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contents This month’s features 6

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Sharing cultures Families share their homes and learn from exchange students.

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It’s date night Area couples give us suggestions for a night out.

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First love

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Post-divorce dating

A child’s first crush means the world.

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Camp Guide 2013

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Sunny citrus

Experts offer tips on how to balance your kids’ emotions and your feelings for a new flame.

Check here for overnight camp listings for coed, boys, girls and special needs camps, along with spring break day camp details.

Oranges, lemons and more brighten up winter meals.

In every issue

On the cover

Artist’s Muse ...................30

Special to WNC Parent

Home-school Happenings .34 Divorced Families ............36

Are you a member?

Story Times .....................39

Join the conversation, post photos and connect with other parents at WNCParent.com. Look for WNC Parent on Facebook and Twitter.

Nature Center Notes.........41 FEAST .............................42 Calendar .........................46 Kids Page ........................53

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Katie Wadington, editor

And so it begins. It is cold, it is January (as I write this), and summer camp is on my mind. Kids screaming with excitement as they zip line into a cold lake on a 90-degree day. Counselors leading a hike under sunny skies up to the top of an area peak with gorgeous views. Campers sitting around a picnic table in the shade, making crafts. Boys and girls enjoying a campfire, marshmallows and all, singing the songs they’ve learned through the week. (And momentarily there, I was transported from a blustery day into the middle of July.) Every year it amazes me how many opportunities are available to children in WNC. From high adventure to traditional camp experiences, from a few days of overnight camp to weeks away from home. Between these overnight listings and the day camp listings that will be in the March issue, I have a hard time deciding where to send my kids while I’m at work over the summer. You’ll find our Overnight Camp Guide starting on Page 18. But most people aren’t thinking about camp this month. It’s February, the month of love. So many stories in this issue are focused on relationships. Do you remember your first crush? The boy or girl who made your world just stop? I certainly remember mine. Our story on Page 12 gets into kids and crushes, including tips for how to deal with them. We also talked to some experts for advice in our story on how children deal with post-divorce dating. Find that on Page 16. Speaking of dating, we talked to several couples about their favorite date night spots. And they offer a wealth of new ideas in the story on Page 9. It’s a roundup I was happy to have for my own date nights. Happy Valentine’s Day to you! I’m headed back to my desk to work on the day camp edition of the Camp Guide, out next month.

.com

Librarian’s Picks...............38 Growing Together............40

Escape to camp

P.O. Box 2090, Asheville, NC 28802 PRESIDENT AND PUBLISHER Randy Hammer WNC PARENT EDITOR FEATURES EDITOR Katie Wadington — 232-5829 Bruce Steele kwadington@citizen-times.com bsteele@citizen-times.com ADVERTISING/CIRCULATION Brittany Martin — 232-5898, bymartin@gannett.com CALENDAR CONTENT Due by Feb. 10. E-mail calendar@wncparent.com ADVERTISING DEADLINE Advertising deadline for the March issue is Feb. 12.

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FRIENDSHIPS

AROUND THE GLOBE

Dakota Lehman, right, spent a year in Colmar, France, through the Rotary of Asheville’s youth exchange program. She poses with friends Sebastian, left, from Ecuador, and Allana, from Brazil, at a monthly Rotary exchange student get-together. SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

Exchange programs give high-schoolers a taste of the world 6

By Pam J. Hecht, WNC Parent contributor

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parked by a love of travel and an independent nature, Asheville High School senior Dakota Lehman, 18, dreamed of life in another country. When the opportunity to live in France came up, she says she jumped at the chance, spending a year in Colmar, France, during 11th grade, as part of the Asheville Rotary Club’s student exchange program. Traveling to other countries as an exchange student offers teens the chance to learn about different cultures and languages, while making connections that can last a lifetime. At home, local families host foreign students from around the world, learning — and bonding — while sharing a taste of American life here in the mountains.

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Leah Everist, second from left, visits the Taj Mahal in India with, from left, the daughter of one of her Hindi teachers, and fellow exchange students, Musa, from New York, and Giselle, from Chicago. SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

An adventure abroad For Lehman, communicating in a new language was challenging in the beginning, as was navigating through the public transportation system, but she says her new friends and family made her feel at home. “I fell in love with the country, the culture, and the people within days of being there,” says Lehman, who still keeps in touch with the friends she made. The French she learned at school helped, but it’s easier to master a language when you’re completely submerged in it, she adds. Learning the language (and customs) first is not necessarily a requirement, and kids typically pick up language quickly, but it helps, says Greg Brown, Asheville Rotary Club youth exchange program chair. Student exchange programs can run anywhere from a couple

of weeks to a year. “She made lifelong friends, stays in contact with her host families, and has been invited to other countries by other exchange students that she met on her trip,” says Jen Chandlee, Dakota’s mom. “It gave her the independence that many teens crave but within a supervised program and she came home a more mature young woman.” “It gave me a better perspective on the world and life and I learned a lot about myself and my strengths and weaknesses,” adds Lehman, who was selected to receive a Rotary scholarship. For Leah Everist, of North Asheville, who’d never been out of the country, six weeks was a good length of time to be immersed in a new culture and learn a new language, she says. Through the AFS student exchange program, Everist, 17, received a full scholarship from NSLIY (a U.S. govern-

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ment-sponsored, merit-based program) and lived with a family in Gurgaon, Haryana, in India, during July and August 2012. She attended school five or six days a week to learn Hindi. “The most important things I took away from my time in India were the relationships I built,” says Everist, a senior at Asheville High. “My host family took me in as a second daughter and taught me what was appropriate to say, wear, and do in their world.” “The experience made Leah more self-reliant and opened her eyes to another society,” says her mom, Mary Everist. “She learned a great deal about herself and her own resilience and determination.” Everist’s host sister, Sheffi, taught her much about how people different in appearance and practice, “still have the Continues on Page 8

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FOR MORE INFORMATION

Arno Vepsalainen, 17, exchange student from Finland, with his hosts Tim Fierle and Lewis Fierle, 14, at left. SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

Johannes “JoJo” Droste, of Liedinghousen, Germany, at right, visits the Grove Park Inn’s gingerbread house display with his host family James and Terri Heatherly and sons Jordan, second from right, and Joshua. SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

FRIENDSHIPS Continued from Page 7

same struggles and successes,” Leah says.

An addition to the family

When Tim and Mary’s Fierle’s daughter, Helena, 16, a high school junior, left home this August to live with another family as an exchange student in Korbach, Germany, a new child came to take her place: Arno, a 17-year-old high school junior from Finland. Both are participating in the Rotary Club’s student exchange program. “Having him helped ease the loss of our daughter for a year,” says Tim Fierle, of North Asheville. “It’s like paying it forward because we could extend hospitality like the families doing the same for our daughter in Germany.” The Fierles liked the educational aspect of having Arno in their home, exposing their son Lewis, 14, to someone from another country and giving the family a chance to learn firsthand about Finnish culture. He quickly became part of the family, says Fierles, attending Asheville High School with Lewis and introducing him to inline hockey.

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To start, check in with your school’s counseling department to find out about any school-run travel or hosting opportunities, or for information on nonprofit exchange programs. Costs vary and can be up to hundreds or thousands of dollars, depending on length of stay and scholarships administered through exchange programs. For an overview of what’s out there, go online to: » goabroad.com/highschool-study-abroad » AFS Intercultural Programs, afs.org » Nacel Open Door, nacelopendoor.org » Ayusa, ayusa.org » Asse International Student Exchange Programs, asse.com » American Councils for International Education, americancouncils.org » AIFS/AYA, aifs.com » CIEE, ciee.org » Youth for Understanding, yfuusa.org » Rotary International, rotary.org, browngn@att.net » GVI Foundations, gvifoundations.com (volunteer abroad program)

Families who host a foreign student typically provide room and board while the student’s family and/or exchange program pay travel and spending costs. Exchange organizations often have a local coordinator who maintains contact with the host families and their students. Both Buncombe County and Asheville City schools can accept up to five foreign exchange students per year, as long as they are living with a student attending the same school. As with the Rotary program, many exchange students live with two or three different host families. “This will be a lifelong connection and friendship, but it’s not easy to let go — we got attached (to Arno),” says Fierle. Terri Heatherly, of Hendersonville, didn’t plan on hosting 15-year-old Johannes Droste of Liedinghousen, Germany, for a semester this year. But when an email from her son Joshua’s marching band director showed up in her inbox, it was like a “tap on the shoulder” from above, she says. Her husband, James, and sons Joshua, 18, a senior at West Henderson High School, and Jordan, 20, agreed. “We gained a family member, and it was neat to learn about the differences between our cultures,” says Heatherly. “My younger son enjoyed being the older

brother to someone who looks up to him.” Johannes traveled to the U.S. through the Nacel Open Door student exchange program. The family especially enjoyed celebrating Christmas together, incorporating German traditions as well as their own, she says. “I promised his mother that I would take care of Johannes as if he were my own,” says Heatherly. “He has stolen my heart and will forever be in my life.” Spending time outside of their comfort zone and experiencing new cultures makes students “better people in general with a wider view of the world,” says Tery Krisher, senior counselor at Reynolds High School, which has enrolled three exchange students this year through Ayusa, a student exchange program that brings students to the U.S. “Our kids have been good about helping acclimate them, and the foreign students (with their serious mindset when it comes to learning) are a good influence on our kids — these experiences open opportunities on both sides,” Krisher said. “We now have a link to the other side of the world,” says Heatherly. “The friendship and love you gain and the relationships you build — you can’t put a price on it.”

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DATE NIGHT DESTINATIONS By Betty Lynne Leary, WNC Parent contributor

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h, date nights. Remember those? The excitement and anticipation would build all week, planning every detail from the clothes you would wear to the table you wanted at your favorite restaurant. After the kids arrived, date nights suddenly took a back seat to mac-and-cheese, family game night and early bedtimes. If you’re trying to rekindle that date-night spirit and carve out some special time with your spouse, take some advice from these Western North Carolina parents who shared their favorite date-night spots with us. See pages 10 and 11.

Bouchon prepares French comfort food and wine, and is a date night favorite. ERIN BRETHAUER/EBRETHAU@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM

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DATE NIGHT

their two boys, ages 12 and 8, always make time to wander the streets of Asheville while they’re on a date. “Downtown has some very unique stores that you won’t find anywhere else,” Katey says.

Continued from Page 9

Longtime favorite “Our favorite spot is Wanpen’s Thai Restaurant, an older restaurant on Hendersonville Road in South Asheville,” says Whitney Yoder. “Chuck and I have been going there on date nights for more than 20 years, plus every Sunday after church with our kids.” The Yoders live in Mars Hill with their four children ages 13, 12, 10 and 7. Whitney particularly loves the authentic home-cooked Thai food, the warm atmosphere and genuine Thai hospitality offered by Wanpen and her husband, Sam. “Wanpen and Sam have a very devoted clientele,” Whitney adds. “We all affectionately refer to ourselves as Wanpen’s family.” In the evenings Wanpen’s is intimate and quiet, filled with the aromas of lemon grass, curry and jasmine tea. The Yoders enjoy Wanpen’s shrimp pad Thai and panang noir. “No matter what we order, it is always incredibly fresh and delicious.” Whitney says. “When the dish comes to the table, it honestly looks like a work of art.”

Downtown regulars “Rob and I go out at least once a week,” Katey Atema relates. “We love downtown Asheville and its culture, so most of the time we end up there.” One of the couple’s favorite places to eat is The Lexington Avenue Brewery.

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Head to the Village

The Corner Kitchen, in a historic home in Biltmore Village, whips up classics with a Southern twist. ERIN BRETHAUER/ EBRETHAU@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM

They love the laid-back atmosphere, especially in the warmer months, when they sit outside and watch all the happenings. The restaurant changes its menu every three months, so there’s always something new to try and much of the food is locally sourced. “Their portobello is to die for,” Katey notes, “and the pretzel appetizer makes my mouth water just thinking about it.” When the Atemas are looking for a lighter meal, they head to Santé Wine Bar and Tap Room, in the Grove Arcade. But no matter where they eat, the couple, who live in Black Mountain with

With three kids between the ages of 9 and 3, Kevin and Kristi Jackson relish their date nights. They listed several popular Asheville restaurants for their special alone time, including Rezaz, The Red Stag Grill at the Bohemian Hotel and Corner Kitchen, all in Biltmore Village. “We love the great food and great atmosphere at all of these places,” Kristi says, and adds that they usually get seafood when they go out. The couple live in Biltmore Lake.

No-fuss fun “For a night out, we like to grab some take-out sushi from Fresh Market along with some gouda cheese, sesame crackers and a bottle of merlot,” explains Linda Keck, who recently moved to Fairview from Hendersonville. In the summer months, she and husband, Robert, take their picnic fare to a cozy fire pit behind Arden Presbyterian Church on U.S. 25 along Lake Julian. “It’s romantic and inexpensive, and we do not need to wait for a table,” Linda says. “We just enjoy talking while it is quiet and no one is around. We found this place when our kids used to take the bus to Asheville Christian Academy from this parking lot.”

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The Kecks have been married 21 years and have four children ages 18, 16, 14 and 9.

restaurant. “We like to eat there, preferably at a window seat overlooking the mountains,” she adds. “We like to hike afterward around the Camp Alice trail, Pinnacle trail or Craggy Gardens.” And sometimes they even bring their 14-year-old son Jackson along.

New adventures Adam and Erica Hodges enjoy Asheville’s eclectic cuisine offerings and often try new places based on recommendations from friends. “We love to walk in downtown Asheville and often try a place if it seems to have a good atmosphere,” Adam says. “We love outdoor dining in the summer so you can really soak in all that downtown has to offer. Mellow Mushroom has a great outdoor atmosphere, and we like people-watching there.” The couple, who live in Arden with their two girls, ages 12 and 9, also enjoy the Red Stag Grill for its ambiance and the steaks and fish. Adam also noted that Doc Chey’s has well-priced, delicious Asian cuisine such as the pad Thai and Thai peanut noodle salad. “Barley’s Taproom is also great for pizza, black bean hummus and a great beer selection in a casual setting,” Adam adds. “We enjoy trying new things and are often pleasantly surprised with the date night adventures we go on.”

Keep coming back For Michael and Paula Bruder, of Asheville, parents of two grown kids and one in the eighth grade, there is one favorite date night place. “Our favorite date night restaurant is the Stoney Knob Café in Weaverville,” Paula says. “It is eclectic, dimly lit and has an excellent chef.” Attentive wait

Romance on Lexington

Greek and Italian specialties from Pomodoros on Tunnel Road, including the Greek salad, short ribs, tiramisu, and, shown here, saganaki, or flaming cheese. ERIN BRETHAUER/EBRETHAU@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM

staff keep the couple coming back along with the shrimp and grits, lamb dishes and Moroccan chicken.

Close to home For the Wilhelmi family of Swannanoa, Pomodoros in East Asheville is a close, convenient place for a date night. “Scott and I love their calamari for an appetizer, and they also have delicious Greek salads and pasta,” Lori says. “We also like the nice, quiet atmosphere.” Between May and October, another favorite place is the Mount Mitchell

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“We find ourselves frequenting Bouchon French Bistro on North Lexington more than any other place,” Julie Lizarralde says of their date-night routine. “We like to try new places, but we’re always drawn back to the romantic, warm and lively environment at Bouchon.” The couple, who live in Fairview with their two boys, ages 9 and 11, enjoy sitting in the courtyard on warm nights. “They have incredible frites with herb de Provence seasoning. Norm enjoys the all-you-can-eat mussel nights, and I always order the quiche of the day,” she adds.

The simple route For Allan and Lolly Hightower, of Montreat, date nights are a wonderful way to escape a house full of teenagers. They are parents to their own two kids, ages 15 and 16, plus they are hosting a 17-year-old Korean exchange student for a year. According to Lolly, date night is a simple, yet pleasurable evening alone for the couple. “We go to Green Tea Sushi early, like 5ish, then go to Sam’s Club and shop with a full stomach and no kids!”

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FIRST CRUSH? Love your children all the more By Paul Clark WNC Parent contributor

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our daughter, who normally talks her way through church, sits silently, staring at her bowl of cereal. Your son, who would wear his clothes all week if he could, now showers every day. Somebody’s in love. First crushes can be exhilarating. And they can be crushing. Children whose only experience with love has been centered around family and close friends are wrestling with an unfamiliar, confusing sort of love. They’re on top of the world one moment and in the pits the next. It’s enough to drive you crazy. But what about them? What can you do to help your child through this delicate time? Should you do anything at all? Crushes happen to most children about the time they hit puberty, according to Kurt D. Michael, a psychology professor at Appalachian State University. In North America, that means between 8-14 years for most girls and ages 10-15 for most boys. It happens after they’ve ILLUSTRATION BY THINKSTOCK.COM

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Social media can make first crushes happen at a dizzying pace. Messaging is the new way to flirt. It can also put a quick end to things. ANN MARIE MCBRIDE

a social worker with the Buncombe County Schools system.

noticed the difference between boys and girls and right about time the new hormones kick in. They notice someone they didn’t notice before. They’re smitten, dopey, off in their heads, tongue-tied where they used to be motormouthed, rambling where they used to be brimming with confidence. Be encouraging and positive during this time, Asheville psychologist Mindy Erin Pardoll said. If you sense your child is open to the discussion — and hopefully, you have an open relationship with him or her that would make two-way inquiry OK — ask them what they like about this person, she said. Listen, don’t comment or judge. The wrong attitude can make you seem nosy. Maybe all they need is a sounding board. Let them pour out their hearts. Be supportive and don’t say anything negative about the person they’ve set their heart on. Let them find their own way and intervene only if your parental instincts tell you to. “I would stay away from advice unless they ask for it,” Pardoll said. “Relationships can be scary for children, especially adolescents. For most kids, it’s their first experience with being rejected, and they get really fearful. They don’t know how to handle the rejection.” If and when that rejection comes, congratulate them for putting themselves out there, Pardoll said. It takes a brave person to risk denial, and those who put themselves in

rejection’s way can learn and gain strength from the experience. Helping children see the positive in a negative is what parents do, and first love is a good opportunity for helping your child get emotionally stronger for the rest of his or her life. “Everyone gets rejected,” Pardoll said. “Life is about putting yourself out there.” Social media can make first crushes happen at a dizzying pace, said Ann Marie McBride, a social worker with the Buncombe County Schools system. Messaging is the new way to flirt. It can also put a quick end to things. “It’s right there on Facebook the next day, that picture of your ‘boyfriend’ at a party with someone else,” McBride said. “The anonymity of social media can make someone more bold than in person.” Children often do what people they’re close to do, so, if they see parents, older siblings and other

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people close to them involved in relationships, they might be emboldened to try one of their own, Michael said. How can a parent tell when a crush moves into an area that children are ill-equipped to handle? Michael, who is also a licensed psychologist, sees lots of Facebook postings from children bragging about sexual conquests, some as early as 11 years old. If your children’s postings indicate anything untoward, “it is our obligation to investigate further,” he said. When can a parent tell if the crush is becoming inappropriate? Listen to your children, Michael said. If they mention sexual acts, that’s certainly the time to step in, he said. “I work regularly with young people that develop what appear to be inappropriately intense romantic attractions for their developmental age,” he said. “If the crush seems overly sexualized, then I would say this is a red flag.” Crushes have been around forever, but popular culture today is pretty loose, as far as what children can see online, on TV and everywhere else, Michael said. “So, while I don’t think the age of onset for romantic attraction is much different due to social media, I suspect that the manner and means of expressing crushes has grown exponentially in the electronic age.”

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How are your children dealing with your dating? T By Paul Clark, WNC Parent contributor

o death and divorce, add another life-changing word that begins with “d” — dating. If and when you’re ready to date again, doing so in a way that doesn’t make your young children feel threatened takes some finesse and a whole lot of love. “It starts with good communication with the two biological parents,” said Mindy Erin Pardoll, an Asheville child psychologist who works primarily with girls. Children whose parents are working through their separation or divorce amicably are much less likely to act out or feel guilty when mom or dad meets someone they like, she said. As in all matters of divorce and separation, it’s important not to put children in the middle, Pardoll said. Nonetheless, children may resent the fact that you’re going out. They’re already likely torn up about the rip in the family and see your dating as an attempt to replace their other parent. They might be mad at you for, in their eyes, leaving the absent parent behind. Kids who used to have you all to themselves now have to share you with someone they don’t know. Children

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DO’S AND DON’TS FOR NEW DATERS

older than a few years may “get’ the male/ female dynamic, but they might not understand it and may feel threatened by a force that’s beyond their comprehension. “How well is an 8-year-old able to express their feelings to begin with?” asked Barry Rand, a clinical psychologist in Asheville. “When they have to deal with adult feelings, it can be very challenging.” Backlash can come in many forms, Rand said. Girls, especially, are likely to internalize their feelings, becoming sad, depressed, irritable or anxious. Boys may act out, getting into fights at school or letting their grades drop. These behaviors may also be a result of their parents’ split, and they can happen to boys and girls, Pardoll said. Expect your children to interrupt when your friend is over or to seek a lot of your attention. Don’t be surprised if they’re angry or hostile to this new person. “I see a lot of feelings of betrayal,” Pardoll said. “The kids feel like they’re betraying their mothers if they hang out with their father and his girlfriend. Children almost feel guilty for being around the new boyfriend or girlfriend.” You can alleviate that guilt by seeking the child’s other biological parent’s “buyin” for dating other people, Pardoll said. It may be a difficult discussion (done privately and away from the child), but if the two of you can agree that dating is OK, and if you can tell your child that together, then there’s a much better chance that your child won’t feel guilty or disloyal if he or she likes this new person.

“If the mother supports her children socializing with their father’s new girlfriend, the child won’t feel like they’re betraying their parents,” Pardoll said. She suggests that parents tell each other about potential partners before mentioning them to the kids. Sending word through the children will make them feel caught in the middle. Don’t ask them to be your messenger. Start out slow, Pardoll said. The first time your children meet your new friend should be in a casual group setting where there are lots of children and adults. If the kids don’t feel pressured, chances are better they’ll like this new person in their lives. If and when your child “takes” to this new person depends a lot on his or her temperament, Rand said. Are they curious by nature? Anxious? If they’re extroverted, consider doing something that you can all do together, he said. If they’re cautious and closed, don’t date unless your child is with her other parent. Rand works mainly with couples and sees among his patients those whose children are having a hard time adjusting to the new blended family. That counseling often includes the children, so he recommends you consider a professional if there are issues with your children and your new relationship. Most importantly, don’t bring the children into your new relationship until it’s serious, Pardoll advised. “The last thing you want is someone coming in and out of their lives,” she said.

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There’s a lot of advice on the Internet, some from people dating, some from family experts, some from who knows who. But a lot of the advice is the same, as listed below. » Take your time. Make sure you have a committed relationship before introducing your new beau or gal to your children. If they see some solidity, they’re less likely to be threatened. » Let your children know that they have only one mom and one dad. No one that the other parent couples with can take the other parent’s place. » Let them know that you’ll love them no matter what they think of you or your ex’s boyfriend or girlfriend. » Stress that your loving someone else doesn’t mean you love them any less. It may be hard for children to grasp, but love is an infinite commodity that isn’t used up after so many relationships. » Let your children talk. Let them shout. Listen and don’t defend. When you sense they are receptive, talk about why you like spending time with this person. » Introduce your friend into family events slowly. If there’s something you and the kids have done specifically to spend time together, keep it to just you. » Make sure the time you spend with your friend doesn’t come at your children’s expense. Spending time with them before and after a date is a good way to make them feel secure. » Displays of affection can be confusing to kids, especially if they’re teens and working out their own feelings for love and sexuality. Slow is key. » Get rid of your expectations. Maybe they’ll like him/her and maybe they won’t — it’s their choice. Go slow, give it time, be open and honest and maybe the children will come around.

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2013 CAMP GUIDE

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N U FGALORE

Katie Wadington, editor

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riends. Nature. Games. Maybe a pillow fight or two. And no parental nagging for a week or more. What isn’t to love about summer camp? The best part? While the kids are having a great time, they are also gaining life skills, self-confidence, leadership training and more. Camps offer children a chance to try things that are outside of their everyday routines, like horseback riding, archery or rock climb-

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ing. And they provide campers more time to do things they love, such as arts and crafts, dance, drama and swimming. In this issue, you'll find page after page of residential camp opportunities for your little (or not-so-little) ones. There are camps for boys, girls and boys

SUMMER CAMP EXPO & FAMILY FUN DAY Mark your calendar now for the magazine’s third-annual Summer Camp Expo, set for 11 a.m.-3 p.m. March 2 at the Sherrill Center at UNC Asheville. Come to gather information and talk to camp staff. Keep the kids entertained with activities like face painting, bounce house, balloons, prizes and more. Also at this event: Your chance to enter your child to be part of the magazine’s Cover Kids contest.

and girls. And you don’t have to break the bank to give your child an amazing summer experience. Browse here, visit a camp’s website, then book a week. Now is just the right time to think about summer camps. Tucked into the guide you’ll also find a few spring break day camps. Where are the summer day camps, you may wonder? They will appear in the March issue.

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GUIDE / SPRING BREAK DAY CAMPS Camps are March 25-29 unless noted.

ABYSA, FUNdamentals Camp

» abysa.org; 299-7277, ext. 304; shane@abysa.org » Ages 5-14. Games-centered teaching approach to soccer education. Campers organized by age group. Camp will use games, designed to build technical foundations for soccer skills. Camp runs 9 a.m.-noon for ages 5-6 and 9 a.m.-4 p.m. for ages 7-14 at John B. Lewis Soccer Complex at Azalea Park in East Asheville. All campers get participation award and T-shirt. Early drop-off available. $115 for half-day and $195 for full day.

Camp Whatchamacallit

» campwhatchamacallit.com; campwhatchamacallit@gmail.com; 203-885-6840 » Ages 4-13. Coed camp exposing kids to a variety of sports including soccer, lacrosse, softball, baseball, tennis and more. With arts and crafts, visit to WNC Nature Center and group games. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. at WNC Nature Center pavilions, off Azalea Road in East Asheville. Early and late care available. $185 week ($160 each for two or more), $45 per day.

Colburn Earth Science Museum

» colburnmuseum.org; info@colburnmuseum.org; 254-7162 » Grades K-6. Runs March 26-29. Grade level and

hours vary by day. Features themes like “Dinosaur Discovery,” “Rocks from Space” and more. Starts at $20 for members/$30 nonmembers. Reservations required. At museum, 2 S. Pack Square, downtown Asheville.

Playball

» facebook.com/playballasheville; maxyplayball@gmail.com; 575-3000 » Ages 3-5. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. March 25-28. Coach Maxy guides children through the world of sport with her creative lessons and countless opportunities to learn new skills, make new friends, and gain confidence and boost self-esteem. Each activity focuses on balance, coordination, speed, and how to have fun while playing team sports. $40 per day or $140 for 4-day session. At St. Paul’s Preschool, 223 Hillside St., Asheville.

Roots + Wings School of Art

» rootsandwingsarts.com; info@rootsandwingsarts.com; 545-4827 » Grades K-5. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Around the World in 5 Days art camp. Kids will spend time learning about parts of North America, Africa, Central America, Asia, Europe, Australia and more. Students will gain experience in drawing, painting, collage, printmaking, and sculpture during the week. Divided by age group, ages 3-6 and K-5. $150, with sibling discount. At The Cathedral of All Souls in the Biltmore Village.

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Roots + Wings School of Art offers a half-day art camp for spring break. GINGER HUEBNER/SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

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2013 CAMP GUIDE / COED OVERNIGHT

Eagle’s Nest Camp in Pisgah Forest promotes skill building, among other things, including skills like rock climbing. SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

Adventure Treks

offers multiday adventure trips that may include backpacking, rock climbing, paddling and service projects. TAASC is a year-round program and students can join at any time. Contact TAASC for dates and nonmember tuition.

» adventuretreks.com; 888-954-5555; info@adventuretreks.com » June-August; 16-day and longer trips » Ages 12-18. Travel camp with backpacking, rock climbing, mountaineering, canoeing, mountain biking, sea kayaking, sailing, canyoneering and whitewater rafting. Blue Ridge Adventure visits North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. Other locations around U.S. available. Starts at $2,995.

Appalachian Institute for Creative Learning, Swannanoa

Blueprint Summer Programs

» appalachianinstitute.org; 800-951-7442; info@appalachianinstitute.org » July 14-20 and 21-27 » Rising 3rd- to 12th-graders. Campers are called “motivated learners,” figuring that anyone who shows up to take biology, math or art in July is motivated. Campers classes in topics include science and math, history, society and culture, visual arts, drama, more. At Warren Wilson College. See website for pricing. Day camp available through age 12.

Asheville TAASC

» ashevilletaasc.com; 299-9844; ashevilletaasc@gmail.com » Ages 8-18, divided by age group. Asheville’s branch of The American Adventure Service Corps

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» bpsummerprograms.com; 877-415-1111 » June-July » Rising high-schoolers. Blueprint offers a chance for students to discover what it is like to be in college before students get there. Take courses, live on campus in residence halls, participate in Q&A sessions with college admissions teams and take a road trip to major cities or popular attractions near the college. Explore George Washington University in Washington; Stonehill College in Easton, Mass.; Lehigh University in Behtlehem, Pa.; UCLA in Los Angeles.

Blue Star Camps, Hendersonville

» bluestarcamps.com; 692-3591; fun@bluestarcamps.com; @bluestarcamps » June 9-Aug. 2, 4- to 8-week sessions » Rising 1st- to 12th-graders. Jewish coed (first- to third-graders and 10th- and 11th-graders) and separate boys and girls camps (fourth- to ninthgraders) on 500-acre campus. Riding, swimming, land and water sports, trips, dramatic arts, kayaking, ropes course, rock climbing, tennis, more. Founded in 1948. Starts at $5,175.

Buffalo Cove Outdoor Education Center Earth Camp, Blowing Rock

» buffalocove.com; 964-1473; charleecamp@aol.com » July 7-20 (ages 12-17) and July 24-29 (ages 8-12) » Experiential education in the lessons of the Southern Appalachian Mountains, with orienteering, ropes course, trekking, canoeing, rafting, tracking, basketry, wilderness survival, organic gardening, archery, woodworking and more. $550-$1,500.

Camp Cedar Cliff

» campcedarcliff.org; camp@campcedarcliff.org; 450-3331 » June 15-July 26; half-, 1- and 2-week sessions » Rising 2nd- to 12th-graders. Christian camp at the Billy Graham Training Center at The Cove with archery, BB guns, zip line, high ropes courses, swimming, whitewater rafting, climbing wall, rappelling, Bible studies, and more. $370-$1,380.

Camp Celo, Burnsville

» campcelo.com; info@campcelo.com; 675-4323 » June 9-Aug. 10; 1-, 2- and 3-week sessions » Ages 7-12. For over 50 years the Barrus family has welcomed campers. Farm setting is basis for much of the camp activity. Campers care for animals, harvest the garden, hike, camp, swim and tube. With arts and crafts, skits, wood shop, nature appreciation and big group games. $975-$2,050.

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GUIDE / COED OVERNIGHT Camp Chatuga, Mountain Rest, S.C.

» campchatuga.com; 864-638-3728 » June 10-July 27; 1- to 4-week sessions » Ages 6-16. Campers choose from over 30 activities including horseback riding, waterskiing, mountain biking, crafts, drama, archery, riflery and sports. With day trips that may include rafting the Chattooga River, a canopy zip line tour, visiting a water park or a rollerskating party. $665-$3,070.

Camp Cheerio, Glade Valley

» campcheerio.org; 800-226-7496; director@campcheerio.org » June 9-July 6 (girls only) and July 7-Aug. 16 (coed); 6-day to 2-week sessions » Ages 7-15. YMCA camp with aquatics, kayaking, climbing, fishing, cheerleading, horseback riding, arts and crafts, rocketry, sports, high ropes, canoeing, tumbling, hiking, basketball and more. $850$1,800.

Camp Harrison, Boomer

» campharrison.org; facebook.com/ycampharrison; campharrison@ymcacharlotte.org; 800-514-1417 » June 9-Aug. 11; 1-, 2- and 4-week sessions. » Ages 6-16. At this traditional resident camp, campers choose from over 21 land activities including archery, paintball, ropes course, sports and crafts, and enjoy water activities like kayaking, swimming, canoeing, water zip line, more. Campers can personalize their experience through adventure tracks. Starts at $750.

Camp Henry, Canton

» camphenry.net; 646-7230; camphenry@lakelogan.org » June 16-July 27, 2- and 3-night and 1-week sessions » Rising 1st-graders through graduating seniors. At Lake Logan Episcopal Center. Camp, on 300 acres, founded in 1958. Activities include swimming, boating, fishing, hiking, sports, games, arts/crafts, alpine tower climbing, wilderness expedition trips, singing, and storytelling. Camp Henry is a Christian camp with programs and worship run by staff and clergy. Starts at $325.

Camp Highlander, Mills River

» camphighlander.com; email@camphighlander.com; 891-7721 » June 9-Aug. 2; 6- to 20-day sessions » Ages 5-16. Canoeing, kayaking, mountain biking, hiking, horseback riding, swimming, water skiing, arts and crafts, pottery, archery, riflery and more. Family camp offered Memorial Day weekend. Founded in 1957. $1,150-$3,850.

Camp Judaea, Hendersonville

» campjudaea.org; www.facebook.com/campjudea; info@campjudaea.org; 404-634-7883 » June 17-Aug. 8; 10- and 25-day sessions » Rising 2nd- to 10th-graders. Coed pluralistic Jewish

community that celebrates the diversity of all denominations of Jewish life around the world. Strengthening Jewish identity is a core product of the program. This results in strong future Jewish leaders empowered to lead their communities in tikkun olam, repairing the world. $2,000-$4,150.

Camp Living Water, Bryson City

» camplivingwater.com; 488-6012; dirclw@gmail.com » Ages 7-17. Activities include handcrafts, tubing, horseback riding, gem mining, climbing wall and Alpine Tower, swimming, archery, riflery, and much much more. Teen Camp is a 12-day program for ages 13-17 focuses on sharing the Gospel, discipleship and fun, and includes traditional camp activities. High Trek Adventures takes campers ages 13-16 on weeklong wilderness trips. Places emphasis on spiritual growth, with time for Bible reading, prayer and group discussions. See website for dates, sessions and cost.

Camp Lutherock, Newland

» llmi.net; info@llmi.org; facebook.com/lutherock » June 9-Aug. 3, 1-week sessions » Ages 8-19, completed grades 3-12. Christian outdoor adventure camp with creek walks, hiking, group interaction course, rock climbing, rafting, rock slides, camp outs, making ice cream, worship, ropes courses, backpacking. Starts at $419, with discounts before May 12.

Camp Pinewood, Hendersonville

» camppinewood.net; 692-6239; sue@camppinewood.net » June 16-Aug. 11; 4- and 8-week sessions » Completed grades 1-10. Traditional camping program including a water skiing program, tubing, archery, go-karts, horseback riding, tennis, field trips and more. $2,700-$7,100.

Camp Pinnacle, Flat Rock

» camppinnacle.com; info@camppinnacle.com; 855-378-1928 » June 20-Aug. 3; 2- and 4-week sessions » Ages 8-14. With swimming, boating, riflery, archery, tennis, disc golf, game room, crafts, drama, yoga, painting, nature program, field sports and more. Venture Program offers day and overnight trips. $2,750-$4,950.

Camp Tekoa, Hendersonville

» camptekoa.org; 692-6516 » June 9-Aug. 10; 4-day to 1-week sessions » Ages 7-17. Camp owned by the United Methodist Church offers classic activities like boating, swimming, fishing, high ropes course, climbing tower, arts and crafts, hiking, devotions and more, along with adventure options like all-girls adventure camp. Starts at $215 for mini-camps, $435 for full week.

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2013 CAMP GUIDE / COED OVERNIGHT Continued from Page 21

Camp Wayfarer, Flat Rock

» campwayfarer.com; 696-9000; info@campwayfarer.com » June 16-Aug. 1; 5- to 40-day sessions » Ages 6-17. Traditional camp with archery, arts and crafts, culinary arts, horseback riding, dance, drama, fencing, land sports, chorus, fly-fishing, guitar, kayaking, riflery, rock climbing, swimming, tennis, water skiing and more. $1,800-$4,500.

Camp Woodmont, Cloudland, Ga.

» campwoodmont.com; 423-472-6070; alyson@campwoodmont.com » June-July, 1- and 2-week sessions » Ages 6-14. Traditional camp on Lookout Mountain in northwest Georgia with horseback riding, high ropes course, climbing, sports, dance, crafts, canoeing, archery and more in a Christian environment. $725-$1,150.

Cheerio Adventures, Mouth of Wilson, Va. » cheerioadventures.com; 800-226-7496; info@cheerioadventures.com; » June 9-Aug. 16; 6-day, 1- and 2-week sessions

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» Ages 7-15. YMCA camp with horseback riding, climbing, high ropes course, canoeing, backpacking, hiking, tennis, sports, kayaking, rafting, and more. $850-$1,800.

CLIMBE, Montreat

» ww2.montreat.edu/home/tabid/1900/default.aspx; climbe@montreat.edu; 800-349-CAMP » Ages 12-18 (grades 7-12). Center for Learning and Investigation in Mountain Backcountry Ecosystems (CLIMBE) offers science-intensive adventure trips. Each camp focuses on a different aspect of nature — rivers, rocks, forests and caves — and integrates science with outdoor activities like paddling, rock climbing, hiking and caving. See website for details on dates and prices.

include backpacking, sea-kayaking, surfing, rockclimbing, white-water rafting and biking. Community service projects include sea-turtle population restoration, housing repair for communities in need, national park trail restoration, and teaching English.

Eagle’s Nest Camp, Pisgah Forest

Crossfire

» enf.org; 336-761-1040 (winter), 884-2788; info@enf.org; @EaglesNestCamp » June 8-Aug. 11; 1-, 2- and 3-week sessions » Ages 6-17 (grades K-11). Encourages boys and girls to live and grow simply, rooted by intentional experiences and connection to community. Activities promote self-expression, personal growth, skill building and fun. Eagle’s Nest provides campers the opportunity to slow down and reconnect with the core values of nature, friendship and joyful living. Starts at $1,400.

Crossing Borders

Great Smoky Mountains Institute at Tremont

crossfireministry.com; 255-9111

» www.cbadventures.com; info@cbadventures.com; 704-998-9536 » June 17-30 (Costa Rica) and July 8-21 (Peru) » Ages 13-18. International adventures to Costa Rica and Peru. Life-changing adventure experiences in safe, unique places around the globe for youth. Two-week trips include adventure activities, cultural immersion and community service. Adventures

» gsmit.org; 865-448-6709; mail@gsmit.org » June-July; 5- to 10-day sessions » Ages 9-17. Spend time in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park just outside of Townsend, Tenn. Tremont offers an in-depth learning experience that fosters an understanding of these beautiful mountains and encourages a lifelong appreciation and stewardship of the environment. From backpacking

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GUIDE / COED OVERNIGHT Kanuga

in the wilderness to learning about the secret haunts of salamanders, the Institute offers a variety of opportunities to serve different interests, abilities and age groups. Starting at $523.

Green River Preserve, Cedar Mountain

» greenriverpreserve.org; 698-8828; info@greenriverpreserve.org » June 8-Aug. 10; 6- to 22-day sessions » Rising 2nd- to 12th-graders. On a 3,400-acre wildlife reserve. Daily explorations with naturalists, fly-fishing, gardening, canoeing, outdoor skills, painting, pottery, archery and more. Twoweek expedition programs in Blue Ridge Mountains and at Outer Banks for rising high-schoolers. $1,250-$3,450.

Gwynn Valley Camp, Brevard

» gwynnvalley.com; 885-2900; mail@gwynnvalley.com » June 7-Aug. 11; 1-, 2-, 3-week and 10-day sessions » Ages 5-14. Traditional summer program with a working farm and wilderness trips. Includes kayaking, mountain biking, climbing, backpacking, arts, drama, music, sports, archery, horseback, campcraft, WEB of Life. Open since 1935. $1,475-$3,900.

The farm is the setting for much of the camp activity at Camp Celo in Burnsville. Here, campers harvest corn. /SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

Holston Presbytery Camp, Banner Elk

» holstoncamp.org; 898-6611 » June 9-July 19; 1-week sessions » Ages 8-14, plus CIT programs for 15 and older. Christian camp with rock climbing, kayaking, canoeing, archery, sling shot, swimming, crafts, team building, cookouts, backpacking, hiking, Bible study, recreation, fishing. Campers choose daily activities. Starts at $415.

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» kanuga.org; 692-9136 » Camp Kanuga, June 6-Aug. 5, 9- to 13-day sessions. Ages 7-15. Christian camp at Kanuga Conferences, an Episcopal center. Programs include adventure activities, sports and crafts, which take place in a strong community-oriented environment that enables campers to grow physically, emotionally and spiritually while developing new interests, skills and friendships. Offering camp since 1928. $460-$1,350. » Trailblazer Adventure and Paddle and Pack Trailblazer Adventure, June 16-July 12, 13-day sessions. Ages 15-17. Trailblazer Adventure is backpacking trek along the Appalachian Trail. Paddle and Pack Trailblazer Adventure includes a backpacking trek and a flat-water canoe camping trip. $1,460-$1,675.

Land of the Sky Wilderness School, Haywood County

» lotswild.com; lotswilderness@gmail.com; 280-0847 » 5-day sessions; see website for dates » Ages 8 and up. Highland Scout Camp summer courses give students the opportunity to track, build, sail, hike, camp, pack, and play music unique sessions that preserve traditional knowledge of the Appalachian frontier and native Cherokee. Limited

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» June 3-Aug. 2 » Rising 3rd- to 12th-graders. Christian camp on 902 acres at Presbyterian Church in America’s conference center. Ropes courses, climbing tower, archery, swimming, games, whitewater rafting, more. Starts at $315. Discounts before Feb. 15, March 15, April 15.

to 10 campers per week. Forms at http://yamabushi.us/scoutcamp.htm. $350.

Landry Summer Camps

» landrysummercamps.com; 265-4101 » Rising 8th-12th grades. College-prep academic camp on the campus of Lees-McRae College in Banner Elk. Study art, ballet, biology, Latin, pre-law theater, biology, chemistry, music and more. $1,600.

South Mountain Christian Camp, Bostic

» southmountainchristiancamp.org; 245-3322; smcc@blueridge.net » June 23-Aug. 2, 1-week sessions » Ages 7-15. Operates on the premise that summer camp should be available to every child, regardless of their financial situation. Christian programing at a minimal cost. With ropes course, climbing wall, giant swing, crafts, swimming, hiking, boating, small group Bible devotionals, nightly chapel services. Financial assistance is available.

Lutheridge, Arden

» llmi.net; facebook.com/lutheridge; info@llmi.org » June 2-Aug. 3; 1-week sessions » Ages 5-19, completed grades 1-12. Half-week sessions for younger campers. Crafts, games, swimming, singing, worship, and Bible study with an emphasis on creativity and Christian community. Specialized programs can include music or outdoor specialization. Middle and high school programs can feature “night owl” schedule. Half week starts at $277; full week starts at $417. Discounts before May 12.

MAHEC Health Careers Camp

» Jacquelyn Hallum, 257-4479 or jacquelyn.hallum@mahec.net » June 16-22 » Rising 7th- and 8th-graders. Targets economically and educationally disadvantaged and underrepresented minority middle school students, but open to all. Campers will participate in tours of regional hospitals, visit The Health Adventure, earn CPR certification, whitewater rafting, personal growth activities, cultural diversity discussions, work session with the College Foundation of N.C., as well as opportunities to interact with health care professionals. $100 with scholarships available. $10 nonrefundable application fee. Students live on WCU campus.

Missions Camp, Fletcher

Trout Unlimited offers a weeklong camp that emphasizes the conservation of cold water fisheries, with fly fishing, fly tying and more. SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT climbing and/or whitewater canoeing. Some include a formal service project; all include learning to use a map and compass for navigation and leadership and outdoor skill development. Starting at $795.

N.C. Trout Unlimited, Canton

» rivercourse.org; nctu.rivercourse@gmail.com » Rivercourse Coldwater Conservation and FlyFishing camp, June 16-21 » Ages 13-15. Emphasizes Trout Unlimited’s mission, the conservation of cold water fisheries, with fly fishing, fly tying, field trip to Fish Hatchery in Pisgah National Forest, swimming. At Lake Logan. $595.

O’Connor Method Camp Charleston, Charleston, S.C.

Summer College in Biotechnology and Life Science, N.C. State

» http://harvest.cals.ncsu.edu/academic/ index.cfm?pageID=1975 » July 8-Aug. 2 » Rising juniors and seniors with 3.5 GPA and recommendation. Students interested in a career in science participate in a college-level program in state-ofthe-art labs at N.C. State. Coursework includes introductory courses in biology for college credit. $1,713 (estimated, includes program fee, tuition and housing but not food).

Swannanoa 4-H Camp

» nc4h.org/centers/swannanoa-4-h-camp/; 686-3196

True Nature

» truenaturecamp.org; truenaturecamp@gmail.com

Western Carolina University

» hollerministries.com; 651-9827; info@hollerministries.com » June 23-28 » Ages 13-19. Holler Ministries hosts a camp where experienced missionaries share their experiences and train Missions Camp participants for international missions work in an authentically simulated African village. See website for financial details.

» oconnormethodcampcharleston.com; oconnorcharleston@gmail.com » July 28-Aug. 2 » Ages 618. Strings Camp. Classical, fiddle, blues, jazz. For Violin, viola, cello, bass. In Historic Downtown Charleston. For all playing levels. Accredited teacher training in The O’Connor Method, a New American method of string playing. Basic tuition $350.

» Camps hosted on campus in Cullowhee. Contact learn@wcu.edu or 828-227-7397 » Dulcimer U: July 14-19. All ages. Learn all about the mountain dulcimer. Skill building is the core of the programs. Classes include music theory, techniques, history and even technology applications for the dulcimer. Visit dulcimer.wcu.edu. » Health Careers Camp: June 16-22. Rising 7thand 8th-graders. See MAHEC listing above.

Mountain Adventure Guides, Pisgah National Forest

Quaker Lake Camp, Climax

YMCA Camp Greenville, Cedar Mountain

» mtnadventureguides.com; 866-813-5210

North Carolina Outward Bound

» ncoutwardbound.org; 888-756-2627; info@ncobs.org » June-August; 4-, 9- and 14-day sessions » Parent-child course is for ages 12 and older; other sessions ages 14-16 and 16-18. Wilderness-based programs that may include backpacking, rock

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» quakerlakecamp.org; 336-674-2321 » June 8-Aug. 3 » Ages 5-17. Christian camp near Greensboro. Bible study, crafts, swimming, theater, climbing tower, hayrides, boating and organized recreation. Oneday camp for 5- and 6-year-olds.

Ridge Haven, Brevard

» ridgehaven.org/camps; 877-862-3916

» campgreenville.org; 864-242-1111, ext. 34 » June 9-Aug. 10; 1- and 2-week sessions » Ages 7-17, with specialty camps for 5- and 6-yearolds with parents. Traditional has arts and crafts, horseback riding, target sports, swimming and boating, field sports and more. Adventure programs include backpacking, mountain biking, rock climbing, whitewater, caving, fly-fishing and more. Starts at $660.

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CAMP GUIDE / BOYS’ OVERNIGHT Blue Star Camps, Hendersonville

» www.bluestarcamps.com; 692-3591; fun@bluestarcamps.com; @bluestarcamps » June 9-Aug. 2, 4- to 8-week sessions » Rising 1st- to 12th-graders. Jewish coed (first- to third-graders and 10th- and 11thgraders) and separate boys and girls camps (fourth- to ninth-graders) on 500-acre campus. Riding, swimming, land and water sports, trips, dramatic arts, kayaking, ropes course, rock climbing, tennis, more. Founded in 1948. Starts at $5,175.

Camp Arrowhead, Tuxedo

» camparrowhead.org; office@camparrowhead.org; 692-1123 » June 9-July 19, 1- to 6-week sessions » Ages 6-16. Since 1937, building character, confidence, courage and compassion through shared living experiences in a caring, Christian environment. With archery, kayaking, rock climbing, mountain biking, traditional blacksmithing, swimming, backpacking, horseback riding, sports, nature/ecology, fishing, friendly tribal competitions and more. $1,200-$6,500.

Camp Carolina, Brevard

» campcarolina.com; 884-2414; info@campcarolina.com » June 2-Aug. 9, 2- to 10-week sessions » Completed grades 1-12. Activities at 220acre camp and off-site include mountain boarding, horseback riding, mountain biking, skateboarding, kayaking, canoeing, rafting, rock-climbing, caving, wakeboarding, team sports, arts and crafts, yoga and more. Founded in 1924. $2,850-$10,250.

Camp Chosatonga, Pisgah National Forest

» kahdalea.com; 884-6834; office@kahdalea.com » June 3-Aug. 1; 2 weeks to full summer » Ages 8-17. Emphasis on Christian ideals but respectful of Jewish roots. Backpacking, tennis, horseback riding, swimming, canoeing, high ropes challenge course, nature study, mountain biking, drama, arts and crafts, rock climbing, archery, fishing, more. Sister camp is Camp Kahdalea. $1,260-$7,450.

Camp Daniel Boone Boy Scout Camp, Canton

» campdanielboone.org; Robert Garrett, 800-526-6708, rgarrett@bsamail.org » Boy Scouts register through their troops.

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2013 CAMP GUIDE / BOYS’ OVERNIGHT Continued from Page 25 Merit badges, rock climbing, rafting, hiking, more.

Camp High Rocks, Cedar Mountain

» highrocks.com; 885-2153; mail@highrocks.com; @CampHighRocks » June 9-Aug. 10, 6-day to 4-week sessions » Ages 7-16. Starter camp and mini sessions for younger campers. Smaller camp with 145 campers at a time. Activities at 1,000-acre facility include horseback riding, sailing, swimming, sports, canoeing, backpacking, mountain biking, rock climbing, crafts and archery/ riflery. $1,310-$5,125.

Camp Mondamin, Tuxedo

» mondamin.com; 800-688-5789; mondamin@mondamin.com » May 29-Aug. 18; 5-day to 5-week sessions » Ages 6-17. Backpacking, kayaking, canoeing, sailing, mountain biking, rock climbing, horseback riding, overnight camping trips, mountaineering, more. Sister camp is Green Cove. Founded in 1922. $1,075-$5,950.

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Camp Ridgecrest for Boys, Ridgecrest

» ridgecrestcamps.com; 800-968-1630; rscamps@ridgecrestcamps.com » June 9-Aug. 9; 2,- 4-, 6- and 8-week sessions, plus starter camp » Ages 7-16. Christian camp with archery, mountain biking, Bible study, horseback riding, riflery, swimming, canoeing, tennis, more. Founded in 1929. $650-$6,000 with discounts.

Camp Rockmont, Black Mountain

» rockmont.com; info@rockmont.com; 6863885 » June 9-Aug. 9; 6- to 27-day sessions » Ages 6-16. Christian camp on 550 acres with hiking, kayaking, blacksmithing, homesteading, canoeing, crafts, guitar, Bible study, more. $1,150-$4,875.

Camp Timberlake, Black Mountain

» camptimberlake.com; email@camptimberlake.com; 669-8766; @Camp_Timberlake » June 9-Aug. 10; 6-day to 5-week sessions » Ages 7-16. Christian camp offers riding,

backpacking, tennis, rock climbing, wrestling, paintball, archery, spelunking, riflery, mountain biking, swimming, canoeing, kayaking, guitar, soccer, ropes course, fencing and more. Tribal system gives boys a sense of belonging and helps develop healthy sense of competition. Sister camp is Camp Merri-Mac. $1,300$5,500.

Christ School Lacrosse Camp, Arden

» revolutionlaxcamp.com; 684-6232, ext. 107; laxcamp@christschool.org » July 1-5; 1-week session with day and overnight campers » Ages 10-18. Designed for all skill levels and known throughout the Southeast as the premier instructional lacrosse camp. Staff includes professional players, Division I college coaches and top-level high school coaches. Camp has sold out the past three years; register soon. $395 for day campers (8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m.), $445 for boarding campers.

Deep Woods Camp or Boys, Brevard

» deepwoodscamp.com; deepwoods@citcom.net; 885-2268

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BOYS’ OVERNIGHT » June 9-Aug. 17; 4-, 5-, 9- and 10-week sessions » Ages 10-14. Hiking, backpacking, whitewater canoeing and rafting, mountain biking, rock climbing. $500.

Falling Creek Camp, Tuxedo

» fallingcreek.com; 692-0262; mail@fallingcreek.com » June 2-Aug. 9; 6-, 13-, 20- and 27-day sessions » Completed grades 1-10. Mountain biking, rock climbing, backpacking, canoeing and whitewater kayaking, water activities, sports, horseback riding, more on 525 acres. Adventure trip offered during two-, three- and fourweek sessions. Camp’s mission is to give boys an opportunity for personal growth and fun as they develop an understanding of their relationships with nature, their fellow man, and God. Founded in 1969. $1,285-$5,125.

2013 CAMP GUIDE / GIRLS’ OVERNIGHT Ballet Conservatory of Asheville Summer Intensive

» balletconservatoryofasheville.com; 255-5777 » June 24-July 20 » Ages 10 and older, with serious interest in ballet. Guest faculty includes Amanda Edge of New York City Ballet. Daily classes with concentrated, professional instruction in ballet, pointe, variations, partnering, boy’s class, modern, jazz, hip-hop, Pilates, acting for dancers, nutrition, injury prevention, and ballet history. About 30 rehearsal hours per week and a final showcase performance. Housing available for out-of-town residents. Admission by audition or video. Audition is Feb. 17 at 5 Points Studios, 6 E. Chestnut St., Asheville, at corner of Broadway.

Blue Ridge Dance Camp

» ashevilleballet.com; Ann Dunn, 258-1028 » July 28-Aug. 2 » Ages 11-18. Asheville Ballet’s summer intensive with daily classes in ballet, pointe, repertoire, modern, jazz, choreography and dance history. Classes held at state-of-the-art studio at 4 Lynnwood Road, Asheville. Limited to 15 students, who stay at home of director. $650.

Blue Star Camps, Hendersonville » bluestarcamps.com; 692-3591;

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fun@bluestarcamps.com; @bluestarcamps » June 9-Aug. 2, 4- to 8-week sessions » Rising 1st- to 12th-graders. Jewish coed (first- to third-graders and 10th- and 11th-graders) and separate boys and girls camps (fourth- to ninth-graders) on 500-acre campus. Riding, swimming, land and water sports, trips, dramatic arts, kayaking, ropes course, rock climbing, tennis, more. Founded in 1948. Starts at $5,175.

Camp Carysbrook, Riner, Va.

» campcarysbrook.com; info@campcarysbrook.com; 540-382-1670 » June 23-Aug. 11 1- to 7-week sessions » Ages 6-16. Horseback riding, outdoor living skills, sports, nature study, caving, rock climbing, more. Founded in 1923. $925-$5,200 with sister discount.

Camp Cheerio, Glade Valley

» campcheerio.org; 800-226-7496; director@campcheerio.org » June 9-July 6 (girls only) and July 7-Aug. 16 (coed); 6-day to 2-week sessions » Ages 7-15. YMCA camp with aquatics, kayaking, climbing, fishing, cheerleading, horseback riding, arts and crafts, rocketry, sports, high ropes, canoeing, tumbling, hiking, basketball and more. $850-$1,800.

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2013 CAMP GUIDE / GIRLS’ OVERNIGHT Camp Illahee, Brevard

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Camp Crestridge, Ridgecrest

» ridgecrestcamps.com; 800-968-1630; rscamps@ridgecrestcamps.com » June 9-Aug. 9; 2-, 4-, 6- and 8-week sessions with a 1-week starter camp » Ages 7-16. Christian camp with archery, mountain biking, Bible study, horseback riding, riflery, swimming, canoeing, tennis, volleyball, off-campus trips and more. Sister camp to Ridgecrest. $650-$6,000 with sibling discounts.

Camp Ginger Cascades, Lenoir

» camplikeagirl.org » June 16-July 14; weeklong sessions » Ages 6-17. Open to registered and nonregistered Girl Scouts alike. Activities include rock climbing, swimming, canoeing and kayaking, arts and crafts, rafting, adventure trips and more. Discount before March 18.

Camp Glen Arden, Tuxedo

» campillahee.com; mail@campillahee.com; 883-2181 » June 2-Aug. 9; 1-week to 4-week sessions » Ages 7-16. Traditional camp on 110 acres that opened in 1921. With swimming, arts and crafts, tennis, gymnastics, horseback riding, marksmanship, field hockey, lacrosse, team sports, ropes course, rock climbing, canoeing and kayaking and more. $1,325$5,050.

Camp Kahdalea, Pisgah National Forest

» http://kahdalea.com; 884-6834 » June 3-Aug. 1; 2 weeks to full summer, with 6-day starter camp » Ages 7-17. Camp with backpacking, tennis, horseback riding, swimming, canoeing, high ropes challenge course, nature study, mountain biking, drama, sign language, arts and crafts, riflery, rock climbing, archery, fishing, dance, more. Camp has a Christian philosophy but loves and respects Jewish roots. Brother camp is Camp Chosatonga. $1,260-$7,450.

Camp Merrie-Woode, Sapphire

» campglenarden.com; 692-8362; tajarden@aol.com » June 9-Aug. 5; 2- to 4-week sessions » Rising 1st- to 11th-graders. Archery, horseback riding, canoeing, gymnastics, sailing, rock climbing, pottery, photography, kayaking, sports, performing arts, more. “Progression system” allows girls to set their own pace within activity schedules. Founded in 1951. $2,750-$5,400.

» merriewoode.com; phyllis@merriewoode.com » June 3-Aug. 10; 2- to 4-week sessions » Ages 7-17. Established in 1919, camp offers structured program of canoeing, kayaking, sailing, climbing, hiking, riding, nature, tennis, drama, studio art, photography and pottery. $2,250-$5,100.

Camp Green Cove, Tuxedo

Camp Merri-Mac for Girls, Black Mountain

» greencove.com; 800-688-5789; greencove@greencove.com » May 29-Aug. 18; 5-day to 5-week sessions » Ages 6-17. Noncompetitive camp with swimming, kayaking, canoeing, sailing, mountain biking, backpacking, rock climbing, horseback riding, overnight camping trips and more. Founded in 1945. Brother camp is Mondamin. $1,075-$5,950.

Camp Greystone, Tuxedo

» campgreystone.com; office@campgreystone.com; 693-3182 » May 27-Aug. 9; 5-day to 4-week sessions » Rising 1st- to 12th-graders. A 150-acre camp on Lake Summit founded in 1920. Horseback riding, gymnastics, rope course, water skiing, sailing, tennis, softball, archery, ceramics, jewelry making, knitting, painting, Bible classes and more. $1,100-$6,000.

Camp Hollymont, Asheville

» hollymont.com; 4info@hollymont.com; 686-5343; » June 16-Aug. 9; 7-, 13-, 20 and 27-day sessions » Ages 6-15. Small group day activities and skills include archery, arts and crafts, basketball, cooking, dance, digital photography, drama, horseback riding, sewing, swimming, volleyball, tennis, and more. Large group evening activities include talent shows, council ring campfires, tribal competitions, Big Sis/Lil Sis nights, country fairs, scavenger hunts, etc. $1,595$5,995.

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fishing, nature and more. $1,100-$3,400.

Keyauwee Program Center, Sophia

» camplikeagirl.org » June 16-Aug. 2; weeklong sessions » Ages 6-17. Open to registered Girl Scouts and nonregistered girls alike. Activities include rock climbing, alpine tower, horseback riding, swimming, canoeing and kayaking, arts and crafts, rafting, adventure trips and more. Prices vary. Discounts available before March 18.

Keystone Camp, Brevard

» keystonecamp.com; office@keystonecamp.com; 884-9125 » June 9-Aug. 9; 6-day to 4-week sessions » Completed kindergarten to 9th grade. Founded in 1916, camp offers daily horseback riding, archery, riflery, arts and crafts, swimming, canoeing, adventure sports, performing arts, golf, tennis, team sports, more. $1,310-$5,025.

North Carolina Outward Bound

» NCOutwardBound.org; 888-756-2627; info@ncobs.org; @NCOutwardBound » June-August; 9- and 14-day trips » Ages 14-18. Girls-only backpacking, rock climbing and whitewater trip in the Appalachian Mountains. Wilderness-based, overnight program that includes a service project. Starts at $1,835.

Rockbrook Camp for Girls, Brevard

» merri-mac.com; mail@merri-mac.com; 669-8766; @CampMerriMac » June 9-Aug. 10; 6-day to 5-week sessions » Ages 6-16. Christian camp with riding, backpacking, tennis, rock climbing, gymnastics, archery, spelunking, riflery, swimming, canoeing, music, sports, ropes course, fencing, rafting, dance, drama, more. Tribal system gives girls a lifelong group within camp family and teaches tradition. Brother camp is Camp Timberlake. $1,300-$5,500.

» rockbrookcamp.com; 884-6151; office@rockbrookcamp.com; facebook.com/rockbrook » June 2-Aug. 8; 2-, 3- or 4-week sessions » Ages 6-16. Traditional summer camp with diverse program of horseback riding, outdoor adventure activities, whitewater rafting, ceramics, crafts, gymnastics, riflery, more. Founded in 1921. $2,750$4,850.

Camp Pisgah, Brevard

Skyland Camp for Girls, Clyde

» camplikeagirl.org » June 16-Aug. 4; weeklong sessions » Ages 6-17, Open to registered and nonregistered Girl Scouts alike. Activities include rock climbing, horseback riding, swimming, canoeing and kayaking, arts and crafts, rafting, adventure trips, llama treks and more. Prices vary. Discount before March 18.

» skylandcamp.com; 627-2470; @skylandcamp » June 30-Aug. 3; 2 1/2- to 5-week sessions, plus 1-week starter camp » Ages 6-15.Since 1917. Camp offers horseback riding, tennis, swimming, archery, arts and crafts, drama, culinary arts, yoga, dance and mountain trips. New starter camp this summer for rising 1st- to 5th-graders. $1,400-$5,500.

Camp Ton-A-Wandah, Flat Rock

Upper 90 Soccer & Adventure Camp, Swannanoa

» camptonawandah.com; 800-322-0178; info@camptonawandah.com; @CampTonawandah » June 2-Aug. 3; 1-, 2- and 3-week sessions » Ages 5-16. Traditional camp activities including archery, riflery, rock climbing, horseback riding, hiking and camping, kayaking, canoeing, drama and acting, arts and crafts, clay works, glass fusing, soccer, lacrosse, basketball, volleyball, softball,

» upper90soccer.com; senos@warren-wilson.edu; 771-3737 » June 17-20 » Ages 11-18. For ages 11-13, $400. For college-bound players ages 14-18, $395. Soccer, climbing, paddling, swimming, alpine tower, and more.

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SPECIAL NEEDS Camp Lakey Gap, Black Mountain

» christmount.org/camplakeygap; camplakeygap@gmail.com; 669-8977 » June 9-July 26 » Ages 4-adult. Campers will have a 1:1 or 1:2 staff ratio to provide support while participating in hiking, swimming, outdoor games, art, music, canoeing and more. All activities are adapted using visual structure so campers with autism can participate as independently as possible. Day camping opportunities are available. $1,725 per week. Scholarships available.

Camp Spring Creek, Bakersville

» campspringcreek.org; info@campspringcreek.org; 766-5032 » June 9-Aug. 3, 4- to 8-week sessions » Ages 6-14. Camp creates an environment where dyslexic children become better readers, spellers and writers, discover their natural talents, and gain self-confidence and independence. $7,480.

SOAR, Balsam

» soarnc.org; admissions@soarnc.org; 456-3435; » June 8-Aug. 15; 10-, 12-, 18- and 26-day sessions » Ages 8-18. Success Oriented Achievement Realized (SOAR) is an adventure program for preteens, teens and adults with LD and/or ADHD. Emphasis is placed on developing self-confidence, social skills, problem-solving techniques. Programs include llama trek, canoeing, horseback riding, Rock climbing, rafting, SCUBA, fishing, kayaking and more. Programs also in Florida, Wyoming, New York, California and Belize. Starts at $2,900.

Talisman Programs, Zirconia

» talismancamps.com; 888-458-8226 » June 15-Aug. 10, 13- and 19-day sessions » Ages 8-22. Talisman Programs offers a residential program for campers with ADHD, Asperger’s, high-functioning autism and mild behavior issues. Talisman offers both traditional on-campus sessions, as well as adventure-based programming in the backcountry. Adventure-based programs include: backpacking, high-ropes course, whitewater canoeing and kayaking, rock climbing, and more. Campers focus on communication and cooperation skills, personal growth and development, and building self-esteem. Starts at $2,043.

Victory Junction, Randleman

» victoryjunction.com; 877-VJG-CAMP or 336-4989055 » June 9-Aug. 8; 4- and 5-day sessions » Ages 6-16. Camp for children with chronic medical conditions or serious illnesses. Activities include horse barn, petting zoo animals, pool, gym, archery, boating, fishing, bowling, climbing tower, zip line, mini-golf, talent show. Free.

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artist’s muse

What should I do with all of this art?! By Ginger Huebner WNC Parent columnist

Artwork piles up quickly when kids are in school, and you can’t save it all. But you can save some of it, either in its true form or digitally. GINGER HUEBNER/SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

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A friend recently asked me how I have stored my children’s artwork over the years. It is a great question, and like many parents, I have a hard time tossing what comes home or what is created at home. My current methods are in no way perfect, and I have accepted the challenge of finding other ideas. Here are my findings. You must be selective in what artwork you keep. One method to help with this is to allow a pile of work to grow over a month’s time. At the end of the month, look through it with your child. Let them decide what they would like to keep. Then, narrow it down one more time by asking them to pick their top 10

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(or five, etc). Storing original work can be a wonderful way to look back with your child years down the road at their many stages of creating. All of the ideas below can be kept in a series and labeled with each child’s name and year: » According file folders can offer easy organization for grades / ages. » Pizza boxes or plastic bins are a good option for storing larger pieces. » Three-ring binders and sheet protectors work well to collect work that is more close to 8.5-by-11 in size. It also offers an easier method for looking through the work. » Cardboard tubes can protect all sizes of works for years. This method could be wonderful for long-term storage. There are also methods of cataloging your child’s work digitally instead of physically. Here are some options once you photograph the original work: » Artwork photo albums: Print the photos of the works and place them in a photo album. » Publish a photo book: You can create a book of just your child’s art-

work online through the many photo websites. » PDF gallery: You can create a PDF file of all the works that can be sent to many or easily viewed on the computer. » Apps: More recent options for cataloging artwork are apps on the smartphones and tablet devices. There are two that I can across that provide a great option for digital history of work: Artkive and Art My Kid Made.

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Whether you are hoping to save original work or digitize all of it, I do believe it is a worthwhile effort that will provide sweet moments down the road with you and your child. Ginger Huebner is the director of Roots + Wings School of Art and Asheville Community Design Lab, offering visual art and design education for all ages. Email her at info@rootsandwingsarts.com or visit www.rootsandwingsarts.com.

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home-school happenings

Looking for connections By Nicole McKeon WNC Parent columnist

I am sure that my horror and profound sadness for the tragic incident in Connecticut is shared by all of you. I have been haunted by the images of the faces of the kids and adults who died. I have been struggling to try to make some sense of what happened, and have been unable to do so. I have also been haunted by the face of the young man who committed this atrocity. I wonder what could possibly make someone have so little connection to other human beings, to his own emotions, to be able to do what he did?. I am certain that mental health issues played a large part in his breakdown, but I also think that he is a

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stunning reflection of what is happening in our country. You are all familiar, I am sure, with the anecdote about putting a frog in a pot of cool water over a flame. The frog will not jump out because you slowly increase the temperature of the water. Well, I think our society is like that. We are slowly being boiled to death, but we’re too busy texting on our cell phones, and racing to work, and stressing out over how we are going to pay for our health insurance, and shopping, to notice that we are in trouble. Maybe we need to see this heinous act in Sandy Hook as the most dramatic and tragic wake-up call ever. Yes, maybe this one kid, who did this terrible thing, had an underlying mental health issue, but maybe, just maybe, we have a chance to rescue the next kid who feels so disconnected from basic human decency, from the respect for human life.

A police officer was on duty at Newtown Middle School on Dec. 18 as students returned to school in Newtown, Conn., four days after the school shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. SETH HARRISONTHE JOURNAL NEWS

We need change in our country. It’s easy to say, it’s so hard to do. Look at our government. How’s that for an example to our children? These men and women, charged with representing the “people”

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are so immobilized by lobbyists and corporations that they are no longer even close to knowing who “the people” are or what they need. Is it any wonder that there is so much apathy? We feel powerless. We the people are swimming around in water that is getting hotter and hotter, and we have no clue that soon, we are going to be boiled to death. Why? Because, we have been paralyzed by the mounting expense of daily living, by the constant bombardment of our senses with hypersexual movies and television, and the mantra we hear advertised, that we need more, that we don’t have enough, that we are slipping behind. Did you think you were alone? Nope. You are not. And, maybe that’s a starting place for change. Maybe we need a national discussion about the fact that as a country, as a people, we have lost our way. Maybe, we need to get angry. We need to shut up the folks who say it is a bad thing to “get emotional.” We need a national day of “getting emotional.” A countrywide revolution in the way we

prioritize. The teachers who died at Sandy Hook Elementary demonstrated a heroic dedication to the sanctity of life, and we owe it to them to make sure that we all demonstrate the same dedication. And, the children who died, well, they could have been mine, or yours. We need to not be complacent, we need to be emotional, and start recognizing that we owe each other a debt of humility and honesty and compassion. We need to disconnect from our technology-laden lives, and reconnect to each other, before it’s too late. What does this have to do with home-schooling? Well, not so much. It has to do with life schooling, whether it takes place in a public school, a private school or a home school. We are all connected, and we all need to share our frustrations and fears in a way that will reconnect us. Nicole McKeon is a home-schooling mom and owner of Homeschool Station in Fairview. Email her at homeschoolstation@hotmail.com.

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parent brief

Test your home for radon, for free You could have another resident in your house and not even know it. Radon is invisible and doesn’t have a smell. And living in a home with radon can cause lung cancer. The only way to know if radon gas is in your home is to test for it. The N.C. Radon Program is assisting families with newborn children by providing free radon test kits. The results of your test will be mailed to you for free. To test your home for free, just complete the information below. Visit www.ncradon.org for more information. Parent’s name: Address: Phone number: County where you live: Month and year when your child was born: Please mail your information to this address to receive your test kit: N.C. Radon Program c/o WNC Parent Magazine Promotion 1645 Mail Service Center Raleigh, NC 27699-1645

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divorced families

Communication is about ‘we’ By Trip Woodard WNC Parent columnist

Relationships. Whether they are parent to child, parent to parent or child to child, it is all about communication. I think it is fair to say that over half the couples and families I see ask for better communication skills as a primary therapy goal. And this includes both families going through the transition of divorce and those who aren’t. So, you may ask, what are the common denominators in communication? If you have a child in college, it is money. Otherwise, you actually have to talk. Let us then review the basics in good communication. First, when it comes to a disagree-

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ment, try to avoid blaming in your language. That means talking like the real problem is that something is wrong with the other person. These kinds of conversations typically lead off with “you” statements such as “you never help me with the kids” or “your room is a pigsty.’” Instead, try to use the classic “I’ statement and put the problem as more neutral. Examples could be, “I really feel overwhelmed with the kids. Is there a way we could work together on this?” Or to the other, “I have concerns with the amount of flies in your room? Could we discuss this before DSS gets here?” OK, I was kidding about the last example. The basic idea, which isn’t easy, is to make it a mutual and not a personal problem by how you put your words. The goal is to talk in a way the other person is willing to listen. Blaming never works

and tend to make the other person instantly defensive. Next, try to find points of understanding when the other person is talking. This does not mean you are agreeing with them, but rather that you are hearing what they have to say. Examples again might be, “I understand that our work schedules are complicated and that it is frustrating for you to be taking care of the kids so much.” Or to the other, “I know that you have named all the flies and that it must be difficult to get rid of your pets.” Ooops … slipped up on that second one again. The third principle is to think of your relationship as being like a bank account. Every disagreement is a withdrawal. It then becomes critical that you make regular and even daily “deposits” by showing actions and/or words of appreciation and love for each other.

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Sometimes, we get in relational bad habits of simply taking one another for granted. I remind my clients that in such cases the only difference between a rut and a grave are dimensions. Last, recognize when you are getting overwhelmed in a discussion and need to take a break to cool off. Indicators that you may be there include using a louder voice than normal, repeating what you have said over and over or being sarcastic. Tell the other that you love them and that you need to take a break from the conversation. Then go into the other room and scream into a pillow if you need to, but do something to calm yourself down. Re-engage the conversation as soon as you feel calm. This may fly in the face of the saying “never go to bed mad,� but I have never known two exhausted people to come to a constructive solution to a late night argument. It is always better to resume the conversation the next day when you have both gotten some decent rest. I would love to write more on the subject, but I am getting a call from my son who is at college, so I probably need to exercise my communication skills with him by writing another check. Trip Woodard is a licensed family and marriage therapist and a clinical member of the N.C. Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. Contact him at 606-8607.

THINKSTOCK.COM

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librarian’s picks

Volume combines history, humor By Jennifer Prince

Buncombe County Public Libraries

Where do presidents come from? The cover of Michael Townsend’s new book, “Where Do Presidents Come From? And Other Presidential Stuff of SuperGreat Importance,” shows plainly that the stork brings the president. Shown in the illustration is a fully grown Abraham Lincoln, top hat and all, being carried by a most capable stork. The outlandish, frivolous nature of the illustration attracts attention, certainly, but this is a case where readers should not judge the book by the cover. The book is in graphic novel format. Highly stylized figures and bright, matte colors set the tone. The book sets the stage by depicting the political issues that shaped the war between the English colonies in America and England. The book goes on to describe the wherefores of pivotal presidential terms, how a president is elected, awesome things about the White House and the duties of a president. In addition, the book explains how the Electoral College works, and the history behind various constitutional amendments. Jokes, puns and anachronistic humor

area story times Buncombe County Libraries Visit www.buncombecounty.org Black Mountain, 250-4756: Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday; Mother Goose: 11:30 a.m. Tuesday; Toddler: 10:30 a.m. Thursday East Asheville, 250-4738: Preschool: 11 a.m. Wednesday and Saturday Enka-Candler, 250-4758: Preschool:

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at hand. The historical content is firstrate and is supported by a complete bibliography. When Townsend describes Washington crossing the Delaware River under cover of night and fog, he depicts the general, dozens of soldiers, a couple of horses and a cannon piled on top of each other in a tiny boat. One caption describes Washington’s tactical maneuvering: “Washington’s idea was to launch a surprise attack (before his men’s enlistment expired) on a group of Hessians camped out in a town called Trenton. Part of the plan included a secret crossing of the Delaware River at nighttime. On the night of December 25, Washington put his risky plan into action.” A smaller caption at the bottom of the page reads, “Side note: Many boats were used in the crossing and several trips were made, but the idea of them using one trip in one boat is more fun to draw,” and it can be argued, more fun to look at. With this book, Townsend accomplishes much. The history is thorough. The writing is succinct and accessible. The illustrations are at once helpful and hilarious. Townsend’s touch is light, but he never trivializes. The humor is so over the top, parents and teachers need not worry that young readers will get the humor and the history mixed up.

abound. George Washington debates career choices: president of the United States or video game tester. England and France are depicted as cats and dogs, because they, well, fought like cats and dogs. When describing Thomas Paine’s radical publication, “Common Sense,” Townsend sums up with, “It was a hot seller, like bananas at a monkey convention.” While Townsend embraces fully the opportunities that humor affords, he appreciates the importance of the topic

This book is available in the Buncombe County Public Libraries. To learn more, visit www.buncombecounty.org/library.

10:30 a.m. Wednesday; Toddler: 10:30 a.m. Thursday Fairview, 250-6484: Mother Goose, 11 a.m. Tuesday; Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Thursday Leicester, 250-6480: Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday North Asheville, 250-4752: Preschool: 11 a.m. Wednesday; Toddler: 10 a.m. Wednesday Oakley/South Asheville, 250-4754: Mother Goose: 11 a.m. Thursday; Toddler: 11 a.m. Wednesday; Preschool: 10 a.m. Wednesday

Pack Memorial Library, 250-4700: Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Mondays; Mother Goose: 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays; Toddler: 10:30 a.m. Thursdays Skyland/South Buncombe, 2506488: Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Thursday; Toddler: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Swannanoa, 250-6486: Preschool: 11 a.m. Thursday; Toddler: 10 a.m. Thursday Weaverville, 250-6482: Mother Goose: 11 a.m. Wednesday; Toddler: 11 a.m. Thursday; Preschool: 11 a.m. Tuesday

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area story times West Asheville, 250-4750: Mother Goose: 11 a.m. Monday; Toddler: 11 a.m. Wednesday; Preschool: 11 a.m. Thursday

Haywood County Library

Visit www.haywoodlibrary.org. Waynesville, 356-2512 or 356-2511: Movers and Shakers: 11 a.m. Thursdays; Ready 4 Learning: 11 a.m. Tuesdays; Family story time: 11 a.m. Wednesdays Spanish story time: Waynesville branch offers Spanish story time for families, 4-4:30 p.m. Fridays, with books and songs in in Spanish (and explanations in English). All welcome. For more information in English, contact Carole Dennis at 356-2511 or cdennis@haywoodnc.net. For more information in Spanish, contact Marisa Dana at 561275-8097 or marisamdana@gmail.com. Canton, 648-2924: Family story time, 11 a.m. Tuesdays; Rompin’ Stompin’ story time, 10 a.m. Thursdays

Henderson County Library

Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us. Main, 697-4725: Bouncing Babies: 11 a.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays; Toddler Time: 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays; Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays; 4 O’Clock Club (K-5): 4 p.m. Thursdays. Edneyville, 685-0110: Family: 10 a.m. Mondays Etowah, 891-6577: Family: 10 a.m. Tuesdays Fletcher, 687-1218: Toddler Time: 10 a.m. Wednesdays; Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Green River, 697-4969: Family: 10 a.m. Thursdays Mills River, 890-1850: Familiy: 10 a.m. Mondays

Barnes & Noble

Asheville Mall, 296-7335: 11 a.m. Mondays and 2 p.m. Saturdays; Biltmore Park Town Square, Asheville, 687-0681: 11 a.m. Saturdays

Spellbound Children’s Bookshop

21 Battery Park Ave., Asheville, 232-2228: 10:30-11 a.m. Saturdays, ages 4-7.

The Health Adventure

800 Brevard Road, Suite 620, A sheville, 665-2217: 3:30 p.m. Monday and Friday.

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growing together

Grief in a casserole dish By Chris Worthy WNC Parent columnist

I chop and slice and listen for the sizzle of olive oil in the skillet. Bread is rising. Casserole dishes wait to be filled. I stir and try to coordinate steps on a recipe I’ve made a hundred times but somehow can’t remember. I will the food to comfort and heal the family that will receive it. Too many times in recent years — though even one would be too many — I’ve sat in a packed church or chapel as a family grieved their child. The sadness is unlike any other. It’s the kind that settles in your bone marrow, filling the crevices and cracks of your being. Any parent feels the sting of anoth-

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er’s loss acutely, I think. I am sure a mental health professional would tell me there are many reasons why: we identify with situation; it is a manifestation of our biggest fears. Yes, I know that to be true. But mostly, I think we are connected to each other by virtue of circumstance and providence. No family does this parenting thing right without surrounding ourselves and our children with others who share our values and want the same things for their children as we do for ours. But that we in this sisterhood of moms could somehow spread the grief on a counter and divide it into manageable bits, each of us taking a part. We could carry our pieces and not be

crushed by the weight. We could say to our friends, “Let us bear it for you. Your child was our child, too.” Together, we could make the path straight and easy, rather than an endless uphill climb. Yet, even as we pray and carry what we can of another mom’s pain, though in shards instead of uniform, neat pieces, I don’t know if it lightens her burden. As the months and years go by, we say her child’s name, we squeeze her hand without a word and we beg that God would grant her peace. Chris Worthy is an attorney who took down her shingle to be a stay-at-home mom. Reach her at chris@worthyplace.com.

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nature center notes

Was that a cougar in the forest?

Bobcats could be mistaken for Eastern cougars in the mountains of WNC. SPECIAL TO

By Hannah Epperson Special to WNC Parent

I saw a cougar! If your child said that to you, you’d likely chalk it up to an active imagination. After all, there aren’t cougars in Western North Carolina anymore. Are there? Every year there are reports of cougar sightings in this region — reports made by adults, who would likely be unhappy if you told them they were imagining things. Is it possible they really saw a cougar? Well, yes, it’s possible. But it’s very unlikely. In 2011, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service concluded that the Eastern cougar — that is, the subspecies of cougar in this part of the country — had been ex-

WNC PARENT

tinct since the 1930s. There is still a small population of another cougar subspecies in southern Florida, commonly called the Florida panther. And there are lots of Western cougars in other parts of the United States. Cougars spotted in our area are probably from one of these other cougar populations and have wandered from their normal range. It’s also possible that they are actually someone’s escaped exotic pet. Sometimes a bobcat may even be mistaken for a cougar. Though it seems hard to

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believe, as a bobcat is much smaller than a cougar, from a distance a large cat in a tree just looks like a large cat in a tree. Perspective can make it difficult to determine exactly how big the cat is. When you visit the WNC Nature Center, be sure to take a stroll through Predator Loop where you can say with absolute certainty, “I saw a cougar!” The WNC Nature Center is at 75 Gashes Creek Road, Asheville. Visit www.wncnaturecenter.com or call 259-8080.

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THERE’S NO BAD

PIZZA

By Kate Justen

WNC Parent columnist

Who doesn’t love pizza? I would guess it is in the top five favorite foods for just about anyone I know. Pizza originated in Naples, Italy, and is traditionally flatbread with tomato sauce and cheese. We add extra cheese and meat, some people even put a vegetable or two on it. But why stop there? When we ask students what they want to make in our FEAST classes, they always ask for pizza. For most of our classes we do not have access to an oven or enough time to make pizza from scratch. So we had to get creative. One way we have done this is to make pizza bread or pizza sandwiches. Because we focus on using fresh produce and working with what we have, students need an open mind when it comes to the toppings they are using on their pizza. Kale, Swiss chard, tomatoes, onion, peppers, carrots, lettuce, fresh herbs and garlic were the options for our January class. Not your traditional pizza, but the students loved it. They even cooked down the tomatoes to make their own sauce. What about those who can’t or shouldn’t eat a lot of bread and cheese? We problem-solved this one by making green pizza wraps with big green leaves. We have used all kinds of greens for these; a variety of lettuces, kale, chard, baby collard greens and cabbage. We all know what we love about pizza. Even when it is not great pizza, we still eat it because it is pizza. A few weeks ago I made a comment to my son about wanting to get good pizza. He looked at me and said, “Mom, is there really such a thing as bad pizza?” Kate Justen is the program director of FEAST — Fresh Easy Affordable Sustainable Tasty, a program of Slow Food Asheville. Contact her at feast.avl@gmail.com or visit www.slowfoodasheville.org.

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FEAST’s Asheville Middle School students have to improvise on making pizza. KATE JUSTEN/SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

Pizza bread

Pizza sauce

1 loaf French bread 1 cup pizza sauce or 1/2 cup pesto 1 cup vegetables of you choice 1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese

1 1/2 cup crushed tomatoes or 3 cups fresh tomato puree* 1 teaspoon fresh basil or 1/2 teaspoon dried 1/2 teaspoon fresh oregano, or 1/4 tespoon dried 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon sugar 1 clove crushed garlic

Cut loaf of bread in half, lengthwise. Layer sauce, vegetables and cheese. Bake at 425 degrees for 12 minutes.

Pizza boats 1 package romaine lettuce hearts 1/4 pound cooked Italian sausage 1-2 cups fresh diced veggies (garlic, onion, bell peppers, zucchini, mushrooms, spinach, kale, tomatoes)

1 cup mozzarella cheese 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese 1 tablespoon olive oil Fresh basil, oregano and/or parlsey

In a sauté pan combine vegetables and oil, sauté over medium heat for 8-10 minutes. Remove vegetables

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Mix all ingredients well and let sit for 5 or more minutes before spreading on crust *When using fresh tomato puree, add the tomatoes to a saucepan and simmer over medium heat until it is a thin sauce, about one hour. Then add remaining ingredients.

from heat, add the cooked Italian sausage and cheeses. Separate the romaine leaves, rinse and dry. Scoop the vegetable mixture into the lettuce leaves Top with additional fresh veggies and herbs.


THINKSTOCK.COM

Sunny citrus makes winter dishes shine By Susan Selasky Detroit Free Press

Things are looking bright and sunny in local grocery stores, thanks to the sweet citrus selection this time of year. And after weeks of holiday meals, it’s time to lighten the load with citrus. Eating fruit is a great way to kick the new year off on a healthy note and cook in season. It’s near peak season for all things orange, tangerine and yellow. There are the snack-size mandarins — such as Clementines and satsumas — that are sweet and easy to eat. Cara Caras are navel oranges with a tangy and sweet balance. Blood oranges are prized for their cranberry tones and their deep red flesh. And don’t forget the old standbys: grapefruit, temple oranges, tangelos and honey bells. All are suitable for eating out of hand, for juicing and for use in cooking. Think vinaigrettes, salads, and pairings with fish and chicken. When choosing citrus, Aaron Wynn of Whole Foods Market in Ann Arbor, Mich., says consider pairing fish with Cara Cara or blood oranges: “Anything with that grapefruit-y and not super sweet taste also goes well with fish.” Larissa Shain, registered dietitian at St. Joseph Mercy Oakland hospital in Pontiac, Mich., likes cooking with lemons and limes. “By using the juices from the lemons and limes, you can use less salt,” Shain says. If you make chili (using no-salt-added tomatoes and tomato sauce, of course), stir in a squeeze of lemon or lime just before serving to enhance flavors. Citrus is full of vitamin C and high in antioxidants, but it’s also a good source of potassium, which Shain says helps lower blood pressure and the risk for stroke. Tips and recipes are on Page 44.

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Slow cooker 40-clove chicken with Meyer lemon taste If you don’t want to 40 cloves of garlic peel 40 cloves of garlic, (about 2 heads), use already peeled, whole peeled garlic cloves.

6 skinless boneless chicken breasts (about 5 ounces each) Freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons olive oil 1/2 cup dry white wine 2 tablespoons fresh chopped parsley 2 tablespoons dry vermouth 2 teaspoons dry basil 1 teaspoon dry oregano Generous pinch of red pepper flakes or to

4 ribs of celery, sliced Juice and zest of 2 Meyer lemons Fresh chopped herbs such as parsley or cilantro for garnish, optional

Sprinkle the chicken with pepper. In a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Working in batches if necessary, add chicken to the skillet and brown on all sides. Remove to platter. Combine wine, parsley,

vermouth, basil, oregano and red pepper flakes in large bowl. Add garlic and celery; mix well. Transfer the garlic and celery to the slow cooker with slotted spoon. Add chicken to remaining herb mixture; coat well. Place chicken on top of celery mixture. Sprinkle lemon juice and peel over chicken. Cover and cook on low for 6 hours. Sprinkle with fresh herbs before serving. Serves 6. Source: Larissa Shain, registered dietitian, St. Joseph Mercy Oakland hospital in Pontiac, Mich. Tested by Susan M. Selasky for the Free Press Test Kitchen.

Citrus salad with dates and walnuts 1/2 cup chopped dates Boiling water 4 tablespoons blood orange or Clementine juice 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon white wine vinegar 1/8 teaspoon ground cumin, optional Salt to taste 1/4 red onion, thinly

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sliced 1 cup Clementine, blood orange or red grapefruit segments 5 cups salad greens 1/2 cup walnuts, toasted and chopped

In heatproof bowl, cover dates with boiling water; let sit for 5 minutes. Strain, reserving 1 teaspoon of the liquid. Place the reserved liquid

in a bowl and add the juice, olive oil, vinegar, cumin and salt to taste. Add dates, onion and Clementine segments; toss with greens and nuts and serve. Serves 4. Source: Adapted from Everyday with Rachael Ray magazine, December 2012 issue. Tested by Susan M. Selasky for the Free Press Test Kitchen.

CITRUS HOW-TOS Ways to prepare and store it: JUICING: You can get more juice out of limes or lemons by microwaving them for 20 seconds or by rolling them under your palm on the countertop. As you press, the segments break down, releasing more juice. You can also use a fork to poke the segments. Freeze leftover juice in ice cube trays, then store in a freezer bag. ZESTING: This means to remove pieces of the outer rind of the fruit. The rind has aromatic oils that enhance and flavor foods. The white pithy part under the peel is bitter. If a recipe calls for the “zest of one lemon,” that means to remove strips of rind from the whole lemon. If the recipe calls for grated lemon zest, you should grate the rind on a box grater, a zester or a rasp-style grater. Store thin or wide strips of lemon zest and grated lemon zest in a freezer-safe container or plastic sealable bag. It will keep for several months. Several kitchen tools remove the zest of lemons easily to avoid the pith: » Rasp-style zesters and graters. Their sharp teeth make removing the peel a snap, and different styles produce fine to coarse grates. » Citrus zesters. These have five tiny but sharp holes in their tips. When you pull the zester across the fruit, little strips of peel come off. » Vegetable peelers. Peel it as if you’re peeling an apple. Don’t dig too deep or you’ll remove the white pith. If this happens, use a paring knife to scrape away pith. SEGMENTING: Use a serrated knife to cut a slice off each end of the fruit, revealing some of the flesh. Stand the fruit on one cut end. Starting at the top of the fruit and cutting to the bottom, slice off pieces of peel along with the pith (you will get some of the flesh), following the curve of the fruit. Cut off any remaining pith. Hold the fruit in your hand over a bowl to catch the juices. Cut on each side of the membrane all the way to the core to cut a segment.

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calendar of events

Things to do

Items for the March calendar are due Feb. 10. Email details to calendar@wncparent.com.

Jan. 28

HENDERSONVILLE CHILDREN’S CHOIR: Winter season includes fiddle songs and music from “Lion King.” Registration starts at 4:15 p.m., with rehearsal 4:30-5:30. $40 per semester with $80 family cap. Register online and find more information at www.hendersonvillechildrenschoir.org. Call July at 696-4968 with questions on financial assistance.

Jan. 28-31

‘THE CIVIL WAR’: Diana Wortham Theatre’s Matinee Series for Students and Families presents “The Civil War,” a production focusing on the stories and individuals caught up in the war that divided the nation. Performances at 10 a.m. and noon, Jan. 28-31. Recommended for students in grades 3-9. Open to school groups, home-schoolers, community groups and families. For tickets and information, call 257-4530 or visit www.dwtheatre.com.

Jan. 29

GAGGLE OF GIGGLES YOUTH IMPROV SHOW: Chris Martin’s Youth Improv Troupe makes its monthly appearance, from 6-7 p.m. at The Hop, 640 Merrimon Ave., Asheville. Visit www.thehopicecreamcafe.com. Have a child interested in joining the crew? Email Martin at cwaremartin@yahoo.com. PARI SCI GIRLS PROGRAM: For girls ages 9-14. Each month’s program will lead young girls to try a different facet of science and bring real connections to that field for their pursuit beyond the monthly program. At the Transylvania 4-H Office, 98 E. Morgan St., Brevard. $10. Register online at www.pari.edu or call 862-5554.

Jan. 30

CRAZY CHEMISTS: Make snow spray with crazy chemists. Ages 3 and older. Limited space. Call 697-8333 to register. Free with $5 admission/free for members. At Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. Visit www.handsonwnc.org. ELIMINATION COMMUNICATION FUNDAMENTALS: Join Andrea Olson, a Diaper Free Baby mentor, as she teaches about elimination communication and how to have a diaper free baby. This is a gentle and non-coercive method of encouraging your babies to be diaper free. $25. From 2-4 p.m. At Nest Organics, 51 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville. Call 2581901 or visit www.nestorganics.com.

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Bright Star Touring Theatre’s “Bella Under the Bigtop” is an all-ages show, with a performance at 10 a.m. Feb. 2 at Asheville Community Theatre. SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

Jan. 31

FAMILY FUN NIGHT: FISH THE MAGISH! Pack Memorial Library presents Fish the Magish and his mind-bending magic for all ages. Free. At 6:30 p.m. at 67 Haywood St., Asheville. Call 250-4720 or email pack.children@buncombecounty.org. LISTEN TO THIS: Asheville Community Theatre offers an original storytelling series with stories and songs from locals. At 7:30 p.m. at 35 E. Walnut St. Tickets $10. Visit www.ashevilletheatre.org. THE SOUND POST STRING BREAKERS: A group of youth fiddle students led by Natalya Weinstein returns to The Hop to show off its musical skills. With a special performance by Americana folk trio Red June. From 6-7:30 p.m. at 640 Merrimon Ave., Asheville. Visit www.thehopicecreamcafe.com.

Feb. 1

HAND IN HAND SPAGHETTI DINNER: Fundraiser for Hand In Hand, Valley Churches helping Valley Schools, 5-7 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church of Swannanoa, 372 Bee Tree Road, Swannanoa. For information or to make carry-out orders, call 6863140. $7 for adults, $4 for kids. Event includes bake sale. All proceeds benefit deserving students in the Owen School District. Snow date is Feb. 8. PLAY & LEARN: Registration starts Feb. 1 for all locations. Parents/caregivers and children ages 3-5 in Buncombe County who are not in regulated child care may attend a free 8-week series 45-minute classes, focusing on pre-literacy and school readiness skills. Must be age 3 by class start date. Younger siblings may attend, but materials are not provided. Register by email or phone. Contact Marna Holland at 350-2904 or marna.holland@asheville.k12.nc.us. Dates and school locations include: » Hominy Valley, 9 a.m. Thursdays, Feb. 7-April 4; » Emma, 10:30 a.m. Thursdays, Feb. 7-April 4; » Leicester, 9 a.m. Fridays, Feb. 8-April 5; » Haw Creek, 9 a.m. Mondays, Feb. 18-April 15; » Estes, 9 a.m. Wednesdays, Feb. 27-April 24; » Asheville City Schools Preschool, 10 or 11 a.m. Tuesdays, Feb. 12-April 9, and 10 or 11 a.m. Wednesdays, Feb. 13-April 10.

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Feb. 2

FACE PAINTING: Free face painting at Asheville’s Fun Depot, noon-5 p.m. No purchase necessary, tips appreciated. Call before arriving to verify event, 277-2386. Visit www.ashevillesfundepot.com. GRADY’S GROUNDHOG DAY: Will Chimney Rock Park’s Grady the Groundhog give the same prediction as Punxsutawney Phil? Or will he give his own prediction about winter’s claim on the weather? Weather permitting, the park offers an educational program on groundhogs and other woodland critters while waiting eagerly to see Grady’s shadow in the Meadows. Guided family hikes on the Great Woodland Adventure trail will follow the program at noon and 12:30 p.m. Kid’s Groundhog Day crafts will be offered from noon-1 p.m. One free youth ages 5-15 with each paid adult ($12); free for under 5. Call 625-9611 or visit www.chimneyrockpark.com. REUTER FAMILY YMCA SWIM LESSONS: Fourweek session of Saturday lessons for parent-child through youth, Feb. 2-23. Register by Jan. 27. Starts at $25. Call 651-9622 or visit www.ymcawnc.org. SATURDAYS AT ACT: Bright Star Touring Theatre brings “Bella Under the Bigtop” and “Harriet Tubman” to Asheville Community Theatre. “Bella” is an all-ages show about a traveling circus that’s hired a new monkey who has a penchant for bullying. Performance at 10 a.m. “Harriet Tubman” celebrates the most famous conductor on the Underground Railroad. Performance at 11:30 a.m. Both at 35 E. Walnut St., Asheville. $5 tickets at the door. Visit www.ashevilletheatre.org. SPACED-OUT SATURDAY: Astronomy for the whole family at the Colburn Earth Science Museum. Fly around the universe in a digital spaceship. This month’s theme is “Heliophysics: The Sun” with lessons on star formation and black holes. Free with admission or membership. At 1 and 3 p.m. at Pack Place, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. Visit www.colburnmuseum.org or call 254-7162.

Feb. 3

WINDOWS ON WALDORF: Open House at 2 p.m. at Azalea Mountain School. Experience Waldorf Education firsthand. Adults can attend a selection of mini-classes led by the school’s teachers while children enjoy craft projects. Refreshments and Q&A will follow. The school offers a pre-K to sixth-grade program based on Waldorf curriculum, at 587 Haywood Road, Asheville. Call 575-2557 or visit www.azaleamountain.org.

Feb. 4

TRY BALLET: Ballet Conservatory offers free dance trial class. At 3:15 p.m. for ages 8-9 ballet. At 5 Points Studios, 6 E. Chestnut St., corner of Broadway, Asheville. RSVP at 255-5777. Visit www.BalletConservatoryofAsheville.com. HENDERSONVILLE YMCA SWIM LESSONS: Fourweek session of Monday/Wednesday lessons for preschool through youth, Feb. 4-27. Register by Jan. 31. Starts at $30. Call 692-5774 or visit www.ymcawnc.org. REUTER FAMILY YMCA SWIM LESSONS: Fourweek session of Monday/Wednesday lessons for parent-child through youth, Feb. 4-27. Register by Jan. 31. Starts at $45. Call 651-9622 or visit

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calendar of events Continued from Page 47 www.ymcawnc.org. WEE NATURALIST: N.C. Arboretum program for ages 2-5 with nature lessons, stories, crafts and visits from classroom animals. Runs 10-11 a.m. Mondays and Tuesdays (explore classroom starting at 9:30 a.m. or at 11 a.m.). $5 if registered online, $6 for drop-ins. Younger siblings and adults free when accompanied by paid participant. Free parking for registered participants. Visit www.ncarboretum.org to register. Contact Michelle Pearce at 665-2492, ext. 243, or mpearce@ncarboretum.org. YWCA SWIM LESSONS: Learn to swim in the YWCA of Asheville’s indoor solar-heated pool. Classes are available year-round for all ages and levels. To sign up, call 254-7206, ext. 110, or stop by the YWCA, 185 S. French Broad Ave. For more information, visit www.ywcaofasheville.org.

Feb. 5

ASHEVILLE CATHOLIC SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE: 10-11:30 a.m. first Tuesday of each month. Call 252-7896 for reservations. For more information, visit www.ashevillecatholic.org or email info@ashevillecatholic.org. HENDERSONVILLE YMCA SWIM LESSONS: Four-

The Health Adventure’s “Smokey Bear & Woodsy Owl: Home Sweet Home” exhibit encourages families to spend time together outdoors and inspires children to discover and care for the natural resources that sustain our world. SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT week session of Tuesday/Thursday lessons for preschool through youth, Feb. 5-28. Register by Jan. 31. Starts at $30. Call 692-5774 or visit www.ymcawnc.org. PRESCHOOL ART LESSONS: Roots + Wings School of Art offers four-week sessions, 1:30-2:30 p.m. Feb. 5-26, for ages 3-6. Focus is on funky landscapes and silly trees using mixed media techniques. $50 per child. Classes at Cathedral of All Souls, Biltmore Village. Register online at www.rootsandwingsarts.com. For information, call 545-4827 or email info@rootsandwingsarts.com. REUTER FAMILY YMCA SWIM LESSONS: Fourweek session of Tuesday/Thursday lessons for parent-child through youth, Feb. 5-28. Register by Jan. 31. Starts at $45. Call 651-9622 or visit www.ymcawnc.org. WEE NATURALIST: N.C. Arboretum program for ages 2-5 with nature lessons, stories, crafts and visits from classroom animals. Runs 10-11 a.m. Mondays and Tuesdays (explore classroom starting at 9:30 a.m. or at 11 a.m.). $5 if registered online, $6 for drop-ins. Younger siblings and adults free when accompanied by paid participant. Free parking for registered participants. Visit www.ncarboretum.org to register. Contact Michelle Pearce at 665-2492, ext. 243, or mpearce@ncarboretum.org.

Feb. 6

JEWISH PRESCHOOL/PRE-K PROGRAM: Registration is open for “A Taste of CHS,” an educational program for Preschool and pre-K children, at Chabad’s Hebrew School of the Arts. Curriculum covers beginning Hebrew language, Jewish music, dance and culture. For ages 3-5. Runs 3:30-5 p.m. Wednesdays, Feb. 6-27. At The Chabad House, 660 Merrimon Ave., Asheville. Call 505-0746, email chana@chabadasheville.org or visit www.chabadasheville.org. SPROUTING NATURALISTS: New preschool-age nature program at Chimney Rock State Park. For ages 2-5. This month’s theme is “Critter Kingdoms.” Learn about burrows, nests, caves and other animal habitats. 10-11:30 a.m. the first Wednesday of the month. Kids 5 and younger, $3; adults, $12; older siblings (ages 6-15), $5.50; passholders, free. Advance registration required. Call 625-9611 weekdays to register. Visit www.chimneyrockpark.com.

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Feb. 7

ACA UPPER SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE: Visit the Upper School (grades 9-12) of Asheville Christian Academy, 9-11 a.m., 74 Riverwood Road, Swannanoa. Drop-ins welcome, but registration is encouraged. Register at www.acacademy.org. Call 581-2200. ART LESSONS: Roots + Wings School of Art offers four-week sessions, 4-5 p.m. Feb. 7-28, for grades K-5. Focus is on exploring symbols in art through drawing, painting and printmaking. $50 per child. Classes at Cathedral of All Souls, Biltmore Village. Register online at www.rootsandwingsarts.com. For information, call 545-4827 or email info@rootsandwingsarts.com. INTRO TO BREAST-FEEDING: One-day intensive class gives an in-depth introduction to the ins and outs of becoming a breast-feeding mom. Taught by IBCLC Michelle Shelfer. $35. From 1:30-3 p.m. at Nest Organics, 51 N. Lexington Ave. Asheville. Call 2581901 to register. Visit www.nestorganics.com.

Feb. 8

TRY BALLET OR TAP DANCE: Ballet Conservatory offers free dance trial classes. At 3 p.m. ages 5-6 ballet; 3:15 p.m. ages 6-8 tap; 4:45 p.m. ages 9-12 tap. At 5 Points Studios, 6 E. Chestnut St., corner of Broadway, Asheville. RSVP at 255-5777. Visit www.balletconservatoryofasheville.com. HEALTHY MAMA, HEALTHY BABY: Cultivate new skills, tools and insights for pregnancy and postpartum care using the teachings of Chinese medicine. Taught by Dov Shoneman L.Ac MTCM. Free. From 1-2:30 p.m. at Nest Organics, 51 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville. Call 258-1901 to register. Visit www.nestorganics.com.

Feb. 9

FACE PAINTING: Free face painting at Asheville’s Fun Depot, 1-5 p.m. No purchase necessary, tips appreciated. Call before arriving to verify event, 277-2386. Visit www.ashevillesfundepot.com. FLETCHER FATHER-DAUGHTER DANCE: Two dances, 3:30-5:30 p.m. and 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Calvary Episcopal Church. $22 for Fletcher residents, $26 for nonresidents. Visit www.fletcherparks.org.

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Kids’ page

WNC PARENT DRAWING BY JEFF RUMINSKI

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calendar of events Continued from Page 48 FROG LOVE IN THE PINK BEDS: Indoor program on wood frogs and amphibian conservation, followed by an outdoor exploration in the winter woods. From 1–4 p.m. at Cradle of Forestry in America, Pisgah National Forest near Brevard. Call 877-3130 or visit www.cradleofforestry.org. SLEEP SENSE: Meggan Hartman, MA and infant sleep consultant, leads workshop about the uncertainties of infant sleep. Learn about your child’s changing sleep patterns and gentle tips for developing healthy sleep habits. 11 a.m.-noon at Nest Organics, 51 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville. Call 258-1901 for information.

Feb. 10

VERITAS OPEN HOUSE: Veritas Christian Academy hosts a drop-in community open house, 2-4 p.m. at the school, 17 Cane Creek Road, Fletcher. Call 681-0546 or visit www.veritasnc.org.

Feb. 11

ASHEVILLE YMCA SWIM LESSONS: Session for pre-K and youth, Mondays and Wednesdays, Feb. 11-March 6. Registration deadline is Feb. 7 (with late registration fee of $20). Starts at $45. Call 210-9605 or visit www.ymcawnc.org. CELEBRATE PREGNANCY CLASS: The Baby Place at Park Ridge Health offers a twist on a

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normal childbirth class, covering important labor process and support techniques, dealing with pregnancy ailments, breast-feeding and newborn care. Includes a massage voucher with the $65 fee. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. at The Health Adventure, Biltmore Square Mall, 800 Brevard Road, Call 681-2229 or visit www.parkridgebabies.com to register. WEE NATURALIST: N.C. Arboretum program for ages 2-5 with nature lessons, stories, crafts and visits from classroom animals. Runs 10-11 a.m. Mondays and Tuesdays (explore classroom starting at 9:30 a.m. or at 11 a.m.). $5 if registered online, $6 for drop-ins. Younger siblings and adults free when accompanied by paid participant. Free parking for registered participants. Visit www.ncarboretum.org to register. Contact Michelle Pearce at 665-2492, ext. 243, or mpearce@ncarboretum.org.

Feb. 12

ASHEVILLE YMCA SWIM LESSONS: Session for pre-K and youth, Tuesdays and Thursdays, Feb. 12-March 7. Registration deadline is Feb. 8 (with late registration fee of $20). Starts at $45. Call 210-9605 or visit www.ymcawnc.org. WEE NATURALIST: N.C. Arboretum program for ages 2-5 with nature lessons, stories, crafts and visits from classroom animals. Runs 10-11 a.m. Mondays and Tuesdays (explore classroom starting at 9:30 a.m. or at 11 a.m.). $5 if registered online, $6 for drop-ins. Younger siblings and adults free when accompanied by paid participant. Free parking for registered participants. Visit www.ncarboretum.org to register. Contact Michelle Pearce at 665-2492, ext. 243, or mpearce@ncarboretum.org.

Feb. 13

FIRST LEGO LEAGUE ROBOTICS: Design, build and program NXT FLL robots. For ages 10-14. Classes meet 3-5 p.m. second and fourth Wednesdays, at 94 Coxe Ave., Asheville. This is a STEM educational activity. Parental participation encouraged. To learn more, call 258-2038. OPEN HOUSE: Rainbow Mountain Children’s school offers an open house, 3-6 p.m. at 574 Haywood Road, West Asheville. Visit www.rmcs.org.

Feb. 14

TRY BALLET OR JAZZ: Ballet Conservatory offers free dance class. At 3:15 p.m. age 6-7 ballet and 4 p.m. age 6-8 jazz. At 5 Points Studios, 6 E. Chestnut St., corner of Broadway, Asheville. RSVP at 2555777. Visit www.BalletConservatoryofAsheville.com.

Feb. 15

PEDIATRIC CARE: Learn the wisdom of Chinese medicine and pediatric massage (tui-na), energetic dietary nutrition and herbs. Taught by Dov Shoneman L.Ac MTCM. Free. From 1-2:30 p.m. at Nest Organics, 51 N. Lexington Ave. Call 258-1901 to register. Visit www.nestorganics.com. SING TOGETHER: Celebrate the month of love with songs that touch your heart during Intersections Sing Together Series, “Love Songs & Lullabies,” led by Beth Magill. At 6:30 p.m. in The Forum at Pack Place, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. Tickets: Adult $8; children 12 and under $6. Registration recommended. For information and to register, contact

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Rae at 210-9837 or rae@dwtheatre.com or visit www.dwtheatre.com/intersections. YO GABBA GABBA LIVE!: The award-winning Nickelodeon TV show presents “Get the Sillies Out!” at Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. Performances at 3 and 6 p.m. Tickets start at $25. Visit www.ticketmaster.com or www.yogabbagabbalive.com.

Feb. 16

ASHEVILLE YMCA SWIM LESSONS: Session for pre-K and youth, Saturdays, Feb. 16-March 9. Registration deadline is Feb. 14 (with late registration fee of $20). Starts at $25. Call 210-9605 or visit www.ymcawnc.org. FACE PAINTING: Free face painting at Asheville’s Fun Depot, noon-5 p.m. No purchase necessary, tips appreciated. Call before arriving to verify event, 277-2386. Visit www.ashevillesfundepot.com. POLAR BEAR PLUNGE FOR MEALS ON WHEELS: The Asheville Racquet Club will host the fifth-annual Polar Bear Plunge to benefit Meals On Wheels of Asheville and Buncombe County, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. at the club off Hendersonville Road in South Asheville. A family-friendly event with polar bears dressed in outrageous costumes as they execute less-thanOlympic style dives, belly flops and cannonballs from the diving board. Polar Bear Plunge is open to anyone (age 13-16 only with parental consent) willing to raise at least $150 (the cost of one month’s worth of meals for the elderly) and brave the icy water of the club’s outdoor swimming pool. With a post-jump chili lunch, $5. Open to the public. For information, Call ARC at 274-3361 or Meals On

Wheels of Asheville and Buncombe County at 253-5286 or visit www.mowabc.org. SAT PRACTICE TEST: The Reynolds High School PTSO is sponsoring a communitywide SAT Practice Test for students from any area high school/home school. The practice test will be offered 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m., with check-in beginning at 8:30 a.m. inside the school’s front doors. Students should bring pencils, a graphing calculator and any water or snacks they might want during the four-hour test. Admission is $10 at the door. The test is free from Kaplan; all proceeds support the PTSO. Advance registration is strongly encouraged by calling 1-800-KAPTEST, but students can register at the door. The snow make-up date will be Feb. 23. SIBLING CLASS, “MY MOM’S HAVING A BABY”: Class designed for young siblings, ages 3-8. Includes a discussion of pregnancy at the child's level; what it means to be a sibling; a chance to make a gift for self and new baby. Free. Held third Saturday of the month at Mission Hospital, Room A-649. For information, contact Mission Children’s Hospital’s Child Life Department at 213-8302. WEE TRADE: Consignment sale with 45,000 square feet of gently used children’s items. Clothing sizes range from infant to juniors, plus maternity. Sale items also include books, toys, children’s furniture and equipment. Sale runs Feb. 16-17 and 22-23. Shop 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Feb. 16. At WNC Ag Center Davis Event Center, Fletcher. Visit www.wee-trade.net.

Feb. 17

BALLET CONSERVATORY OF ASHEVILLE SUMMER INTENSIVE: Auditions for program June

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24-July 20 geared toward talented dancers ages 10 and older. Daily classes with concentrated, professional instruction in ballet, pointe, variations, partnering, boy’s class, modern, jazz, hip-hop, Pilates, acting for dancers, nutrition, injury prevention, and ballet history. Admission by audition or video. At 5 Points Studios, 6 E. Chestnut St. Visit www.balletconservatoryofasheville.com or call 255-5777. JEWISH TEENS WORKSHOP: Registration is open for Chabad House’s JLI Teens course, “Jewish Revolutions: Building a Better World.” This series explores Judaism’s take on modern causes such as social justice, world peace, freedom, and the environment. For ages 13+. $85. At 6:45 p.m. Sundays 6:45 pm., Feb 17-April 7. At the Chabad House, 660 Merrimon Ave., Asheville. Call 505-0746 or visit www.chabadasheville.org. WEE TRADE: Consignment sale with 45,000 square feet of gently used children’s items. Clothing sizes range from infant to juniors, plus maternity. Sale items also include books, toys, children’s furniture and equipment. Sale runs Feb. 16-17 and 22-23. Shop noon-6 p.m. Feb. 17. At WNC Ag Center Davis Event Center, Fletcher. Visit www.wee-trade.net.

Feb. 18

FAMILY GROUP NIGHT: Family Support Network of WNC at Mission Children’s Hospital and St. Gerard House host meeting with group meal for whole families experiencing special needs in Henderson and surrounding counties. Families split into groups (parents, siblings, child care, children with special

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calendar of events Continued from Page 55 needs, youth with special needs) after dinner to sthare stories, play games and gather resources. Free. Meets every third Monday, 5:30-7:30 p.m. at St. Gerard House, 620 Oakland St., Hendersonville. To register for group or for more information, contact Kate Glance at 213-9787 or kate.glance@msj.org. Visit www.stgerardhouse.com. WEE NATURALIST: N.C. Arboretum program for ages 2-5 with nature lessons, stories, crafts and visits from classroom animals. Runs 10-11 a.m. Mondays and Tuesdays (explore classroom starting at 9:30 a.m. or at 11 a.m.). $5 if registered online, $6 for drop-ins. Younger siblings and adults free when accompanied by paid participant. Free parking for registered participants. Visit www.ncarboretum.org to register. Contact Michelle Pearce at 665-2492, ext. 243, or mpearce@ncarboretum.org.

Feb. 19

TODDLER SLEEP CLASS: Meggan Hartman, MA and infant sleep consultant, leads workshop for parents with children ages 12-36 months. Class covers transition from crib to toddler bed, sleep issues related to potty training, nightmares, preschool and new siblings, as well as developmental milestones. $15. At 11 a.m. at Mod Sprog, 830 Hendersonville Road, Suite 2, Asheville. Visit www.megganhartman.com. WEE NATURALIST: N.C. Arboretum program for

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ages 2-5 with nature lessons, stories, crafts and visits from classroom animals. Runs 10-11 a.m. Mondays and Tuesdays (explore classroom starting at 9:30 a.m. or at 11 a.m.). $5 if registered online, $6 for drop-ins. Younger siblings and adults free when accompanied by paid participant. Free parking for registered participants. Visit www.ncarboretum.org to register. Contact Michelle Pearce at 665-2492, ext. 243, or mpearce@ncarboretum.org.

Feb. 21

AUTISM PARENT SUPPORT GROUP: Buncombe County Chapter of the Autism Society of NC offers a parent support group, open to all parents, caregivers and advocates. Meetings are 6:15 p.m. the third Thursday of the month at the Autism Society of North Carolina office, 306 Summit St, Asheville. Child care provided upon request. To register or for more information, please contact chapter leader Lisa Pickering at lisarogerkaelyn@gmail.com. TIPS FOR SUCCESSFUL PUMPING: Are you a working mom who breast-feeds? Are you a stay-athome mom who wants to store milk? Are you somewhere in between? Does pumping feel overwhelming? If so, this class is for you. Join Michelle Shelfer, IBCLC, as she walks you through how to successfully pump. $25. Noon-1 p.m. at Nest Organics, 51 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville. Call to register, 258-1901. Visit www.nestorganics.com.

Feb. 22

WEE TRADE: Consignment sale with 45,000 square feet of gently used children’s items. Clothing sizes range from infant to juniors, plus maternity. Sale

items also include books, toys, children’s furniture and equipment. Sale runs Feb. 22-23. Restock sale, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Feb. 22. At WNC Ag Center Davis Event Center, Fletcher. Visit www.wee-trade.net.

Feb. 23

FACE PAINTING: Free face painting at Asheville’s Fun Depot, 1-5 p.m. No purchase necessary, tips appreciated. Call before arriving to verify event, 277-2386. Visit www.ashevillesfundepot.com. NESTING PARTY: Learn about cloth diapering, baby wearing and importance of chemical-free living. Free. 2-4 p.m. at Nest Organics, 51 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville. Call 258-1901 or visit www.nestorganics.com. NORTH BUNCOMBE CHILLY CHALLENGE 8K: North Buncombe Middle School PTO hosts the Chilly Challenge 8K timed race and 1-mile fun run, starting at 10 a.m. Starts at school, 51 N. Buncombe School Road, Weaverville. Part of Asheville Track Club Grand Prix race series. Post-race chili cookoff. Registration includes long-sleeve T-shirt and chili tasting. Register at www.active.com or at school website. OLD FARMER’S BALL — YMCA SATURDAY NIGHT DANCE: Community event with contra dancing, square dancing and similar kinds of traditional folk dance, rooted in old-time Appalachian music and other styles of traditional fiddle music. Family dance for families with kids ages 5-11 is 6-7:30 p.m. Contra dance for teens and adults is 8-10 p.m. with beginner lesson at 7:30. At Asheville YMCA, 30 Woodfin St. Visit www.oldfarmersball.com/ymca/index.php WEE TRADE: Consignment sale with 45,000 square feet of gently used children’s items. Clothing sizes

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range from infant to juniors, plus maternity. Sale items also include books, toys, children’s furniture and equipment. Sale runs 8 a.m.-3 p.m. with many items discounted 50 percent. At WNC Ag Center Davis Event Center, Fletcher. Visit www.wee-trade.net.

Feb. 24

CELEBRATE PREGNANCY CLASS: The Baby Place at Park Ridge Health offers a twist on a normal childbirth class, covering important labor process and support techniques, dealing with pregnancy ailments, breast-feeding and newborn care. Includes a massage voucher with the $65 fee. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. at The Health Adventure, Biltmore Square Mall, 800 Brevard Road, Call 681-2229 or visit www.parkridgebabies.com to register.

Feb. 25

WEE NATURALIST: N.C. Arboretum program for ages 2-5 with nature lessons, stories, crafts and visits from classroom animals. Runs 10-11 a.m. Mondays and Tuesdays (explore classroom starting at 9:30 a.m. or at 11 a.m.). $5 if registered online, $6 for drop-ins. Younger siblings and adults free when accompanied by paid participant. Free parking for registered participants. Visit www.ncarboretum.org to register. Contact Michelle Pearce at 665-2492, ext. 243, or mpearce@ncarboretum.org.

Feb. 26

PARI SCI GIRLS PROGRAM: For girls ages 9-14. Each month’s program will lead young girls to try a

different facet of science and bring real connections to that field for their pursuit beyond the monthly program. At the Transylvania 4-H Office, 98 E. Morgan St., Brevard. $10. Register online at www.pari.edu or call 862-5554. WEE NATURALIST: N.C. Arboretum program for ages 2-5 with nature lessons, stories, crafts and visits from classroom animals. Runs 10-11 a.m. Mondays and Tuesdays (explore classroom starting at 9:30 a.m. or at 11 a.m.). $5 if registered online, $6 for drop-ins. Younger siblings and adults free when accompanied by paid participant. Free parking for registered participants. Visit www.ncarboretum.org to register. Contact Michelle Pearce at 665-2492, ext. 243, or mpearce@ncarboretum.org.

Feb. 27

FIRST LEGO LEAGUE ROBOTICS: Design, build and program NXT FLL robots. For ages 10-14. Classes meet 3-5 p.m. second and fourth Wednesdays, at 94 Coxe Ave., Asheville. This is a STEM educational activity. Parental participation encouraged. To learn more, call 258-2038.

March 2

FACE PAINTING: Free face painting at Asheville’s Fun Depot, noon-5 p.m. No purchase necessary, tips appreciated. Call before arriving to verify event, 277-2386. Visit www.ashevillesfundepot.com. NATIONAL GIRLS AND WOMEN IN SPORTS DAY: A community event designed to expose women and girls to a variety of activities that will inspire them to lead active, healthy lives. Open to women and girls ages 6 and older as a chance to try a new sport or

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fitness class, or build skills in a sport of interest. Early registration is $10 per person until Feb. 15. Late registration is $15/person. Fees include three clinics, T-shirt and goody bag, healthy lunch and door prizes. Guest speaker is Julie Wunder from WLOSTV13, an Emmy award-winning meteorologist, journalist, runner and healthy-living role model. Event runs 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m. at UNC Asheville. Registration recommended. To register, contact Jessica Johnston at the Stephens-Lee Recreation Center at 350-2058 or jjohnston@ashevillenc.gov. For more information about the event, contact Christen McNamara at 251-4029 or outdoorprograms@ashevillenc.gov. REUTER FAMILY YMCA SWIM LESSONS: Fourweek session of Saturday lessons for parent-child through youth, March 2-23. Register by Feb. 24. Starts at $25. Call 651-9622 or visit www.ymcawnc.org. SPACED-OUT SATURDAY: Astronomy for the whole family at the Colburn Earth Science Museum. Fly around the universe in a digital spaceship. This month’s theme is “Beyond the Solar System.” Free with admission or membership. At 1 and 3 p.m. at Pack Place, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. Visit www.colburnmuseum.org or call 254-7162. WNC PARENT CAMP EXPO: The third-annual Summer Camp Expo and Family Fun Day, with dozens of camps to discover. Learn about overnight and day camps, traditional and sports camps, academic and special needs camps. Plus family fun with live entertainment, bounce house, face painting, balloons, prizes, giveaways and more. Plus, a photo

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calendar of events

PARENTS’ NIGHTS OUT

Continued from Page 57 session to help us pick future WNC Parent Cover Kids. From 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at UNC Asheville’s Sherrill Center, One University Heights, Asheville. Visit www.citizen-times.com/CampExpo.

March 4

REUTER FAMILY YMCA SWIM LESSONS: Fourweek session of Monday/Wednesday lessons for parent-child through youth, March 4-27. Register by Feb. 28. Starts at $45. Call 651-9622 or visit www.ymcawnc.org.

March 5

ASHEVILLE CATHOLIC SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE: 10-11:30 a.m. first Tuesday of each month. Call 252-7896 for reservations. For more information, visit www.ashevillecatholic.org or email info@ashevillecatholic.org. REUTER FAMILY YMCA SWIM LESSONS: Fourweek session of Tuesday/Thursday lessons for parent-child through youth, March 5-28. Register by Feb. 28. Starts at $45. Call 651-9622 or visit www.ymcawnc.org.

March 6

SPROUTING NATURALISTS: New preschool-age nature program at Chimney Rock State Park. For ages 2-5. This month’s theme is “Animals and Their Babies.” Learn about differences between baby and adult animals. 10-11:30 a.m. the first Wednesday of the month. Kids 5 and younger, $3; adults, $12; older siblings (ages 6-15), $5.50; passholders, free. Advance registration required. Call 625-9611 weekdays to register. Visit www.chimneyrockpark.com.

March 8

COLBURN EARTH SCIENCE MUSEUM: Kids’ Night at the Museum with activities, games, crafts, dinner and hands-on science lessons. This month, learn about “Weird, Wild and Wacky.” For grades K-4. $20 nonmembers, $16 members and siblings. 5-9 p.m. in Pack Place, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. Register by phone at 254-7162. Visit www.colburnmuseum.org for more information. “THE LITTLE PRINCE”: Flat Rock Playhouse’s YouTheatre performs Antoine de Saint Exupery’s story of a

Need a date night? Here is a roundup of upcoming parents’ nights out. Have an event to submit? Email information to calendar@wncparent.com.

FEB. 2

ASHEVILLE DOWNTOWN YMCA: For ages 2-13. Themed nights include swimming, healthy snacks, games and crafts. 6-10 p.m. the first Saturday of each month at the Downtown YMCA, 30 Woodfin St., Asheville. $15 members/$23 nonmembers, with $2 sibling discount. Register online at www.ymcawnc.org. Call 210-9622 or email cemrick@ymcawnc.org for more information.

FEB. 8

COLBURN EARTH SCIENCE MUSEUM: Kids’ Night at the Museum with activities, games, crafts, dinner and hands-on science lessons. This month, learn about “Taking Flight.” For grades K-4. $20 nonmembers, $16 members and siblings. 5-9 p.m. in Pack Place, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. Register by phone at 2547162. Visit www.colburnmuseum.org for more information. FIRED UP! CREATIVE LOUNGE: Kids paint pottery, have pizza and play games, 6-9 p.m.

world-weary and disenchanted Aviator and a mysterious, regal “little man.” At Downtown Playhouse, Hendersonville. Runs through March 17. $10 for students, $18 for adults. Visit www.flatrockplayhouse.org.

March 9

HEALTHY PARKS, HEALTHY YOU 5K FUN RUN/ WALK: Buncombe County Parks, Greenways and Recreation Services hosts the fourth-annual event open to adults and children of all ages. Race starts at 10:30 a.m. on the Buncombe County Sports Park track in Candler. Find mail-in registration forms online at www.buncombecounty.org/parks or call for a form. Registration available day of race start-

the second Friday of the month. At 26 Wall St., Asheville, and 321 N. Main St., Hendersonville. Ages 5-12. $25. Registration required. Call Asheville shop at 253-8181 and Hendersonville shop at 698-9960.

FEB. 9

HAHN’S GYMNASTICS: For children ages 3-12, with pizza dinner and gymnasticsrelated games and activities. $15 for first child, $10 for each sibling if enrolled at Hahn’s ($20/$15 if not enrolled). From 5:30 p.m.-midnight. Call 684-8832 to register.

FEB. 15

PROVIDENCE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY: For ages 5-14. From 6-10 p.m. with dinner 6-7 p.m. Games, crafts and movies. $15 per child. At 48 Woodland Hills Rd, Asheville. Call 658-8964 to reserve a spot.

FEB. 22

WOODFIN YMCA: Neighborhood Y at Woodfin offers Parents’ Night Out the fourth Friday of each month, 6-9 p.m. Themed nights include healthy snacks, games and crafts. $12 member/$18 nonmember, with $2 sibling discount. Ages 2-13. Register online at www.ymcawnc.org or in person at 40 N. Merrimon Ave., Suite 101, Asheville. Call 505-3990.

ing at 8:30 a.m. $12 for adults and $7 for children ages 4-15. Walkers are welcome to bring baby joggers, but no dogs or bikes are permitted on the track during race time. For more information and registration forms, call Jay Nelson at 250-4269 or email him at jay.nelson@buncombecounty.org.

March 11

ASHEVILLE YMCA SWIM LESSONS: Session for pre-K and youth, Mondays and Wednesdays, March 11-April 3. Registration deadline is March 7 (with late registration fee of $20). Starts at $45. Call 210-9605 or visit www.ymcawnc.org.

March 12

ASHEVILLE YMCA SWIM LESSONS: Session for pre-K and youth, Tuesdays and Thursdays, March 12-April 4. Registration deadline is March 8 (with late registration fee of $20). Starts at $45. Call 210-9605 or visit www.ymcawnc.org.

Ongoing

HEALTH ADVENTURE PROGRAMS: Free with admission. At the museum, in Biltmore Square Mall, at 800 Brevard Road, Suite 620. Call 665-2217 or visit www.thehealthadventure.org. » Smokey Bear & Woodsy Owl: Home Sweet Home: Exhibit encourages families to spend time together outdoors and inspires children to discover and care for the natural resources that sustain our world — our home sweet home. The exhibit was

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BASEBALL AND SOFTBALL REGISTRATION

Continued from Page 58 developed by The Betty Brinn Children’s Museum of Milwaukee in collaboration with the US Forest Service. » Science Wonders on Wednesday: Science demonstrations of all kinds, on topics from electricity, sound, the body, more. At 3:30 p.m. Wednesdays. » Preschool Play Date: Interactive fun just for preschoolers, 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. » Science Wonders on Weekends: Experiment with science through hands-on activities led by museum facilitators. All ages. Two times, noon-1 p.m. and 3-4 p.m. Saturdays. CONNECT: INCREASING SOCIAL FLEXIBILITY THROUGH ACTIONS AND THOUGHTS: Class at St. Gerard House, 620 Oakland St., Hendersonville, to learn how thoughts, actions and reactions affect social situations. Classes are interactive and age appropriate. Curriculum incorporates social thinking lessons and characters, uses evidence-based practices, games, role play and skits. Call 693-4223, ext. 21, for information. St. Gerard House provides services for children with autism spectrum diagnosis but a child and/or adolescent in class does not need to be diagnosed. CLOGGING CLASSES: Classes for all ages, skill levels with The Asheville Clogging Company. Ages 5 and up. Email ashley@ashevillecloggingcompany.com or call 329-3856. Visit ashevillecloggingcompany.com MUSIC WORKSHOP: Singer/songwriter Sonia Brooks hosts free music workshop for children, 11 a.m.-noon Saturdays at Grateful Steps Bookstore, 159 S. Lexington Ave. Walk-ins welcome. Donations accepted. Call Sonia at 380-0275 with questions. PARENTS’ MORNING OUT: Enjoy a few hours to yourself each week while your child develops valuable social and play

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East Asheville Little League: 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Feb. 9 and 16 at East Asheville Recreation Center, 906 Tunnel Road. $65. Visit www.eayouthsports.org. Fletcher baseball and softball: 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Jan. 19 and 26 at Fletcher First Baptist Fellowship Building; 2-6 p.m. at Dick’s Sporting Goods, Asheville. $100 per player (maximum $200 per family). Visit www.fletcheryouth sports.baberuthonline.com. North Asheville Little League: 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Feb. 2 and 9 at North Asheville Community Center, 37 E. Larchmont Drive. Visit www.northashevillelittle league.com. South Asheville Little League: 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Feb. 2, 9 and 16 at Oakley Community Center, 749 Fairview Road.

Visit www.salittleleague.net. South Buncombe baseball and softball: 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Feb. 16 and 23 at Valley Springs Middle School cafeteria. Visit www.sbraa.baberuth online.com. Swannanoa Babe Ruth Baseball and Softball: 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturdays in January and February at Swannanoa Burger King. For ages 4-15. $45 with sibling discounts available. Email SwannanoaBabeRuth@gmail.com for more information. West Asheville Little League: 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturdays in February at West Asheville Community Center, 970 Haywood Road. Visit www.eteamz. com/westashevillelittleleague2/ or email info@wavlball.com.

SOCCER REGISTRATION Henderson County Parks and Recreation: Coed, ages 5-18 (as of Aug. 1, 2012). New players must submit birth certificate. $70. Returning Fall 2012 players with uniform will receive $20

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discount. Register by Feb. 24. Practices begin week of March 25. Call 697-4884, email lrice@hendersoncountync.org or visit www.hendersoncounty recreation.org.


skills in agroup environment. Now accepting children from 6 months-4 years old. At St. Eugene Catholic Church, 72 Culvern St., North Asheville. For information, call Jennifer Leiter at 450-1922 or PMO directly at 254-5193, ext. 25. ASHEVILLE YOUTH ENSEMBLE: Fall music series has a train theme, complete with train whistles for every student. New young musicians welcome with at least one year of note reading experience playing violin, viola, cello, bass, flute, recorder and percussion (percussion section also open to piano players). Ensemble meets 4-5 p.m. Tuesdays in East Asheville. For more information or to join contact Lisa Smith at 299-4856 or AshevilleYouthEnsemble@gmail.com. PRENATAL BONDING: Relaxing 1-hour weekly program in West Asheville with prenatal specialist. Donation suggested. For more information, contact Emma at 255-5648 or emma@gentletouchparentchild.com. SMOKY MOUNTAIN CHESS CLUB: Meets 2-4 p.m. Thursdays at Blue Ridge Books, 152 S. Main St., Waynesville. Players of all levels welcome. Call 456-6000. THE TREE HOUSE DROP-OFF: Hourly service for ages 12 months-8 years. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. $8 per hour, siblings $6 per hour; threehour maximum. At 1020 Merrimon Ave., Asheville. Visit http://ashevilletreehouse.com or call 505-2589. STEPHENS-LEE RECREATION CENTER PROGRAMS: At 30 George Washington Carver St., Asheville. Through Asheville Parks, Recreation and Cultural Arts. Call 350-2058. » Afternoon Adventures: For grades K-5, 2:455:30 p.m. Homework help, recreation. $13 per week. » Tiny Tykes: Toddler program with crafts, centers,

play in the gym. 10 a.m.-noon Wednesday and Friday. $1 per class. Join the Tiny Tykes Club for multiclass rates. Contact Jessica Johnston at 350-2058 or jjohnston@ashevillenc.gov. CELEBRATION SINGERS OF ASHEVILLE: Singers ages 7-14 may join Asheville’s community chorus. Rehearsals 6-7:45 p.m. Thursdays at First Congregational Church, Downtown Asheville. Call Ginger Haselden at 230-5778. Visit www.singasheville.org. CHABAD HEBREW SCHOOL OF THE ARTS: Enrollment now open for Chabad Hebrew School of the Arts, a combination Sunday School and Hebrew School Program. Sibling discounts available. For ages 3-13. Sundays 10 a.m.-noon. September-May. At the Chabad House, 660 Merrimon Ave., Asheville. Call 505-0746 or visit www.chabadasheville.org. YWCA AFTER-SCHOOL PROGRAM: Registration is open for the 5-star program for grades K-6. Program runs 2:30-6 p.m. Monday-Friday at the YWCA, 185 S. French Broad Ave. With transportation from area schools. Participants receive homework assistance, and participate in enrichment activities such as swimming lessons, gardening, dance and field trips. Space is limited. $70/week for YWCA members and $104/week for nonmembers. Visit www.ywcaofasheville.org or call CiCi Weston at 254-7206, ext. 111. T-BONE’S RADIO ACTIVE KIDS: Stories, music, contests, interviews and all things for families. 8-10 a.m. Saturdays on www.ashevillefm.org. CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS, ON EAGLES WINGS MINISTRIES: A local nonprofit that operates a safe home for domestic victims of sex trafficking ages 12-17, Hope House, needs daytime volunteers to assist with transportation and help with its home school program. Visit www.oewm.net.

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WNC Parent February