3-7 National School Breakfast Week APRIL 2014 Month of the Military Child Occupational Therapy Awareness Month 13-19 National Library Week 22 Earth Day 23 Administrative Professionals Day 25 Gifted Education Day 25 National Arbor Day 26 Prom MAY 2014 Better Hearing and Speech Month 5-9 National Music Week 5-9 Teacher Appreciation Week 6 National Teacher Day 8 School Nurse Appreciation Day 11-17 National Police (SRO) Week 12-18 Children’s Book Week 13 Retirement Banquet 17 Armed Forces Day 23-24 Graduation TBA School Nutrition Employee Appreciation Day TBA Exceptional Children’s Week

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Graduation 2014

Miller-Murphy-Howard Building Perry, Georgia Friday, May 23, 2014 Houston County Career Academy, 6:00 p.m. Warner Robins High, 8:00 p.m. Saturday, May 24 , 2014 Veterans High, 9:00 a.m. Perry High, 12:00 p.m. Houston County High, 3:00 p.m. Northside High, 6:00 p.m.

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Academic Performance, CRCT 2013 Criterion-Referenced Competency Tests Criterion-Referenced Competency Test (CRCT) system scores were released in June 2013, by the Georgia Department of Education for the state assessment given April 2013. Houston County students continue to outperform the state average, with Houston’s students scoring better in all 30 areas. Georgia has used the CRCT for 13 years to measure the knowledge and skills students master by the end of the school year. Based on state standards, student scores are categorized as either: does not meet standard, meets standard or exceeds standard. Students in grades 3–8 were tested in the areas of reading, mathematics, English/language arts, social studies and science. The CRCT scores are used to provide educators with student achievement data to drive decision-making at the classroom, school, local and state level, and to serve as gateway assessments for certain grades, meaning students must pass certain portions of the test to be promoted to the next grade. State law requires that students in third, fifth and eighth grades meet or exceed standards in reading to be promoted to the next grade. Fifth- and eighthgraders must also pass math to be promoted. The percentage of students who met or exceeded standards on the 2013 CRCT is provided for both Houston County and Georgia. Houston County School System Reading Grade 3 4 5 6 7 8

93% 92% 94% 97% 95% 97%

English/LA

Math

Science

Social Studies

Meeting or Exceeding State Standards 93% 88% 85% 94% 87% 86% 97% 90% 83% 94% 86% 81% 94% 94% 90% 97% 87% 84%

88% 84% 83% 80% 85% 85%

Georgia Reading Grade 3 4 5 6 7 8

91% 90% 91% 96% 94% 96%

English/LA Math Science Social Studies Meeting or Exceeding State Standards 91% 81% 78% 81% 91% 80% 81% 78% 94% 84% 78% 77% 92% 80% 73% 73% 93% 91% 85% 78% 95% 77% 74% 77%

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Academic Performance, Writing 5th & 8th Grade Writing Assessments On the fifth-grade writing assessment, 91 percent of Houston County fifth-graders met or exceeded standards, 12 points higher than the state and 13 points more than our RESA comparison group. The scores for the system, RESA and state are provided for 2013 and 2012 by both percentages and scale scores.

Grade 5 Writing Assessment Meets + Exceeds Scale Score 2013 2012 2013 2012 System 91% 91% 227 225 RESA 78% 80% 215 213 State 79% 81% 215 213 On the eighth-grade writing assessment, Houston County middle school students scored higher than the state and their comparison group’s averages. The system's overall scaled score was 221 -- better than the 215 state score and 212 for area systems. Scores for all students for 2013 and 2012 are shown below for each Houston County middle school, the system overall, RESA and Georgia.

Grade 8 Writing Assessment Meets + Exceeds Scaled Score 2013 2012 2013 2012 Bonaire 91% 91% 235 224 Feagin Mill 90% 92% 222 222 Huntington 84% 88% 217 217 Mossy Creek 96% 96% 230 234 Northside 82% 83% 215 212 Perry 76% 84% 210 216 Thomson 86% 86% 219 218 Warner Robins 88% 81% 217 214 System 87% 87% 221 219 RESA 77% 77% 212 212 State 82% 82% 215 216

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Academic Performance, Writing 2012 Georgia High School Graduation Writing Test Students must pass the Georgia High School Graduation Writing Test GHSWT to graduate from high school. Houston County juniors continue to outperform their peers across the state on the GHSWT. The main administration of the GHSWT was given on Oct. 3, 2012. Of Houston County’s eleventhgraders who tested for the first time, 95 percent passed the test. The state average was also 95 percent. Scores range from 100 to 350 with three performance levels represented: does not meet (100-199), meets (200-249) and exceeds (250-350). A passing score is 200. The GHSWT results are used to identify students who may need additional instruction in academic content and skills considered essential for a high school diploma. Fall 2012 marks the sixth main administration of the GHSWT based on Georgia Performance Standards. The GHSWT scores are provided below for all students, both regular program and special needs, who took the test for the first time. The results are shown for the system, state and by school for 2012. 2012 – Percent Meets/Exceeds System 95 State 95 HC Career Academy Houston County High Northside High Perry High Veterans High Warner Robins High

100 96 94 99 98 90


Academic Performance, AP Advanced Placement On Advanced Placement (AP) Exams, Houston County students typically perform at or above the global, state and southern region average scores. AP is an international program of college level courses and exams for secondary students. Participating students who earn a qualifying exam score may receive college credit at the same time they are earning high school credit. Each May students have the option of taking an AP exam after completing college-level courses at their high school. Houston County students are encouraged to enroll in AP classes for the rigor and challenge, the chance to take college courses early, and the opportunity to take AP exams with the possibility or earning college credit. The College Board currently offers 34 AP courses. Among Houston County’s five high schools, over 25 AP courses are being offered during the 2013-14 school year. Houston County issued 1,250 AP exams in May 2013. Exams with a qualifying score of 3, 4, or 5 totaled 835, saving parents an estimated $2,000,000 in college tuition. Houston County students scored a mean score of 3.00, higher than Georgia at 2.79; the U.S. mean at 2.89; and the global average of 2.91.

Accreditation In 2009, the Houston County School System was granted District Accreditation by the AdvancED Accreditation Commission, the national commission that confers the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Council on Accreditation and School Improvement (SACS CASI) accreditation seal. This means that the system and all 38 schools are accredited, and that Houston County is recognized across the nation as a quality school system. The accreditation process involves three ongoing components: 1) meeting high quality standards; 2) implementing a continuous process of improvement; and 3) engaging in quality assurance through internal and external review. The district’s accreditation is for a five-year term with regular monitoring of progress and reporting occurring during the term. District Accreditation provides Houston County a nationally-recognized mark of quality for our system overall, as well as all schools within our district. It demonstrates our commitment to excellence, our openness to external review and feedback, and our desire to be the best we can be on behalf of the students we serve. District Accreditation is a rigorous process that focuses the entire school system on the primary goal of creating lifelong learners.

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School Times Elementary Schools All Elementary Schools: 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Doors Open at 7:45 a.m. Middle Schools All Middle Schools: 7:30 a.m. to 2:45 p. m. High Schools All High Schools: 7:45 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. Houston County Career Academy: 7:45 a.m. to 2:25 p.m. Houston County Crossroads Center: 8:00 a.m. to 2:40 p.m. Edge Academy:

School Zones Maps of our school zones are posted in schools and online, www.hcbe.net/zonemaps.html. One may also enter an address online to discover the schools zoned for that specific address, as well as the buses that serve that area. This information is accessible from the HCBOE Web site, either from the zoning page www.hcbe.net/zonemaps.html or bus routes page www.hcbe.net/busroute.html.

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Houston County School System Enrollment History


Budget Fiscal Year July 1, 2014, through June 30, 2014

This budget was approved by the Board of Education on July 25, 2013.

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English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Program Assistant Superintendent for Teaching & Learning: Dr. Eric Payne Coordinator of Language Arts, 6-12, & ESOL: Dr. Amy Fouse ESOL Program Goals

The English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) program goals are to help students obtain English language proficiency and to meet age and grade appropriate academic achievement standards for grade promotion and graduation. This program assists students to succeed socially and academically in all four language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing). The ESOL Program is federally mandated and was established to ensure equal access to the school system’s instructional program for those students who have limited English proficiency.

Program Description

Elementary students participate in mainstream classes and receive ESOL instruction based on each student’s proficiency level and grade level. Small group instruction is designed to develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in English. Middle and high school students are scheduled into classes where they are provided extra language support. Some high school students also spend a portion of their school day in self-contained intensive English classes or content-based ESOL. All students participate in mainstream electives. The scheduling of classes is based on the grade level and English language proficiency of the ESOL student.

Enrollment Procedures for English Language Learners

All students enrolling in Houston County schools are surveyed to determine language background other than English. ESOL instructional support will be provided after the student qualifies according to the WIDA-ACCESS Placement Test (W-APT). Eligible students are then assigned to a cluster site. English Learners are assessed annually on the state-adopted English proficiency measure (ACCESS) to determine continued eligibility. ACCESS=Assessing Comprehension and Communication in English Stateto-State). Parents have the right to select ESOL program services, remove their child from the ESOL program upon request, or decline ESOL services.

Languages Represented

Spanish Gujarati Vietnamese Chinese Korean Filipino, Tagalog German Arabic Russian Hindi Japanese Other Asian Other African Turkish Housa Amharic Hebrew Thai Other Indian Mayan Languages Swahili Englishes other than Standard American English Haitian Creole Portuguese Swedish Hmong Romanian Ukrainian Urdu

(as of 1/12)

Migrant Services All students enrolling in Houston County schools are surveyed to determine language background other than English. If any question on the Home Language Survey is answered with a language other than English, students must be screened for ESOL services. ESOL instructional support will be provided after the student qualifies based on an English language proficiency test. Parents have the right to select ESOL program services, remove their child from the ESOL program upon request, or decline ESOL services.

Acronyms

BICS: Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills CALP: Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency ELL: English Language Learners LAC: Language Assessment Conference LEP: Limited English Proficient PHLOTE: Primary Home Language Other Than English

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Student Services Assistant Superintendent for Student Services: Paula Dougherty Director of Student Services: Dr. Zabrina Cannady The mission of Student Services is to eliminate barriers to student achievement. We believe that student failure is not an option. The Houston County School System provides a wealth of services for our students. The departmental goal is to assist school-based personnel with implementing instruction that will maximize student achievement for all students. The Student Services department partners with parents, students, community members and school personnel to meet the GDOE criteria for exemplary school status in the areas of academics, attendance, dropout rate and graduation rate. This department encompasses several programs, which are listed below. Special Education Department: The special education department includes 275 special education teachers and 247 special education paraprofessionals who support the efforts of approximately 3,048 students with disabilities as they strive for academic success. The department includes personnel that serve system-wide: program specialists, behavior and academic intervention teachers, transition specialist, special education technology, an audiologist, assistive technology, physical therapist, physical therapy assistants, occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants and a child find team. Itinerant services are offered in the areas of hearing impairment, visual impairment, autism and orthopedic impairment. Psychology Department: The psychology department consists of 12 school psychologists who work to help children and youth succeed academically, socially, behaviorally and emotionally. They collaborate with educators, parents, and other professionals to create safe, healthy, and supportive learning environments that strengthen connections between home, school and the community for all students. School psychologists are highly trained in both psychology and education, completing a minimum of a specialist-level degree program that includes a year-long supervised internship. This training emphasizes preparation in mental health and educational interventions, child development, curriculum/instruction, and assessment. School psychologists must be certified and/or licensed by the state in which they work. The National Association of School Psychologists sets ethical and training standards for practice and service delivery. For more information, contact Mrs. Kathy James. Health Related Services: Our System employs 7 nurses, 1 special education nurse, and 36 health technicians. The nursing staff addresses the health care needs of students and staff. We involve parents, students, and teachers in the development of appropriate health related accommodations and procedures. Specific individual health and safety plans are developed and implemented for students with medical conditions that impact attendance and learning. We partner with community agencies to bring programs and opportunities to our schools. For more information, contact Mrs. Kathryn Shiplett, our lead nurse. Social Services: The social services department consists of 8 school social workers. They work with students and families to help them face a variety of social issues and provide support when necessary. With support from our community, the social workers assist families with economic and homeless issues. Through innovative programs and initiatives, the school social workers are able to reduce truancy and provide students and parents with resources necessary to ensure a successful school year. For more information, contact Dr. Shirley Randall. 22


Student Services, continued Counseling Department: The counseling department employs 61 school-based counselors. The school counseling program’s mission is to promote the academic, personal/social and career development of students to eliminate barriers to student achievement through the implementation of a school guidance curriculum that is organized, planned, sequential and flexible for all students. In addition to the counseling department, our school system employs achievement specialists at each of the Title I high schools. Through the use of disaggregated data, our achievement specialists plan for program and activity development to design interventions and to close the achievement gap between specific groups of students and their peers. School Nutrition Program: School Nutrition Program: The Houston County School Nutrition Program uses food based menu planning with the Offer versus Serve option. Our program includes breakfast, lunch, after school snack and a summer feeding program. All schools offer a variety of nutritious menus each day. Elementary students may choose from four lunch entrée choices including items such as made from scratch entrees, fresh sandwiches, and vegetarian options served with a variety of hot vegetables, fruit, and low fat milk daily. Middle school students may choose from between nine and eleven lunch entrée choices. High school students are offered a minimum of 15 lunch entrée choices each day. The food court design in secondary schools includes daily offerings such as pizza, blue-plate specials, hot grilled sandwiches, chef salads and popular ethnic food choices. Students may also purchase Grab-n-Go specials to eat outside at various locations. Meal Prices

Breakfast, Elementary Lunch, Elementary Breakfast, Middle and High Lunch, Middle and High

Reduced

Paid

Adult

Adult (Visitors)

$.40

$2.50

$3.00

$3.00

$.30 $.40 $.30

$1.50 $2.25 $1.50

$1.75 $3.00 $1.75

$1.75 $3.00 $1.75

All school nutrition employees are required to complete a 30-hour employee orientation course within their first year of employment. Employees must attend a six hour in-service training each year. Several other training opportunities are offered throughout the year for professional enrichment. Managers must complete 150 hours of coursework and be ServSafe certified. In accordance with state law and local board of education policy, all kitchens are inspected by the Houston County health Department. Our schools have an excellent record, with an average system-wide score of above 99%. For more information, contact Mrs. Meredith Potter. Annual Lunches Served Annual Breakfasts Served Average Daily Student Breakfasts Served Average Daily Student Lunches Served Average Daily Snacks Served Summer Meals Served June and July School Nutrition Workers

2011-2014 3,841,767 1,597,949 8,877 21,343 273 272852 370 23


Facilities Assistant Superintendent for Finance & Business Operations: Stephen Thublin Director of Facilities: Jason Daniel Our 38 schools have a total of 1,992 instructional units. The schools are located on 944 acres county wide. Auxiliary buildings such as the maintenance shop, stadium, warehouse and central office are located on another 76.5 acres. The average building age is 27 years, and the oldest facility is the central office which was built in 1925. The Facilities Department oversees building, renovations and modifications, to include projects approved by voters through a Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax (SPLOST). As part of managing the facilities, this department handles all security alarms, video surveillance cameras and fire alarms covering more than four million square feet of buildings. 2012-2017 SPLOST The citizens of Houston County approved an E-SPLOST on November 8, 2011, to help meet the needs of the schools by improving the Houston County School System facilities. The E-SPLOST timeframe is April 2014 through March 2017. Security and safety upgrades are planned for all schools. Upgrades include additional cameras and the installation of secured vestibules where needed. Many schools have received improvements which include updating older HVAC systems, improved lighting, replace carpet with polished concrete, replace carpet in gyms with sports flooring, renovate mechanical systems and fixtures, kitchens, and site upgrades including additional parking and storm water allowance. A replacement school for C.B. Watson was built and named C.B. Watson Primary. Linwood Elementary will occupy the building for the 2013-2014 school year while Linwood is renovated. Once the renovations are complete, Linwood Elementary will be renamed Pearl Stephens Elementary. McConnell-Talbert Stadium was renovated in 2013. Perry Primary will be replaced with Langston Road Elementary, which is under construction on Langston Road in Perry, Georgia. This school will open August 2014. Renovations of Houston County High, Northside High, Warner Robins High, and are also planned. Other new construction projects include a Central Bus/Transportation Facility, Stadium, and Central Tennis Facility. For more information, visit the system website’s E-SPLOST page at http://www.hcbe.net/splost.aspx.

Veterans High School Opened August 2010 24


Transportation Assistant Superintendent for Finance & Business Operations: Stephen Thublin Director of Transportation: Tom Walmer Children transported Bus routes Total # Buses Route Buses / Used for spares Special Needs Buses School Bus Stops Daily Bus Drivers Monitors Miles Driven Daily Area Covered Extracurricular trips

2012-2013 14,448 students transported twice daily 180 236 180 / 56 54 (including 12 spares)

7,598 193 60 10,776 Houston County, 379.8 square miles 3,490 trips in 2012-2013

On average, each bus driver completes two routes twice a day, with most driving a middle school and high school route and then an elementary school route. Safety Record / Driver Training Our system has an outstanding safety record. All firsttime school bus drivers in Houston County successfully complete a minimum of 44 hours of training, to include 12 hours in a classroom, 8 hours of bus inspection and 24 hours of behind-the-wheel training. The behind-thewheel training consists of 12 hours of driving without students and 12 hours of driving with students. In addition all drivers must pass the Commercial Driver’s License test and receive current, nationally recognized instruction in student management. Bus Inspections In accordance with state law and the local Board of Education policy, all school buses are inspected annually by the Department of Motor Vehicle Safety prior to the beginning of each school year. Additionally, all school buses must be inspected every 30 days by the transportation department. Fuel Since August 4, 2006, our buses have run on ultra-low-sulfer biofuel. This new fuel burns cleaner and cuts down on air pollution. Buses are fueled offsite using local fuel suppliers.

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School mascots and Colors Elementary Schools Bonaire Elementary Centerville Elementary Eagle Springs Elementary Kings Chapel Elementary Hilltop Elementary Lake Joy Elementary Lake Joy Primary Lindsey Elementary Linwood Elementary Matt Arthur Elementary Miller Elementary Morningside Elementary Northside Elementary Parkwood Elementary Pearl Stephens Elementary David Perdue Elementary David Perdue Primary Perry Primary Quail Run Elementary Russell Elementary Shirley Hills Elementary Tucker Elementary Westside Elementary Middle Schools Bonaire Middle Feagin Mill Middle Huntington Middle Mossy Creek Northside Middle Perry Middle Thomson Middle Warner Robins Middle High Schools HC Career Academy Houston County High Northside High Perry High Veterans High Warner Robins High Alternative School HC Crossroads Center

Wildcat Mustang Eagles Cougar Hawk Lion Lion Jet Leopard Knight Rockets Panther Falcon Blue Eagle Panther Bulldog Panda Teddy Bear Cub Patriot Mustang Tiger Wildcat

Red Royal Blue Royal Blue & Silver Green & Yellow Red and Black Black, Silver, Royal Blue Black, Silver, Royal Blue Blue & Gold Gold & Black Purple, Silver & Black Royal Blue & Orange Burgundy & Gold Silver & Teal Royal Blue & White Red & Black Red, Black & White Navy, Blue & White Red & White Burgundy & Blue Red. White & Blue Green & Blue Blue & White Blue & Orange

Jaguar Wolf Hawk Gator Jets Panther Tiger Warrior

Purple, Black & White Black & Silver Red, Black, Gray & White Gold and Black Green, White & Gold Maroon & Gold Blue, White & Orange Orange, Black & White

N/A Bear Eagle Panther Warhawks Demon

Blue and Green Black, Silver & White Blue & White Maroon & Gold Red, White & Blue Cardinal & White

Cougar

Black & Gold

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Exemplary Awards Major Awards / Accomplishments for 2012 – 2013  Feagin Mill Middle School Principal Dr. Jesse Davis was named Georgia’s 2013 National Distinguished Principal.  Northside High School made the U.S. News & World Report list of the best high schools in the country and was awarded a silver medal.  Shirley Hills Elementary won first place in the poster presenter competition at the National Youth-At-Risk Conference.  A Perry High student won a Silver Medal from the national Scholastic Art & Writing Awards for his work titled “Bicycle.” Three Perry High students also won regional Scholastic Gold Key awards.  Several schools won national FCCLA awards:  Bonaire Middle won two national Gold medals and two Silver medals, plus the National Middle School Career Connection Award  Bonaire Middle also won the 2013 Otis Spunkmeyer O-riginals Recipe Contest  Thomson Middle won Gold and Silver medals  Feagin Mill Middle won Gold  Houston County High won 3 Gold medals, with one student earning a perfect score of 100 in the Early Childhood Education STAR Event and winning $10,000 in college scholarships!  And a Career Academy & Warner Robins High dual enrolled student won Gold  Lake Joy Elementary teacher Dennis Peavy was one of only eight teachers in the U.S. honored by the American Farm Bureau Foundation for exceptional efforts to encourage agricultural literacy.  All five of our high schools were named AP STEM Schools. Four were also named AP STEM Achievement Schools: Houston County High, Northside High, Perry High and Veterans High.  Shirley Hills Elementary was named a Reward School by the Georgia Department of Education.  Both Miller Elementary and Morningside Elementary were presented the Family-Friendly Partnership School Award by the Georgia Department of Education.  Lake Joy Primary and Morningside Elementary won School Bell Awards.  Perry Primary School and Perry Middle School won awards in the Governor’s Georgia SHAPE Honor Roll Program. Perry Primary won Silver medal and Perry Middle won Bronze.  Several schools earned Industry Certification: Early Childhood Education: Northside High; Marketing: Houston County High, Northside High and Warner Robins High; and Business & Computer Science: Houston County Career Academy, Houston County High, Northside High, Perry High and Warner Robins High.

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Exemplary Awards, cont.  Bonaire Middle and Feagin Mill Middle students won 1st place at the Georgia Science and Engineering Fair.  Northside High won the Georgia High School Association Class AAAAA State Literary Meet competition plus three students won first-place individual awards.  Houston County High’s FFA team won first place in the Georgia State Dairy Cattle Evaluation Career Development Event.  Perry High School’s FFA won the state top award for the senior division for the nursery landscape career development event. Two students were also top individuals in the division.  Perry Middle FFA were the Livestock Evaluation State Champions for the Jr. Division.  Bonaire Middle’s Beta Club won six state awards, plus their sponsor, Cynthia Davis, was elected to serve as the State Jr. Beta Club Sponsor-Elect.  Northside High won first place for high schools in the annual Academic Bowl held at the Jimmy Carter National Historic Site in Plains, Ga.  Mossy Creek Middle won first place for middle schools in the annual Jimmy Carter National Historic Academic Bowl.  Thirteen of our students were selected for All-State Band from Feagin Mill Middle, Perry Middle, Houston County High, Northside High, Veterans High, and Warner Robins High.  Eleven students from our schools were selected for All-State Chorus from Bonaire Middle, Thomson Middle, Veterans High and Warner Robins High.  A Perry High student represented the State of Georgia in the National Poetry Out Loud contest after winning first place in the state competition.  Northside High won the State One-Act competition for AAAAA schools. This was Northside High’s seventeenth State Championship in the one-act competition since 1978.  Our Houston County Sharks won three GHSA/AAASP Varsity State Wheelchair Championships – Handball, Basketball and Football! The team has now won eight state championships since the team began competing in 2008!  Houston County High won the AAAAA State Cheerleading Championship.  Veterans High won the AAAA State Cheerleading Championship.  Mossy Creek Middle and Warner Robins High students won first place in the “Digging Peanuts in Plains” postcard contest and were presented the awards by President Jimmy Carter.

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Exemplary Awards, cont.  Eli Walker, a Houston County Career Academy and Middle Georgia Technical College dual enrollment teacher, was awarded the Dual Enrollment Instructor of the Year for the state of Georgia.  Bonaire Middle’s Alice Mullis won the Georgia Association of Teachers of Family and Consumer Sciences (GATFACS) Outstanding Teacher in Community Service Award.  Two Northside Elementary teachers were designated 2013 Georgia Master Teachers, recognizing them among the state’s best teachers. Beth Sciarro and Jeannie Smith are two of only 58 teachers state-wide named Master Teachers.  Huntington Middle School Principal Dr. Gwendolyn Taylor was selected as the Second Vice President of the Georgia Association of Secondary School Principals  Our Community Relations Department won seven top state awards of five Golds and two “best of the best.”  Our School Nutrition Program won two state awards and one southeast region award.  Teaching & Learning won the Georgia Economics Program of Excellence award from the Georgia Council on Economic Education.  Human Resources won a State Gold Award for our Recruitment Processes & Materials.  Cindy Flesher is the President of the Georgia Association of Educational Leaders.  Mark Scott is serving as President–Elect of the Georgia Association of School Personnel Administrators.  Lake Joy Primary School music teacher Faye Boyer was chosen one of 217 quarterfinalists nominated for the Music Educator Award presented by The Recording Academy and GRAMMY Foundation. More than 30,000 nominations were submitted from all 50 states in the U.S.  Sharon Lunceford, Director of Information Technology, completed her second year as President of the Georgia Association of Managers of Educational Information Systems (GAMEIS) and now serves as Immediate Past President.  Our school board is deemed a Distinguished School Board by the Georgia School Boards Association.  In addition, our system is district accredited, meaning all 38 of our schools are accredited.

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Georgia Schools of Excellence Of our 38 schools, 23 have been named Georgia Schools of Excellence for a total of 37 times. 

Russell Elementary School

1986

Warner Robins High School

1986, 1990, 1997

Warner Robins Jr. High School

1987, 2001

Tabor Jr. High School

1988

Northside High School

1988, 1993

Tucker Elementary School

1989

Perry Middle School

1989, 1997

Perry High School

1989, 1996

Miller Elementary School

1990

Bonaire Elementary School

1991, 2009

Northside Middle School

1991

Kings Chapel Elementary School

1992, 2005

Shirley Hills Elementary School

1993

Bert Rumble/Huntington Middle School

1993, 1999, 2007

Houston County High School

1995

Perry Elementary School

1996

Centerville Elementary School

1998, 2008

Quail Run Elementary School

2002, 2007, 2008

Bonaire Middle School

2002

Northside Elementary School

2003

Feagin Mill Middle School

2003, 2007

Pearl Stephens Elementary School

2004

Lake Joy Elementary

2010

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School Bell Award Winners Fifteen of our schools have won a School Bell Award.

 Lake Joy Primary & Morningside, 2013  Miller Elementary School, 2011  Eagle Springs Elementary School, 2010 and 2007  Lake Joy Elementary, 2010  David Perdue Primary, 2009  Tucker Elementary, 2009  Matt Arthur Elementary, 2008  Shirley Hills Elementary, 2006 and 2001  David Perdue Elementary, 2005  Linwood Elementary, 2005  Northside Elementary, 2003  Morningside Elementary, 2002  Quail Run Elementary, 2000; and  Centerville Elementary, 1998. School Bell Award Background Information The Georgia Association of Elementary School Principals (GAESP) selects 10 elementary schools a year to receive the School Bell Award. This award gives recognition to exemplary programs in the areas of curriculum and organizational leadership. The program was developed to help inform fellow educators and the general public of outstanding educational programs in Georgia. This award is presented to schools that demonstrate excellence in elementary programming. Nominated schools must have a principal that has served at least two full years in the school and who will be serving as principal upon receipt of the award. The principal must also be an active member in the state organization.

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2013 – 2014 Teachers of the Year 2013-2014 Houston County Teacher of the Year Mrs. Amanda Miliner, Miller Elementary School

2013-2014 Systemwide Finalists

 Brette Callaway, Pearl Stephens Elementary  Lisa Carson, Huntington Middle  Marla Garnto, Northside Elementary  Christie Wall, Veterans High Matt Arthur Elementary .......................................................................................Stacy Daly Bonaire Elementary ......................................................................................... Blake Johnsa Bonaire Middle .............................................................................................. Cheralyn Keily Centerville Elementary……………………Top 10 Finalist .............................. Anne Moore Eagle Springs Elementary ......................................................................... Kimberly Strozier Feagin Mill Middle ............................................................................................. Brian Lewis Hilltop Elementary ............................................................................................. Ruth White Houston County Career Academy .................................................................. Cindy O’Mara Houston County Crossroads Center ...............................................................Angela Karros Houston County High ................................................................................Stephanie Justen Huntington Middle……………………Top 10 Finalist ..................................... Lisa Carson Kings Chapel Elementary ............................................................................Julie Tomberlin Lake Joy Elementary……………………Top 10 Finalist ........................... Ashley McSwain Lake Joy Primary ........................................................................................... Sherry Partain Lindsey Elementary ....................................................................................... Penny Rumph Linwood Elementary............................................................................................. Aree Byrd Miller Elementary……………………Top 10 Finalist ................................ Amanda Miliner Morningside Elementary ............................................................................... Michele Casey Mossy Creek Middle……………………Top 10 Finalist ............................... Justin Bennett Northside Elementary……………………Top 10 Finalist ..............................Marla Garnto Northside High……………………Top 10 Finalist ............................................ Lori Zavetz Northside Middle ........................................................................................... Melissa Shiver Parkwood Elementary................................................................................ Servella Wrotten David Perdue Elementary ................................................................................ Amy Warden David Perdue Primary ....................................................................................Phaedra Early Perry High ......................................................................................................... Jerry Gatzke Perry Middle ..................................................................................................... Wendy Pheil Perry Primary............................................................................................... Jennifer Knight Quail Run Elementary ....................................................................................... Darcy Hatin Russell Elementary ......................................................................................... Marcy Waugh Shirley Hills Elementary .......................................................................................Jack Story Pearl Stephens Elementary……………………Top 10 Finalist .................. Brette Callaway Thomson Middle ............................................................................................. Jessica Green Tucker Elementary.................................................................................... Stephanie Wilson Veterans High……………………Top 10 Finalist ........................................... Christie Wall Warner Robins High ...................................................................................... Jane Johnston Warner Robins Middle……………………Top 10 Finalist ...................... Kimessia Hughes Westside Elementary ................................................................................... Amber Bowling

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Employees of the Year, 2013 - 2014

Maintenance Employee of the Year Steve Langston

Custodian of the Year

Albert Simon Feagin Mill Middle School

School Nutrition Manager of the Year Annette Pender Perry Middle School

Warehouse & Purchasing Employee of the Year Antwan Brooks

Bus Driver of the Year Justo Montana

Bus Monitor of the Year Pearl Broadnax

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Educational Web Sites

Houston County Board of Education, http://www.hcbe.net/ Includes HCBOE goals, school calendar, job openings, Board policy, zone maps, bus routes, Board meetings, facilities plans, school lunch program and links to system schools. Georgia Department of Education, www.doe.k12.ga.us/ Includes the Georgia Public Education Report Card, education definitions, education acronyms, and information on the curriculum, Georgia public schools and the State Board of Education. The AYP report may be found at www.gadoe.org/ayp2007.search.asp. The 2005-06 Report Card may be found at http://reportcard2006.gaosa.org/k12/default.aspx. Governor’s Office of Student Achievement, www.gaosa.org/ The OSA was established to address two major goals that affect all students: student achievement and school completion. Georgia School Council Institute (GSCI), www.gsci.org/ The GSCI has several tools to include www.GeorgiaEducation.org, which provides student achievement data, school council training and resources, education news and links to education information resources. Georgia School Boards Association, www.gsba.com Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education, www.gpee.org Georgia Association of Educational Leaders, www.ciclt.net/gael/ Organization that provides unity of school leadership groups in Georgia American Association of School Administrators, www.aasa.org National Center for Education Statistics, nces.ed.gov/ National Association of Elementary Schools Principals, www.naesp.org/ National Association of Secondary School Principals, www.nassp.org/ National Education Association, www.nea.org/ U.S. Department of Education, www.ed.gov/ Education Writers Association, www.ewa.org/ Georgia Department of Human Resources, http://health.state.ga.us/programs/immunization/ Provides immunization requirements for children entering schools

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Georgia Department of Education Dr. John D. Barge, Chief Executive Officer 2066 Twin Towers East, Atlanta, Georgia 30334 800-311-3627; state.superintendent@doe.k12.ga.us Associate Superintendent for Policy & Charter Schools Garry McGiboney: 404-657-2965; gmcgiboney@doe.k12.ga.us Deputy State Superintendent for Curriculum, Instruction & Assessment Dr. Martha Reichrath: 404-656-2804; mreichrath@doe.k12.ga.us Deputy Superintendent for School Improvement Avis King: 404-651-7277; aking@doe.k12.ga.us Deputy Superintendent for Finance and Business Operations Scott Austensen: 404-656-2492; saustens@doe.k12.ga.us Deputy Superintendent for School Turnaround Sylvia C. Hooker: 404-232-1426; shooker@doe.k12.ga.us Chief Information Officer Bob Swiggum: 404-657-0810; rswiggum@doe.k12.ga.us AskDOE, State School Superintendent’s Helpdesk 800-311-3627; askdoe@gadoe.org

Georgia Board of Education Members First Congressional District Linda M. Zechmann 912-285-4499, FAX: 912-285-2558, lindazechmann@wayxcable.com Second Congressional District Dr. Elizabeth J. Ragsdale 404-657-7410, FAX: 404-657-6978, eragsdale2@doe.k12.ga.us Third Congressional District Helen Odom Rice, Vice-Chair 404-657-7410, FAX: 404-657-6978, hrice@doe.k12.ga.us 36


Georgia Board of Education, continued Fourth Congressional District Daniel Israel 404-657-7410, FAX: 404-657-6978, disrael@doe.k12.ga.us Fifth Congressional District Kenneth Mason 404-652-7410, FAX: 404-657-6978; kmason@doe.k12.ga.us Sixth Congressional District Barbara Hampton, Chair 404-657-7410, FAX: 404-657-6978; bahampton@doe.k12.ga.us Seventh Congressional District Mike Royal 404-657-7410, FAX: 404-657-6978, mroyal@doe.k12.ga.us ** Eighth Congressional District Wanda Barrs 404-657-7410, FAX: 404-657-6978, wbarrs@doe.k12.ga.us

Ninth Congressional District Larry E. Winter 706-278-2834, FAX: 404-657-6978, lwinter@doe.k12.ga.us Tenth Congressional District Brian K. Burdette 404-657-7410, FAX: 404-657-6978; bburdette@doe.k12.ga.us Eleventh Congressional District J. Grant Lewis, M.D. 404-657-7410, FAX: 404-657-6978, glewis@doe.k12.ga.us Twelfth Congressional District Allen C. Rice 404-657-7410; FAX: 404-657-6978, arice@doe.k12.ga.us Thirteenth Congressional District Dr. Mary Sue Murray 404-657-7410, FAX: 404-657-6978, mmurray@doe.k12.ga.us

** Represents Houston County

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Education Acronymns A AASA ACA ACE ACT ADA ADD ADHD AECT AERA AFDC AFT ALA AP AP APEG ASBO ASCA ASCD ASL ASP ASFSA AYP

American Association of School Administrators American Counseling Association American Council on Education American College Testing Americans with Disabilities Act Attention Deficit Disorder Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Association for Educational Communications and Technology American Educational Research Association Aid to Families with Dependent Children American Federation of Teachers American Library Association Accommodation Plan (Section 504 Students) Advanced Placement Adequate Program for Education in Georgia Association of School Business Officials American School Counselor Association Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development American Sign Language After School Program American School Food Service Association Adequate Yearly Progress

B BD BEOG BLT BOE BST

Behavior Disorder Basic Education Opportunity Grant Basic Literacy Test Board of Education Basic Skills Test

C CACREP CAP CBA CCGPS CDA CNA CAN CRCT CRESST

Council on Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs Corrective Action Plan Curriculum Based Assessment Common Core Georgia Performance Standards Child Development Associate Child Nutrition Act Comprehensive Needs Assessment Criterion-Referenced Competency Test Center for Research on Evaluation and Student Testing

38


D DFACS DOE DHR DJJ DTAE

Department of Family and Children Services Department of Education Department of Human Resources Department of Juvenile Justice Department of Technical and Adult Education

E EBD ECE EHA EIP EOCT ERIC ES ESEA ESOL ETS

Emotional and Behavioral Disorder Early Childhood Education Education for Handicapped Children Act Early Intervention Program End-of-Course Test Education Resources Information Center Elementary School, Grades K-5 Elementary and Secondary Education Act English to Speakers of Other Languages Educational Testing Service

F FAPE FBLA FCCLA FERPA FTE FRL FY

Free and Appropriate Public Education Future Business Leaders of America Family, Career and Community Leaders of America Family Educational Rigihts and Privacy Act Full-time Equivalent Free and Reduced Lunch Fiscal Year

G GACE GACES GACIS GACCE GACTE GaDOE GAE GAEA GAEL GAESP GAMEIS GAMSP GaPIE GAPT GAPSS GASBO GASCD GASP GASPA

Georgia Advisory Council on Education Georgia Association for Counselor Education and Supervision Georgia Association of Curriculum and Instructional Supervisors Georgia Association of Chamber of Commerce Executives Georgia Association of Colleges of Teacher Educators Georgia Department of Education Georgia Association of Educators Georgia Art Education Association Georgia Association of Educational Leaders Georgia Association of Elementary School Principals Georgia Association of Managers of Educational Information Systems Georgia Association of Middle School Principals Georgia Association of Partners in Education Georgia Association for Pupil Transportation Georgia Assessment of Performance on School Standards Georgia Association of School Business Officials Georgia Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Georgia Association of School Psychologists Georgia Association of School Personnel Administrators

39


GASSP GSP GSPRA GSSA GTAPP GYSTC GCSTME GCTM GED GELI GERA GERSC GFIE GHEA GHP GHSA GHSGT GHSWT G-KAP-R GIMS GITEA GKAP GLC GLISI GLRS GMEA GMSA GPA GPB GPEE GPPF GPS GPEE GREAT GSAMS GSBA GSCA GSCI GSDC GSEI GSFC GSFSA GSPRA GSSA GTAPP GTEP GTFC GTOI GYSTC

Georgia Association of Secondary School Principals Georgia Scholars Program Georgia School Public Relations Association Georgia School Superintendents Association Georgia Teacher Alternative Preparation Program Georgia Youth Science and Technology Centers Georgia Coalition for Science, Technology and Mathematics Education Georgia Council of Teachers of Mathematics General Education Development (Diploma) Georgia Early Learning Initiative Georgia Educational Research Association Governor’s Education Reform Student Commission Georgia Foundation for the Improvement of Education Georgia Home Education Association Governor’s Honors Program Georgia High School Association Georgia High School Graduation Test Georgia High School Writing Test Georgia Kindergarten Assessment Program – Revised Georgia Initiative in Math and Science Georgia Industrial Technology Education Association Georgia Kindergarten Assessment Program Georgia Learning Connections Georgia’s Leadership Institute for School Improvement Georgia Learning Resources System Georgia Music Educators Association Georgia Middle School Association Grade Point Average Georgia Public Broadcasting Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education Georgia Public Policy Foundation Georgia Performance Standards Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education Gang Resistance Education And Training Georgia Statewide Academic and Medical System Georgia School Boards Association Georgia School Counselors Association Georgia School Council Institute Georgia Staff Development Council Georgia Superintendent Evaluation Instrument Georgia Student Finance Commission Georgia School Food Service Association Georgia School Public Relations Association Georgia School Superintendents Association Georgia Teacher Alternative Preparation Program Georgia Teachers Evaluation Program Georgia Teaching Force Center Georgia Teachers Observation Instrument Georgia Youth Science and Technology Center 40


H H/H HEA HEIR HOA HOPE HOTS HS

Hospital/Homebound Higher Education Act Home Education Information Resource Hands On Atlanta Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally Higher Order Thinking Skills High School, Grades 9-12

I IB IDEA IEP INTASC IQ ISS ITBS IU

International Baccalaureate Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Individualized Education Plan Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium Intelligence Quotient In-school Suspension Iowa Test of Basic Skills Instructional Unit

K K K-12 KIPP

Kindergarten Kindergarten through Grade 12 Knowledge is Power Program

L LAPS LD LEA LEP LKES LRE

Leader Assessment on Performance Standards Learning Disability Local Education Agency Limited English Proficient Leader Keys Effectiveness System Least Restrictive Environment

M MAPMIS MCR MGWA MIMH MOMH MS

Metro Area Plus Managers of Information Systems Modified Compliance Review Middle Grades Writing Assessment Mildly Mentally Handicapped Moderately Mentally Handicapped Middle School, Grades 6-8

N NAEP NAES NAESP NASBE NASDC NASSP NBC

National Assessment of Educational Progress (National Report Card) National Alliance for Effective Schools National Association of Elementary School Principals National Association of State Boards of Education New American Schools Development Corporation National Association of Secondary School Principals National Board Certification

41


NBCC NBPTS NCATE NCES NCLB NCTQ NEA NEGP NGA NGSP NICHD NIH NRT NSBA NSF NSPRA NTE

National Board for Certified Counselors National Board of Professional Teaching Standards National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education National Center for Education Statistics No Child Left Behind Act National Council on Teacher Quality National Education Association National Education Goals Panel National Governor’s Association Next Generation Schools Project National Institute of Child Health and Human Development National Institutes of Health Norm-Referenced Test National School Boards Association National Science Foundation National School Public Relations Association National Teachers’ Examination

O O.C.G.A. OEA OERI OSR OSS

Official Code of Georgia Office of Education Accountability Office of Educational Research and Improvement, U.S. Department of Education Office of School Readiness Out-Of-School Suspension

P PAGE PDP PDK PEC PFP PPC Pre-K PSAT PSC PSO PTA PTO PTSA PTSO

Professional Association of Georgia Educators Professional Development Plan Phi Delta Kappa Program for Exceptional Children Pay for Performance Professional Practices Commission Pre-Kindergarten Preliminary Scholastic Assessment Test Professional Standards Commission Postsecondary Options Program Parent Teacher Association Parent Teacher Organization Parent Teacher Student Association Parent Teacher Student Organization

Q QBE QCC

Quality Basic Education Quality Core Curriculum

R RBOC REP

Regional Educational Service Agency Board of Control Regional Education Program 42


RESA RYDC

Regional Educational Service Agency Regional Youth Detention Center

S SACS SAP SAPA SAT SAYRE SBD SBOE SCANS SDRC SDU SED SEDL SEF SERVE SFA SIA SIS SLEP SLP SMCP SOE SPAI SREB SRC SRO SSS SST SSW STEAM STEM STW SYDC

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Student Assistance Program Student Assistance Professionals Association Scholastic Assessment Test Southeastern Association for Year-Round Education Severe Behavior Disorder State Board of Education Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills State Data and Research Center Staff Development Unit Serious Emotional Disturbance Southwest Educational Development Laboratory Southern Education Foundation Southeastern Regional Vision for Education Success for All (Reading program) Special Instructional Assistance Student Information System Secondary Level English Proficiency Test School Lunch Program System Media Contact Person School of Excellence Speech Pathologist Assessment Instrument Southern Regional Education Board Southern Regional Council School Resource Officer Student Support Service Student Support Team School Social Worker Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Mathematics Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics School-to-Work State Youth Development Campus

T TAP TCT TESOL TFA TIMSS TKES TOEFL TOTY TRSGA TSS

Test of Achievement and Proficiency Teacher Certification Test Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages Teach for America Third International Math and Science Study Teacher Keys Effectiveness System Test of English as a Foreign Language Teachers of the Year Teachers Retirement System of Georgia Teacher Support Specialist 43


Education Definitions

A A Plus Education Reform Act of 2000 (H.B. 1187): Education legislation drafted by Governor Roy Barnes that took effect in April 2000. The law lowered class sizes, developed an accountability framework with state criterion-referenced tests as the measurement system, created school councils and implemented early intervention programs. Ability Grouping: A way to organize students of like abilities that allows them to remain together for a short period of time – part of the school day, a few days or a few weeks. Accreditation: The process by which an organization sanctions teacher-education programs. Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP): A series of performance goals set by the state for each school district and school, as well as the state as a whole. Advanced Placement (AP) Exams: Tests administered by the College Board in various subjects such as European history, calculus and foreign language. High school students take these exams to receive college credit. American College Testing (ACT) Assessment: National college admission examination that consists of tests in English, reading, mathematics and science reasoning. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA): Federal law passed in 1990 that prohibits the discrimination against any disabled individual. Applies to both employment and educational services. Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD): A medical term used to describe students with severe inattention and impulsiveness. The disorder can be treated through medication, psychotherapy, behavior modification and training. The most common medications used are Ritalin, Dexedrine and Aderall. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): A medical term used to describe students with inappropriate degrees of hyperactivity, inattention and impulsiveness. The disorder can be treated through medication, psychotherapy and behavior modification and training. The most common medications used are Ritalin, Dexedrine and Aderall.

B Behavior Disorder (BD): A term used in special education to describe students whose behavior interferes with their classroom performance. Such students have problems relating to other children and adults, exhibit inappropriate behaviors such as extreme anger, are severely depressed or have a tendency to develop physical symptoms or fears about personal and school problems. Behavioral Correction Plan: Plan developed for a student with chronic disciplinary problems upon return from an expulsion or suspension. Benchmarks: Examples of performances that serve as standards against which students’ achievement is scored. Blue Ribbon Schools Program: A national program established by the U.S. Department of Education in 1982 to honor outstanding public and private schools across the country and share information on the best practices among schools.

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Business/Education Partnerships: School-reform coalitions formed by private businesses and schools or districts. Partnerships range from individual school partnerships to systemic school reform efforts.

C Carnegie Unit: One unit of credit awarded in grades 9 through 12 for a minimum of 150 hours of instruction during the regular school year or 120 hours of instruction during summer school. Certificate of Performance: Certificate for students who do not pass the Georgia High School Graduation Test, but meet all other graduation requirements. Students who leave school with a certificate of performance may take the graduation test again as many times as necessary to qualify for a high school diploma. Closing the Gap Commission: A commission created by Governor Roy Barnes in 2001 that was charged with recommending ways to close the student achievement gaps that exist for students disaggregated by ethnicity, sex, disability, language proficiency and socioeconomic status. College Board: Nonprofit organization that administers the SAT and AP programs. Communities in Schools (CIS): A community-based organization that helps children succeed in school and prepare for life. Through partnerships with schools, public officials, businesses, parents and the community, the organization provides numerous services to prevent children from dropping out of school. Community Partnerships: Connections between local organizations and schools to help address students’ needs and improve achievement. Criterion-Referenced Competency Tests (CRCT): Tests administered to Georgia students to evaluate students’ acquisition of skills and knowledge described in Georgia’s Quality Core Curriculum (QCC). In grades one through eight, tests are given in reading, math and language arts. In grades three through eight, tests are also given in science and social studies. Test scores will be used in considering the promotion of students in grades three, five and eight beginning with the 2003-2004 School Year. CRCT scores produce information on students, classrooms, schools, systems and state achievement in education. Curriculum Based Assessment (CBA): Tests developed by the Georgia Department of Education to measure student achievement on a broad range of the state’s Quality Core Curriculum (QCC). Georgia High School Graduation Test is a CBA.

E Early Intervention Programs (EIP): Programs provided from kindergarten through the fifth grade. These programs provide specialized instruction in smaller classes to students who are performing below grade level. Education Coordinating Council (ECC): Council formed by the A Plus Education Reform Act that provides a forum for interagency communication and coordination regarding educational policy and programs. The ECC oversees and reviews all education accountability programs from pre-kindergarten through postsecondary education in Georgia. The ECC is composed of the Governor, the State School Superintendent, the Chairman of the State Board of Education, the Chancellor and the Chair of the Board of Regents, the Director of the Office of School Readiness, the Executive Secretary and the Chair of the Professional Standards Commission and the Commissioner and the Chair of the Georgia Department of Technical and Adult Education.

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Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA): Federal law passed in 1965 that focuses on children from high-poverty communities and students at risk of education failure. The Act authorizes Title I, Safe and Drug Free Schools and Title VII programs and was reauthorized in 2002 as No Child Left Behind (NCLB). Emotional and Behavioral Disorders (EBD): Disorders characterized by consistently aggressive, impulsive or withdrawn behavior (i.e. schizophrenia). EBDs impair personal, social, academic and vocational skills. End-of-Course Tests (EOCT): Assessments for high school students in core subjects to be determined by the Georgia Board of Education. The tests will measure students’ acquisition of skills and knowledge described in the Georgia Quality Core Curriculum. English as a Second Language (ESOL): Most commonly includes immersion as well as support to individuals in their native languages. Classes are typically composed of students who speak many different languages, but are not fluent in English. They may attend classes for only a portion of every day to work strictly on English skills or attend for a full day and learn both academics and English. Equalization Grants: State funding to provide additional assistance to the poorer school districts. Equalization funding aims to reduce the disparities as to how much can be raised through local tax dollars between the wealthiest and poorest school districts in the state. Exceptional Learners: Students with an IQ in the bottom (mentally challenged) or top (gifted) three percent of the population or who have other physical or mental differences that affect learning. All exceptional learners receive special education.

G Georgia High School Graduation Test (GHSGT): Passage required by high school students to receive a high school diploma. Covers content in mathematics, language arts, science and social studies. Performance levels are reported at the pass and pass plus levels. A score of 500 is needed to pass each section of the Graduation Test. The pass plus scale scores are 538 or greater for English language arts and 535 or greater for math. Georgia High School Writing Test (GHSWT): Administered to all 11th grade students. Students are asked to produce a response to a persuasive writing prompt. Georgia Kindergarten Assessment Program-Revised (GKAP-R): A test administered to kindergarten students in Georgia to determine whether they are ready for first grade. Students are evaluated in the areas of literacy, mathematics and social/emotional development through one-on-one, small group and large group instructional settings throughout the year. Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education (GPEE): Founded in 1990 by the Georgia Chamber of Commerce and the Georgia Economic Developers Association, the Partnership consists of business, education, community and government leaders who share a vision of improved education. Working to be Georgia's foremost change agent in education, the non-profit, non-partisan organization takes lead roles in efforts to shape policy and reform education. The mission of the Partnership is to improve the academic achievement of Georgia students through research, advocacy and communication. Georgia Schools of Excellence Program: Statewide program that works in conjunction with the Blue Ribbon Schools Program. The program recognizes outstanding Georgia public and private schools and nominates them for the national program. Georgia Teacher Alternative Preparation Program (GTAPP): College coursework and supervised hands-on experience for individuals who hold college degrees and wish to

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teach in grades K-12, but who have not completed a traditional teacher preparation program. Gifted: A term used to describe a student who demonstrates a high level of ability and who needs special instructional services to achieve at a level equal to his/her ability. Gifted students have IQ scores in the top three percent of the population.

H Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally (HOPE): Funded by the Georgia Lottery, the HOPE program provides qualified Georgia students with tuition assistance in diploma, certificate or degree programs at any public or private college, university or technical institution in the state. To qualify, students must earn a 3.0 GPA in high school, and they must maintain a 3.0 in college to keep the scholarship. Home schoolers can retroactively qualify for the scholarship. Highly Qualified Teacher: A teacher is considered Highly Qualified when he or she meets the requirements of (1) obtaining an academic minimum of a bachelor’s degree, (2) obtaining a full state certification or licensure, and (3) formally demonstrates a high level of competency in the subject taught.

I In-School Suspension (ISS): An alternative to Out-Of-School Suspension for less severe rule infractions. The goal of ISS is to remove students from interactions with their peers. Students are given specific assignments aimed at improving their achievement levels. In-Service Workshop: Workshops attended by teachers on various topics pertaining to education. Inclusion: Term used when special education or ESOL students receive educational services in a general education classroom setting. The students are included in the regular education program rather than being served in individual education classes. Individualized Education Plan (IEP): A plan developed by a student’s parent and teachers that outlines the student’s program of study and the particular education services the child receives. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA): A law passed in 1990 that requires public schools to provide a free and appropriate public education to disabled school-aged children ages three through 21. Iowa Tests of Basic Skills (ITBS): Achievement tests given to students throughout the country. Scores usually are reported as percentiles, with scores in the 50th percentile being the national norm.

L Learning Disability (LD): A term used in special education to describe a disorder in one of the basic psychological processes. These students may have difficulty in listening, thinking, speaking, writing, spelling or doing mathematical calculations. Limited-English-Proficient (LEP) Students: Students whose first language is other than English and who have not yet mastered English.

M Magnet School: A school with strong emphasis in a particular subject area (i.e. music, science, drama, math). Students may be selected through an application process instead of being assigned based on residence.

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Mainstreaming: Moving a special education student from a special environment into the regular school environment. Middle Grades Writing Assessment (MGWA): Test administered in eighth grade that consists of an evaluation of the student’s response to an assigned narrative, persuasive or expository prompt.

N National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP): Often referred to as the National Report Card. National testing program administered by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). Reading and mathematics tests are given to fourth, eighth, and twelfth grade students nationwide. NAEP reports student performance as average scale scores and by achievement level. Average scale scores reflect the performance of test takers both as a whole and in groups (i.e. by gender, race, etc.). NAEP has three achievement levels: basic (partial mastery), proficient (solid academic performance) and advanced (superior academic performance). National Board Certification (NBC): Rigorous program for classroom teachers administered by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards that includes performance-based assessments and peer review. The state and some local school systems reward National Board Certified teachers with additional pay. NBC takes approximately a year to complete and is the top national certification for educators. National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS): A nonprofit organization created in 1987 to advance education reform and establish high standards for teachers. NBPTS administers the National Board Certification program to assess and certify teachers in accordance with these standards. Next Generation School Project (NGSP): An initiative of the Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education. It is a grassroots effort that encourages local communities to organize themselves to dramatically improve their local schools. For 10 years, schools receive annual grants to give them necessary resources for innovations. In 2002, schools began to receive grants to change the school calendar from the traditional 180 days to a more balanced calendar that features strong intercessions for remediation and enrichment activities. No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act: Law passed in 2001 that emphasizes increased accountability for States, school systems and schools and creates greater choice for parents and students, particularly those attending low-performing schools. The law gives more flexibility for states and local education agencies in the use of federal education dollars, and a stronger emphasis on reading. The law requires all states to implement statewide accountability systems, and allows students attending persistently failing schools to use Title I funds for supplementary education services.

O Office of Student Achievement (OSA): Formerly known as the Office of Education Accountability (OEA), was established to improve student achievement and school completion in Georgia. The OSA will produce annual accountability report cards for K-12 public schools and post-secondary education institutions with the implementation of the reform.

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P Per-pupil Expenditures: Money spent on each student in a given school district. Because public schools are financed in part by local property taxes, there is a disparity in per-pupil expenditures across the state. Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT): A practice test for students taking the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). The PSAT is designed to help students identify academic strengths and weaknesses. Since 1997, state funds have paid for PSAT administration to all tenth grade students in Georgia’s public schools. Praxis I: Academic skills assessment that tests knowledge in reading, math and writing. The Praxis I is required for initial teacher certification in Georgia. Praxis II: Subject assessment tests that are required for teacher certification in Georgia. Praxis II tests measure knowledge in particular content areas. For most teaching fields, two Praxis II tests are required. Professional Learning: A whole range of activities aimed at improving teaching by providing teachers with necessary skills training and information. Professional development activities range from formal courses and seminars to teacher mentoring and collaboration. Professional Standards Commission: The agency responsible for certifying teachers, school personnel and administrators in the State of Georgia. Psycho-educational Programs: Programs located on regular education campuses or in special centers, which provide services to students with severe emotional and behavior disorders or autism.

Q Quality Basic Education (QBE) Act: The legal foundation for education in Georgia passed into law in 1986 with the goal of improving education. It provides the framework for such things as funding, educational programs and student and teacher assessments. Quality Core Curriculum (QCC): The State of Georgia’s mandated minimum guidelines for the curriculum. Objectives are given at each grade level and must be taught. Local systems can add to QCC, but they cannot teach less than is mandated.

R Reading First: Initiative included in the No Child Left Behind Act that significantly increases the federal investment in scientifically based reading instruction programs in the early grades. The goal of the program is to ensure every child can read by the end of third grade. Reconstitution: Process through which the state oversees a low performing school (school receiving Needs Improvement designation on a school report card for two or more consecutive years) and directs the duties of the school principal until school performance improves. Regional Education Service Agencies (RESAs): The primary provider of staff development in Georgia. Georgia’s 16 RESAs provide leadership development, strategic planning, school improvement planning and other services to teachers and local schools.

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S Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT): Standardized test taken by college-bound students to gain admission to College. The SAT tests students’ verbal and mathematical reasoning ability. SAT II: Subject Tests: Tests that measure knowledge in high school subject areas such as biology, calculus and American History. The SAT IIs are required at many highly competitive colleges and universities. School Choice: Allows parents to enroll their children in the school of their choice. Section 504: Federal law that prohibits discrimination against disabled students. Social Promotion: Practice of allowing students who have failed to meet performance standards and academic requirements to pass on to the next grade with their peers instead of completing or satisfying the requirements. Social promotion ended in Georgia in the 2003-2004 school year for Grade 3, in 2004-2005 for Grade 5, and in 2005-2006 for Grade 8. Special Education: Special instruction for mentally challenged or gifted students. Special Instructional Assistance (SIA): A state funded program for kindergarten, first and second grade at-risk students. It provides additional funding to the regular instructional program to reduce class size, purchase additional teaching materials and involve parents in their children’s education. Special Needs: A student who has disabilities or is at the risk of developing disabilities that may require special education services.

T Title I: A federally funded program for K-12 at-risk students that provides additional help on the basic skills. Title I is the largest federal aid program for elementary and secondary schools. The program provides money to school systems based on the number of lowincome families in each district. Title II: A federally funded program that provides assistance to state and local educational agencies and institutions of higher education with teacher education programs. Title II funds programs to improve teaching and learning, reform teacher preparation and certification standards and to develop better performance-based assessment and professional development strategies. Title VI: Part of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color or national origin in programs and activities that receive federal financial assistance, including schools. Title VI prohibits the denial of equal access to education to students with limited proficiency in English. Title VII: A federal program designed to improve the English proficiency of bilingual students. Title IX: Law barring gender discrimination in education facilities that receive federal funds. Most Title IX cases filed against K-12 schools involve sex equity in athletic programs. Tracking: The practice of dividing students into class size groups, which exist for the major part of the school day or year, based on the student’s perceived ability or prior achievement and then designing and delivering instruction to each group. Transition Plan: Plan separate from the IEP that documents goals for a special education student to aid him or her in making the transition from school to work.

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V Values Education: The process of providing opportunities for all students to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes about the following values specified by the Georgia Board of Education: citizenship, respect for others, and respect for self. Voucher: A state allocation of money given to parents to allow their children to attend a school of the parent’s choice, either public or private. Georgia does not allow vouchers.

Z Zero Tolerance: Policies that mandate predetermined consequences or punishments for a specific offense regardless of the circumstances surrounding it.

Sources: Georgia Department of Education, Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Educations “Education-ary”

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2013 - 2014 Media Kit