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WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA’S PARENTING RESOURCE ● OCTOBER 2011 ● WNCPARENT.COM

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Happy tots Take your toddler out and about PAGE 10

Find support, friendship in moms groups PAGE 5 Keep kids moving with Kindermusik PAGE 15 BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH: Families cope PAGE 18


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c o n t e n t s Experience fall

in the mountains

This month’s features 5 Band together

Find support and friendship in Asheville’s moms’ groups.

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By Katie Wadington, Editor

10 Get out and go

We offer suggestions on places to take your toddler.

14 Music and more

Kindermusik offers young children a chance to play and learn.

18 Families and cancer How do you cope with breast cancer when you have kids? Two families share their stories.

25 Pumping pumpkins

Put that pumpkin to good use and burn some calories.

28 Day Tripper

Spend the day in Waynesville, especially for Apple Harvest Festival. 30 Fall festival roundup A look at goings-on in WNC through October.

42 Kids need to play

Playtime is getting lost, and experts are worried.

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Car seat controversy To turn the 1-year-old around or not? Parents weigh in.

56 Don’t hate eggplant Try a new recipe with that purple farmers market find.

58 Fall = apple pie

Carole Miller of True Confections shares her apple pie secrets.

In every issue

On the cover

Day Tripper .....................28

Easton Bradley, by Jesseca Bellemare Photography, www.jessecabellemare.com

Kids’ Voices .....................26 Parent 2 Parent ................35 Home-School Happenings.48 Growing Together............50 Divorced Families ............52 Story Times .....................54 Librarian’s Picks...............55 Puzzles............................65 Kids Page ........................66 Calendar .........................68

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.com Are you a member? Join the conversation, post photos and connect with other parents at WNCParent.com. Look for WNC Parent on Facebook and Twitter.

“I love fall.” That is the opening line on many of our Kids’ Voices quotes this month. I’ll echo those fifth-graders. The crisp, fresh air. The skies that seem even bluer when set against the orange treetops. The cinnamon scent that fills the kitchen. I wish fall were six months long. And WNC is a great place to be this time of year. Families can find fun on any given weekend. Check our calendar of fall festivals starting on Page 30 for a full plate of options. Waynesville’s Apple Harvest Festival is a highlight of our new Day Tripper feature, on Page 28. Enjoy the food of autumn by baking an apple pie using a recipe from Carole Miller of True Confections, found on Page 58. Or make ghoulish treats for Halloween; you’ll find ideas on Page 61. Fall means pumpkins, but here’s something you’ve probably not thought to do — exercise with one of those orange orbs. Brian Lawler tells you how on Page 25. The magazine also focuses on toddlers this month. The thing about toddlers — they like to move. And that constant need to expend energy can leave a parent exhausted. Why not take a break by joining other parents in one of the many moms’ groups around Asheville? We describe many of them starting on Page 5. Kindermusik satisfies a need to move with a chance to learn. The music program, which offers classes for infants to age 7, is featured in a story on Page 14. Toddlers also like getting out and about. We give you a sampling of outings to take with little ones on Page 10. Lastly, be sure to read our nod to Pink October, a touching story on Page 18 about how families cope when mom gets breast cancer. Read it, then go give your kids an extra hug. Until next month....

P.O. Box 2090, Asheville, NC 28802 828-232-5845 | www.wncparent.com PRESIDENT AND PUBLISHER Randy Hammer WNC PARENT EDITOR Katie Wadington — 232-5829 kwadington@citizen-times.com

FEATURES EDITOR Bruce Steele bsteele@citizen-times.com

ADVERTISING/CIRCULATION Tim (Bo) Head — 232-5860, thead@gannett.com CALENDAR CONTENT Due by Oct. 10. E-mail calendar@wncparent.com ADVERTISING DEADLINE Advertising deadline for the November issue is Oct. 18.

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The Moms Club of Hendersonville holds monthly meetings at the Hendersonville First Church of Christ. It's one of many groups for mothers in the Asheville and Hendersonville areas. JOHN FLETCHER/JFLETCHER@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM

Mom gets a break

Groups offer fun, support to parents By Betty Lynne Leary WNC Parent contributor

Bookstores stock the shelves with countless self-help tomes while TV psychologists offer advice on every channel. Yet, where do most moms go when they need support or have questions about raising their kids? They turn to another mom as nothing compares with the voice of experience. For moms in Western North Carolina, there are a variety of support groups that offer opportunities to share experiences.

These active groups schedule playdates and field trips, go hiking all year long, and offer practical help to nursing moms. The Asheville Stay-at-Home Moms Playgroup was formed last January when Brandy Lewis moved from Manhattan to Asheville. “I had a very successful playgroup in New York,” Lewis says, “and the whole reason for creating this group was to meet friends for myself, for my daughter, and soon-to-be baby boy.” The group has 32 members from the surrounding area including Black Mountain, Waynesville and Hendersonville. The group provides support, friendship and an outlet to talk to other adults to get advice or just to bond. They meet several times a week for playdates at a member’s home or go to parks or

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indoor play areas. There are no fees to join but members are asked to attend at least one outing per month. Here’s a glance at other groups for moms around Asheville:

Arden Moms

South of Asheville, the Arden Moms get together at least once a week either at someone’s home or at destinations such as the Carl Sandburg Home goat farm, the WNC Nature Center, apple orchards or pumpkin patches. “Joining the mom’s group was the best thing I did as a new mother,” says Susan Toole, organizer of the group. “It gave me a reason to get dressed and get out of the Continues on Page 6

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Continued from Page 5

Toni McDonald, left, and Jackie Orr talk as Eric Lau, Ryah McDonald and Caroline Orr play together during a Mom's Club of Hendersonville meeting at the Hendersonville First Church of Christ. JOHN

house and introduced me to a lot of moms going through similar experiences.” She adds that it is great to get advice from other moms and trade battle stories of raising kids. The Arden Moms schedule a Mom’s Night Out on occasion to give moms a chance to have dinner and a movie, or perhaps attend a book club meeting without kids. There is a $3 annual fee to join.

Hiking with Preschoolers in WNC

MOPS

Several area churches offer Mothers of Preschoolers programs, or MOPS, sponsored by the MOPS international organization. Mud Creek Baptist Church in Hendersonville, Biltmore Baptist Church in Asheville, and North Asheville Baptist Church all offer MOPS programs that run with the school calendar from September through May. “The purpose of MOPS is to nurture every mother of preschoolers,” says Melissa Thorsland, coordinator of the Mud Creek Baptist Church program. “Stay-athome moms, working moms, single, teen, married moms, and moms with different lifestyles who all share a similar desire to be the very best mom they can be.” Registration for MOPS ranges from $25 to $40 for the year and includes two meetings per month. At Mud Creek, moms receive a subscription to Momsense Magazine, a MOPS reusable shopping bag, stickers, and email devotions. At Biltmore Baptist, kids go to Praise Island, the church’s nursery, free of charge where they enjoy age-based classes full of crafts, games and story time. Breakfast is also

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FLETCHER/ JFLETCHER@ CITIZEN-TIMES. COM

provided. “The best thing about MOPS is the friendships you make with other moms,” explains LeAnn Moffitt, membership coordinator for the Biltmore Baptist program. “It’s tough being a mom, and this is a time in life when we can encourage and support each other.”

Moms Club of Hendersonville

Toni McDonald, of Hendersonville, discovered the Moms Club of Hendersonville just over a year ago. “If I had known about the club, I would have joined a long time ago,” she says. “Kids are welcome at all of our meetings and events and this was a big factor for me when I first looked at the club.” The group of about 32 members meets monthly at the Hendersonville Church of Christ and offers an activity calendar with additional scheduled outings. The group is open to any mother, expectant mother, grandparent, or caregiver that wants to spend time with others from the area.

holds informal monthly meetings, not classes, where women talk about childbirth, baby’s first weeks of life, and how to avoid and overcome difficulties. There are no requirements to join and you do not have to be a member to attend. Those who do join with a $40 fee help support the La Leche League’s purchase of new books and materials for the group as well as hosting conferences and workshops for families and leaders. Continues on Page 8

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Twenty-seven years ago, when Susan Mooney could not console her crying baby at 3 a.m., she called a breast-feeding counselor. “I was told to call back at a more reasonable hour,” Mooney recalls. “As I sat in my rocker and cried along with my fussy newborn, I vowed no woman would struggle like I was. When I had my second baby I trained to become a leader.” Mooney has been leading La Leche League meetings in Asheville for more than 18 years. The La Leche League exists to help mothers learn the art of breastfeeding as an important element in the healthy development of the baby and mother. The group

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Another new group in town that boasts more than 70 members is the Hiking with Preschoolers in WNC club. Started by Stacia Sparks, the group promotes the fun, free social outlet of hiking with the family. “Western North Carolina is a hiker’s paradise and to be able to get our kids out enjoying what this area has to offer on a regular basis is like the icing on the cake,” Sparks says. And winter weather doesn’t slow the group down. “We hiked through the winter all bundled up,” she adds. “What I like is that the outdoors is so accessible even in the wintertime. You just have to be prepared for the conditions.” Sparks notes that having both the kids and parents engaged in a physical activity really facilitates conversation and hiking in all kinds of conditions fosters fast friendships.

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MOMS GROUPS Continued from Page 6

A sampling of support groups for moms in WNC. Asheville Stay-At-Home Moms Playgroup: Visit www.meetup.com/Asheville-Stay-At-HomeMoms-Playgroup/ Arden Moms Meetup Group: Visit www.meetup.com/ arden-moms or contact Susan Toole at ArdenMoms@gmail.com. AshevilleMommies.com: Meet and greets for moms while kids play. Two sessions, 11 a.m.-noon and 3-4 p.m. Wednesdays at The Hop Ice Cream and Coffee Shop, 640 Merrimon Ave. Asheville Moms with Multiples: Group for moms with multiples meets 7 p.m. the first Thursday of each month at the Women’s Resource Center on Doctors Drive, behind Mission Hospital. Meetings are an opportunity to share experiences and offer support in a social setting. Call 444-AMOM or visit www.ashevillemom.com. Biltmore Baptist MOPS: Group for all mothers of children from infancy through kindergarten. Morning group meets 9:30-11:30 and evening group meets 6:15-7:45 on the first and third Wednesday of each month at Biltmore Baptist Church, 35 Clayton Road, Arden. Call 687-1111, email mopsofbbc@yahoo.com or visit www.biltmorebaptist.org/mops/. Hiking with Preschoolers: Visit www.meetup.com/hiking-withPreschoolers/ La Leche League of Asheville mornings: Pregnant moms, babies and toddlers welcome at all meetings. Meets at 10 a.m. the second Monday of the month at First Congregational Church on

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Oak Street. Contact a leader: Susan, 628-4438 or wncbabylady@gmail.com; Jessica, 242-6531; or Falan, 683-1999. Visit www.facebook.com/#!/pages/LaLeche-League-of-Asheville Buncombe/370356353543 La Leche League of Asheville evenings: Pregnant moms, babies and toddlers welcome at all meetings. Meets at 7 p.m. the third Monday of the month at Awakening Heart on Merrimon Avenue. Contact a leader: Yvette, 254-5591; or Molly, 713-7089. Visit www.facebook.com/#!/pages/LaLeche-League-of-Asheville Buncombe/370356353543 La Leche League of Hendersonville: Offers information and support for pregnant or breastfeeding women. Meets at 10 a.m. the second Wednesday of the month at Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Hendersonville, 2021 Kanuga Road. Babies and toddlers are welcome. For more information, Contact a leader: Andrea 6766047, Katie 808-1490, or MC 6939899. Mom2mom: Christian moms group meets at St. Paul’s Church, 32 Rosscraggon Road, Rosscraggon Business Park Building B, Asheville. Moms with any age children are welcome. Call 388-3598. Mommy and Me: Park Ridge Hospital offers a support group for moms at 10 a.m. the fourth Monday of the month. Contact Amy Mast at 216-7244. The hospital offers a luncheon for moms and babies, noon-1 p.m. the third Monday of the month, at the hospital’s private dining room. Call 681-2229. Moms Club of Hendersonville: A support group open to mothers of all ages in the Henderson Coun-

ty area, including mothers who have home-based businesses and those who work part-time but are home with their children during the day. The group meets for speeches and topics for discussion, park days, playgroups, nights out, holiday activities and service projects benefiting needy children in the community. Meets 9:30 a.m. the first Thursday of the month at Hendersonville Church of Christ, 1975 Haywood Road, Hendersonville. Children welcome. Call Kerry at 692-7724 or visit http://hendersonvillemomsclub. wordpress.com MOPS at Mud Creek: Mothers of Preschoolers provides an open, faith-based atmosphere for moms of infants through kindergartners. Meets second and fourth Wednesdays, 9:15-11:15 a.m., SeptemberMay, at Mud Creek Baptist Church, 403 Rutledge Drive, Hendersonville. Email Melissa Thorsland, melthor@tds.net, or MOPS.MudCreek@gmail.com or visit http:// mopsatmudcreek.webs.com/ links.htm. North Asheville MOPS: Meets 9:30-11:30 a.m. the first Monday of each month at Maranatha Baptist Church, 1040 Lower Flat Creek Road, Weaverville. Contact Amy at 658-0739 or Liban at lmorris_cid@hotmail.com. WNC Mountain Mamas: Moms and kids can meet up and play at 11 a.m. Wednesdays the Hop Ice Cream Shop, 640 Merrimon Ave. Enjoy half-priced coffees and ice cream. Encompassing, supporting and uniting WNC families. Visit www.wncmountainmamas. proboards.com

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Toddler play places

By Betty Lynne Leary WNC Parent contributor

If eating and sleeping are the bywords for babies, toddlers can best be described as the true explorers of childhood. Newly mobile, innately curious and yearning to stretch their limits, toddlers love finding new places to see, touch, hear and investigate. Parents look for safe, clean, toddler-friendly places for their youngsters. A fenced-in playground is attractive to alleviate worries about wanderers. Restrooms are a bonus and a variety of age-appropriate play equipment is a must. Following is a sampling of places that are ideal for toddlers:

Grady Bremer, 4, wades in the stream at Robert Lake Park in Montreat. The park is friendly for toddlers and older siblings. BETTY LYNNE LEARY/SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

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Valeria Rangel, 4, plays with at Mountain Play Lodge in South Asheville. ERIN BRETHAUER/ EBRETHAU@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM

…I can still hear the People clapping.

In Fairview, the Spring Mountain Community Center offers a toddlersize park and playground in a quiet, rural setting. A large, grassy field is encircled by a one-sixth mile walking track that is perfect for toddlers on scooters and trikes. Swings, slides, and a climbing set occupy one corner of the park and a small creek flows nearby. A covered pavilion can be rented for birthday parties or other gatherings. Located just four miles off Highway 74A on Old Fort Road, the park is a hidden gem just 15 minutes from Asheville. “Our favorite park is Robert Lake Park in Montreat,” says Erin Bremer, mother of Grady, 4, and Charlotte, 10 months. “Grady loves playing in the fresh mountain water no matter how cold it is! He loves playing with friends and pretending they are camping using the trees, creek and stones to make pretend campfires, tents and food.” The park is popular with moms because shallow branches of the main river give toddlers a place to play safely in just a few inches of water. Bathrooms are available and there is a va-

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riety of equipment including bucket swings, slides, climbers and a special fenced-in toddler playground. Large, shady trees with picnic tables underneath provide a perfect lunch spot. The park can be found just a mile from the stone arches on Montreat Road and plenty of parking is available on Community Center Circle. Just a few miles west in Swannanoa, the Grovemont community boasts a large play area next door to the Swannanoa Public Library. A dozen large oaks provide shade over swings, climbing structures, a large play set, a tire swing, and a carshaped structure kids sit on while spinning a steering wheel. A soccer field, surrounded by a stone wall, allows room for ball play, kite flying, or as a peaceful spot for blowing bubbles. Azalea Park in East Asheville, also satisfies a toddler’s need for exploration. Bright purple and aqua climbers come complete with stairs to climb and tubes to slide down. A small rock wall climber offers a toddler-size mountain to conquer. A towering sycamore tree in the center of the small park has a bench underneath so moms can see all around. Four swings, two bucket swings, and a sandbox are nearby as is a covered picnic area with grills. Over in Woodfin, Avery’s Little Corner was built to honor Avery King, a local toddler who was killed in 2006. This imaginative play space offers a wide variety of equipment for youngsters, a walking trail, picnic shelter, and bathrooms. The playground is located at 90 Elk Mountain Road directly behind Town Hall.

“Grady loves playing in the fresh mountain water no matter how cold it is! He loves ... pretending they are camping using the trees, creek and stones to make ... campfires, tents and food.” Erin Bremer, on Robert Lake Park in Montreat

Other favorite outdoor play places include: » Jake Rusher Park, off Sweeten Creek Road in Arden; » Splashville, in Pack Square Park in downtown Asheville; » Fletcher Community Park, off Howard Gap Road in Fletcher.

Indoor Alternatives

While we relish the warm days of fall in Western North Carolina, the weather eventually turns and parents find themselves with energetics kids and no place to play. Luckily, our area also offers some terrific indoor alternatives for pint-sized explorers. Newly opened last spring is the Mountain Play Lodge on Sweeten Creek Road in Arden with 16,000 square feet of play areas, concessions, party rooms, and retail space. Within the exclusive toddler area, kids can choose to play with soft foam sculptures, in a cottage play house or a bouncer, or with the Thomas the Tank Engine table. There is also a dual-lane slide and an obstacle course bouncer that are great for toddlers.

“We pride ourselves on being a childand parent-friendly facility,” says Shaun Collyer, owner and operator of Mountain Play Lodge. “Parents appreciate that we keep the facility so clean and that we provide delicious coffee drinks and free wifi.” All-day admission rates are $10 for ages 3-12 and $6 for ages 2 and under. A Frequent Visitor Card provides 10 admissions at 20 percent off regular admission rates. On rainy days, Kim Bailey of South Asheville and her 20-month-old son Jackson love the Mighty Mites program at Asheville Gymnastics. For $5 for a 45minute session, toddlers can tumble on the spring-loaded gym floor, jump on the trampolines, and climb ropes and walls. “They have a trampoline that is built into the floor so Jackson can bounce but not fall off and get hurt,” Bailey says. “He also loves jumping into the pit filled with foam and the parachute play time too.” “It’s a great place for snow days because kids can stay all day long,” says Shelley Schenker, co-owner of Asheville Gymnastics. The gym, located on Coxe Avenue in downtown Asheville, also offers wi-fi for parents who want to work while the kids play. Other fun indoor play places include: » Asheville’s Fun Depot, on Roberts Road in Asheville; » Story time at Barnes & Noble bookstores. The county libraries, located throughout the area, offer a variety of story times, demonstrations, and other learning opportunities for young children. No matter what the season, the public library is always a fun, and free, place to visit. (For a list of area story times, see Page 54.)

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It is breathtaking to witness the whirling dervish that eight 5-year-olds can create in a room when they are asked to move wildly and exuberantly to loud, danceable music while shaking shiny jingle bells in their hands. It’s even more breathtaking to watch them respond to a command to halt in their tracks when the music stops, to make not a single movement lest the jingle of even one bell be heard in the now-silent room. Suddenly, the music and dancing and jingling commences again with wild abandon. Just as suddenly, the music — and movement — stops. Start, stop, start, stop, until the children have mastered the art of the total freeze. It’s all part of the magic of Kindermusik, an international music and movement program that has touched millions of children from birth to age 7 since it was created in the late 1960s by early childhood music educators and child development experts. “This one’s about self-control, and it’s a challenge,” longtime Kindermusik teacher Yvette Odell said of the dance/freeze exercise as she programmed her mp3 player for the next round of fun at the Asheville Performing Arts Academy on Charlotte Street. “It’s hard for a 5-year-old to keep those bells still.”

More than music

Kindermusik is not just about music. It’s about movement, language, socialization and development of myriad other skills, carried out with the help of jingling bells, pounding drums, glockenspiels, floating scarves, clicking sticks and a host of other stimulating instruments and tools. “The many songs and activities in Kindermusik class enhance a child’s total development by strengthening physical,

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Yvette Odell guides a Kindermusik class at the Asheville Performing Arts Center. JOHN COUTLAKIS/JCOUTLAKIS@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM emotional, social and cognitive skills at a very early age,” said Lora Scott, another veteran Kindermusik educator. “Teaching children through Kindermusik has allowed me to experience the joy of watching children learn and grow through music.” Deanna Border’s 5-year-old son, Eli, has been a continual student of Kindermusik since he was 6 months old. She and her husband, Sid Border, wanted to give their son early exposure to music, but found other benefits beyond the fun, games and socialization. “I’ve always heard or read anecdotes about kids who are involved in Kindermusik doing better in school,” Border said. “Eli is doing really, really well in kindergarten, and I can’t help but feel that there’s some correlation there.” Eli followed instructions like a pro

during his first class with “Miss Yvette,” standing still as a mouse, his bells silent, when the music stopped. “I liked the freeze/dance with the bells the most because it was really hard to keep them quiet,” Eli said. “But I liked to see how still I could be.” Maria Wood, who teaches in Asheville and Black Mountain, said Kindermusik offers benefits not just to children but to their parents, as well. “It fosters a really meaningful connection between parents and kids, and then within the class group, and finally extending through the music to people and even cultures we’ve never met,” Wood said. “Music engages the whole mind, body and soul, and in this era of screens and information overload, it is a gift to invite young families to slow down for an hour a

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week and really enjoy each other,” she said.

Fun for all ages

Kindermusik is not just for children old enough to move and dance along with the music. “Babies get it; they come out of the womb already knowing about the pitches, tonalities, the patterns of melody, rhythm, phrases, sounds and silences, and so much more,” Odell said. “We adults have to be ready to notice it, too, and if they see that we notice it repeatedly, they will decide it is worth knowing about, worth remembering,” she said. “That is when the neural connections solidify and become permanent; otherwise, this Continues on Page 16

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Yvette Odell, left, makes sure her Kindermusik class exposes children to different instruments, such as the cello, at the Asheville Performing Arts Center. JOHN COUTLAKIS/JCOUTLAKIS@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM Continued from Page 15

music aptitude just goes away.” Debra Huff, who teaches Kindermusik in Mars Hill, said what children learn in class spreads into their daily lives. “They learn quickly the routine of the classroom, learning to share, the concept of ‘instruments in the basket’ when it’s time to put the items away,” Huff said. “Parents tell me how their children will go through the routine at home beginning with the hello song, remember words of songs we’ve sung in class, then sing it is time to say goodbye,” she said. “Routines help children lessen anxiety by creating an awareness of knowing what is coming next.” Sarah Patten, mother of 3- and 5-yearold boys and a 5-month-old daughter, said music has become “a language” to her older son, who now plays violin, and the two younger children have been equally affected by Kindermusik. “Miss Yvette talks about how music sort of connects different parts of the brain that don’t otherwise get connected,” Patten said. “Music is part of the magic of life, and for my kids to have that innate understanding of that is a really special thing for them as human beings.” Mary Andrae’s 18-month-old son, Oli-

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WANT TO TRY KINDERMUSIK? Kindermusik classes for newbornsage 7 are ongoing at a variety of sites in the Asheville area. Here are contacts for some certified educators. Lora Scott, 649-2320, edolora@charter.net; www.all soulscathedral.org/music-choirs/ kindermusik. Yvette Odell, 242-1548, www.kindermusikwithyvette.com. Maria Wood, kindermusik inthemountains@gmail.com; www.kindermusikinthemountains. typepad.com. Allyson MacCauley, allyson marief@hotmail.com Debra Huff, 206-3145, dhuff@mhc.edu ver, began taking Kindermusik from Wood when he was 6 months old, and he now plays ukulele and dabbles in guitar. Kindermusik is particularly important for

parents who are “musically impaired,” like she and her husband, Jason Jones, and can’t act as musical role models on their own, she said. “I could tell even at 6 months that the music and activities were very stimulating for Oliver,” Andrae said. “The more things we can expose our children to to help deal with the stresses of living, the better off they are. And I think if they have a musical talent, the better copers they’ll be.” Kindermusik also had an unexpected benefit for Andrae. “It was a lot of fun for me,” she said. “I had chosen to stay home for a year, and I’m a very social person, so that part was nice, getting out of the house and being with other mothers.” Patten agreed, adding that she has absorbed some parenting skills watching “Miss Yvette” in action as she keeps her young charges on task. “You get community, it’s fun for the kids, it give you some sort of social interaction for them if they’re not in pre-school, and then there’s the subtext of academic stuff they don’t realize they’re getting,” Patten said. “I’ve seen parents give up in midstream, and seeing what it’s done for my 5-year-old … I just wish they could see it. It’s like he speaks another language.”

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Fun for the whole family! • Pony Rides • Hay Rides • Six Inflatables • Door Prizes

Monday, October 31 • 5:00–8:00 p.m.

• Game Booths • Face Painting • Concession Stand

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• Candy! • Batting Cage

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• Balloon Twisting • Costume Parade (No scary costumes please!)

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Rain or shine! Freedom. Friendship. Faith.

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Coping with cancer

Breast cancer turns families’ worlds upside down

also welling in her eyes.

PINK OCTOBER

Tell the children

By James Shea WNC Parent contributor

Tears ran down 7-year-old Cara Trantham’s cheek and words came reluctantly as she recalled her mother’s breast cancer. She was with her mother, Carrie Trantham, in 2008 when a doctor called with the news. The diagnosis changed the family forever. Trantham underwent mastectomy surgery and radiation treatment. Bailee Trantham, 13, said the cancer diagnosis and treatment was one of the most difficult periods in the life. “I prayed a lot,” she said, with tears

Trantham, 37, was not surprised by the diagnosis. She works as an ultrasound technician and scanned herself after discovering a lump on her breast. “I knew it looked worrisome,” she said. Family and friends gathered that night at the Trantham family home in Candler after she learned about the diagnosis. Everyone grieved but was supportive. A major challenge that comes with a breast cancer diagnosis is managing family dynamics. The entire family’s routine is upset, and everyone is in a more fragile emotional state. “You are in such a fog,” Trantham said. “You think you are in control, and then one day you aren’t.” Trantham and her husband, Joey , decided to be open and honest with their three children — Cara, Bailee and Abbie, 11 — about the diagnosis.

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“We decided from the very beginning we were not going to leave them in the dark,” she said. “We would tell them.” In the United States, one in eight women will develop some form of breast cancer in their lifetime, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Nearly 40,000 women died from breast cancer in 2010, but there are 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the U.S. Continues on Page 20

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Continued from Page 18

Getting through Alice Myer, a patient and family counselor at Hope Center, helps families get through a cancer diagnosis and treatment. “There is a lot of listening,” Myer said. “They tell me where it is supposed to start.” Cancer, even for people who work in the field, is complicated. It is a challenge to explain the options to the person diagnosed with breast cancer. And it is a challenge for their children. They know their mother is sick, but it can be difficult to explain cancer, especially to young children. “All the people who work in the field are aware that they have a language that most people don’t know,” Myer said. But she said hiding the diagnosis from children is the wrong approach. A family should be open and honest with everyone. “You don’t want to keep a secret,” Myer said. “The word cancer is powerful to adults and might not have the same meaning to children.” Carolyn Comeau, 51, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2007 after finding a lump on her breast. She and her husband, Craig, also wanted to be open with their children, Colin, 10, and Louise, 8. They sat them down and began the difficult conversation, de-

Carolyn and Craig Comeau and their children, Colin and Louise, at their home in East Asheville. The Comeaus chose to share the news of Carolyn's breast cancer diagnosis with their children. JOHN FLETCHER/JFLETCHER@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM

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spite knowing it would turn the family upside down. “The hardest conversation was when I told (my children),” Comeau said. “A lot of people don’t want to use the ‘C’ word. I didn’t want them to see me cry.”

Accepting help

Events happen quickly after breast cancer is diagnosed. Doctors are consulted. Patients and families educate themselves. Hard choices are made. “The task of sorting through all that information is hard,” Craig Comeau said. “All that information is hard in the moment when you are just trying to live your life.” Carolyn Comeau said she does not remember much about that period. “Past the moment of diagnosis, you are falling through a tunnel,” she said. “You don’t retain anything.” The Comeaus and Tranthams said they could never have survived that troubling period without the support and help. They never asked. People just helped. “They keep your life as normal as possible,” Trantham said. Families are not alone and can rely on friends, family, co-workers and church members for everything from cooking to laundry, they said.

Websites like www.MyLifeLine.org and www.CaringBridge.com offer schedules to coordinate when to bring food or help in other ways. It takes much of the responsibility away from the family.

the area and said her children often relied on them for support. “They could talk to my mom and sisters,” she said. “They could write things down. They done really, really good.”

Age-appropriate answers

End treatment is not the end

Children will often want to discuss issues that surround the breast cancer diagnosis. For Carolyn Comeau, the questions came at the most random times. She was driving one day and Colin asked if the family would be better off if she had not been diagnosed with cancer. “I about drove off the road,” she said when recalling that moment. Another time Colin asked, “Momma why would you take a medicine if it makes you lose your hair?” The questions were often difficult, but Carolyn and Craig Comeau answered them in an “age-appropriate way” and tried to keep the family together while Carolyn underwent treatment. Myer said parents should stay positive when they talk with their children. The children may not understand the particulars, but they want to know that their mother will survive. “You have to make it age appropriate,” she said. Carrie Trantham has a lot of family in

Myer said sometimes the real challenge for a family comes after treatment is over. The family works so hard to keep everything together, and people sometimes collapses once the cancer is gone. “People don’t realize once the treatment is over, they are emotional,” Myer said. “Most people change their perspective after a serious illness. They re-evaluate things. They adjust to the new normal.” Both Carolyn Comeau and Carrie Trantham are cancer free. Comeau goes to a support group for breast cancer survivors called the Young and the Breastless. She still sees the impact on her family even through she has been cancer-free for three years. “I see remnants,” Comeau said. “Louise is very clingy.” But she says her children are “richer” for going through the experience. They understand that all people and individuals face challenges. “Love is what gets you through,” Comeau said.

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Thursday, October 6 | 5:00-7:30 pm | Pack Square Park hope | celebration | connection

Help us Paint the Town Pink and kick off a month of breast cancer awareness! We invite you to wear pink and join us at Pack Square Park for an evening of celebration with inspiring speakers, incredible music, and connection.

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The observance of Halloween, which dates back to Celtic rituals thousands of years ago, has long been associated with images of witches, ghosts and vampires. Over the years, Halloween customs and rituals have changed dramatically. Today, Halloween is celebrated many different ways, including wearing costumes, children trick or treating, carving pumpkins, and going to haunted houses and parties. Here are some facts about Halloween from the U.S. Census Bureau: » 41 million: The estimated number of potential trick-or-treaters in 2010 — children 5-14 — across the United States. Of course, many other children — older than 14 and younger than 5 — also go trick-ortreating. » 116.7 million: Number of occupied housing units across the nation in 2010 — all potential stops for trick-or-treaters. » 92: Percentage of households with residents who consider their neighborhood safe. In addition, 78 percent said there was no place within a mile of their homes where they would be afraid to walk alone at night. » 1.1 billion pounds: Pumpkin production by major pumpkin-producing states in 2010. Illinois produced an estimated 427 million pounds of the vined orange gourd. California, New York and Ohio were also major pumpkin-producing states, each with an estimate of more than 100 million pounds.

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kids’ fitness

Fight fall’s sweets by lifting pumpkins By Brian Lawler Special to WNC Parent

Halloween is a time of year that children (and adults) are given ample opportunities to eat candy. My three boys will ravage the neighborhoods and local fall festivals in an effort to collect as much candy as humanly possible. Later they will devour their plunder and terrorize my wife and one another before their blood sugar crashes, leading to cravings for even more sugar. A pumpkin can be a great exercise training tool to offset your child’s tendencies to overindulge in sweet, gooey treats. Pumpkins are a fun way to add overload to most body weight exercises and are a cheap alternative to purchasing more expensive pieces of exercise equipment such as medicine balls or dumbbells. Research has found that most adults underestimate the total amount of calories that they consume and overestimate the amount of calories that they burn during exercise. This common distortion from reality can set your child up to become overweight or obese later in life. To help keep your child’s candy eating in check, have them exercise with a pumpkin. A 100-pound child will burn about 10 calories during 1 minute of calisthenics or body weight movements such as squats. If your child eats a 240 calorie bag of M&M’s, then he or she can perform squats, presses, wood chops and lunges for the next 24 minutes to burn off those additional calories. Exercising will help to stabilize their blood sugars more quickly and return your child’s personality to normal more quickly. It will also help reduce the likelihood of storing the extra calories from the candy as fat. Of course, the best strategy is to limit your child’s candy consumption overall. But if your child chooses to overindulge (or sneaks candy

Evan Hoyle performs an overhead squat with two pumpkins. SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT from a hidden stash), then at least her or she will learn how much exercise it takes to burn all of those extra empty calories. When the Halloween season is over and you are done exercising with your pumpkin, then you and your child can eat it. Pumpkins are low in fat and calories and rich in disease fighting nutrients, such as beta-carotenes, vitamin C and E, and fiber. Pumpkin seeds, muffins, and other treats are great healthy snacks that you and your kids will enjoy eating this fall season. Brian Lawler is a physical therapist and sports performance trainer at Asheville Physical Therapy. Too see exercises that you and your child can perform with a pumpkin, visit his website at www.AshevillePhysicalTherapy.com.

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Healthy plate has beans, grains, proteins By Nanci Hellmich USA TODAY

When the government released the new MyPlate image this summer, the message seemed simple enough: Fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables, make onequarter of it grains such as rice or pasta, and the rest should be protein-rich foods such as lean meat, poultry, seafood or eggs. The main points are clear, but there’s still a lot of confusion about some of the specifics, especially about how to eat more whole grains and what qualifies as a lean-protein food, says Elizabeth Ward, a registered dietitian in Boston, nutrition blogger at www.food.usatoday.com and author of a new book, “MyPlate for Moms, How to Feed Yourself & Your Family Better” (Loughin Press, $15.95). Here are some of her suggestions for meeting the MyPlate (choosemyplate.gov) recommendations as well as the federal dietary guidelines: » Try to select protein-rich foods that deliver a lot of nutrients for the calories. Consider salmon, tuna, skinless chicken breast, turkey, pork tenderloin, beans and eggs, she says. Adults should consume at least 8 ounces a week, so try to serve fish at least twice a week, Ward says. Don’t skimp on the protein, because research shows that it helps you stay full longer and keeps hunger at bay, she says. » Beef up your bean intake. Beans and peas, including kidney beans, pinto beans, black beans, garbanzo beans (chickpeas), lima beans, black-eyed peas, split peas and lentils, can be considered either a vegetable or a protein food, Ward says. » Try new whole grains. Most people eat the same side dishes over and over and don’t give new foods a try, she says. Half the grains you eat are supposed to be whole grains, Ward says. Foods are considered whole grains when the following terms are listed first on the ingredient list: whole wheat, brown rice, bulgur, oatmeal, rolled oats, whole oats, wholegrain barley, wild rice, buckwheat, quinoa or millet, she says. “There are some quick-cooking whole-grain products at the grocery store that are ready in minutes.”

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kids’ voices

Why we love fall

To celebrate this season of apples and pumpkins, crisp weather and falling leaves, we asked students in Julia Meeks’ fifth-grade class at Glenn C. Marlow Elementary in Fletcher what they like best about fall. Here’s what they told WNC Parent Editor Katie Wadington.

“One thing I like about fall is I love going to my cousin’s football games. He plays for T.C. Roberson and I am always there screaming my head off! Sometimes it is very cold, but I love it anyway. It is very exciting and fun to watch.” Myra Strickland, 10

“I love fall because of the leaves changing colors and falling off the trees. Also because of the leaves you get to play in and jump onto the pile and see them go everywhere. ... I like seeing my puppies jumping into the leaves. It looks so funny.” Cameron Kanetzke, 10

“One reason I love fall is because it is when deer season starts. Another is that fishing starts to get better. The fall soccer season starts, and basketball season isn’t far away. The fourth reason is that I love Halloween and Thanksgiving. Those are some reasons I like fall.” Slayde Stepp, 10

“I love fall! Some things I like about it are the colors changing on the trees. The reds, oranges and yellows are everywhere! I love raking the leaves up and then running and jumping in them with my dog. another thing is that I really enjoy going on walks with my family. We always laugh and have a great time!” Olivia Kemp, 10

“I love fall. I can go on and on and on about it. What I love about it is the leaves changing colors from green to orange to yellow to brown. Fall is when the air feels cozy and fresh and feels wonderful. It’s also the time for hiking. My family hikes up and down mountains with me and we see beautiful views. Fall is also the time for football games. I go with my dad to watch the Wolfpack play against other teams. Fall, oh fall, why do you have to go?” Nick Voso, 11

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“My first favorite thing in fall is the leaves changing color. It is so beautiful to see all the different shades of red, yellow and orange (which is my favorite color). ... my next favorite part of fall is all the decorations. We always go to a pumpkin patch to pick out our pumpkins, and then we go home and carve them and then put a candle or light inside of them. We also put a beautiful fall scene at the end of our driveway. It includes a bale of hay, a bunch of corn stalks, pumpkins and boy and girl scarecrows. It makes me smile every time I leave and come home.” Ashley McMahan, 10

“Fall is amazing in different ways. One reason it is amazing is because in the fall the leaves change colors and during the other seasons they don’t do that. And fall is amazing because the weather starts to cool down to where it is not too hot and not too cold.” Kaili Vanderhoof, 10

“I love fall! One reason I love fall is the beautiful leaves changing. When I see the leaves changing to red, yellow and orange, I get all excited that fall is here. Another thing I like about fall is the leaves fall to the ground. When they fall, I go and rake them up into a big pile. then my brother an dI go and jump in them.” Austin Laughter, 10

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Quick getaway to Waynesville

Apple Harvest Festival is good reason to head west By Mike McWilliams WNC Parent contributor

Getting there Waynesville is about a half-hour away from downtown Asheville. To get there, take Interstate 40 west for about 17 miles. Then follow U.S. 74 west for six miles before taking Exit 102 to Waynesville. At the bottom of the exit, turn right onto U.S. 276 South/Russ Avenue and follow it for about a mile. Turn right onto North Main Street and follow into downtown.

The story

Waynesville was founded in 1810 by Revolutionary Way soldier Col. Robert Love after his former Army commander Gen. “Mad” Anthony Wayne. Love was Haywood County’s first elected justice of the peace, and donated the land where the courthouse is now located. He died in 1845 and is buried in the town's Oak Hill Cemetery.

5 things for families to do » Apple Harvest Festival Now in its 23rd year, Waynesville’s Apple Harvest Festival is a perfect place for families to spend a crisp, autumn day and celebrate everything apples. The event features handmade crafts, local food and live entertainment, including mountain music and cloggers. The children’s play area also offers activities and games. Apple Harvest Festival takes place from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Oct. 15 in downtown Waynesville. Admission is free. For more information, visit www.haywoodapplefest.com. » Fun Things Etc. This specialty toy store is located on North Main Street in Waynesville. The store features toys, games, puzzles and recreational equipment for kids of all ages. For more information, visit www.funthingsetconline.com. » Wheels Through Time Located in nearby Maggie Valley, Wheels Through Time is a “museum that runs.” It features more than 300 rare

The 23rd annual Apple Harvest Festival in Waynesville celebrates fall's iconic fruit and is a great way for families to spend a crisp autumn day. HAYWOOD COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE/SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

American vintage motorcycles, including Harley-Davidson, Indian, Excelsior, Crocker, Henderson and many more. There are also dozens of exhibits ranging from board track racers, hill climbing, choppers, and one-of-akind motorcycles. For more information, visit www.wheelsthroughtime.com. » Old Pressley Sapphire Mine Located near Canton, the Old Pressley Sapphire Mine is one of the oldest operating mines in Western North Carolina. The world's largest sapphire, the 1,445-carat “Star of the Carolinas” was discovered here, and visitors are invited to sift through dirt to find their

School Tours Tuesday Mornings The Learning Community is a private K-8 school 15 minutes from downtown Asheville, on the grounds of Camp Rockmont.

“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” Eleanor Roosevelt

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Please call 828.686.3080 or email info@thelearningcommunity.org for more information. www.thelearningcommunity.org


Harness your inner biker and take the family to visit the Wheels Through Time museum in Maggie Valley. HAYWOOD COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE/SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT own gems and jewels. For more information, visit www.oldpressleymine.com. » America’s Clogging Hall of Fame World Championships This is the event's 30th anniversary. Last year saw more than 300 team dances and more than 500 solo dancers. The event runs Oct. 21-23 at the Stompin' Ground, 3116 Soco Road, Maggie Valley. Admission is $10 Friday and Saturday and $8 on Sunday. For more information, visit www.achf.net.

» Cataloochee Ski Area Kids ski for free at this mountain ski resort in Maggie Valley. Skiing and snowboarding classes are also available. The season typically starts by mid-November. For more information, visit www.cataloochee.com.

Good eats

» Nick and Nate’s Pizzeria, 111 N. Main St., Waynesville. » Joey's Pancake House, 4309 Soco

Road, Maggie Valley. » Beaver’s Drive In, 1605 S. Main St., Waynesville.

Along the way

Haywood County features the longest stretch of the Blue Ridge Parkway of any North Carolina county. Instead of taking the interstate from Asheville, take in some brilliant fall colors along the parkway.

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Fall festivals abound

Through October

HICKORY NUT GAP FARM: Visit the farm from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. daily. Visit the corn maze, pick your own pumpkin, buy organic apples, visit with our animals and more. Adults $5, children $3, age 4 and younger free. Pony rides on Saturdays and Sundays for extra cost. Visit www.hickorynutgapfarm.com.

Sept. 30

GHOST TRAIN: Tweetsie Railroad’s 22nd annual celebration, Fridays and Saturdays through Oct. 29.

After dark, see Halloween characters and Ghost Train engineer Casey Bones, visit the haunted house, go trick-or-treating. Visit www.tweetsie.com.

Oct. 1

FARM CITY DAY: Antique and modern farm equipment, music, square dancing, clogging, food, petting zoo, more. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Jackson Park, Hendersonville. Visit www.historichendersonville.org SCARECROW FESTIVAL: Crafts, scarecrow contest, food, more. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at Lake Julian Park, off

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Monthy Art Sessions Wednesdays: Ages 3 -6 / Mondays: K-5th grade

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Oct. 1-2

LAND OF OZ: Tour the old Land of Oz theme park. Hayride or shuttle from Beech Mountain to enchanted forest with live music, tour of Dorothy’s house, an Oz museum and more. Trips at 10 a.m., noon and 2 p.m. Tickets are $16.50 in advance, $20 day of (ages 2 and under free). Not accessible to wheelchairs or large strollers. Visit www.autumnatoz.com. FALL FESTIVAL: Games, inflatable rides and food at Immaculata Catholic School. 3-8 p.m. Oct. 1 and 1-6 p.m. Oct. 2. Adult dinner with silent auction benefiting scholarship program on Oct. 2. Call 693-3277.

Oct. 4-8

Art in the Evening

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Long Shoals Road, Asheville. Visit www.buncombecounty.org. MUSIC IN THE MOUNTAINS FOLK FESTIVAL: Toe River Arts Council’s 26th annual festival with songs, stories, various musical styles in the old-timey tradition. 5-8 p.m. at Burnsville Town Center. Visit www.toeriverarts.org. HEY DAY: Friends of the WNC Nature Center host the 35th annual fall family festival with games, crafts, music, animals and more. Proceeds go toward improvements at the center. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at WNC Nature Center, 75 Gashes Creek Road, Asheville. Call 298-5600 or visit www.wildwnc.org.

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99th ANNUAL INDIAN FAIR: Entertainment, midway games, food, traditional and contemporary arts and crafts. At Cherokee Indian Fair Grounds, U.S. 441, Cherokee. $10. Opens at 10 a.m. Visit www.cherokee-nc.com.

Oct. 7

GREAT PUMPKIN PATCH EXPRESS: Weekends through October at Great Smoky Mountain Railroad’s Bryson City depot. Meet the Peanuts characters, select a pumpkin, hay rides, live music, storytelling, more. Wear costumes and trick-or-treat. Ticket prices include admission to model trains museum ($9 & $5 for museum only). Train rides 3 p.m. Fridays, 11:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. $53, $31 age 2-12. 488-7000 or 800-872-4681.

Oct. 8

BOONE HERITAGE FESTIVAL: Living history demonstrations, craft vendors and live music. 9 a.m.4 p.m. at Hickory Ridge Living History Museum, 591 Horn in the West Drive, Boone. MINERAL CITY HERITAGE FESTIVAL: Food, crafts, children’s activities and more, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. in Spruce Pine. Visit www.sprucepinefestivals.com MOUNTAIN GLORY FESTIVAL: Street festival with arts and crafts, food, quilt show, children’s area, more. 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. in Marion. Visit www.mtngloryfestival.com

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Oct. 14

STINGY JACK’S PUMPKIN PATCH FESTIVAL: Runs Oct. 14-16, 21-23, and 28-30 at Mountains &

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Meadows Events Center at Turkey Pen, 324 McGuire Road, Pisgah Forest. Illuminated twilight trails, corn maze, hay rides, food, artists, music. Storytelling and music at 6 p.m. $15, $12.50 age 6-12, free age 5 and under. Parking on Asheville Highway for $5. 7846497 or www.stingyjackspumpkinpatch.com.

Oct. 15

APPLE HARVEST FESTIVAL: 23rd annual event with arts, crafts, entertainment, food and apples. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. in downtown Waynesville. Visit www.haywood-nc.com PRESBYTERIAN HOME FALL FESTIVAL: 10 a.m.2 p.m., 80 Lake Eden Road, Black Mountain. Wagon rides, food, silent auction, games, music and more. Call 686-3451 or visit www.presbyterianhome forchildren.org.

Oct. 15-16

ARTS AND CRAFTS FALL FESTIVAL: Arts and crafts festival with children’s area, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. in Lake Lure. Visit www.lakelureartsandcraftsfestivals.com

Oct. 16

HARDLOX: Jewish food and heritage festival, with traditional music and dance, crafts, food, children’s activities. From 11 a.m.-4 p.m. at Pack Square Park, downtown Asheville. Visit www.hardloxjewishfestival.org

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Return to the Land of Oz theme park at Beech Mountain the first weekend in October. Tour Dorothy’s house, an Oz museum and more. SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

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CORN MAZES BLUE RIDGE CORN MAZE: Six-acre maze at 1605 Everett Road, Pisgah Forest. Times by appointment, Monday-Friday; 2-8 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. $7 for ages 13 and up, $5 for ages 6-12, free for 5 and under. Group rates. Visit www.blueridgecornmaze.com or call 226-0508. COLD MOUNTAIN CORN MAIZE: 4168 Pisgah Drive, along N.C. 110, south of Canton. Open 4-9 p.m. Wednesday-Friday and 1-9 p.m. Saturday-Sunday through Nov. 1. Admission $8 for ages 6 and older. Haunted maze opens Oct. 1. Group rates. Call 648-8575 or visit www.themaize.com. ELIADA FIELDS OF FUN MAZE: Twisting trails over 12 acres at 2 Compton Drive, Asheville. With cow train, corn cannons, hay bale maze and more for all ages. Weekends through Oct. 30, 4-10 p.m. Fridays, 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturdays, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Sundays. $9 for adults, $6 for children ages 4-11 and free for children younger than 4. Group rates. Visit www.fieldsoffun.org, call 254-5356, ext. 156, or email alee@eliada.org for information. HICKORY NUT GAP FARM: 57 Sugar Hollow Road, Fairview. Farm offers a corn maze, pumpkin patch, face painting, pony rides, apples and more. Enjoy fresh-pressed cider and visit with the farm’s animals. Open from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. daily through Oct. 31. Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for children, free for 2 and younger. Group rates. Call 6281027 or visit www.hickorynutgapfarm.com.


Oct. 20-23

CRAFT FAIR OF THE SOUTHERN HIGHLANDS: Asheville Civic Center. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Oct. 21-23, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Oct. 24. www.southernhighlandguild.org. LAKE EDEN ARTS FESTIVAL: Weekend of art, music and outdoor fun at Camp Rockmont in Black Mountain. Visit www.theleaf.com.

Oct. 21-22

PUMPKINFEST: Hayrides, trick-or-treating, a pumpkin roll, more, in Franklin. Visit www.renewingfranklin.org/pumpkinfest.html. SHOCK IN THE CORN: Haunted maze at Blue Ridge Corn Maze. $8 admission, $2 parking. Open at dark. Visit www.blueridgecornmaze.com.

Oct. 21-23

FALL HARVEST DAYS: Crafters, demonstrations, farm tools, antique engines, antique tractor pulls, more. At WNC Agricultural Center. $8 per day, children under 12 free with paid adult. Call 687-1414 or 891-3223.

Oct. 22

GREEN RIVER ‘DISCOVERY DAY’: Arts and crafts, music, games, storytelling, food. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. on the grounds of the old community store across from the old mill site on U.S. 225 in Tuxedo. Rain or shine. Call 698-7230. HOWL-O-WEEN: Games, presentations, crafts and more at the WNC Nature Center. Come in costume.

Eliada's corn maze has a pirate theme for 2011. Wind your way through the maze on weekends through Oct. 30. CITIZEN-TIMES PHOTO From 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Visit www.wncnaturecenter.com.

Oct. 28-29

SHOCK IN THE CORN: Haunted maze at Blue Ridge Corn Maze. $8 admission, $2 parking. Open at dark.

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Visit www.blueridgecornmaze.com.

Oct. 29

HALLOWEEN CARNIVAL: Games, face painting, prizes and costume contest. Kate's Park in Fletcher, 3-5 p.m. for children 11 and younger. Call 687-0751 or visit www.fletcherparks.org. HALLOWEEN CARNIVAL: Candy, carnival games, magician, bounce house, crafts, food, more. For ages 0-10. Wear a costume. 6-7:30 p.m. at Carver Community Center, Black Mountain. Free. Visit www.bmrecreation.com. HALLOWEEN COSTUME PARADE: 4-7 p.m. in Dillsboro, with family-friendly costume parade and contest at 6 p.m. Visit www.visitdillsboro.org. HALLOWEENFEST: Tiny tot pumpkin bowl, cookie decorating, inflatables, costume parade, hay maze, trick-or-treat, pumpkin patch, 5K race and fun walk. In downtown Brevard. Call 884-3278. HAUNTED LAGOON: Zeugner Center, behind Roberson High School, Arden. Noon-3 p.m. Face painting, costume contest at 12:30 p.m., swimming, trick-or-treat. Admission is can of food for MANNA FoodBank; $2 for swimmers. Call 684-5072 or visit www.buncombecounty.org. HOOPLA: Biltmore Baptist hosts event with inflatables, carnival games, face painting, prizes, popcorn, cotton candy and more. 3-6 p.m. at 35 Clayton Road, Arden. Visit www.biltmorebaptist.org/hoopla. PIRATE PARTY: Grove Park Inn Resort & Spa hosts community party with cupcake decoration, face painters, balloon fairy, more. 1-3 p.m. $10 per person. Visit www.groveparkinn.com or call 800-4380050.

Oct. 31

• Medicaid, private pay, and most insurances accepted • CHAP accredited and state licensed Call 828-667-3200 | 200 Ridgefield Court, Suite 214, Asheville, NC 28806 | www.bayada.com Call 828-327-3800 | 1985 Tate Boulevard SE Suite 417 | Hickory, NC 28602 Call 828-327-3800 | 240 Hwy 105 Ext Suite 201| Boone, NC 28607 AN-0000286903

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FALL FAMILY FESTIVAL: 5-8 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Asheville, 5 Oak St. Visit www.fbca.net. TRICK-OR-TREAT STREET: 4:30-7:30 p.m. at gazebo on Main Street, downtown Hendersonville. With Halloween costume contest for children and pets and the Monster Mash entertainment.

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Victoria Dunkle and her husband, Dave, pose for a picture with their two children Gus, 6, and Lorelei, 4. ERIN BRETHAUER/EBRETHAU@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM

Mom in the news

TV anchor Victoria Dunkle puts family first By Katie Wadington WNC Parent editor

Victoria Dunkle is the morning and noon news anchor and a reporter at Ashevilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ABC-TV affiliate, WLOS-Channel 13. Before moving to Asheville, she was a

news anchor at the Fox affiliate in Lansing, Mich., and at the NBC affiliate in Traverse City, Mich. She has a bachelor of science in communication from Clarion University in Pennsylvania. She and her husband, Dave Noyes, have two children, Gus, 6, and Lorelei, 4.

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Q: What drew you to TV journalism? A: It was something I had wanted to do from the time I was a little girl. I used to make my little sister watch me do the news using one of our nightstands as the news desk. I love telling the stories of people. It is a privilege to share information that can help people. I find that to be Continues on Page 36

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Victoria Dunkle spends time with son Gus as he builds with his Legos. ERIN BRETHAUER/EBRETHAU@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM Continued from Page 35

one of the most rewarding aspects of the job. Q: Describe your typical workday. A: It starts early, before 3 a.m. I am at work by 4 a.m. Recently, I started taking those people stories on the road with the early morning live interviews. So I get to work, grab the details for that day’s interviews and out the door we go. After the live shots from 5-7 a.m. I head back to the station to start working on News 13 at Noon, which I anchor. That means writing promotional scripts and helping my producer. Somewhere in between all of that, I look for more live interview opportunities. They can come from email suggestions to news releases to word of mouth. You never know where the interesting story is going to turn up. My husband, Dave Noyes, is a real estate broker in the Asheville area. And he is at home with the kids when they start their day. He gets them ready for school before he heads to work. It is a real tagteam effort for us.

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After the noon news, I’m out the door and heading over to pick up my daughter from preschool. At that point, I’m in full Mama mode. And we wait for big brother to get out of school. Q: How has becoming a parent changed your perspective on what you do? Do you approach stories differently? A: First, my priorities shifted. My son and daughter deserve the best I have to offer. I won’t get a second chance to be the Mama they need me to be. So in our family, my husband and I have God, each other and our children as our priorities. And keeping that in perspective is what makes me better at doing my job. Because it gives us a balance so I bring the level of professionalism and commitment to the job that I need to be able to have. Q: What do your kids think about your job on television? Do they get to see you on TV very often? A: They think it is cool that their mom is on TV. But I admit, they don’t get to see a lot of the news. They aren’t old enough for a lot of the content. My son, Gus, would

like me to do more interviews about Legos, and Lorelei, she says I need more princesses on the news with me. They are pretty used to the fact that we can’t go many places without someone coming up to say they recognize me from the news. But both of my kiddos have such great personalities… that sometimes I get “Hey, aren’t you Gus and Lorelei’s mom?” That will keep things in perspective for you. Q: How would you describe your children? A: Gus is my oldest, and he is a little man. He loves Legos, sports and being kind to people. He is creative and comes up with the most amazing designs with those Legos. He also says he wants to be a rock star. He loves Toby Mac, Chris Tomlin, Jack Johnson and any tune from a “Cars” soundtrack. He is also has a kind heart that yearns to help people feel better. He has a knack for knowing when I need a hug or a word of encouragement. Not bad for 6½ years

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old. Lorelei is my sweet princess. She loves all things girlie. We have fun painting our nails. And she is always ready for dress-up time. She just ran by with a “Hi Mom, Bye Mom.” Must be heading out for snuggle time with Daddy. She, too, has a way of loving on you that is amazing. I live for the weekend morning when I get to cuddle up with her. Q: What do you love most about being a parent? Has anything surprised you that you didn’t expect? A: I love looking at Gus and Lorelei and seeing their personalities develop. I love to see them developing a love for Jesus and for people. We try to make sure they have a strong foundation in what is right and what will benefit them as they grow up. Being a parent is always full of surprises. We can share tips and hints with each other. But since God creates these sweet babies to be individuals, what works

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for one child isn’t going to work for all of them. And the biggest tip I can offer is to realize that no parent is perfect. In this world, that is not easy to allow yourself to do. But when I can reach that point, then I can be better as a parent. Dave and I know we won’t make all the right decisions, but we pray that we make all of the decisions in love. Q: Do you have any guilty pleasures? A: Chocolate. It is something that makes me happy. And I am so glad when we have stories touting its health benefits. Oh… and coffee. With my hours, that’s a must. Q: If you find yourself with free time, how do you like to spend it? A: I spend some of my free time working on the Women’s Bible Study that I co-write and teach with Lori Masters Frank. We offer it at Biltmore Baptist Church. But most of my free time involves my favorite people… Dave, Gus and Lorelei. They are the reason my face lights up and they bring me so much joy. Q: Do you and your husband get out on date nights? Do you have a favorite place to go? A: Not as many as we would like. But

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yes, we try to make time when we can. His job keeps him pretty busy, too. As far as our favorite place — we talk about trying different spots. But since we don’t get these nights out very often… we seem to gravitate to the same spot, Frankie Bones. We love the atmosphere (I’m such a fan of Dean Martin and the other members of the Rat Pack). And they take good care of us, allowing us to have a quiet evening. It’s a real treat to be able to finish a sentence without an “excuse me, Mama or Daddy.” Q: What do you enjoy doing together as a family? A: I love to bake. So I get the kids in the kitchen with me making treats. And they both are pretty good little pastry chefs. We have a creek that runs along part of our neighborhood, so that was a favorite spot this summer. We also love waterfalls. We get requests to go to Triple Falls in DuPont quite often. We like to take a picnic and eat on one of the big rocks before you climb up to the falls. But I would say “Friday Family Fun Night” is the big draw. We watch a movie or play games. By the way, watch out for my kiddos — they play a mean game of Uno.

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TSA alters screenings for kids By Bart Jansen USA TODAY

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Children 12 years old and younger won’t have to take off their shoes to get on an airplane, and they’ll get patted down less, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said recently. These changes will be adopted in airports nationwide within months, after Transportation Security Administration officers receive extra training, Napolitano told a Senate homeland security committee. The program will be expanding from a pilot program in six airports that began in the spring. “There’d be additional training for a different pat-down procedure for them and also, again, allowing them to leave their shoes on,” Napolitano says. The announcement was the latest example of an effort by the department to have risk-based screening rather than the same process for everybody, as TSA Administrator John Pistole mapped out in a series of speeches. “As we have made clear we are always taking steps, based on the most recent intelligence, to enhance procedures while at the same time improving the passenger experience whenever possible,” spokesman Greg Soule said. “TSA anticipates these changes, which will begin rolling out in select airports this week, will continue to strengthen and streamline the security screening process for travelers.” After public outrage in April over a video of a 6-year-old girl getting patted down at Louis Armstrong New Orleans Memorial Airport, Pistole told the Senate committee in June that the agency would try to avoid patting down children. Under the new policy, random searches will still be conducted for children and other passengers who are treated differently, to keep the system unpredictable, Napolitano said. However, she said, the children will be able to avoid taking off their shoes and have different pat-down procedures “over the coming weeks and months.”

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by Leah McGrath, RD, LDN

Ingles Supermarkets - Corporate Dietitian

Don’t pick on the PICKY EATER...

Eat Your Vegetables Lasagna Ingredients • 1 box no-bake lasagna noodles • 1 cup reduced fat Laura Lynn ricotta cheese • 1/2 cup silken tofu • 1 cup reduced fat Sargento Italian blend (Mozzarella & Provolone) • 1 link pork chorizo • 2 cups fresh spinach leaves • 1/2 cup fresh basil leaves • 1 medium zucchini, cut into thin strips with vegetable peeler • 2 tsp Perfect Pinch mediterranean blend • 1 tsp nutmeg • 1 egg, beaten • 1 jar Harvest Farms ORGANIC pasta sauce

Directions 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spread pasta sauce over bottom of 9x12 baking dish and lay down one layer of lasagna noodles. Brown chorizo and drain fat. 2. Mix together ricotta, tofu, 1/2 cup of shredded cheese egg, and add in Perfect Pinch and nutmeg. Stir in chorizo until all ingredients blended together.Mix in spinach and basil leaves 3. Spread 1/2 of this mixture ontop of noodles. Layer thin strips of zucchini as you would a layer of pasta noodles over top of spinach/basil. Cover this with other 1/2 of cheese/chorizo mixture and then top with layer of noodles and then remaining pasta sauce and then remaining 1/2 cup of cheese. 4. Cover baking dish with aluminum foil and bake for 30 minutes. Remove foil and cook for 20 more minutes. Remove from oven and let stand for 5 minutes before serving.

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If “I don’t like____”, “I won’t eat____” or just “Ick, Uck, Blech” are commonly heard around your dinner table you may have a picky or fussy eater, but it may not be quite so simple. Let’s look at why some toddlers and small children are or become picky eaters. 1. It may be because of what mom ate or didn’t eat during pregnancy. A study from the University of Colorado School of Medicine showed that mom’s food choices while pregnant influenced what her baby ate and drank in the future. Children whose mom’s ate a healthy and varied diet through pregnancy were more likely to prefer healthy food. Source: http://www. ucdenver.edu/about/newsroom/newsreleases/Pages/Pregnantmoth er’sdietimpactfetussmelltaste.aspx 2.Kids taste more than adults. According to the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia we are born with some 10,000 taste sensors (buds) that gradually begin decreasing over time. By the time we are adults we may only have 3,000-5,000 taste buds. This means that tastes are more acute to a child and highly seasoned foods or bitter or sour flavors may actually be uncomfortable for them. 3. Your child may be full. Often a child who is not hungry will ignore or refuse food. Make sure kids aren’t filling up on liquids before or during meals and that the portions you give them are age appropriate. 4. It may be your fault. Children model their behavior, including how or what they eat, on those around them. Are you eating your vegetables? Be sure you are setting a good example and aren’t an “Eat as I say but not as I do.” parent or caregiver. 5. Distracted dining. Kids are easily distracted by television or video games. Make sure meal times are technology-free times so they can focus on their food. 6. A sign of something else. Extremely selective eating may be a sign of something else. If your child has a limited diet it may be beneficial to have them checked for autism.(Source: http:// www.autismunited.org/blog/how-to-introduce-new-food-to-yourautistic-child-80446.html) Become a fan of Ingles Supermarket on Facebook - www.facebook.com/inglesmarket Follow me on Twitter - www.twitter.com/InglesDietitian Toll-Free: 800-334-4936 | lmcgrath@ingles-markets.com

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Play time increasingly neglected

Experts say children need an hour of unstructured outside play every day. Adult-led sporting activities don’t count. SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

Advocates say importance of play is getting lost By Kim Mulford Gannett

Imagine child’s play as a medieval castle under siege from all sides. From the north, government core curriculum standards are squeezing out school recess. From the south, encroaching forces of electronic media and videogames are breaking through fortress walls. And from all sides, parental fears are seeping under the foundations. Play is under attack. Since the 1970s, kids have lost an average nine hours of free playtime a week. Kids are getting less free time outside. And when kids are given recreational

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activities, they are likely to be adult-led and adult-supervised. So say play advocates like Danielle Marshall, who works for KaBOOM!, a nonprofit which has built more than 2,000 playgrounds nationwide. “There is a play deficit in the United States,” said Marshall. “It’s having a detrimental impact on our children. “The sad reality is play is being taken away from kids,” said Marshall. “Some of it is adult-imposed. Other things are trends in society. The way children are playing today has definitely changed.”

Play is paramount

First, a lesson on the importance of play.

Cindy Dell Clark, an anthropology professor at Rutgers University-Camden, studies how children use play to cope with chronic illness. It’s true that young animals roughhouse and fool around, she said, but play among human children is not universal. The way children play depends on how they grow up. “Kids don’t do pretend play in all societies,” said Clark. “In a lot of societies, kids have important work to do. Their chores are important for economic survival.” Cultures that encourage children to use their imaginations, tell stories or act out roles are offering a signal that it must be important. It has value, especially in a society that wants children to become independent.

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Play as teacher

Please call 828-274-3361 or visit our website AshevilleRacquetClub.com for more information.

Kids also learn through play, said Marshall. They have to figure out the rules when they make up games. They learn to problem-solve and develop their decision-making skills. “A lot of times, adults drive what children are doing in their lives,” said Marshall. Continues on Page 44

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“In a society like that, where everyone is an agent that operates for themselves, play is important,” said Clark. “It helps kids to navigate what they’re experiencing socially and make sense of it for themselves.” In the course of her work to study how children with diabetes and asthma coped with their illnesses, Clark found kids used their imaginations to handle stress and make sense of their disease. She recalled the case of one boy with asthma whose stuffed animals were taken away because they contained possible allergens. He had to learn how to stay calm during a nighttime asthma attack. So he imagined the cartoon characters printed on his bedsheets could come to life and protect him. “He conjured the idea of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles as his protectors,” said Clark. “If he were really close to death, (he imagined) they would fly out the window and get his doctor.” In another case, a mother invented a game to help her little boy cope with his insulin shots. She pretended the needle was a zebra, and with each injection, she would tell her son the zebra was going to give him a kiss. When the shot was over, the boy was allowed to take the syringe, put it on the floor and stamp his foot on it, saying, “Bad zebra, you hurt me.” The scenario allowed the mother to show her son she was giving him the injection out of love, and the boy was allowed to demonstrate his objections. “Only play allows you to do that,” said Clark. “Play allows you to take yourself out of this very literal circumstance and go into ‘as-if’ playing.” Playing allows children to act out a new way of thinking about the real world, she said. “I think each and every one of us can nurture that in our children,” Clark said. “It’s what makes it possible to be resilient for all of us. Play doesn’t say there is only one way to intepret everything. You can shift meaning around —1/8 it’s a loving zebra, it’s a hurtful zebra. It can be kind of limber and ambiguous.”

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But when kids play, they can explore ideas and try things out in a safe way. They also build relationships on the playground, and learn how to negotiate with their peers. And there are physical benefits, too. The rise in childhood obesity coincides with the drop in outdoor play time. Playgrounds challenge small bodies and helps kids develop gross motor skills, Marshall said. But many parents keep their parents from playing outside because they are concerned about their safety. “We’ve gotten to the place where we want to bubblewrap our children, and we don’t want them to get hurt whether that be physically or even emotionally,” said Marshall. “We don’t want anything to happen to them.” Perhaps the reduction in play can explain the growth of museums dedicated to promoting play. The Garden State Discovery Museum in Cherry Hill engages children’s imaginations the moment they walk in the door, said museum director Kelly Lyons. The museum features exhibits intended to spark role-playing and pretending. The pint-sized diner lets kids reverse roles with adults; a pretend farm market, construction zone and veterinarian’s office offer more ways to explore the world of grown-ups through play. Last month, the museum opened a new 2,000-square-foot exhibit called the Dinosaureum, a giant climbing structure designed to give kids space to climb, slide, crawl and stretch. Children learn best through play, she said. “If you’re constantly feeding them information in an academic way, they don’t learn how to do it on their own,” said Lyons, who is the mother of a 7-month-old son. “If you give them the opportunity to make mistakes and really be engaged by things, ultimately what you have on your hands is somebody who loves to learn and that’s always a good thing.”

Play rediscovered

But the value of play gets lost in society’s demand for perfection, according to Karen Hutchison, a play advocate and expert. She teaches her education students about the importance of play at Rowan University, and was the U.S. delegate for the International Play Association’s Right To Play Award earlier this summer. Parents have structured their children’s lives so much, there is no time for play unless it’s adult-directed, Hutchison

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Kai Green plays at the Garden State Discovery Museum in Cherry Hill, N.J. The growth in childre’s museums may have contributed to a drop in outdoor playtime. JOHN ZIOMEK/GANNETT

PLAY TIPS FOR PARENTS » Kids need at least one hour of free, unstructured, child-led playtime outside every day. Adult-supervised sports don’t count. » Take the kids to the park or playground. Invite other neighborhood children to come along. » Turn off electronic media and tell your kids to go play. If they complain, “I’m bored,” that’s good, says play expert Karen Hutchison. They’ll have to find ways to entertain themselves —1/8 otherwise known as play.

PLAY, BY THE NUMBERS

» One in five children in the United States lives within walking distance of a park or playground. The numbers are worse in low-income neighborhoods. » Children between the ages of 8 and 18 average more than 7.5 hours per day playing on entertainment media. » Since the late 1970s, kids lost 12 hours of free time per week and experienced a 25 percent decrease in play and a 50 percent decrease in unstructured outdoor activities.

Source: KaBOOM! (www.kaboom.org)

said. Schools are trimming recess time, too. Between 60-80 percent of recess has been so modified or limited, you can’t call it recess anymore, she said. Play is part of our DNA, Hutchison said. It’s directly connected to brain development. Play “absolutely alchemizes learning, rather than hampers it,” said Hutchison. True play is unstructured, she said. “It’s messy and it’s child-initiated,” Hutchison

said. “We’ve become a society of helicopter parents,” she added. “We hover over our kids and we don’t want them to get hurt, when actually, the opposite happens. By allowing them to go onto the playground and get scraped knees and even broken arms, they learn what they can do and what they can’t do.” Experience, she said, is the best teacher. And that’s what play is all about.

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How to protect little ears

Sometimes it’s just a comfort issue, but if noise is loud and exposure is prolonged, kids can damage hearing By Elizabeth Weise USA TODAY

When New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees brought his son out on the field to glory in his team's Super Bowl win, 1-year-old Baylen sported hearing-protective earmuffs. Divya Kumar spent much of a recent Disney on Ice show with her hands covering her 2-year-old’s ears to protect her from the “disturbing” volume. Tom Kirvin always carries earplugs for his 8-year-old son because the sound in movies can be “outrageous. In some theaters, they’re so loud it’s kind of chestrattling,” the San Francisco dad says. All those loud sounds are annoying, even painful sometimes and can bring children to tears. But they may not be dangerous. “I can be very confident that it’s not hurting their ears,” says Brian Fligor, director of diagnostic audiology at Children’s Hospital in Boston. For little Baylen, “more likely than not it was more of a comfort issue.” Still, parents shouldn’t be complacent: Many sounds damage children’s hearing, and it’s important to know the difference. Hearing loss from loud or sustained noises is caused by destruction of the cilia, tiny hairlike projections that sprout from sound receptor cells in the ear. Loud or prolonged noise can shear off or break the cilia so there’s nothing left to detect the sound. Fligor has done sound testing at New England Patriots games and found the noise levels to reach 100 decibels, with a sustained roar of around 85. That’s just one decibel below the maximum acceptable level for a worker to be exposed to for eight hours a day, says Andrew Oxenham, a professor at the University of Minnesota who studies auditory cognition. According to federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration rules, “if you’re exposed to 86 decibels all day, you should be OK.” There’s an inverse relationship between intensity and length of exposure when it

Children's hearing can be damaged by listening to loud sounds over a length of time, day after day. SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

“If you are exposed to a fairly loud noise, say at 90 decibels, for hours, you can develop a hearing loss. If you’re exposed to something like a gunshot at 140 decibels, that only takes a matter of seconds.” Susan Norton, chief of audiology at Seattle Children’s Hospital

comes to hearing loss. “If you are exposed to a fairly loud noise, say at 90 decibels, for hours, you can develop a hearing loss. If you’re exposed to something like a gunshot at 140 decibels, that only takes a matter of seconds,” says Susan Norton, chief of audiology at Seattle Children’s Hospital.

Takes 10 years or 2 seconds

People vary in their susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss, says Norton.

W N C PA R E N T. C O M

“Someone can be exposed once and have a whopping hearing loss, and some people can hunt for years and not be that much affected.” The problem is, there’s no way to predict who’s going to be susceptible until their hearing is damaged. What’s really dangerous for children and teens is “listening to high-level sounds for very sustained lengths of time, day after day,” Fligor says. Kids with lawn-mowing businesses who don't wear earplugs or kids who work on the farm around loud farm equipment are at risk. As far as music played through earphones goes, the danger is prolonged exposure to high-intensity noise. Not too many kids have actual damage from using iPods, Fligor says, “but it can develop over the course of five or 10 years of heavy use.” Listeners tend also to inch up the volume if they’re wearing headsets for long periods of time. It’s “a vicious cycle,” says Norton. As the cilia in the ears become fatigued, the music seems softer. “So you turn it louder,” and the whole cycle starts again, she says. The answer is to “give your ears a rest.”

Preventative steps

One seldom-considered danger to children’s hearing is the reluctance of some parents to vaccinate. Meningitis, rubella and mumps were all major causes of hearing loss in children before vaccines became available. Now “we have seen kids who have gotten meningitis because they haven't been immunized against it,” and in some, that leads to hearing loss, Norton says. “Most of the parents today weren’t alive when there were large epidemics of measles or mumps or meningitis,” she says. “They don’t know the dangers.” The other major preventable cause of hearing loss is kids sticking objects in their ears. “I’ve seen kids who have stuck Q-tips through their eardrum,” Norton says. “Nobody thinks it’s going to happen, but it can.” Common sense is the best guide for parents, she says. “Anything an adult should wear ear protection for, a child should. If they’re going to be mowing the lawn, if they’re using a leaf blower, certainly any kind of tools like that.”

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BUCKLE UP?

Parents question new, more stringent guidelines for car seats

By Angie Campbell Upstate Parent magazine

Ruthie Godfrey recently celebrated the fact that her 8-month-old son, Jackson, graduated from an infant carrier seat to a rear-facing child car seat. She was glad her little boy, who is already the size of a 1-year-old, only had four months left to remain rear-facing to meet safety recommendations. Then she learned the recommendations had changed. “I was so looking forward to the day when he could turn around and face the front,” she said. In late March, both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration released new recommendations for how children should ride in vehicles. The AAP now advises parents to put their children in rear-facing car seats until the child turns 2, or until the child reaches the maximum height and weight for his car seat. Most children should ride in a belt-positioning booster seat until they have reached 4 feet 9 inches tall and are between 8-12 years of age, it also advises. Godfrey, of Roebuck, S.C., said this is a big change from previous recommendations, which cited age 12 months and 20 pounds as the minimum safety guidelines for infants and toddlers to ride rear-facing, or up to the limits of the car seat. “Of course, I want to do whatever is safe for my child, but as a parent, the way the car seat is now, I can’t even see his face,” Godfrey said. “Handing him things or just being able to see him, it’s easier if they’re facing forward. I’ve been counting down the days until he turns a year old. He’s extra tall, so his feet are already hitting the edge of the seat. I don’t think he’ll make it to 2.” When Upstate Parent magazine asked parents for feedback on Facebook, the majority response agreed — the new guidelines just don’t seem practical. “I remember climbing over seats in the station wagon on long trips,” wrote Jeannette Johnston Avakian. “I’m still here!!” Marie Douglass asked, “Where do you put their legs when they are between 1 and 2 years old and have to be facing backwards?”

46

Ruthie Godfrey will do whatever it takes to keep her son, Jackson, safe while traveling, which includes leaving him in a rear-facing car seat until he turns 2. CINDY HOSEA/GANNETT But safety experts warn there’s a reason the new guidelines were issued. “It’s pretty straightforward,” said Dwayne Smith, injury prevention manager with AnMed Health and Safe Kids Upstate. “Infant spines are developing, and their heads are proportionally large for their bodies. Injury to their head or spine can easily occur if they’re not properly restrained.”

Rear-facing vs. forward-facing seats

Smith said the AAP relied on scientific studies in child passenger safety to construct its new recommendations. According to the policy released by the AAP, studies have found that forward-facing children ages 12–24 months are five times more likely to be injured in car crashes when compared to rear-facing children that age. “If you tell the typical parent, ‘If you turn your child around forward-facing before the best practice recommendation, you’re exposing them to the possibility of

injury five times over,’ most parents hopefully would understand the benefits of keeping them rear-facing,” Smith said. Passengers move toward the point of impact during a collision, Smith said, and forward-facing seat harnesses don’t restrain a child’s neck or head. Rear-facing child car seats are designed to act as a shell and cushion children during the impact of a crash. “When they’re rear-facing in a forward collision, they decelerate into the shell of the car seat, and the shell absorbs the energy of the crash — not the child’s head and spine,” he said. He said if a child was forward-facing in a front collision crash, the child’s head would whip forward and stretch the cervical column and spinal cord. “If the spinal cord stretches more than a quarter of an inch, it bursts,” he said. The child’s brain could also rattle back and forth in his skull, causing permanent brain damage or death, he added. Scott Keeley, fire marshal for the city of Greer, S.C., whose fire department is a

W N C PA R E N T | O C TO B E R 2 0 1 1


car seat safety inspection station, said he often hears parents complain that rearfacing seats don’t allow comfort room for a child’s growing legs. “In the event of a crash, the child may end up with a broken leg or something to that effect, but if they’re riding forwardfacing and the strain is put on their neck, it could break their necks,” Keeley said. “Would you rather your child have a broken leg or a broken neck? That’s the way you should look at it.”

Booster seats

The AAP also recommends parents graduate to a forward-facing car seat after the child turns 2, or meets the height and weight requirements of its car seat manufacturer. They should keep the child in the forward-facing seat for as long as possible, Smith said, because a five-point harness system, used with a forward-facing seat, keeps the child safer than a lap and shoulder seat belt would. “The confirmatory evidence shows that 2- to 6-year-olds placed in forward-facing restraints reduce their risk of fatality in a crash by 22 percent compared to seat-belt restrained children,” Smith said. He said studies also show that most parents graduate their child to a seatbelt

far too soon. An important step — booster seats — are being skipped. “It’s extremely dangerous to skip that step,” he said. The AAP’s new guidelines recommend parents keep children in booster seats until they reach a height of 4-foot-9, but many parents on Facebook argued it’s unnecessary. Keeley said those parents need to consider safety first. “You can have older children that don’t fit those guidelines,” he said. “Some of them might pitch a fit about it, but the safest way isn’t always the coolest way. That booster seat just gets them up so that a lap and shoulder belt will fit them properly.” Smith said lap and shoulder seatbelts are designed to most effectively protect a male who is 5-foot-10 and 170 pounds. Beltpositioning booster seats lift a child until the seatbelt fits properly, but Smith understands why parents find them inconvenient. “If they’re driving their child to elementary school and waiting in a drop-off line, it puts parents in a difficult predicament because of the culture of the drop-off on a school campus,” he said. “It’s not practical for them to get out of the car, run around, undo the child’s harness and let

them out.” For a lap and shoulder belt to fit a child correctly, the shoulder belt should lie across the center of the chest and the shoulder — not on the neck and not on the face, Smith said. The lap belt should lie across their hips, not on their abdomens. “When we talk to school children about this, we tell them to find the points of their hips on both sides and identify that bony protrusion,” Smith said. “We tell them the belt has to be on bone, not on the belly. Lap belts should touch the crest of the pelvis, and the shoulder belt is on the breast bone and collar bone.” He said people compromise their protection if they put an arm over that shoulder belt, or place the shoulder belt behind their heads. According to North Carolina law, children need to sit in a child restraint device until they reach age 8 or 80 pounds, whichever comes first. Children between 40-80 pounds are expected to sit in belt-positioning booster seats. Godfrey understands the reasons the recommendations were issued and said she plans to follow them. She knows other parents who don’t plan to. “The bottom line is, I’ll do whatever they say is the safest thing,” she said. “I just might not be happy about it.”

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47


car seat safety inspection station, said he often hears parents complain that rearfacing seats don’t allow comfort room for a child’s growing legs. “In the event of a crash, the child may end up with a broken leg or something to that effect, but if they’re riding forwardfacing and the strain is put on their neck, it could break their necks,” Keeley said. “Would you rather your child have a broken leg or a broken neck? That’s the way you should look at it.”

Booster seats

The AAP also recommends parents graduate to a forward-facing car seat after the child turns 2, or meets the height and weight requirements of its car seat manufacturer. They should keep the child in the forward-facing seat for as long as possible, Smith said, because a five-point harness system, used with a forward-facing seat, keeps the child safer than a lap and shoulder seat belt would. “The confirmatory evidence shows that 2- to 6-year-olds placed in forward-facing restraints reduce their risk of fatality in a crash by 22 percent compared to seat-belt restrained children,” Smith said. He said studies also show that most parents graduate their child to a seatbelt

far too soon. An important step — booster seats — are being skipped. “It’s extremely dangerous to skip that step,” he said. The AAP’s new guidelines recommend parents keep children in booster seats until they reach a height of 4-foot-9, but many parents on Facebook argued it’s unnecessary. Keeley said those parents need to consider safety first. “You can have older children that don’t fit those guidelines,” he said. “Some of them might pitch a fit about it, but the safest way isn’t always the coolest way. That booster seat just gets them up so that a lap and shoulder belt will fit them properly.” Smith said lap and shoulder seatbelts are designed to most effectively protect a male who is 5-foot-10 and 170 pounds. Beltpositioning booster seats lift a child until the seatbelt fits properly, but Smith understands why parents find them inconvenient. “If they’re driving their child to elementary school and waiting in a drop-off line, it puts parents in a difficult predicament because of the culture of the drop-off on a school campus,” he said. “It’s not practical for them to get out of the car, run around, undo the child’s harness and let

them out.” For a lap and shoulder belt to fit a child correctly, the shoulder belt should lie across the center of the chest and the shoulder — not on the neck and not on the face, Smith said. The lap belt should lie across their hips, not on their abdomens. “When we talk to school children about this, we tell them to find the points of their hips on both sides and identify that bony protrusion,” Smith said. “We tell them the belt has to be on bone, not on the belly. Lap belts should touch the crest of the pelvis, and the shoulder belt is on the breast bone and collar bone.” He said people compromise their protection if they put an arm over that shoulder belt, or place the shoulder belt behind their heads. According to North Carolina law, children need to sit in a child restraint device until they reach age 8 or 80 pounds, whichever comes first. Children between 40-80 pounds are expected to sit in belt-positioning booster seats. Godfrey understands the reasons the recommendations were issued and said she plans to follow them. She knows other parents who don’t plan to. “The bottom line is, I’ll do whatever they say is the safest thing,” she said. “I just might not be happy about it.”

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Pumpkin Patch

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Campfires Hayrides & More

Located At: 4168 Pisgah Dr. Canton, NC AN-0000286941

For directions and info, email us at ptfarmer58@aol.com or call 828-734-5500

The Cold Mountain Corn Maze is sponsored by Seasonal Produce Farm, Riverview farm & Garden, Kiss Country Radio, Farmers Co-op of Waynesville, Ingles Markets and sponsored in part by the Haywood Co Tourism Development Authority and the Good Samaritan Clinic.

W N C PA R E N T. C O M

47


home-school happenings

Focus on ‘home’ in home school By Nicole McKeon WNC Parent columnist

I have a confession to make. I lose my temper with my kids sometimes. I yell, I raise my voice, I rant, and have even been known to (gasp) nag. My house is not always a place of peaceful calm, loving reassurance and organized wellness. There are often overflowing laundry baskets, filled with clean clothing that has never made it to a drawer or closet, but instead has been ransacked as needed for underwear, hockey jerseys and favorite socks. My refrigerator has, on occasion, deteriorated to science experiment status. My bed gets made every morning from force of habit, but many days, the bed may be the sole island in the whole room that is not unkempt.

And, sometimes, my husband and I go to bed without kissing each other goodnight, because we have collapsed in solo exhaustion at differing times. This is our imperfect home. I assure you one thing, though, it is filled with love. The rooms are overflowing not only with books and art projects and unfolded clothing, but with love, as well. The home in our home school is not always neat, but it is always seeking joy. There are always open arms and open hearts. We may eat soup for dinner more often than the average family, but it is soup that has been made with love by a husband/dad who puts not only veggies and chicken and salt and pepper in the pot, but love and tenderness and support. So, think about your home. Is the “home” in your home school wearing a little thin? Have you forgotten to take a deep breath, and tell your home school student how much you love him before you tell him for the 400th time to go finish his writing project? It’s all right. It’s easy to let it all become overwhelm-

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Think about your home. Is the “home” in your home school wearing a little thin? Have you forgotten to tell your home-school student how much you love him before telling him to finish his writing project?


ing and to forget to take time to smell the roses (or coffee, in my case). Sometimes it helps to cut out some of the running around we home-schoolers tend to do and designate certain days to just be at home, as a family. To focus on the reason many of us began home-schooling to begin with, to be together. Often, being together doesn’t necessarily mean sitting together on the sofa reading from Shakespeare! Being together can be everyone in the same house, peacefully attending to their own business. The peace comes from knowing you are all there, together. And, don’t forget to attend to the little things. Leave a note on your daughter’s pillow when she’s had a rough day, tell your partner you’re grateful for his/her presence, cut your toddler’s sandwich into heart shapes. These are the little things that become the big things in adult memories. The things that in the simplest ways build self-esteem and self-love, which passes along into a legacy of family love. Whatever kind of home you have, I wish you love in it. Nicole McKeon is a home-schooling mom and owner of Homeschool Station in Fairview. Email her at homeschoolstation@hotmail.com.

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growing together

No grocery shopping this winter By Chris Worthy WNC Parent columnist

Few things rival my great annual dread of winter. My weekly dread of grocery shopping comes close. My local store is clean and bright and staffed with employees who know me — yes, the lady in the deli always remembers that I am vegetarian — and exude customer service. Yet my goal is to avoid going there for the winter. It’s nothing personal about my friendly neighborhood grocer, of course, but taking an hour to plan and schlep through the store with processed food purchased to appease teenagers is not my idea of a fruitful use of my time. Doing so when I am bundled up to my eyebrows is enough to rob me of my Christmas spirit, at least temporarily.

And so I plan. A master list has been created as if I were preparing for an arctic expedition, which is sort of true, minus the expedition. I have calculated exactly how much olive oil, yeast, tomato sauce and salmon we need to keep me out of the store until March. I figure I will have to go out twice a month for perishables and dog food, but even our veggies will arrive at my door via a produce co-op. The freezer is packed with peaches and blueberries and my pantry has enough scuppernong jelly to last until the next harvest. Exactly how much dental floss does a family of four use in five months? Well, I’m sure my dentist hopes my calculations are correct. I think my husband worries that I am planning to dig a bunker in the backyard and start a collection of potable water, or maybe ask the neighbors to join in some of survivalist cult. But oh no, this is all selfish. It’s all about me this time, thank you

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very much. When the inevitable snow forecast comes, I hope to pull a blanket up tighter around my shoulders and not join the rest of the town in a panicked run for milk and bread. (By the way, why milk and bread? Chips and coffee I could understand.) And if my kids balk at my plans? I think the pizza guy delivers year-round. Chris Worthy is an attorney who took down her shingle to be a stay-at-home mom. Contact her at chris@worthyplace.com.

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Mich. students receive iPads Gannett

ZEELAND, Mich — As students walk through the halls of high school here, their backpacks are a little lighter. Stacks of paper and some textbooks have been replaced by an Apple iPad — one for every high-schooler in the district. That’s 1,800 iPads between two high schools in the district. And it’s just the beginning for Zeeland Public Schools, which embarked on an ambitious project this fall that will give a tablet to every student in grades 3 to 12 — the only district this state to do so. The program represents one of the most aggressive in the country. The school uses the iPad for assigning classwork, testing and communicating with students. Some teachers have gone paperless. “They think technology now — live, breathe and eat it,” said John Holwerda, assistant principal at Zeeland West High School. “We’re coming to their world, instead of them coming to ours.”

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Children are tougher than you think By Trip Woodard WNC Parent columnist

“The second rule of mental health is always knowing who to blame.” This is a saying most of my clients hear early in our therapy process. It is a good treatment prank to use because so many people expect therapy ultimately amounts to blaming their mother or father for life’s woes. In divorce, blame runs rampant. Encouraged by deep-seated feelings of hurt, anger and fear, it becomes a relief valve to have something (or preferably

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someone) to blame for all the disappointments and lifestyle adjustments that will need to be made as separation/divorce events unfold. The most affected by all of this, unfortunately, are the children. But, not to worry. This column is not a set up for parents to feel guilty. Instead, we will look at some of the myths and challenges that face children, especially of the toddler age. First, the good news. Despite what you may read or see on TV, there are no research studies saying your children are doomed to a life of drug abuse and crime just because they have lived through a divorce. Children have their individuality almost from birth which includes resiliency. This means some children seem to be born with a thicker skin than others. They require less comforting in general and have an easier time with social adaptation. For these children, divorce can be a major bump in the road, but it isn’t the end of the world. Children also fare better with divorce because there are so many resources available to support them during this time of transition. Age-appropriate books, stories and videos are available from the library and Internet. Area schools and

Toddlers, as all children, need an age-appropriate narrative as to what is going on. agencies offer support groups for children (and parents) going through the divorce process. Finally, I like to believe parents today are better educated about what helps children adjust than parents of the past. Most parents know, for example, that it is a definite “no-no” to blame the other parent for the divorce in front of their child. Rather, they should put feelings aside and do their best to be supportive of the other parent’s efforts in the transition process. So, what are a few pointers specific to toddlers? » Toddlers ideally need frequent contact with both parents. Alternating times for seeing them at child care and having as much touch contact as possible is helpful. This can be very draining on parents who have a lot of their own emotional baggage to sort out, so use common sense about your abilities. » Toddlers, as all children, need an age-appropriate narrative as to what is

going on. Keep it simple. Let them know that sometimes grown-ups are not happy living together and are happier living apart. Remind them this is something that is not their fault and they are loved by both parents (unless circumstances strongly indicate otherwise). Let them know they may have feelings some days about what is happening in their family and teach them appropriate things to do, such as drawing their feelings or yelling into a pillow. Parents can practice these ideas with their children. » If toddlers move back and forth between households, do the best you can to keep their routines and schedules the same. This includes such thing as bath time, types of meals and routines such as storytelling at bed time. Remember, “sameness equals sanest.” Last, remember that what you have to give to your child that matters most is yourself. That means you have to take care of yourself. Get support from friends, religious groups or professionals as needed. Then you’ll understand why you don’t need “the second rule of mental health.” Trip Woodard is a licensed family and marriage therapist and a clinical member of the N.C. Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. Contact him at 606-8607.

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story times Buncombe County Public Libraries

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Instructor Spencer Bolejack is a NCDPI licensed teacher in North Carolina (History, Social Studies grades 6-12), and also holds dan rankings in Koran Tang Soo Do (SMAA) and Budo Taijutsu (Bujinkan) LOTS Wilderness LCC, is an all ages experiential education center in western North Carolina. Using classical Ninjutsu and the Korean martial art of Tang Soo Do, Wilderness therapy sessions, custom programs for families, and guide services are also available throughout the year.

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Visit buncombecounty.org Black Mountain, 250-4756 Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Mother Goose: 11:30 a.m. Tuesday Toddler: 10:30 a.m. Thursday East Asheville, 250-4738 Preschool: 11 a.m. Wednesday and Saturday Enka-Candler, 250-4758 Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Toddler: 10:30 a.m. Thursday Fairview, 250-6484 Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Thursday Toddler: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Leicester, 250-6480 Mother Goose: 11:30 a.m. Tuesday Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday North Asheville, 250-4752 School Age: 3:15 p.m. Thursday Preschool: 11 a.m. Wednesday Toddler: 10 a.m. Wednesday Oakley/South Asheville, 250-4754 Mother Goose: 11 a.m. Thursday Toddler: 11 a.m. Wednesday Preschool: 10 a.m. Wednesday Pack Memorial Library, 250-4700 Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Mondays Mother Goose: 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays Toddler: 10:30 a.m. Thursdays School Age: 3:30 p.m. Wednesdays Skyland/South Buncombe, 250-6488 Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Thursday Toddler: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Swannanoa, 250-6486 Preschool: 11 a.m. Thursday Toddler: 10 a.m. Thursday Weaverville, 250-6482 Mother Goose: 11 a.m. Wednesday Toddler: 11 a.m. Thursday Preschool: 11 a.m. Tuesday West Asheville, 250-4750 Mother Goose: 11 a.m. Monday Toddler: 11 a.m. Wednesday Preschool: 11 a.m. Thursday

Haywood County Public Library

Visit www.haywoodlibrary.org. Waynesville, 356-2512 or 356-2511 Baby Rhyme Time: 9:30 a.m. Mondays Movers and Shakers: 11 a.m. Thursdays Family story time: 11 a.m. Wednesdays Ready 4 Learning: 11 a.m. Tuesdays Canton For story times, call 648-2924, ext. 2562, or email lhartzell@haywoodnc.net.

Henderson County Public Library

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Visit www.henderson.lib.nc.us. Main, 697-4725


librarian’s pick

Picture books simply fabulous By Jennifer Prince WNC Parent columnist

With nary a gimmick in sight, these three new picture books shine with clarity and simplicity. In “Lots of Dots,” author Craig Frazier honors circles of all sizes by pointing out the everyday places where dots appear. Not really a story per se, “Lots of Dots” consists of just a few sentences drawn out over the course of the book. Each phrase in each sentence is the focal point of a single page. Frazier begins by presenting the obvious dot shape of a drum and the dots on a ladybug. Gradually, he introduces objects whose dot nature is not so obvious: round scoops of ice cream, floating bubbles, gumballs. The bright, stylized illustrations allow the inclusion of items such as barbells, stars and flowers. All in all, the book is a celebration of exploration. In “Perfect Square,” author Michael Hall showcases the potential of a square piece of paper. “It was a perfect square. It had four matching corners and four equal sides. And it was perfectly happy.”

story times Bouncing Babies: 11 a.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays Toddler Time: 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Stories Alive: 4 p.m. Thursdays Edneyville, 685-0110 Family: 10 a.m. Mondays Etowah, 891-6577 Family: 11 a.m. Tuesdays Fletcher, 687-1218 Bouncing Babies: 11:15 a.m. Wednesdays Toddler Time: 10 a.m. Wednesdays Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Green River, 697-4969 Family: 10 a.m. Thursdays Mills River, 890-1850 Familiy: 10 a.m. Mondays

Then over the course of a week, the square is cut, crumpled, colored and torn. In the process, the square transforms from one beautiful creation into another: a fountain, a garden, a bridge. In the end, the accumulation of images makes a cheerful outdoor scene. For the images, Hall uses bright, saturated colors. The square’s metamorphosis from simple to stunning is rendered clearly, and is likely to encourage young readers to see what they can create with their own paper squares. “Press Here” by Hervé Tullet is a triumph, intriguing and entertaining. The story begins with a single yellow circle painted in the middle of an otherwise

Barnes & Noble Asheville Mall, 296-7335 11 a.m. Mondays and 2 p.m. Saturdays

blank white page. The text reads, “Ready?” Each time the reader turns the page, the text prompts him or her to interact with the yellow dot in some way: press, rub, give five quick taps, and so on. After following each instruction, the reader turns the page to discover the yellow dot has changed. At first, the yellow dot changes to two yellow dots, then three. Then one of the yellow dots turns red. Soon, there are lots of red, blue and yellow dots. As the instructions vary, the dots respond in kind: They grow, glow in the dark, get blown away, get blown back, get tilted to one side of the book, then another side. There are no moving, detachable parts to this book. The entire effect is achieved with paint, paper and text. It is simple and brilliant. All of these books are great for sharing with preschoolers. Look for these books in the Buncombe County Public Libraries. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library for more information.

Blue Ridge Books 152 S. Main St., Waynesville, 456-6000 10:30 a.m. Mondays for ages 3 and under. No story time on Labor Day.

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Stop hating eggplant By Ron Mikulak Gannett

I may be going out on a limb here, but I would venture that okra and eggplant are among the vegetables that are most widely disliked by the American eating public. Texture is the issue for both okra and eggplant, the former for its alleged sliminess, and the latter for its sponginess. Both issues can be minimized with proper cooking — or both unique qualities can be appreciated by connoisseurs. The common American globular eggplant, with its fairly robust size and glossy dark purple, almost black skin, gives cause to ponder the nomenclature, but indeed, the first eggplants, native to Asia, were small, round and white-skinned. Farmers will occasionally offer whiteskinned varieties, and I have seen slim green-skinned eggplant too, but the most common alternatives to the large common varieties are the Italian and Japanese eggplants — slimmer, longer, sometimes dark blackish-purple and sometimes lighter skinned, and variegated, lavender and white. No matter the variety, all eggplant have similar taste profiles (mild, a bit bland, sometimes just a tad bitter) and can be treated similarly in cooking. Like many vegetables, eggplant can be eaten at any stage of growth — they are ripe as soon as they fruit, and the smaller they are, the sweeter and more tender. Like tomatoes, eggplant, according to botanical structure, is a fruit, but only a foolish cook will use either in a fruit salad. Because one cooks tomatoes and eggplant as if they were vegetables, let us accept them as vegetables, and not be as nitpicky as the anonymous caller who castigated me earlier this year for terming the tomato a vegetable. One should be precise, but not precious.

Asian import

A native of Asia, most likely India, eggplant came to the West first by the Moors, who planted it in Spain. From there, it found its way to Italy, Greece, then France and England. Some think Thomas Jefferson first planted eggplant in North America at Monticello, though postmodern novelist John Barth in his historical novel parody “The Sot-weed Factor”

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Eggplant, tomato and rice casserole My copy of “Greene on Greens” by the late Bert Greene (Workman, 1984) is battered and taped together, evidence of my long reliance on his cookbook for interesting vegetable ideas. He called this Provenalinspired dish “midi-poche.”

2 small eggplants (about pound) sliced lengthwise 2 teaspoons lemon juice 1 tablespoon salt 4 tablespoons ( stick) butter 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 shallot, peeled and minced 1 small onion, peeled and chopped 1 clove garlic, peeled and minced 4 cups fresh tomatoes, seeded and chopped Pinch sugar 1/2 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme or a pinch dried 1 tablespoon minced fresh basil or 1 teaspoons dried 1 teaspoon crushed allspice 1/2 cup flour 1 cup cooked rice 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Slice eggplant lengthwise, sprinkle with lemon juice and salt and let drain in a colander 30 minutes or more.

Meanwhile, melt 2 tablespoons butter and 1 tablespoon oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add shallot and onion, and cook 2 minutes. Add garlic, and cook another minute. Add tomatoes, and sprinkle with the sugar. Add the thyme, basil, allspice and teaspoon salt. Cook, uncovered, stirring, over medium-low heat 20 minutes or so, until sauce is thick. Rinse eggplant slices, and squeeze dry. Toss with the flour, coating slices lightly and shaking off excess. Heat remaining butter and oil in a large saut pan, and cook eggplant slices in batches over medium heat until golden on both sides. Drain on paper towels. Heat oven to 350 degrees. Spoon some of the tomato sauce on the bottom of a 2-quart baking dish or casserole. Layer half the eggplant slices over the sauce, sprinkle with half the rice and then spoon half the remaining sauce over. Top with half the grated cheese. Repeat with a layer of eggplant, rice, tomato sauce and cheese. Bake until bubbly, 15 to 20 minutes. Serve hot or at room temperature. Serves 4.

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imagines Capt. John Smith using an eggplant in early 17th-century Maryland in a fertility ritual involving Powhatan and Pocahontas. The efficacy of Smith’s “sacred eggplant” ritual notwithstanding, eggplant is a versatile vegetable that can provide the substantial mouth-feel in hearty vegetarian dishes, or form an interesting textural complement to ground lamb or beef in ethnic casseroles, such as moussaka or eggplant Parmesan. I like to cut eggplant into french frylike sticks, coat with breadcrumbs, and fry or oven roast until crisp, for a surprisingly light alternative to fried potatoes. The question of whether to salt eggplant is a dilemma I have long resolved — whenever I manage to plan enough ahead, I always salt sliced eggplant. Some cookbooks say to do so, so the salt can draw out bitter juices, but modern eggplant cultivars are seldom particularly bitter. My experience seems to agree with the other school, that suggests salting changes the cellular structure, making eggplant less prone to absorbing oil during sauting. Eggplant is available all year round in the grocery, but growers should have a good selection through the end of October.

Eggplant ‘Oreos’ Layering things between slices of broiled eggplant is a lovely way to make use of the vegetable's structure and texture. I like the looks of this concoction, a savory variant on the iconic cookie.

1 large or 2 medium eggplant (look for ones that are as cylindrical as possible) Salt Olive oil 8 ounces fresh goat cheese 2 or 3 tablespoons milk 1/4 cup dried tomatoes, chopped Salt and pepper Pesto sauce

Slice the eggplant into eight rounds about 3/8-inch thick. Liberally salt both sides, and place in colander 30-60 minutes. Rinse, and squeeze dry. Heat broiler or grill to high. Brush both sides of eggplant rounds with olive oil, and broil or grill until cooked through and softened and just barely beginning to brown, 5 minutes or more per side. Let cool. In a bowl, mix goat cheese with a tablespoon or two of milk to make cheese spreadable. Fold in chopped dried tomatoes and salt and pepper to taste. Spread goat cheese mixture on one eggplant round, and top with another to make a “cookie.” Repeat with rest of eggplant rounds. Thin cup pesto sauce with enough olive oil to make a pourable mixture. Place one “oreo” on a serving plate, and drape with a tablespoon or two of pesto oil. Serves 4 as an appetizer.

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Carole Miller and her apple pie, ready to bake. Miller suggests putting the pie in the freezer for a little bit before baking to firm up the butter. JOHN FLETCHER/JFLETCHER@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM

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By Carol Motsinger WNC Parent contributor

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How to make Growing up, Carole Miller watched her grandmother, a baking goddess, work her magic in the kitchen from a distance. She never let any of the grandkids help produce her baked goodies, which included everything except rye bread for some reason. So Carole was regulated to dish duty. This Carol can only, at best, clean a dirty plate. And I’m especially skilled at cleaning plates that come to me with a heaping slice of pie from Carole’s shop, True Confections in the Grove Arcade. Maybe her impressive baking abilities have something to do with the extra letter at the end of her name? Either way, I can blame my mother for spelling my name without an “e” — and for my lack of baking abilities. My mother is a tremendous cook who taught me how to create countless cuisines

and ensured that I grew up to be an adventurous eater. But when that woman tries to make bread, croutons come out of the oven. There’s no way of sweetening that fact: She just can’t make things rise. Carole said she may not have gotten direct lessons from her grandmother, but she definitely inherited that culinary gene from her. “She made her own butter, and she had a couple of dairy cows, made her own cheese,” Carole said last week while flattening pie dough using the intimidating, massive rolling pin that she also inherited from her grandmother. “I definitely also got my flavor training from her,” she said. “They also grew their own apples and peaches.” Carole was kind enough to extend some of this flavor training to me, a silly microwave maven who just learned to boil an egg literally two years ago. I thought that fresh off Hendersonville’s annual apple festival, I had a fine

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Fall Indoor Soccer Come Check out our new Indoor Soccer facility. We will be offering many different leagues to fit your soccer needs. For More Info Call 669-2052 www.bmrecreation.com AN-0000286800

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Peel the apples and slice them into small pieces so they bake evenly. JOHN FLETCHER

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excuse to get paid to eat pie, to go investigate a great way for our dear readers to eat those fresh, local apples. I got to spend two mornings witnessing her expert prep, which flowed flawlessly in her compact kitchen. She made all these foreign concepts, like weighing flour, appear so native. It turns out the key to a Carole confection comes down to one word: butter. “I think I have spent a lot of time with butter,” she joked. “Butter is my friend.” And butter seems to like us a lot, too: It’s what renders the crust on the pies so flaky and tender, Carole said. Which to me, is the best part. I collected some other sweet secrets that are sure to inspire delicious use of your bevy of apple bushels. As I practically licked the plate clean after eating the apple pie Carole baked in her demonstration, I was inspired to maybe even try my hand at this at home. After, of course, I start spelling my name with “e.” Here are some more delicious tips to keep in mind when using your own recipe this season: » “The main ingredients are flour, butter, water,” she said of the dough. “If you use them in a ratio of one, two, three, it works out about right.” » “The less you work the flour, the less you develop the gluten so it stays flaky and tender. Continues on Page 60

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Club W Kid’s Fitness at the YWCA of Asheville

• Zumba • Yoga • Dive-A-Palooza • Fit Swim Club Sessions begin in November. Space is limited, so sign up TODAY! For more information about class schedules and pricing, call or visit our website. 185 S. French Broad Ave. • 254-7206 • www.ywcaofasheville.org

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Continued from Page 59

“The flakiness comes from how you incorporate the fat in the dry ingredients so the colder it stays, the less the butter melts.” » “I use brown sugar instead of white sugar. “The molasses in the brown sugar really goes with the apples ... you also have to have cinnamon. Apples and cinnamon is like a match made in heaven.” » “I use half whole wheat flour and commercial pastry flour for the dough. The closest thing you can get at home (to the commercial pastry flour) is the White Lily brand, which is what I also use for my biscuits.” » Cut the apples in thin, small slices. “There is not a lot of moisture in apples, but there is some,” she said. “That’s one of the reasons why people sometimes get a big space between the crust and the apple mixture in the cooked pie.” If apples are only quartered, they will shrink enough to leave an undesirable gap. » “When you are mixing in the brown sugar and cinnamon, add a pinch of salt because it brings out the flavor.” She also adds some fresh lime juice to the apple filling “to help brighten the flavors.” » For extra sweetness, brush the top pie crust with water and sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar before putting it in the oven. » Before putting the completed pie in the oven, “sit it in the freezer for a bit so the butter hardens.”

Carole Miller’s apple pie For the crust: 2 1/4 all-purpose flour 1/2 teaspoon salt 8 ounces butter 4 to 6 tablespoon ice water

Mix flour and salt. Cut in butter until pieces are around the size of peas. Add four tablespoons water and mix until it comes together. Do not over mix. Divide into two pieces, one slightly larger than the other. Wrap and refrigerator at least two hours. For the filling: 6 cups sliced apples 3/4 cups brown sugar 3/4 teaspoon cinnamon pinch salt 1/4 cup all-purpose flour 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice

Combine brown sugar, salt, flour and cinnamon. Roll out bottom crust above about two inches larger than pie pan, leaving one inch overhanging all around. Mix sliced apples with dry ingredients. Add lime juice and toss. Fill bottom crust. Roll top crust one

Miller uses brown sugar instead of white sugar in her filling. JOHN FLETCHER /JFLETCHER@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM

inch larger than diameter of pie. Cut vent holes in top and place over apples. Roll top and bottom crust under and flute edges. Brush top of pie lightly with water and sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar. Stick it in the freezer so the butter hardens and then put it in 450 degree oven for eight minutes. Turn it down to 375 for half the time, and then turn it down to 350. It takes about 50 minutes to an hour after you set the crust for eight minutes.

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The purpose of the First Baptist Church First Kids Preschool Program is to help children trust that they are loved by Jesus Christ and his followers; to give children opportunities to develop physically, emotionally, socially, cognitively, and spiritually to their greatest potential; and to minister, where appropriate, to the needs of children’s families.

By Ron Mikulak Gannett

Children’s food quirks are a source of bemusement to adult omnivores who will eat just about anything. A recent inquiry of a group of kids resulted in a wide-ranging list of foods deemed obnoxious. Sara Martin, 10, readily offered a vegetable that many adults, alas, would agree with her about: Brussels sprouts. But her Continues on Page 62

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Caramel apples become wicked witches with the help of ice cream cones, M&Ms, candy corns, chocolate and more. BRAD LUTTRELL/ GANNETT

Witchy caramel apples 2 cups heavy cream 2 cups brown sugar, packed 5 ounces (1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons) dark corn syrup 2 tablespoons vanilla 7 Granny Smith apples 7 Popsicle sticks 7 sugar ice cream cones 7 Fudge Stripe cookies Chow mein noodles M&Ms Candy corn 1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips 7 cupcake papers Cooking spray

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In a heavy pan, combine the cream, brown sugar, corn syrup and vanilla, and bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring often. Once it comes to a boil, stop stirring, insert a candy thermometer and boil to 249 degrees. Do not stir while boiling. While caramel is cooking, place apples in a bowl of hot water for a few minutes to soften the waxy coating stores apply for cosmetic purposes. Then with a dish towel, scrub off the wax coating (this will make the caramel adhere better). Firmly stick a Popsicle stick into the top (stem end) of each

Continued from Page 61

friend Eleanor Sudduth, 10, admitted to disliking asparagus, a spring treat for most adults. Jake Hendrix, 11, said he couldn't abide the thought of eating clams or mussels — too slimy and icky. But John Appleberry, 11, felt similarly about spaghetti — too slimy for his tastes. These four opinionated eaters were gathered one recent Sunday afternoon at a

apple. Spread a work surface with newspapers, waxed paper or parchment paper for easier cleanup. Place the chow mein noodles, M&Ms and candy corn in separate small bowls, and keep handy for decorating while caramel is still soft. Spread open the cupcake papers flat, and spray with cooking spray. When caramel reaches 249 degrees, carefully spoon the caramel over the apples, holding apples by the stick. Caramel will be hot, so parental help or oversight will be needed. When apples are completely covered and excess caramel allowed to drip off, place stick side up on prepared cupcake papers. Quickly press on M&Ms for eyes, candy corn for a nose and an appropriately crooked chow mein noodle for a smiley mouth. Place a cookie over the Popsicle stick, chocolate-side up for the brim of the witch's hat. Under the cookie brim, place additional chow mein noodles to look like crinkly witch's hair. Melt the chocolate in the microwave and stir until smooth. Cover ice cream cones with melted chocolate and place over Popsicle stick to complete the hat. Set aside for caramel and chocolate to set. Makes 7 witches.

Louisville, Ky., bakery, The Sweet Tooth, to be guinea pigs of a sort — a test group of youth who were going to make Halloween treats with The Sweet Tooth’s owner, Sara Strange Woodford. Woodford needed some acolytes to test out her ideas for icky-sounding, but fun-tomake Halloween treats — ogres’ toes, severed fingers, a bag o’ bones and witchy caramel apples. So even though she won’t pick up and

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The Relationship Center

Professional Counseling for Individuals, Children, Adolescents and Families Sara Martin puts the fingernail on her "Ogres' Toes." BRAD LUTTRELL/GANNETT

Ogres’ toes 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, room temperature 1/2 cup peanut butter 1/2 cup brown sugar 1 egg 1/2 teaspoon vanilla 4 drops green food coloring 1 cup plus 2 tablespoon flour 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/4 cup ground peanuts 1/2 cup sugar M&Ms

Heat oven to 350 degrees. In a bowl, cream together the butter, peanut butter and brown sugar. Add the egg and vanilla, and beat well. Add the green food coloring, and stir until blended. In another bowl, combine the flour, salt, baking powder and ground peanuts. Stir the flour mixture into the sugar and butter mixture to make stiff, but sticky dough. Form the dough into rough, irregular cylinders, about inch in diameter and 3 or 4 inches long — the ogres' toes. Roll the toes in a bowl of white sugar. Press one M&M on the end to make a toenail. With a butter knife, press shallow lines to suggest the knuckle of the toe. Place about 2 inches apart on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake 8-10 minutes. The cookies will spread during baking. Let cool on sheet, then remove to rack to finish cooling. Makes about 2 dozen toes.

Carol Greenberger, LPC • Women's Issues • Teen Counseling

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Inspiring the Whole Child Head " Heart " and " Hands

Experiential and Arts-based Waldorf Curriculum

- Morning Garden for parents and children, birth – 3.5 years of age - Kindergarten + 1 38* 7%#>%8B =#% /-1 , 2 *<8% #A;&

munch on an asparagus spear, Eleanor was eager to make, bake and bite into an ogre’s toe. A clam is too slimy for Jake, but a severed finger sounds yummy. Go figure. Woodford’s take is sensible, however. “The way to get kids to eat new things is to get them to help make it. If they know what it is, what is in it, they are more likeContinues on Page 64

- 1st – 4th Grade Programs include

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Meeting the Intellectual, Emotional, and Social Development Needs of Each Child

OPEN HOUSE

Sunday, October 2 from 3:30-5:00 pm

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Continued from Page 63

ly to want to eat it.” The first project was the witchy caramel apples. Woodford showed the students how to mix the cream, sugar and syrup that is the base of the caramel, and the importance of tracking the temperature of the mixture as it cooks. While the caramel came to temperature, the group worked on preparing the apples, first scrubbing off the cosmetic wax on the skins — the better to make the caramel adhere — and then firmly attaching the popsicle sticks, a task that needed a bit of adult muscle for some of them. Once decorated with candy and cookies, the witches were lined up on the counter to set and be admired briefly before tackling the next project: the ogres’ toes. The two groups lined up with their recipe sheets to measure out the required amounts of butter, peanut butter and brown sugar in one bowl, and the flour, baking powder and salt in another. Eleanor cracked an egg into the butter and peanut butter mixture, and Sara stirred it around. The two added their dry ingredients, and when the resulting dough became too stiff to mix easily with the plastic spatula, they happily took Woodford's advice and finished their mixing with their hands. They kneaded it all together as Woodford came

Severed goblin fingers

Bag o’ bones

Pretzel rods Milk chocolate, melted in microwave Sliced almonds White chocolate, melted in microwave and tinted red with food coloring Food coloring Cotton swabs

Mini pretzel sticks Mini marshmallows White chocolate

Stick one marshmallow on each end of a pretzel stick through the curvy (not the flat) edge of the marshmallow. Make as many bones as you would like. Melt the white chocolate slowly in the microwave. One at a time, drop the bones into the melted white chocolate. With a fork, fish out the chocolate-covered bone, and tap gently to remove excess chocolate. Place dipped bones on waxed paper to harden.

Break pretzel rods in half — the rougher and more uneven the broken ends the better. Dip the unbroken end of the pretzel in the melted milk chocolate to coat, leaving the broken end undipped. Place on waxed paper. Press one sliced almond into the chocolate at the tip to suggest a fingernail. Mix a small amount of food coloring — red, blue, yellow or a ghastly mixture — with a small amount of water. Dip the cotton swab into the coloring and paint the goblin's fingernail. When the milk chocolate is completely cooled, dip the broken end of the pretzel into the melted red chocolate. Try to let it drip down a bit to suggest dripping blood. Let chocolates firm up on waxed paper. Make as many as you need for ghoulish treats.

around and added just enough green food coloring to give the dough a Shrek-ish hue. Somehow John and Jake kept their hands free of sticky dough as they mixed their batch, allowing them to neatly pinch off just enough to roll into a toe-like cylinder, press in a blue or yellow M&M “toenail” and finish off their gruesome anatomy lesson with knuckle creases made with the edge of a butter knife. Baked and cooled, the result was some gnarly looking, but very tasty soft and chewy green peanut butter cookies.

SCHOOLS, COMMUNITY GROUPS, FAMILIES, HOMESCHOOLERS! SHAKESPEARE ON TRIAL The Yellow Brick Road OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2011

OCTOBER 26 & 27, 2011

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NOVEMBER 16 & 17, 2011

Theatreworks USA's The Yellow Brick Road. Photo by Jeremy Daniel.

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NOVEMBER 21 & 22, 2011

BILLY JONAS

DECEMBER 19, 2011 Tickets: $7 per person $6 per person (groups of 11 or more)

For tickets & info visit School Shows page at www.dwtheatre.com or call 828-210-9837. AN-0000286797

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puzzles for parents Across 1. Heidi's shoe 6. Superhero team, acr. 9. Attribute of Casper the Friendly Ghost 13. Like color blue 14. Old-fashioned over 15. Elegant sitting room 16. Based on number 8 17. Pigeon sound 18. Devoutly religious 19. ___ Incredible ____ 21. Sent 23. “Four score and seven years ____” 24. Suite cleaner 25. Beaver construction 28. Tangerine and grapefruit hybrid 30. Reason by deduction 35. Prayer leader in mosque 37. Electrically charged particles 39. Relating to kidneys 40. Cannonballs to cannon 41. Do this before walking 43. Lope de ____, Spanish playwright 44. Wealthy man in the Orient 46. Freight horse cart 47. What Rumpelstiltskin did 48. Relating to

anode 50. “All's well that ____ well” 52. Late Kennedy 53. SAT, e.g. 55. You owe who? 57. Has paleness as symptom 60. America's rank 64. Tropical fruit 65. Romanian money 67. 1/100th of Finnish markka 68. Mary-Kate or Ashley 69. Hole punching tool 70. German surrealist Max 71. Sixth month of civil year 72. Ctrl+Alt+___ 73. Atkins and “Cabbage Soup,” e.g.

Down 1. See him run 2. Foot curve 3. Spiderman got his powers after one 4. Nebraska's largest city 5. Popular language in India 6. Opposite of geek in high school? 7. “Anna Karenina” author 8. Smell of baking bread, e.g. 9. Jack and Jill went to fetch this 10. Sunburn aid 11. High in decibels 12. Half the width of ems 15. It bit Peter

Parker 20. Reasonable judgment 22. International help, e.g. 24. Mosque's distinctive feature 25. Wonder Woman's name 26. Capital of Jordan 27. Cuban dance 29. Master of castle

fad

31. Rpms 32. Incompetent 33. Lacking clarity 34. African antelope 36. ____ ring, 1970s

38. Tchaikovsky's fowl 42. Ancient kingdom in Anatolia 45. His butler is Alfred

49. Hula girl's flower 51. Soaked 54. Often tossed before eating 56. Wombs 57. “____ Lang Syne” 58. Space shuttle Atlantis owner 59. Never without n 60. Reject 61. Cast as Catwom-

an in upcoming Batman flick 62. Of the present month 63. Lice eggs 64. India's smallest state 66. One of Bo Peep's flock

Solutions on Page 77

Private music lessons for all instruments and voices. Offering Music Technology Classes (anyone for Garage Band?)

{

FOR A SOUND EDUCATION

W N C PA R E N T. C O M

}

252.6244

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Across 1. Heidi's shoe 6. Superhero team, acr. 9. Attribute of Casper the Friendly Ghost 13. Like color blue 14. Old-fashioned over 15. Elegant sitting room 16. Based on number 8 17. Pigeon sound 18. Devoutly religious 19. ___ Incredible ____ 21. Sent 23. “Four score and seven years ____” 24. Suite cleaner 25. Beaver construction 28. Tangerine and grapefruit hybrid 30. Reason by deduction 35. Prayer leader in mosque 37. Electrically charged particles 39. Relating to kidneys 40. Cannonballs to cannon 41. Do this before walking 43. Lope de ____, Spanish playwright 44. Wealthy man in the Orient 46. Freight horse cart 47. What Rumpelstiltskin did 48. Relating to anode 50. “All's well that

____ well” 52. Late Kennedy 53. SAT, e.g. 55. You owe who? 57. Has paleness as symptom 60. America's rank 64. Tropical fruit 65. Romanian money 67. 1/100th of Finnish markka 68. Mary-Kate or Ashley 69. Hole punching tool 70. German surrealist Max 71. Sixth month of civil year 72. Ctrl+Alt+___ 73. Atkins and “Cabbage Soup,” e.g.

Down 1. See him run 2. Foot curve 3. Spiderman got his powers after one 4. Nebraska's largest city 5. Popular language in India 6. Opposite of geek in high school? 7. “Anna Karenina” author 8. Smell of baking bread, e.g. 9. Jack and Jill went to fetch this 10. Sunburn aid 11. High in decibels 12. Half the width of ems 15. It bit Peter Parker 20. Reasonable judgment 22. International

help, e.g. 24. Mosque's distinctive feature 25. Wonder Woman's name 26. Capital of Jordan 27. Cuban dance 29. Master of castle 31. Rpms 32. Incompetent 33. Lacking clarity

34. African antelope 36. ____ ring, 1970s fad 38. Tchaikovsky's fowl 42. Ancient kingdom in Anatolia 45. His butler is Alfred 49. Hula girl's flower

51. Soaked 54. Often tossed before eating 56. Wombs 57. “____ Lang Syne” 58. Space shuttle Atlantis owner 59. Never without n 60. Reject 61. Cast as Catwoman in upcoming Bat-

man flick 62. Of the present month 63. Lice eggs 64. India's smallest state 66. One of Bo Peep's flock

Solutions on Page 77

Private music lessons for all instruments and voices. Offering Music Technology Classes (anyone for Garage Band?)

{

FOR A SOUND EDUCATION

W N C PA R E N T. C O M

}

252.6244

www.ashevillemusic.org

65


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Family calendar Information for the November issue calendar, including holiday events, is due Oct. 10. Submit to calendar@wncparent.com.

Visit www.handsonwnc.org.

Oct. 1

Sept. 28

CRAZY CHEMISTRY: Hands On! A Child’s Gallery offers a program for ages 3 and up at 10:30 a.m. Free with admission. At 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. Visit www.handsonwnc.org.

Sept. 29

‘MYSTERY AND MISCHIEF’: Autumn Players of Asheville Community Theatre perform an all ages show at 6:30 p.m. at Swannanoa Library, 101 W. Charleston St. Free. Call 250-6486 or email swannanoa.library@buncombecounty.org.

Sept. 30

SCHOOL’S OUT ADVENTURES: Whitewater rafting on Nantahala River through class 1-3 rapids. Must be able to swim. For ages 8-14. Meet at the Montford Recreation Center, 34 Pearson Drive. Call 251-4029 . Registration required. $32 city resident, $35 nonresident. SING-ALONG: Hands On! A Child’s Gallery offers a sing-along with Tania at 10:30 a.m. All ages. Free with admission. At 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville.

FAMILIES HELPING FAMILIES: Free fall and winter children’s clothing and books available, 9 a.m.-noon at West Asheville Baptist Church gym, 926 Haywood Road. Pick out items your children will need for the season. Sizes newborn to 14. For information, contact Vicki Ross at 216-0535 or jerryvicki@bellsouth.net. FOREST FESTIVAL DAY AND WOODSMEN’S MEET: More than 80 traditional craftsmen, exhibitors, forestry students and musicians gather at the Cradle of Forestry to celebrate forests and forest heritage. With live music, children’s activities, wood carvers, weavers, a blacksmith, and the John G. Palmer Intercolligient Woodsmen’s Meet, a lumberjack competition, organized by Haywood Community College. $6 for ages 16 and older, $3 for youth 15 and under and America the Beautiful and Golden Age pass holders, free for children under 4. Call 877-3130 or visit www.cradleofforestry.org. F.U.N. AT WATERROCK KNOB: Learn about elk and where you can view them at this free Families Understanding Nature program presented by National Park rangers. From 1:30-2:30 p.m. at Waterrock Knob Visitor Center, Milepost 451 on the Blue Ridge Parkway. Call 456-9530, ext. 3, for questions

or directions. ‘PINOCCHIO’: Asheville Puppetry Alliance performs at 2 p.m. Oct. 1 and 2 at White Horse Black Mountain. Tickets $7. Call 669-0816 or visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com. School performance at 10 a.m. Sept. 30 at Diana Wortham Theatre. Public welcome at $7 price if seats available. Call 210-9837. RUNWAY 5K AND HEALTHY FUN DAY: Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Asheville Regional Airport with a 5K run on a portion of the runway and airport campus. Starts at 9 a.m. Proceeds benefit Ladies Night Out, a program that provides mammograms and screenigns to women who can’t afford them. Healthy Fun Day festival is 10 a.m.-1 p.m. with aircraft on display, health and wellness education, live music, low-cost airplane rides, more. Visit www.flyavl.com. YMCA PARENTS’ NIGHT OUT: At Downtown Asheville YMCA for ages 2-12. Activities include swimming, arts and crafts, inflatable obstacle course, snacks and a movie. Register online or in person (at least 24 hours before scheduled program). Offered 6-10 p.m. the first Saturday of each month. $15 for members ($30 for nonmembers), with $2 sibling discounts. Call 210-5622 or visit ymcawnc.org.

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Oct. 2

THE BIG EVENT: Odyssey Community School in Montford hosts a day of fun including a 5K and a 1-mile fun run with prizes, a market with local food and craft vendors, a chili cook-off competition, live music, a face painter and more. Registration for 5K, which is open to runners, walkers and strollers, starts at 8 a.m. for race at 9. Fun run is at 10 a.m. Visit www.thebigeventodyssey.wordpress.com for details on the runs, market and cook-off.

Oct. 3

YWCA SWIM LESSONS: New session of Red Crosscertified lessons starts for all skill levels. Visit www.ywcaofasheville.org or call 254-7206, ext. 110, for details.

Oct. 5

CHILDBIRTH CLASSES: A free two-session class, on Oct. 6 and 13, for expectant parents covering the labor and delivery process, relaxation, breathing patterns, birth options, positioning and comfort measures. 6:30–9 p.m. Registration required. At Pardee Hospital, 800 N. Justice St., Hendersonville. Call 866-790-WELL or visit www.pardeehospital.org to register.

Oct. 7

PROFESSOR WHIZZPOP! MAGIC SHOW: With new tricks. 6:30-7:30 p.m. at The Hop West, 721 Haywood Road. Free. Visit www.thehopicecreamcafe.com. SCHOOL’S OUT ADVENTURE: Bike the Virginia Creeper Trail. Mostly downhill, 17 miles, from Whitetop to Damascus. Must be comfortable on a bike. For ages 8-14. $40 Asheville resident, $45 nonresident; includes bike rental and helmet. Meet at the Montford Recreation Center, 34 Pearson Drive. Call 251-4029. Registration required.

Oct. 8

BUDDY WALK: Western North Carolina Down Syndrome Alliance’s 14th annual event to raise awareness about Down syndrome at noon at Fletcher Community Park, off Howard Gap Road, Fletcher. With lunch and fun from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Visit www.wncdsa.org to register and for information. REUTER FAMILY YMCA SWIM LESSONS: Classes for ages 6 months-12 years are Saturday mornings, Oct. 8-29. Registration deadline is Sept. 30. Starts at $20. Call 651-9622 or visit www.ymcawnc.org. PARENTS’ NIGHT OUT: Hahn’s Gymnastics hosts

children ages 3-12, with pizza dinner and gymnastics-related games and activities. $15 for first child, $7.50 for each sibling if enrolled at Hahn’s ($20/$10 if no enrolled). From 5:30 p.m.-midnight. Call 6848832 to register. TRUE NATURE COUNTRY FAIR: Organic Growers School event with demonstrations, dancing, vendors, guided walks, children’s program, old-time music program and more. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. at Highland Lake Cove, Flat Rock. Tickets $10 for adults, $3 kids under 12. Visit www.organicgrowersschool.org. UNC ASHEVILLE SUPER SATURDAY: Creative, highly motivated and/or academically gifted thirdto eighth-graders must register by Oct. 8 for fall term of Super Saturday enrichment classes. With 27 courses to choose from. Term runs Oct. 15-Nov. 19. For more information or to register, call UNC Asheville’s Cultural Events and Special Academic Programs at 251-6558 or visit www.cesap.unca.edu/super-Saturday-program.

Oct. 9

LOVE AND LOGIC CLASS: Parenting course offered by Children First/Communities In Schools of Buncombe County. Love and Logic teaches parenting techniques to gain control of your household and put the fun back into parenting. Classes meet 9-11 a.m. Wednesdays, Oct. 9-Nov. 23, at the Children First/CIS Family Resource Center at Emma, 37 Brickyard Road. $10 for the workbook. Open to the public. For more information or to register, contact Lisa Barlow at 252-4810 or lisab@childrenfirstbc.org.

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ART CLASS: Roots + Wings School of Art offers four-week art sessions for ages 3-6. Sessions are 3:30-4:30 p.m. Wednesdays, Oct. 5-26 (focus on art from nature). $50 per child. Classes at The Cathedral of All Souls, 3 Angle St., Biltmore Village. Visit www.rootsandwingsarts.com or call 545-4827. SOCK MONKEY CLASS: Make a red-heeled sock monkey, 3-5 p.m., at Purl’s Yark Emporium, 10 Wall St., Asheville. $20. Call 253-2750 or visit www.purlsyarnemporium.com. WIGGLE WITH THE WORMS: Class for ages 8 and up, 3:30-5 p.m., at Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. $15 nonmenbers, $10 members. Call 697-8333 for reservations. Visit www.handsonwnc.org.

Oct. 6

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Susan R. Cohen, MD Leigh M. Dodson, MD H. Wesley Garbee, MD

Eleanor Martin, MD Donna A. Page, MD Calvin O. Tomkins, MD Eleanor McCormac, PA

calendar of events Continued from Page 69

Oct. 10

ASHEVILLE YMCA SWIM LESSONS: Classes for ages 6 months-12 years on Mondays and Wednesdays, Oct. 10-Nov. 2. Registration deadline is Oct. 7. Starts at $40. Call 210-9622 or visit ymcawnc.org. PARK RIDGE CHILDBIRTH CLASS: Park Ridge Health's The Baby Place offers a childbirth class in a one-day session, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. A tour of the Baby Place is included. Call 681-BABY or visit parkridgebabies.com to register. $90. The hospital is at 100 Hospital Drive, Hendersonville.

Oct. 11

A CCEPTING

NEW PATIENTS

Regular Hours: Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:00pm Morning Drop-in clinic: Monday-Friday 7:45am-8:30am Evening Clinic (by appointment only) • Weekend Hours: (by appointment only)

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2 Medical Park Dr., Suite 1000, Asheville 828-254-5326 | www.ashevillepediatrics.com

social & local

Connect and share with WNC Parent, the region’s only LOCAL parenting resource. Find the latest events and articles on Facebook and Twitter.

ART MUSEUM HOME-SCHOOL PROGRAM: Asheville Art Museum offers a program with guided tour and hands-on activities, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. the second Tuesday of the month for first to fourth grades. $4 per student per session. Call 253-3227, ext. 121 or 122, or e-mail eshope@ashevilleart.org or smcrorie@ashevilleart.org for information or to register. ASHEVILLE YMCA SWIM LESSONS: Classes for ages 6 months-12 years on Tuesdays and Thursdays, Oct. 11-Nov. 3. Registration deadline is Oct. 7. Starts at $40. Call 210-9622 or visit ymcawnc.org. DRUGLESS THERAPY FOR ADD/ADHD, DYSLEXIA, LEARNING DISABILITIES: Free talk about how the brain processes information, and how the problems can be permanently corrected in adults and children. Improve the ability to learn, remember and focus. At 6:30 p.m. at Skyland/South Buncombe Library, 260 Overlook Road, Asheville. Call 216-4444 or email wes@WesBeach.com, to RSVP. Visit www.LearningImprovementCenter.com. GRAMMAR SCHOOL SHOW: Asheville band performs all-ages show, 6-7 p.m., at The Hop, 640 Merrimon Ave., Asheville. Visit www.thehopicecreamcafe.com.

Oct. 12

HOLISTIC PARENTING FORUM: Free group to provide support, education and resources for a community of parents committed to natural living. Meets 6-8 p.m. the second Wednesday of the month at Earth Fare in West Asheville. Children welcome. Call 230-4850 or email shantisunshine@gmail.com.

Oct. 13

BEADED BRACELET CLASS: 1-4 p.m., at Purl’s Yark Emporium, 10 Wall St., Asheville. $20. Call 253-2750 or visit www.purlsyarnemporium.com. DRUGLESS THERAPY FOR ADD/ADHD, DYSLEXIA, LEARNING DISABILITIES: Free talk about how the brain processes information, and how the problems can be permanently corrected in adults and children. Improve the ability to learn, remember and focus. At 6:30 p.m. at A-B Tech Enka Campus, Room 228, 1459 Sand Hill Road, Candler. Call 2164444 or email wes@WesBeach.com, to RSVP. Visit www.LearningImprovementCenter.com. ORIGAMI FOLDING FRENZY: Learn new folds and share favorites. All levels welcome. Paper is available AN-0000261482

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@WNCparent | facebook.com/WNCparent | WNCparent.com W N C PA R E N T | O C TO B E R 2 0 1 1

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calendar of events

Oct. 21-22

‘THE LEGEND OF TOMMY HODGES’ OUTDOOR DRAMA: A drama about the first forestry school in America, performed along Biltmore Campus Trail at Cradle of Forestry. It includes characters and stories based on the diaries of students who attended the historic Biltmore Forest School from 1903-07. The show is one mile long, meaning the audience walks one mile to see the entire play, so audience members are asked to dress warm, wear walking shoes and bring a flashlight. Call 877-3130 or visit www.cradleofforestry.com for showtimes. Reservations requested. Tickets are $6 for ages 16 and older, $3 for ages 5-15. Includes hot cider and cookies.

Continued from Page 70 at the museum store or bring your own. Cost is museum admission. From 4-5 p.m. the second Thursday of the month at The Health Adventure, 2 S. Pack Place. Call 254-6373 or visit www.thehealthadventure.org.

Oct. 13-14

‘THE YELLOW BRICK ROAD’: Musical loosely based on “The Wizard of Oz,” where Dora is caught between her Latino family’s traditions and her life as a contemporary American teenager. Tickets $6-$7. Recommended for grades 1–5. Tickets or information, call 210-9837 or visit www.dwtheatre.com. Performances 10 a.m. and noon each day.

Oct. 21-23

SOUTHEASTERN ANIMAL FIBER FAIR: Animals, crafters, workshops at demonstrations, at WNC Agricultural Center, McGough Arena, Fletcher. Runs 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Oct. 21-22 and 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 23. $3 per person, youth under 13 free.

Oct. 14

BREAST-FEEDING CLASS: Hands On! A Child’s Gallery hosts Tammie bogin, breast-feeding peer counselor with teh Henderson County Department of Public Health. Free. Stay and play in museum is $5 for children. Call 697-8333 to sign up. At 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. Visit www.handsonwnc.org. PARENTS’ NIGHT OUT: Fired Up! Creative Lounge offers fun for kids, 6-9 p.m. Children will paint a bisque item, have pizza and play games. $25. At 26 Wall St., Asheville, call 253-8181, and 321 N. Main St., Hendersonville, call 698-9960. Reservations required.

Oct. 15

ASHEVILLE YMCA SWIM LESSONS: Classes for ages 6 months-12 years are Saturday mornings, Oct. 15-Nov 5. Registration deadline is Oct. 14. Starts at $20. Call 210-9622 or visit www.ymcawnc.org. BLACK MOUNTAIN CLOTHING DRIVE: 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at the Carver Center, 101 Carver St., Black Mountain. All donations welcome. For information, search for Black Mountain Clothing Drive on Facebook or email clothing.drive@yahoo.com. CELEBRATE PREGNANCY CLASS: The Baby Place at Park Ridge Health offers a twist on a normal childbirth class, covering important labor techniques and support. Includes a ($65 value) massage voucher with the $99 fee. 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Call 681-2229 or visit parkridgebabies.com to register. ‘OFF THE BEATEN PATH’ HIKE: Chimney Rock State Park offers guided hike to see fall colors, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Learn about how leaves change color and tree identification. $19 for adults, $4 for passholders and Grady’s Kids, $9 for ages 6-15. Hike is moderate to strenuous. Visit www.chimneyrockpark.com.

Oct. 17

HALLOWEEN AND DIA DE LOS MUERTOS CELEBRATION: Come to Odyssey Center for Ceramic Arts in Asheville’s River Arts District to learn about Día de los Muertos and make decorations you can use every Halloween. Create skulls, pumpkins, and ghosts with coils, pinch pots and slabs. 4-6 p.m. For ages 6-12. $35. Visit www.highwaterclays.com. REUTER FAMILY YMCA SWIM LESSONS: Classes for ages 6 months-12 years on Mondays and Wednesdays, Oct. 17-Nov. 9. Registration deadline is Oct. 13. Starts at $40. Call 651-9622 or visit www.ymcawnc.org.

Oct. 23

Asheville Bravo Concerts brings the National Acrobats of the People's Republic of China to Thomas Wolfe Auditorium on Oct. 23. SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

Oct. 18

KIDS VOTE: Voter education and hands-on experience with voting machines, through Oct. 29, at Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org. REUTER FAMILY YMCA SWIM LESSONS: Classes for ages 6 months-12 years on Tuesdays and Thursdays, Oct. 18-Nov. 10. Registration deadline is Oct. 13. Starts at $40. Call 651-9622 or visit www.ymcawnc.org. ‘SEUSSICAL THE MUSICAL’: Curtain Call Collective and director Chris Martin will perform scenes from a favorite Dr. Seuss-inspired play, 6-7 p.m. at The Hop, 640 Merrimon Ave., Asheville. Visit www.thehopicecreamcafe.com.

Oct. 20

PARDEE PARENTING CLASSES: Both at Pardee Hospital, 800 N. Justice St., Hendersonville. Call 866-790-WELL or visit www.pardeehospital.org to register. » BREAST-FEEDING CLASS: Learn the art of breastfeeding. 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Registration required. » DADDY DUTY CLASS: Learn helpful ideas and tips for dads during the labor and birth process. 6:30-8 p.m. in Video Conference Room. Free. Registration required.

Oct. 21

KING ARTHUR SUNSHINE SHOW: Futuristic folkpunk duo performs their new “Iliad, the Robotic Wings of Icarus.” Appropriate for all-ages. At The Hop West, 721 Haywood Road, Asheville. Visit www.thehopicecreamcafe.com.

FAMILY ART PARTY: Asheville Art Museum event, 2-4 p.m., with hands-on color experiments tied to current exhibition, “Color Study.” For children in middle school and older, and adults. Free with membership or admission. Call 253-3227, ext. 122 or 120, for information. Visit www.ashevilleart.org. GUIDED BIRD WALK: Search the forests for flocks of southbound birds like tanagers, warblers and vireos during guided walk, 9 a.m.-noon at Chimney Rock State Park. $22 for adults, $5 annual passholders, $10 ages 6-15, $3 for Grady’s Kids Club members. Includes park admission for the day. Visit www.chimneyrockpark.com to register. NATIONAL ACROBATS OF CHINA: Asheville Bravo Concerts presents return of this troupe. At 4 p.m. at Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. For tickets, visit www.ashevillebravoconcerts.org.

Oct. 24

CLAY CLASSES: Fall session of children’s classes starts at Odyssey Center for Ceramic Arts. For ages 4-12. Visit www.highwaterclays.com. PLAY & LEARN: Parents/caregivers and children ages 3-5 in Buncombe County who are not in regulated child care can attend a series of free 45minute sessions with a focus on pre-literacy skills. There will be four groups offered in the Family Resource Center at Asheville City Schools Preschool on Haywood Road in West Asheville: 10 or 11 a.m. Tuesdays, Nov. 8-Jan. 10, and 10 or 11 a.m. Wednesdays, Nov. 9-Jan. 11. Activities include games, puppet shows, hands-on activities, movement and crafts. Registration by phone (350-2904) or email (marna.holland@asheville.k12.nc.us) is required. Children must be at least 3 years old by Nov. 9 to participate. Registration begins Oct. 24 for new participants and Oct. 31 for returning participants (if slots are still available). Call Marna Holland at 350-2904.

Oct. 25

DRUGLESS THERAPY FOR ADD/ADHD, DYSLEXIA, LEARNING DISABILITIES: Free talk about how the brain processes information, and how the

Continues on Page 76

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calendar of events Continued from Page 75 problems can be permanently corrected in adults and children. Improve the ability to learn, remember and focus. At 6:30 p.m. at Earth Fare, 1865 Hendersonville Road, Asheville. Call 216-4444 or email wes@WesBeach.com, to RSVP. Visit www.LearningImprovementCenter.com.

Oct. 26

CRAZY CHEMISTRY: Make outrageous ooze at class for ages 3 and older. Free with admission. At 10:30 a.m. at Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org.

Oct. 27

HALLOWEEN MASK MAKING: 2-4 p.m. while supplies last, free with admission, at 10:30 a.m. at Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org. INFANT CARE CLASS: Pardee Hospital offers a course on infant care from A to Z. From 6:30-8 p.m. at Pardee, education classrooms, 800 N. Justice St., Hendersonville. Free. Registration required at www.pardeehospital.org or call 866-790-WELL.

Oct. 28

SING-ALONG WITH TANIA: All ages. Free with admission. At 10:30 a.m. at Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. Call 6978333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org. October 28-30, November 4-6 & 11-13 ‘DIARY OF ANNE FRANK’: Hendersonville Little Theatre presents “The Diary of Anne Frank,” the stage adaptation of the book “Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl,” 8 p.m. Oct. 28-29 and 2 p.m. Oct. 30. Call 692-1082

November

Asheville Puppetry Alliance performs "Pinocchio" at 2 p.m. Oct. 1 and 2 at White Horse Black Mountain. SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

Nov. 4

ASHEVILLE INTERNATIONAL CHILDREN’S FILM FESTIVAL: Third annual festival is the largest of its kind in the Southeast, runs Nov. 4-13. More than 70 films from 25 countries shown at three venues in Asheville and Tryon. Visit www.aicff.org for details and showtimes. ‘DIARY OF ANNE FRANK’: Hendersonville Little Theatre presents “The Diary of Anne Frank,” the stage adaptation of the book “Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl,” 8 p.m. Nov. 4-5 and 2 p.m. Nov. 6. Call 692-1082.

KID FITNESS CLASSES: YWCA of Asheville offers new program with yoga, Zumba, diving and Fit Swim Club for kids. Yoga, for ages 7-12, is 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Kids’ Zumba, for ages 7-12, is 10 a.m. Saturdays. YW diving class meets 4:15 p.m. Tuesdays in the YWCA’s solar-heated pool. Freestyle diving is 6:45 p.m. Tuesdays. The YW Fit Swim Club meets Wednesdays at 5:00 pm. The YWCA is located at 185 S. French Broad Avenue. The cost for a 4-week Kid’s Fitness session is $70 for non-members, $45 for Aquatics members and $25 for Club W members. For more information, call 254-7206 or go to www.ywcaofasheville.org.

ART CLASS: Roots + Wings School of Art offers a four-week art class for students in grades K-5. Sessions are 4-5 p.m. Mondays, Nov. 7-28 and focus on drawing, painting and sculpture). $50 per child. Classes at The Cathedral of All Souls, 3 Angle St., Biltmore Village. Visit www.rootsandwingsarts.com or call 545-4827. YWCA SWIM LESSONS: New session of Red Crosscertified lessons starts for all skill levels. Visit www.ywcaofasheville.org or call 254-7206, ext. 110, for details.

Nov. 2

Nov. 9

ART CLASS: Roots + Wings School of Art offers four-week art sessions for ages 3-6. Sessions are 3:30-4:30 p.m. Wednesdays, Nov. 2-30 (focus on collage and mixed media). $50 per child. Classes at The Cathedral of All Souls, 3 Angle St., Biltmore Village. Visit www.rootsandwingsarts.com or call 545-4827.

Nov. 7

HOLISTIC PARENTING FORUM: Free group to provide support, education and resources for a community of parents committed to natural living. Meets 6-8 p.m. the second Wednesday of the month at Earth Fare in West Asheville. Children welcome. Call 230-4850 or email shantisunshine@gmail.com.

Nov. 11

‘DIARY OF ANNE FRANK’: Hendersonville Little Theatre presents “The Diary of Anne Frank,” the

76

stage adaptation of the book “Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl,” 8 p.m. Nov. 11-12 and 2 p.m. Nov. 13. Call 692-1082.

Nov. 12

WNC FOSTER/ADOPT FALL FESTIVAL: Drop in at this free, fun event to learn more about foster parenting and about the older children who are waiting for adoption. Talk to agencies and experienced foster parents. With crafts, face painting and more for kids. 2-5 p.m. at Crowe Plaza Resort Hotel, Asehville. Contact Erica Jourdan at 258-0031, ext. 347, or ejourdan@familiestogether.net.

Ongoing

YMCA AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAM: The YMCA offers after-school care from 2:30-6 p.m. at 17 Buncombe County schools and serves three Asheville City Schools at the YMCA Beaverdam location. Curriculum focuses on arts and humanities, literacy, health and wellness, conflict resolution, math and science, service learning and cultural diversity. For information on how to register, visit www.ymcawnc.org or call 210-2273. FAIRVIEW PRESCHOOL: Registration is open for the 2011-12 school year. Fairview Preschool will provide a developmentally age-appropriate, handson learning environment for children ages 2-5 (pre-K). Classes will meet 8:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday. At 596 U.S. 74, behind Fairview Library, in Fairview. Call 338-2073, email info@FairviewPreschool.org or visit www.FairviewPreschool.org. SWANNANOA VALLEY MONTESSORI SCHOOL: Registration for the 2011-12 school year for ages 18 months to sixth grade. Drop-In tours every 9 a.m. Tuesday. Preschool at 130 Center Ave., Black Mountain. Elementary at Carver Community Center, Black

W N C PA R E N T | O C TO B E R 2 0 1 1


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Mountain. Call 669-8571 or visit www.swanmont.org. GROVE PARK INN PROGRAMS: The Sports Complex at the Grove Park Inn Resort & Spa offers two programs for children. Children will enjoy playing games and sports, making arts and crafts, swimming, eating pizza and watching a movie. For reservations, call 252-2711, ext. 1046, or email mmiller@groveparkinnresort.com. » Kids’ Night Out: 6-10 p.m. each Friday and Saturday, for children ages 3-12. Cost is $45 per child. Advance registration required. » Cub’s Adventure Camp: A full-day (9 a.m.-4 p.m.) or half-day (9 a.m.-1 p.m. or 1-4 p.m.) program on Saturdays. Lunch included. Cost is $65 for full day; $45 for half-day morning with lunch; $30 for half-day afternoon. PARENTS’ MORNING OUT PROGRAM: St. Eugene Catholic Church is enrolling children for its parents morning out program. Two teachers for each 10 children. For ages 6 months to 4 years. Program is 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Church is at 72 Culvern St., Asheville. Call Cynthia Francis at 254-5193, ext. 25, or e-mail mamabear123123@yahoo.com DANCE LESSONS: Asheville Clogging Company offers clogging, Irish step dancing, hip-hop, jazz, ballet and tap classes for all ages, preschool to adult. Visit www.ashevillecloggingcompany.com, call 329-3856 or e-mail ashley@ashevillecloggingcompany.com.

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advertisers’ index

ABC Dental Center ............................. 14 All Kids Pediatrics ............................... 24 Asheville Bravo Concerts.................... 51 Asheville Catholic School.................... 13 Asheville Dance Theatre ..................... 52 Asheville Family Health....................... 52 Asheville Music School........................ 65 Asheville Pediatric Associates ............ 70 Asheville Pediatric Dentistry............... 51 Asheville Performing Arts Acad.......... 77 Asheville Racquet Club....................... 43 Azalea Mountain School ..................... 63 Ballet Conservatory of Asheville ........ 55 Balsam Mountain Trust........................ 21 Bayada Nurses Pediatric..................... 33 Biltmore Baptist Church...................... 27 Blue Ridge Orthodontics .................... 31 Blue Ridge Pediatric Dentistry............ 19 Blue Sky Pediatrics.............................. 62 Buncombe County Parks & Rec.......... 52 Carolina Coupons...........................71-74 Carolina Day School............................ 53 Carolina Pediatric Therapy .....................Inside Back Cover Center Stage....................................... 11 Chambers & Baechtold (Great Beginnings) ....Inside Front Cover Childrens Museum of Upstate............ 68 Children’s Trading Post......................... 6 Claying Around ................................... 13 Colburn Earth Science Museum.......... 29 Dancing Bear Toys............................... 43 Diana Wortham Theatre...................... 64 Dr. Depaolo......................................... 50 Eliada Home For Children..................... 7 Elite Training Center LLC.................... 38 Emmanuel Lutheran School ............... 14 Fastmed Urgent Care ......................... 18 Fired Up .............................................. 23 First Baptist Child Development ........ 61 First Baptist Church Asheville............. 17 Fun Depot........................................... 60 AN-0000286837

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Great Clips .......................................... 48 Hahn’s Gymnastics.............................. 61 Hanger Hall School For Girls ................ 9 Idea Factory ........................................ 18 Ingles................................................... 40 Ingles................................................... 41 Kaelee Denise Photography ............... 48 Keith Black DDS.................................. 20 Land Of the Sky Wilderness School.... 54 Lara’s Integrative Movement.............. 12 Laurel OBGYN..................................... 38 Learning Improvement Center ........... 58 Little Gym (The)................................... 54 Lulu’s Consignment ............................ 10 Mark’s Family Dentistry ...................... 77 Midway Medical Center........................ 3 Mission Health System..........Back Cover Montessori Learning Center............... 32 Mountain Area Child & Family Center 30 Mountain Child Care Connections...... 52 NC Dept of Health.............................. 34 North Buncombe Family Medicine..... 57 Odyssey School................................... 39 Once Upon A Time ............................. 21 Pardee Hospital................................... 37 Park Ridge Health............................... 49 REACH ................................................ 59 Regent Park Early Childhood Development Center .......................... 23 Roots & Wings .................................... 30 Ryan Haldeman DDS........................... 39 Seasonal Produce / Corn Maze........... 47 The Learning Community.................... 28 The Relationship Center ..................... 63 The Toy Box......................................... 23 Town of Black Mountain...................... 59 TS Orthodontics.................................. 69 Veritas.................................................. 49 Will Baunach........................................ 23 Williams Family Dentistry.................... 10 YWCA.................................................. 59

Caidyn Stafford 0-5 Division

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JoinThe Birthday Club and WIN! SPONSORS SPONSORS:

Birthday Club Winner prizes may include: • Wild Parent Birthday Package, Friends of the Nature Center (6-12 Division Winner only) • $5 Certificate from The Hop • 1 Month Free at Phoenix Gymnastics

• Free Membership & One Free Bouldering Pass to Climb Max (6-12 Division Winner only) • 1 Month Free at Hahn’s Gymnastics

**Entries must be accompanied by a photo. No inkjet or photocopies please** Child’s Name _________________________________________ Child’s Birthdate: ______________________ Address ____________________________________________________________________________________ City/State/ZIP: ______________________________________________________________________________ Day Phone #: _____________________________ Evening Phone #: __________________________________ Parent/Guardian’s Name:______________________________________________________________________ Parent/Guardian’s Signature: __________________________________________________________________ How do you receive your copy of WNC Parent? __________________________________________________

Send entry and photo to: WNC Parent Birthday Club, P.O. Box 2090, Asheville, NC 28802

No purchase necessary to win. If you would like your child to enter the WNC PARENT Birthday Club, complete this form along with a recent personal photograph of your child (one that you do not need returned) and mail to: WNC PARENT, P.O. Box 2090, Asheville, NC 28802. Entries must be received by the 15th of the month prior to the month the birthday occurs (ex: birthday in February, entry by January 15.) Child must be under 12 to win. By entering, contestants and their parents (or guardians) release the photo to WNC PARENT with no further obligation to Gannett Pacific Corp. and give consent to WNC PARENT to reproduce and publish any photographs submitted whether or not the entry is chosen as a winner. All entries must be signed by the parent/guardian. Employees and family members of WNC PARENT and contest sponsors are not eligible to win. One winner will be selected randomly from all entries received for age divisions 5-under and 6-12 years. One entry per child.

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Please join us for the grand opening of Mission Health’s new cancer center.

Our Speakers Siddhartha Mukherjee Oncologist, cancer researcher and Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer

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Come celebrate the opening of Western North Carolina’s new comprehensive center for cancer treatment and research with a ribbon-cutting ceremony and guided tours of our new center. Date: Thursday, October 27, 2011 Time: 3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Ronald Paulus, MD, MBA

Place: SECU Cancer Center building 21 Hospital Drive Asheville, NC 28801

President and CEO, Mission Health and Mission Hospital

Here for our region. Here for your life.

WNC Parent October 2011  

WNC Parent October 2011 edition