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PUBLISHED BY ACTIVE INTEREST MEDIA SATURDAY, JANUARY 30, 2016

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE 2016 SIA SNOW SHOW

Women to Watch LEADERS WHO ARE CHANGING THE FACE OF SNOW SPORTS (P.22)

THE FASHION ISSUE

What’s Trending:

Athlete Designers (P. 14) Trends: 70s Style, Technical Edge (P. 20) Women’s: High-Tech, Feminine Touch (P. 28) High-End Design: A Touch of Drama (P. 30)

On-Snow Demo Guide

Everything you need to know to slay the On-Snow Demo/SkiRide Fest at Copper Mountain. (Insert)

QUESTION OF THE DAY

“It’s been tough being a fan of both Minnesota and Denver. Hopefully this is our year.”

—Richard Allen, Vintage Ski World (p. 42)

Get Social

Stay in touch on Facebook, Instagram & Twitter during the Snow Show, Industry + Intelligence and On-Snow Demo: #SIA16, #SIAintel


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BOOTH #2565


PHOTOCHROMIC

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IN THE ISSUE | UP FRONT

Contents

3 Photos: Party Time

3

Letting loose after the Show floor closes.

4 Show News

EDITOR Lindsay Konzak ART DIRECTOR Jackie McCaffrey Bradley

Tesla POW breakfast keynote; the greenest shop.

6 Photos: On the Floor

CONTRIBUTORS Kailee Bradstreet, Eugene Buchanan, Krista Crabtree, Connor W. Davis, Greg Ditrinco, Jordan Gaines, Ben Gavelda, Courtney Holden, Crystal Sagan, Eric Smith, Michael Sudmeier, Morgan Tilton, Bevin Wallace, Dave Zook

Happenings in the aisles.

8 Snowboard Update

Four on the Floor; technology that gives back.

14 Athlete Designers

ADVERTISING SALES Sharon Burson, Andy Hawk

Brands kick collaborations with pros into turbo drive, with more athletes doubling as designers.

ADVERTISING COORDINATOR/ EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT Lori Ostrow

20 Fashion Trends

Find 70s influence with a technical edge in 201617 style on the Show floor.

22

PUBLISHER Andy Hawk

GROUP PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Barb Van Sickle

OIWC Awards

PRODUCTION Caitlin O’Connor

Meet the dynamic winners of this year's Pioneering Woman and First Ascent awards. 29

PREPRESS TECHNICIAN Idania Mentana

14

24

Industry Leaders

2016 Women to Watch and Retailers of the Year.

26

Market Overview

28

Women's Outerwear

29

Midlayers

30

High-End Luxury

The latest research on Nordic and AT sales.

Read the digital version of the Snow Show Preview at snewsnet.com or snowsports.org. Snow Show Preview is part of Active Interest Media’s Outdoor Group Kent Ebersole, Vice President, General Manager Allen Crolius, Vice President of Sales and Marketing

High-tech meets feminine styling in this growing category.

30 38

Performance on the slopes and off.

31

Base layers

A focus on lIghtweight and breathable fabrics.

Exhibitor List 34 Craft Distilleries 32

The best places to get a handcrafted cocktail.

Wish List 36 Event Calendar 38 Show News 35

Backcountry culture in the media; meet Kari Traa; the oldest ski shop; Taro Tomai's K2 collab.

Question of the Day 42 Heard in the Aisles 42

FOR A LIST OF THE AWESOME WOMEN ON THE COVER, SEE PAGE 42.

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SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 3 SIAsnowshow.com

EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN Efrem Zimbalist III PRESIDENT & CEO Andrew W. Clurman EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT & CFO Brian J. Sellstrom EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS Patricia B. Fox SVP, DIGITAL & DATA Jonathan Dorn VICE PRESIDENT, FINANCE Craig Rucker VICE PRESIDENT, CONTROLLER Joseph Cohen VICE PRESIDENT, RESEARCH Kristy Kaus Copyright 2016 by Snow Show Preview

COVER PHOTOS BY JULIE ELLISON AND ALTON RICHARDSON

Dramatic cuts and avant-garde knits.

Active Interest Media 5720 Flatiron Parkway, Boulder, CO 80301


NIGHTLIFE | AT THE SHOW

▲ BJORN BAUER (LEFT) JOINS CHRISTOPHER EWART FOR A COLD ONE AT THE NATIVE EYEWEAR HAPPY HOUR.

PHOTOS BY JULIE ELLISON, ANDY HAWK AND ALTON RICHARDSON

▲ MOLLY HANKS DOYLE OF TITLE NINE DIALS IN THE FIT OF A GIRO HELMET AND GOGGLES AT THE OIWC HAPPY HOUR.

▲ HOW SWEET IT IS: WINE, CHEESE AND CUPCAKES AT KRIMSON KLOVER'S HAPPY HOUR.

▲ GLEN PLAKE BRINGS SOME FLAIR TO THE TRANSPACK BEER PARTY.

▲ JEANNIE THOREN HAS TIME TO KICK BACK NOW THAT SHE'S PASSED THE TORCH OF HER WOMEN'S SKI SHOP IN VAIL TO KIM WALKER OF OUTDOOR DIVAS. READ ABOUT IT ON SNOW SOURCE AT SNOWSPORTS.ORG/BLOG.

▲ HAPPY HOUR IS A HALLOWED TRADITION AT SIA; SPY OPTICS' EVENT DREW A CROWD WITH ITS GREAT BAR.

▲ HAPPY HOUR AT BACKCOUNTRY EXPERIENCE.

SIAsnowshow.com DAY 3 | SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016

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AT THE SHOW | SHOW NEWS

JOE DUNNIGAN (LEFT) AND CHRIS STEINKAMP OF PROTECT OUR WINTERS

HONORING THE COUNTRY’S MOST environmentally conscious ski and snowboard shops, SIA’s annual GreenShopComp, sponsored by Protect Our Winters, rewards retailers working to preserve the environment we all ski in. This year’s winner is Joe Dunnigan, founder of online marketplace +swappow, whose mission is to keep board sport products out of landfills and help newcomers get into the game. We caught up with Dunnigan on the Show floor for his thoughts on the win and +swappow brainstorm.

How and why did you start swappow? Joe Dunnigan: We started it to alleviate the problem of kids not being able to participate

in action sports due to cost. We saw piles of usable gear growing in garages, closets, manufacturer warehouses and retailers' back rooms with no profitable and sustainable way to move it, bottlenecking the product lifecycle. So we created a mobile-focused, centralized and simple secondary market solution for swapping, selling and sharing pre-owned gear.

How does it feel to win the award? JD: We’re stoked. Building something new from nothing can be a lonely place sometimes.

Just to be in the same room with leaders of organizations like POW and SIA is humbling. It validates our vision, rewards our investment and gives us hope for the future. We’re young and small, but our vision is big and our commitment to our mission is very real.

How much gear have you recycled so far? JD: Our recycling efforts are based on units donated to our charitable foundation (the +swappow PLUS Foundation) and those listed on our desktop (swappow.com) and mobile platform. Including hardgoods, softgoods, footwear and accessories, we’re well over 10,000 pieces “saved” since the soft launch of our mobile app this summer—and we’re just getting started.

Why is recycling gear so important? JD: Our industry provides healthy and active lifestyle opportunities for people, so it does

some social good. Getting more kids participating increases self-esteem, reduces childhood obesity and diabetes rates, improves grades and more. Recycling is no less important. Mass production and consumption without “second life” programs is unsustainable, causing climate change and resource depletion. Our program helps society and the industry.

What can the average skier or rider do to help? JD: Download the free app on iTunes; register at swappow.com to list items for sale or to

give away; donate to the +swappow PLUS Foundation; spread the word. And volunteer. We need it all.

What do you ride?

JD: I’m a lifelong GNU fan. My first board in 1988 was a GNU AntiGravity 165. I’m now

riding a GNU Team board from a couple of years ago with Burton bindings. —Eugene Buchanan

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SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 3 SIAsnowshow.com

The Datebook

TODAY’S NOT-TO-MISS EVENTS OIWC Keynote & Awards Ceremony: Bacon, Bloody Marys & Inspiration, Mile High Ballroom, 7 a.m. Keynote is Mark Satkiewicz, president of SmartWool.

The 5-Minute Rental Fit, Rental World/Backshop (Booth 4501), 9:30 a.m.

Hear from Jack Rafferty of Masterfit; Shaun Cattanach of Burton; Chuck Diggers, rental manager from Brian Head, Utah; and a representative from Head.

Doc DesRoches Award, Booth 4123, 10:30 a.m.

SIA and the U.S. Ski Team will recognize Atomic for its promotion of the Team's brand and athletes. Mikaela Shiffrin will sign autographs after the presentation.

Passing the Torch Industry Celebration, Show Floor Entrance, 5 p.m.

Celebrate a career in snow sports as David Ingemie hands the reins to new SIA President Nick Sargent.

Athlete Appearances: Mikaela Shiffrin

LEKI (Booth 3120), 9 a.m.; reusch SnowSports (Booth 2136), 9:40 a.m.; Atomic (Booth 3923), 10 a.m.

Lynsey Dyer

Sego (Booth 4449), 2 p.m.

It's Electric!

TESLA VP TALKS RENEWABLE ENERGY AT POW EVENT

"WE'RE NOT GOING TO GET TO AN ELECTRIC-CAR FUTURE BY OURSELVES," Tesla Motors Vice President Diarmuid O'Connell (pictured below) says. He delivered the keynote presentation, "The Future Of Energy & Transportation," at Protect Our Winter's Friday morning breakfast. "It's a collective fight," he says, adding that, like skiers and snowboarders at this weekend's X Games, his company has to "inspire the competition" to join the fight against global warming and accelerate the shift to sustainable transportation. Introduced by Squaw Valley Ski Holdings CEO Andy Wirth, whose resort recently entered into a new clean energy partnership with Tesla, O'Connell says that rallying against climate change means transitioning to 100 percent clean, renewable energy. It's doing its part by pioneering the electric car movement, of which it plans to manufacture more than a half million this year. It's also developing energy-storage solutions, including building a 10-million-square-foot facility near Reno to handle a new 80-megawatt solar array. Squaw Valley is fighting the good fight, Wirth says, and staying true to stakeholders. It convinced energy provider Liberty Utilities to move away from coal and plans to cut its annual $4 million electric bill in half by switching from coal-sourced energy to solar produced by Tesla's new facility. It's also looking at a new breed of chairlift that would use 18 percent less energy. "We're addressing the hypocrisy of our operations," he says, admitting that between its car-driving guests and its infrastructure, its resorts generate nearly 30,000 metric tons of carbon per year. "In short order we will have moved from one of the most archaic grids to one of the most progressive," says Wirth. But there's still more to be done, with the keys being to educate, advocate and act. "The technologies that can help us address these pressing global problems are available," O'Connell says. "We just need to get everyone on board." —E.B.

PHOTOS BY ALTON RICHARDSON

5 Minutes with #GreenShopComp Winner Joe Dunnigan


AT THE SHOW | IMAGES

▲ VANS' TECHNICAL STORY ON DISPLAY.

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▲ RYAN PALMER OF HOVLAND SNOWSKATES DEMOS A HEEL FLIP.

SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 3 SIAsnowshow.com

▲ WATERPROOF DEMONSTRATION AT SYMPATEX TECHNOLOGIES IN SOURCING SNOW.

PHOTOS BY JULIE ELLISON AND ALTON RICHARDSON

▲ WOW, NO WONDER YOU'RE TIRED AT THE END OF THE DAY.


▲ ROB PETERSON OF BIG AGNES SHOWS OFF THE BRAND'S LATEST.

▲ PRETZELS AT THE BOLLÉ BOOTH!

▲ A FUTURE SHREDDER ADMIRES HIS FUTURE DUDS.

▲ FUTURE OF BACKCOUNTRY RESEARCH, TECHNOLOGY AND SNOW PANEL IN THE BACKCOUNTRY EXPERIENCE BOOTH.

▲ PRO SKIER CODY TOWNSEND, AN ARCADE BELT CO. ATHLETE, POSES WITH THE SKIING MAG CREW.

▲ ZACK HUGHES ENJOYS THE ONEWHEEL ELECTRIC BOARD.

SIAsnowshow.com DAY 3 | SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016

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AT THE SHOW | SHOW NEWS

Beyond Green: Sustainability Grows Up COMPANIES HAVE INCREASINGLY REALIZED the importance of green products and technologies. Still, some elements of the process remain daunting to decipher. Going green is just one factor in a more holistic sustainability picture, and green fabrics and materials represent an even smaller slice of the bigger pie. Look at it this way: While it’s hard to deny that our climate is changing, maybe we should step back from green—if even for a second—and instead consider brands and suppliers who support a broader consciousness. If it feels right, it usually is. Before considering your mainstay brands, meander over to the far side of the Show floor and meet the people in Sourcing Snow.

THE BUSINESS OF SNOW

Eric Carlson, global design and marketing director for Smith, explains that, to Smith, sustainability means maintaining business and customers. This trickles down to everything from having materials that are traceable to the source (transparency and honesty) to lean manufacturing. Upholding a conscious business model is in the company’s DNA; it’s part of their daily work. By providing long-term commitments to suppliers and looking at net cost, rather than commodity shopping,

Smith takes on the responsibility of keeping the market, and the businesses in it, sound. “If we are overbuilding, we are supplying extra product that dilutes the market,” he says. All of Smith’s goggles are still hand-built in the U.S. in their Utah facility. This cuts lead time, allowing them to adjust production based on unforeseen circumstances like winter weather patterns. And less than 4% of the brand’s production accounts for closeout, a fact that keeps retailers loyal. “Accessories can really impact sales,” Carlson says. “We make sure to drive healthy margins.” And while its eyeglass frames are 50% bio-based, using oil from the castor plant, Carlson puts less weight on the eco-aspect and more on product quality and the consumer experience. ”We’re more focused on building the product correctly than promoting how we build it,” he says.

DAVID RUBIN

FORWARD-THINKING SUPPLIERS

3M partners with several industry companies, including snowboard brands like Quiksilver, Roxy, DC and Vans. With operations in more than 70 countries—and with 55,000 products—3M is “intricately woven into the global economy.” Its common goal of improving everyday life includes building sustainability into its design process. ComCOREY SIMPSON

pass, 3M’s in-house sustainability workbook, provides a guide for employees on items like environmental impact, social innovation and attribute mapping. Global Business Manager Paul Colbert says that sustainability and all its aspects—including both social and environmental—weaves its way into the complete lifecycle of the company’s product. 3M is giving back on a local level, too, enhancing education achievement and economic development here at home, as well as overseas. West Coast Sales Manager David Rubin says that 3M donates product to colleges like the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising and the California School of Art and Design for student projects, enhancing the overall learning environment.

COMPANY CULTURE

Dakine’s sustainability picture involves something more akin to the “Aloha Spirit,” an attitude of friendly acceptance that Hawaii is famous for, says Vice President of Design AlALLISTAIR NICOL AND BETTINA BAYER

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SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 3 SIAsnowshow.com


POWERED BY

listair Nicol. Taking it one step further, the brand’s mantra also refers to a healthy way to resolve any problem or accomplish any goal. He explains that this attitude goes handin-hand with the snowsports lifestyle, especially among the younger employees in the company. “They want to work in a place that matches their values,” he says. These values are also apparent in its supply chain, says Bettina Bayer, product line manger for women’s packs and bags. When she visits Dakine’s overseas factories she is impressed with the steps the brand takes to reduce waste. For example, bluesign-certified Duraflex implements an automatic system that grinds and reuses the plastic waste created in the mold process for buckles (the ones found on Dakine’s packs). As an added bonus, the reground plastic creates a stronger product, says Mary Smith, regional sales manager for Duraflex. Aspects like this boost Bayer’s confidence in Dakine’s offerings and the responsible stance it upholds. Bayer adds: “Consumers are asking more questions. They want to know where it comes from.” Similarly, Patagonia, one of the industry’s leaders in sustainable practices, has a tiered and vetted process when it comes to the 86 factories it works with worldwide. Factories are evaluated on their physical environments and working conditions, among other things. And if they lack in one aspect, Patagonia works to help them achieve better standards. It’s basically Relationships 101. “None of it is one-dimensional,” says Corey Simpson, PR and communications manager for Patagonia. “It’s (sustainable thinking) in the entire way we do it.” So before you shop green, look at the bigger picture—one that pats green on the back, but more specifically fosters the health of the snow industry and the integrity of the companies within it. —Christina Shepherd McGuire

Four on the Floor

FEMALE BUYERS WEIGH IN ON THE EVOLUTION OF WOMEN’S SNOWBOARD GEAR THERE’S NO DENYING IT, LADIES’ PRODUCT IS NOW A FORCE TO CONTEND WITH. GONE ARE THE days of “shrinking and pinking." In fact, this cliché industry phrase elicits scowls from a new generation of ladies wearing the pants. The demand for women’s product is gaining momentum, making brands step up. In an effort to speak to this audience, brands—with women-specific designers and managers—are leading the charge. The end product is silhouettes that fit, fabrics that make sense, and function that doesn’t forego fashion. Now, more than ever before in snowboarding, ladies can feel comfortable (and confident) in technology specifically suited for them. This year, we caught up with the gals on the front lines to see exactly what is worth a second look. —C.S.M.

Teeta Langlands

Lauren Anderson

Owner of Darkside Snowboards, Killington, VT

Accessories Buyer, evo, Seattle, WA

Langlands shouted out iNi Collective’s efforts, with its premiere women’s line made almost entirely of stretch fabrics. A special mention was given to its Bibster Bibs— of course—a running revival trend in women’s outerwear. Langlands aligns with its story of being American-designed and American-made. “It makes them very core,” she says. “Darkside is American and homegrown, too.”

Kara Wedmore

Marinna Elinski Holmstead

Women’s Softgoods Buyer, evo, Seattle, WA

Buyer, Habitat, Driggs, ID

Kara digs Patagonia’s Synchilla Snap-T Fleece Pullover, noting that multisport brands are currently strong for evo in the snowboard space. “The heritage styling of this piece speaks perfectly to the Millennials,” she says. “Their parents wore it. It’s timeless.” She also agrees with Langlands that stretch fabrics and bibs are trending for women. “In general, it’s just a really exciting time in women’s product,” Wedmore adds.

MARY AND KATIE SMITH

When Anderson unveiled her pick—Anon’s WM1 goggle, complete with MFI (Magnetic Facemask Integration)—it was clearly a gear-bag game changer. Gone are the days of fidgeting with your neck gaiter on the chair to safely secure it beneath the bridge of your goggles. This chafe-free design allows you to lift the lens and insert the edge of your gaiter or balaclava. It magically seals itself for the perfect fit and integration. ”For me, it’s the convenience,” she says. “It’s less that I have to fiddle with on the chair.”

Riding in the Tetons warrants gear that works, so it was no surprise when Holmstead mentioned Spark R&D’s new women’s Arc (Splitboard) Binding. The lower heel cup, reengineered heel loop, shorter highback, narrower baseplate, and the addition of an extra-small size, lends a fit that makes the trek out back more comfortable. “We definitely sell out of Spark’s bindings every time they come into the store,” Holmstead says. “Before, ladies were buying the guy’s small binding and dealing with a lot of play (in the fit).” Stop by Spark’s booth and Dan Ventura, Spark’s marketing manager, will show you the entire women’s line, including the Arc and Surge Bindings, available in two colorways respectively.

SIAsnowshow.com DAY 3 | SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016

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AT THE SHOW | IMAGES

▲ BLUR BIRD SOCIAL ZONE

▲ LA SPORTIVA'S BRET FISHMAN (LEFT) TALKS WITH SAMANTHA PODHURST FROM ASPEN EXPEDITIONS.

▲ GETTING DOWN AT THE HYATT AFTER-PARTY.

▲ RAPPER 2 CHAINZ KILLED IT AT THE VANS-SPONSORED CONCERT.

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▲ THE BUFF BOOTH'S MURAL MAKES FOR A VIVID BACKDROP.

SNOW SHOW DAILY 2015 2016 | DAY 3 SIAsnowshow.com

▲ TALKING COLORFUL EYEWEAR IN THE SPY BOOTH.

PHOTOS BY JULIE ELLISON AND ALTON RICHARDSON

▲ TIM KONRAD FROM UNOFFICIAL NETWORKS TESTS THE FLEX OF A NEW LINE SKI.


EXPANSION VIEW TECHNOLOGY

GIRO BALANCE GOGGLE

RIDE THE LINE Our new Balance goggle delivers on the promise of a classic full frame style packed with modern vision technology. The Balance goggle offers an expanded ďŹ eld of view utilizing EXV Technology, as well as optically correct spherical vision with Lenses By ZEISS. These classy frames offer the perfect balance of style and high-end function in a low-key package.


AT THE SHOW | SHOW NEWS

WHEN HERBERT LAHOUT BEGAN PEDDLING GOODS FROM A HORSE AND wagon in 1920, he had no idea he was creating the foundation for America’s oldest ski shop. Now, 96 years later, Lahout’s in Littleton, N.H., is an industry institution—and an inspiration for how ski and snowboard retail should be done. Sitting down with great-grandson Anthony Lahout, who runs the family business’s media relations, it’s clear that the humility and passion for the outdoors with which the store began still run deep.

outdoorsman, and I think that that’s the connection that we’ve always had. It’s not like you have to be a hardcore, sponsored athlete to work here, but something we look for in our staff is that you enjoy the outdoors as much as the people coming through our doors.

Tell us about the vibe you get when you walk in the door.

Lahout’s is a fourth-generation family-run business. Talk to us about the pros of working so closely with your kin.

It’s a natural, feel-good place. In a lot of retail environments, you go into the store and there’s a certain feel that you get. In Lahout’s, you feel like home. It’s a very community-feeling place, and we’ve always tried to be honest and supportive. We don’t sell people things. People come in, and we ask how they’re doing, see what they’re skiing, where they’re hiking, and go from there. We don’t have something in mind to push this ski or boot.

How does Lahout’s select its sales team? People like to buy things from people that they connect with. My grandfather looks like an

It’s an on-top-of-each-other operation at Lahout’s. Everyone lives within a mile of each other. I’m next-door neighbors with my uncle, who’s also co-owner of the business. There’s not a lot of isolation. When we’re skiing, we’re always talking about the shop or something involving the shop. You get to spend a lot of quality time with your family, and you always feel supported.

And the cons? There’s no privacy and no censorship. When I worked at Smith and Spyder, you busted your ass, but then you get to turn off. In family business, it’s just not structured like that.

Your grandfather took the reins of the business when he was 12 years old. What have you learned from him? The wisdom that things you enjoy should always be a part of your life. If you like to read, always read. If you like to ski, always ski. He’s taught me to enjoy life and take care of your priorities. —Courtney Holden

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PHOTOS BY (FROM LEFT) COURTESY OF LAHOUT'S (2); JULIE ELLISON

America’s Oldest Ski Shop


Women and the Backcountry BACKCOUNTRY EXPERIENCE PANEL LOOKS MORE CLOSELY AT DECISION-MAKING OUT-OF-BOUNDS

PHOTO BY JULIE ELLISON

DOES HAVING A WOMAN ON A BACKCOUNTRY TRIP MAKE THE GROUP'S decision-making safer? That was just one question discussed at the ladies-led panel, “Inside the Female Mind,” hosted by Backcountry Magazine Assistant Editor Louise Lintilhac at Backcountry Experience on Friday. Personal experiences aside—and in the absence of any known scientific studies examining the gender-based group psychology of backcountry snow sports—the group consensus was no: A group’s dynamic and overall ability to make safe decisions in the backcountry depends on effective group communication, regardless of gender. “If you’re being a good decision-maker, it’s not about being a man or a woman—it’s about being a conservative backcountry skier,” says Lintilhac, sitting alongside adventure photographer KT Miller, pro freestyle skier Lynsey Dyer, adventure writer Berne Broudy and Pip Hunt, women’s category marketing coordinator at Armada Skis. At a time when more women are heading to the backcountry—according to SIA, women’s AT and randonee equipment sales increased by 87 percent in the 2014-15 season—the panel aimed to share and learn from experts in the field, and ultimately improve communication between out-the-gates teams. “People can be too busy running their minds and mouths. Close the mouth—talk when you need to—open your eyes and ears to signs in the landscape around you, and quiet the mind. Take time to get away—that’s why you went to the backcountry in the first place,” Miller says. Another challenge, especially for an athlete who is new to the backcountry, is maintaining a level head and proactively seeking inclusion after falling behind on the skin track. “You may get annoyed with being in the back. Then, when you catch up, it’s one of those times to swallow the ego. Ask the group to catch you up on their discussion and decisions. Help them understand that you are a part of the group,” Lintilhac says. Asking questions as a backcountry student, or as an avid backcountry tourer who is visiting a new area, is important. Conversely, it’s essential for everyone on the team to express their thoughts directly and confidently without “hedging”—or phrasing a comment as a question, which women tend to do, Hunt says. Lastly, trust your teammates, travel in a manageable-sized group, and “find a group that resonates with your risk-taking,” Broudy says. —Morgan Tilton


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FEATURE | DESIGN

Athlete Designers

BRANDS KICK COLLABORATIONS WITH PROS INTO OVERDRIVE

BY EUGENE BUCHANAN

PHOTO COURTESY OF MYPAKAGE

BIG-MOUNTAIN SKIER SEAN PETTIT PARTNERED WITH MYPAKAGE TO CREATE A SIGNATURE ACTION SERIES LINE OF BOXERBRIEFS AND BASE LAYERS.

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SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 3 SIAsnowshow.com


PHOTOS COURTESY OF PATAGONIA; MYPAKAGE; SMARTWOOL

Athlete-brand collaborations are nothing new, from Jack Nicklaus-designed golf clubs to Air Jordans. And they’re not new in snow sports, either, with everyone from Shaun White to Tom Wallisch lending their expertise to better apparel, accessories and hardgoods. But lately, it’s kicked into turbo drive, with more athletes doubling as designers as manufacturers market their gear to a socially engaged generation and capitalize on something they desperately crave: feedback from pros in the field. ATHLETES AND APPAREL

“The work we do with our ambassadors is an integral part of our design process for technical snow and alpine equipment,” says Patagonia’s Corey Simpson. “We integrate their input with feedback and testing results from the field to ensure we’re making the best products possible. It’s a great way to get feedback at every stage of the design and development process, from initial prototype concepts through testing for performance, durability and ease of use. It’s invaluable.” So sums up athletes’ contributions to the apparel side of the industry, with Patagonia one of many companies leading the charge. Case in point: Freeskier and social phenom

PATAGONIA RECONNAISSANCE JACKET (R&D FROM KYE PETERSEN); MYPAKAGE ACTION SERIES ENTOURAGE EDITION BY SEAN PETTIT; AND SMARTWOOL CONRAD ANKER PHD MOUNTAINEER SOCK.

Kye Petersen helping with R&D on Patagonia’s new stretchy and breathable Reconnaissance jacket and pants. And he was more than happy to lend a hand. "I feel privileged to help develop a kit tailored for avid backcountry users,” he says. “All the input I've given is directly related to how I use my gear in the backcountry. The Reconnaissance eliminates extra layering; I carry an outer layer to throw on at the top, but my jacket always stays on and allows my under layers to expel moisture that can be a nuisance or even dangerous.” Smaller companies are also tapping athlete R&D, for fit as well as function. “We use pro skier Amie Engerbretson as our fit model,” says FlyLow Gear President Dan Abrams of the Warren Miller star. “She has tons of input on what we make and how it fits, especially for medium-sized women.” The approach works for less core apparel, as well. This year SmartWool teamed with alpinist Conrad Anker to help develop its new PhD Mountaineer Socks, whose reduced in-boot bulk, heel compression cup and integrated mesh zones are a direct result of his field-testing. For his efforts, a Conrad Anker emoji and Himalayan skyline adorn the sock tops. “I wanted a sock with comfort, fit and performance that could withstand the rigors of alpine climbing,” Anker says. And don’t overlook the contributions of big mountain skier Sean Pettit to the often overlooked underwear world. His recent partnership with MyPakage led to a signature Action Series underwear line of boxer-briefs, as well as backcountry-oriented first layers. “We’ve turned our Action Series into a canvas for athletes,” says spokesman Brian Schroy, adding that pro snowboarder TJ Schneider has also helped with its undergarment program.

ACCESSORIES

Accessories are also on the receiving end of athlete collaboration. POC has given three marquee winter athletes – Julia Mancuso, Jeremy Jones and Aaron Blunck – their own signature lines based on their design suggestions, including a helmet, goggles, sunglasses and, in Mancuso's case, gloves. Involved in the entire process, Blunck debuted his collection last year after an R&D trip to Sweden led to the all-new Auric helmet design, which works with goggles and a beanie underneath, which is how he likes to wear it. Bollè athlete Anna Fenninger provides feedback for the company’s helmets, including three new ones for 2016 – a BOLLÈ JULIET HELMET racing, recreational and junior – all with Fenninger-inspired

WE INTEGRATE ATHLETES' INPUT WITH FEEDBACK AND TESTING RESULTS FROM THE FIELD TO ENSURE WE'RE MAKING THE BEST PRODUCTS POSSIBLE. FREESKIER AND SOCIAL PHENOM KYE PETERSEN (INSET) PARTNERED WITH PATAGONIA ON ITS NEW RECONNAISSANCE JACKET AND PANTS.

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FEATURE | DESIGN graphics, including the Juliet, one of the helmets in the Anna Fenninger Signature Series. “It’s great to work with organizations like Bollé who are interested in more than just my success on the slopes,” she says. “Racing has given me insight into helmets’ performance, safety and comfort, which helps drive their development.”

HARDGOODS

Perhaps nowhere is athlete input better received and used than in hardgoods, the most direct relation consumers have with the slopes. K2 has long been a leader in this realm, most recently enlisting pro Pep Fujas to help design its new Factory Team line, with input from fellow pros Pettit, Andy Mahre, Clayton Vila and Sean Jordan. “Our 2016-17 line is driven by athletes' ideas, all of whom know a thing or two about having a good time,” says K2 brand director Mike Gutt. “And that’s what it’s all about for our customers.” The team has created two new skis in the Factory Team freeride line, the 106-mmwaisted Marksman and 96-mm Poacher, both featuring a Double Barrel core utilizing denser material over the edges for durability. Influenced by the ski styles of Fujas, Pettit and Mahre, the Marksman also has asymmetrical tips and tails for such moves as butters and presses; the park-oriented Poacher reflects the styles of Jordan and Vila, with a Carbon Ollie Braid for pop and rebound. "The majority of my ski days are in less than ideal conditions where my skis take a beating,” Fujas says. “The Double Barrel Core maintains its ruggedness longer." And the Marksman’s outside taper, he adds, “lets you cut through soft snow while still having a platform on the downhill ski and dominant foot.” Marquee freestyle skier Tom Wallisch also joined Eric Pollard this year to develop two new models for Line. The new maple/aspen, 117-90-112 Tom Wallisch Pro includes a Carbon Ollieband to help skiers jump on and off anything. “Tom’s feedback, insight and general passion for being able to make gear he’s proud of motivates everyone in the com-

ALL-AROUND PRO SKIER PEP FUJAS HELPED K2 DESIGN ITS NEW FACTORY TEAM LINE, ALONG WITH FELLOW PROS SEAN PETTIT, ANDY MAHRE, CLAYTON VILA AND SEAN JORDAN.

Behind the Design

For an inside look on how athletes help with design, we asked Scarpa athlete Chris Davenport, who most recently helped design the company’s new Freedom RS boot, what’s involved in bringing a piece of gear to fruition.

Q: How do you help in the design? CD: I come in at the concept phase and am involved in the discussions with the designers and product engineers as to what this product should ultimately look like and who the target consumer is. Later, I ski in prototypes to test things like flex, torsional rigidity, ease of getting in and out, and other things. I act as a lens into the market’s needs and desires and try to fulfill them with the product team. Q: How do you quantify your recommendations? CD: The main filter I use when recommending a change or suggesting an upgrade is, will the consumer benefit from these changes or upgrades? Will it ultimately help us sell more product? And do I have a positive intuitive feel for the recommendation? I have to listen to my gut instinct and pass that information up the line. Q: How does it feel to see your suggestions come to life? CD: When we launched the first Scarpa Freedom SL boot it was a thrill because I’d been involved since the very beginning of that project, and the boot has gone on to become our bestseller. We correctly identified a market need and filled it with a product that has become the leader in the freeride touring category. Whether it’s boots, skis or apparel, when my ideas and visions are implemented in a smart and strategic way it’s an incredibly rewarding experience and one that has become a big part of my business in skiing. —E.B.

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PHOTOS (FROM TOP) COURTESY OF K2; CHRIS DAVENPORT

Q: What do you like about helping develop product? CD: I’ve spent most of my life in ski boots, on skis and wearing ski apparel, so I have a unique understanding of what works and what doesn’t in a variety of skiing disciplines and environments. I’ve always been a gear geek and love tinkering with my gear to try and make it better. Boots are really tricky to get right; it’s more an art form than a science. Fit is paramount, and those first seconds when a consumer steps into a boot are so important. I love the process of product development, going from a concept, to a series of prototypes which we test over and over, to a production product is really satisfying.


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FEATURE | DESIGN

PHOTOS (FROM TOP) COURTESY OF VÖLKL; LINE

how to improve the binding—a team favorite—they wanted a new highback with the same flex.” Their feedback also carries over to graphics, with the new Kink showing each team rider in cartoon character. “We gave artist Sean Cliver little hints of their personality traits, and he transformed them into illustrations,” Cozzens says. Brands like Icelantic also rely on athlete time in the trenches. “We have a team of about 16 athletes, four of whom are pros and the rest we supply with product,” says CEO Annelise Loevlie. “Each year, we give specific athletes relevant prototypes to ski as hard as they can and then they give us feedback on them. We don't have a specific pro model or one specific athlete that we're designing around, but that may come in the future.” This

pany,” says brand director Josh Malczyk. “Having athlete involvement like this helps us stay one step ahead.” Malczyk sings similar praise for Pollard’s new Pescado, an easy-flexing directional powder ski adorned with Pollard's timeless topsheet and base graphics. Athletes are equally involved on the snowboard side. RIDE’s new Warpig stems from a weekend at the Dirksen Derby race where its entire seven-rider pro team, including Jake Blauvelt, rode all conditions all day. “They got weird on everything possible,” says RIDE spokesman Keith Cozzens. “It was a great, full-team collaboration effort, resulting in an awesome new board.” Another athlete-inspired feature is the Squad highback on the Rodeo binding. “The team refers to themselves as a ‘squad,’” Cozzens says. “When asked

THE VÖLKL REVOLT (TOP) WAS DEVELOPED WITH INPUT FROM PRO AHMET DADALI; AND, TOM WALLISCH COLLABORATED WITH LINE TO LAUNCH HIS TOM WALLISCH PRO SKI FOR 2016-17.

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NOWHERE IS ATHLETE INPUT BETTER RECEIVED THAN IN HARDGOODS, THE MOST DIRECT RELATION CONSUMERS HAVE WITH THE SLOPES. year, she adds, they did work with athlete Jason Levinthal to help develop Icelantic's 2016-17 lineup. Even more venerable brands like Völkl, which has long used World Cup racer feedback for its carving skis, has expanded from its racing relationships to athlete feedback for its freeriding skis. Developed with Ahmet Dadali, the new 21-meter-radius Revolt, with tip and tail flex points for buttering, is targeted at younger riders and has a non-symmetric shape for jibbing. “It’s the first time we’ve done something like that, having such direct involvement on a twin tip ski,” says Völkl’s Geoff Curtis. “Ahmet was involved throughout the whole R&D process to realize the right flex, width, rocker profile and skiability.” The bottom line for manufacturers is feedback they can’t get in the office. “Our entire team lends assistance as we work through prototypes,” says DPS team manager Erme Catino, whose team—consisting of Zack Giffin, Piers Solomon, Olof Larsson, Santiago Guzman and Drew Petersen – is affectionately known as the Koalas. Solomon, he adds, worked with company founder Stephan Drake this past year to launch a new ski to accommodate his big-mountain jib style. “We were borne out of the grassroots mission to build skis for those who live and breathe the sport,” Catino says. “Our pro team fits right in with that. Their feedback on our skis, brand and films is all intertwined." RIDE'S NEW WARPIG SNOWBOARD WAS BUILT AFTER A WEEKEND WHEN ITS SEVEN-RIDER PRO TEAM RODE EVERY CONDITION POSSIBLE.

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SPOTLIGHT | FASHION TRENDS

2016-17 Style: 70s Influence, Technical Edge Jessica Kaplan is a trend forecaster who shines a light for companies and their design teams on current fashion trends across the snow sports industry and beyond. She spoke Wednesday during Industry + Intelligence on “Trends in Style, Snow Sports and Culture.” Snow Show Daily sat down with her to get her take on what brands, reps and retailers should look for in 2016-17 lineups during this week’s Show.

What other design inspirations are you seeing this week at the Show? The other massive element of design really comes down to innovation and technical advances within textiles. That element really takes a note from what I talk about when I reference Tech World. Tech World will always be that consumer that is obsessed with the latest and greatest product on the market. Ski design is really rooted in the needs of a skier or snowboarder. What are the needs of these people that are out there every day on the hill that are riding or skiing 100 days a year? Somebody like Jeremy Jones, who is one of the best snowboarders in the world. To me you look at him and you ask him what his needs are, and that’s going to push forward the movement of new design. An example of a product is his mountain boots that he did

with ThirtyTwo. They’re doing another one for 2016, and the boot is elevated. That’s an example of technical innovation that’s influencing design details. It’s the result of athletes that are pushing boundaries.

How do current style trends apply to accessories? What has been standing out to me over the past few seasons, and I think this trend is going to hold steady ... It’s all about collaboration and detailing. So you can’t just have a basic glove or a basic helmet anymore. You have to have a story to go along with it. You have to have some sort of vehicle that promotes that item. For example, Smith Optics did a helmet with Angry Birds. … Another big thing is that the smart brands are taking this approach of selling and marketing their product to both skiers and snowboarders. Brands like Anon goggles or Zeal Optics have pro riders on their skiing and snowboarding teams, which is incredible. And for brands like Astis (gloves), to me, it’s all unique detailing, crafting, bead work, but they’re highly comfortable. You can wear while you are skiing, and it’s about being unique. You have to do something different to market your helmet, market your accessory, or your goggle to make it unique to the consumer.

Tell me about the City Twist Consumer. City Twist is essentially for consumers that live their life both in the mountains and in an urban landscape. It’s someone who could be living in Los Angeles, New York City,

▲ THIRTYTWO MTB JEREMY JONES

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London, Boston or Denver, who spends five days out of the week going to the office every day and going out at night; then on weekends they head up to the mountains, take that trip out west for a week, or on the upper scale they take their jet out. What they’re trying to do ▲ CHAOS TONI is find a jacket that can work on the mountain, but at the same time they can take that jacket and wear it to work every day or go out at night with it. ... In terms of design style, just look at fashion: Animal prints, black jackets with leather jacket influences, things of that nature that can speak to both environments.

The third of the three movements you discussed (after Tech World and City Twist) is Mountain Life. Mountain Life to me is the consumer that really is tapping into this outdoor lifestyle; I try to visualize a person that would spend one day skinning to a remote location in the backcountry, and then go to a remote log cabin with no heat, no plumbing, camp there overnight in a sleeping bag, then the next day get up and hit fresh powder. There are so many brands tapping into this movement. Patagonia is a big one because they are creating product specifically for these people. It’s more of a throwback feel. The keywords are old log cabin, bonfires, rustic coffee mugs and things that you would see from an era of skiing and snowboarding that are not glitz and glamour, they’re more rustic. —Lindsay Konzak

▲ ORAGE MAYA

I definitely feel that pallets are going the direction of more earth-colored hues. When I think of earth-colored hues, I think of mustards, burnt oranges and colors within those families. My prediction is that the colors will take a note from the 1970s, and I think that’s where a lot of designers are getting inspiration right now. It won’t have a retro feel. It will be more of a fusion of the past and present in regard to the colors. I definitely want to say neon has certainly made its departure. I don’t think we’re going to see neon trending by any means in the next season or two. I think it had a really great movement, and had a great couple years recently.

▲ FLYLOW ALBERT BARLEYWINE

What colors will be hot for 2016-17?


OUR MANIFESTO If you’ve ever been on top of a mountain, or out in the middle of the sea, you know what it means to feel truly alive. The feeling that inspires us all, professionals and enthusiasts alike. This is the feeling that has shaped our brand. 140 years of trial and error, in the harshest environments. Worn and trusted by true professionals that demand the best, whose experiences, insights and spirit are in everything we make. Those who are really alive. Who each and every day, put their lives in our hands. Because out there you don’t want to think about what you’re wearing. You want gear that does what it’s meant to do. Lets you truly experience the mountains and the seas.

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AWARD SPOTLIGHT | WINNERS This morning, two women were presented with leadership awards during the Outdoor Industries Women’s Coalition (OIWC) Keynote & Awards Ceremony, held in the Convention Center’s Mile High Ballroom. The Pioneering Woman Award recognizes a woman in the industry who has been influential in paving the way for others. The First Ascent Award acknowledges a woman in the industry who demonstrates strong potential for leadership and career advancement. The Snow Show Daily caught up with this year’s winners.

OIWC Pioneering Woman Award Research Director, SIA Home resort: Ski Liberty in Pennsylvania Lives in: Frederick, Md. Years in the industry: 9

Favorite place to get on snow?

I love my home resort in Pennsylvania. Ski Liberty is small and quaint and super-fun because I always get to ski or ride and do a little après with my friends there. That’s what I truly love about skiing and snowboarding. I learned to ski at Mammoth, and my sister has a place there so that’s awesome for me and will always be a favorite. Who doesn’t love Vail? And I’ve had a few epic powder days on a snowboard in Utah. For cross country there are great memories at Jackson XC in New Hampshire and Devil’s Thumb Ranch just up the road in Fraser, Colorado. I’m headed to St. Anton in Austria for a week in late February so I finally get to experience the Alps, and I am really looking forward to that. I guess I just love snow!

How did you get started in the snow sports industry? I was looking for something that I could be passionate about and use my professional KELLY DAVIS PRESENTS TRENDS AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS AT THE SNOW SHOW.

skills. One night, after a few hours of night skiing, I came across an announcement for the research job at SIA. I wrote a letter to David Ingemie that night. I told him that I was born for this job, and I would prove it to him if he would bring me in for an interview. He called me a few weeks later, I went in to talk with him, and the rest is history.

What are you most proud of in your career? SIA Research started something called the Research Forum in 2011 that brings together researchers at the Snow Show from around the world from other sports like skate, bike, golf, tennis, team sports and from various areas within snow sports like resorts, women’s participation and snowboard to share our research, our ideas, our methods, our successes and our failures. The community has grown over the past five years and now we are tackling some very interesting questions about how to grow our respective markets and grow participation in our sports. I think that we have an excellent shot, a better shot as a community than we would have had working in distinct silos, of finding ways to measurably grow our markets. And, from the heart, I would like to think that something I did will help a bunch of kids who may have never learned to snowboard, or ski, or skate, or golf, or ride a mountain bike do all of those things.

Based on the research you’ve done, the number of women participating in snow sports continues to grow. What effect is that having on the market, and what’s that mean for companies looking to grow their appeal to the fairer sex? Two major ways that impacts the market: product design and in marketing. Plain and simple in marketing, campaigns now specifically target women. On the product side, there are more and more women’s-specific products, and better choices every year that are truly designed for women. And the design of those women’s products now take into consideration that the term “active” participant applies just as much to her as it does to him. Women can rip on skis, and shred on snowboards.

Advice for companies who want to recruit women to their ranks? Offer women good jobs, fair pay, good benefits and flexibility to manage their work-life balance. Show them and all employees how their work and ideas are valued based on their objective merit. Don’t tolerate any gender discrimination or sexual harassment in the workplace from anyone top to bottom. And having women in leadership roles is always helpful.

What’s your advice for young women in the industry, looking to get ahead? Show initiative in the workplace and ask for opportunities; don’t wait for them to show up. Love your craft, whatever it might be from product design to marketing to sales. When I say love, I mean that you should care enough to study ways to continuously improve, to keep up with trends in your craft, and be innovative.

Anything else to add? I would like to thank the OIWC for this award; it’s a huge honor. And finally, I would like to sincerely thank David Ingemie who is stepping down in just a few days as SIA’s president. None of this would have been possible if it weren’t for him and his dedication to the snow sports industry. Thanks David for believing me when I said I was born to do this job; takes one to know one. —Lindsay Konzak

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PHOTO (BOTTOM LEFT) BY ALTON RICHARDSON (KELLY DAVIS)

Kelly Davis


First Ascent Award Winner Kerry O’Flaherty

Owner, Kerry O Sales (Giro, Seirus, Jones Snowboards, Dare2b, Athalon and more) Years in business: 27 Lives in: York Beach, Maine Home Resort: Stratton Mountain Ski Resort, Vermont

How did you get started in this industry?

I started when I was 16, working at Sno-Haus Ski Shop in Long Island, N.Y. That’s where I’m from originally. I went from working there to helping out reps at trade shows. Margo Camacho was my Seirus rep at the time, and she just was larger than life. … Margo came in and treated everybody like an equal. Didn’t matter if you took the trash out, if you were the owner or the buyer or an hourly paid sales associate. It didn’t matter, she treated everybody the same. … And I had no idea while I was working at Sno-Haus that there were reps in the ski business, I didn’t know that existed until I worked there. Then when I worked with her at the first show I was only 17. I saw all the dealings and I knew then that’s what I wanted to do without a doubt.

Do you have something in particular you’re most proud of in the career you’ve had? I’m proud of a lot of things but probably that I was able to build such a solid lineup of brands by myself. Then, later in my career, I had the ability to add my associates that I have currently and take it to the next level. We just recently got an award at our Giro meeting for best merchandising. My associate, Chris, and I love to help merchandise our shops and just take it to the next level for our retailers, and we’ve done some complete remodels at some of our stores. It’s not just for our product; it’s trying to show them how they can show their product and revamp the store a little bit.

Are there challenges being a woman in this industry? There are definitely challenges. I work on the hardgoods and softgoods sides so it’s nice. On the softgoods side, we see a lot of women, pretty powerful women. On the hardgoods side, my whole career up until very recently I was a minority, and it’s so nice to see more women. When I go to demos and I go to trade shows, it’s nice to see them out there doing what they love. They’re not doing what we always refer to at OIWC as a “shrink it and pink it” position. It’s nice to see them out there because you know they love it; they just were never given a chance to do it.

Do you have advice for young women who are starting out? I think for any young woman starting in this industry is first, be yourself. You have to be persistent for sure; you have to be respectful. Don’t be afraid to ask questions, and ask for help. Surround yourself with positive, hard-working people. I was so lucky to have a mentor like Margo. Not everybody has that, but anybody that can find a mentor in this industry, learn from them. Listen and learn from them is probably the biggest thing and not to give up. Sometimes you go after something, you don’t get it. It’s OK. You have bad days, then you have good days, and then you have epic days. You get them all.

What’s your favorite part of your job? My favorite part is the people I get to work with. I’m so lucky to work with some of the best in the industry whether it’s on the vendor side or the retail side, and my own team. I know it sounds corny but it’s very true. I love what I do, and I love helping people. That’s why I feel I’m good at what I do. I love everybody that I get to work with every day. —L.K.

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SPOTLIGHT | INDUSTRY LEADERS

Women to Watch

With the Outdoor Industries Women’s Coalition (OIWC), SIA is proud to recognize the 2016 Women to Watch, outstanding leaders working for brands, reps, retailers, resorts and non-profits. SYMPATEX.COM

Kathy McGuire

Executive Vice President, Operations, K2 Sports Years with current job: 24 Number of years in snow sports industry: 28 Average days on-snow: Never enough

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How did you get your start in this industry? In 1988, I moved to Burlington, Vt., with my boyfriend at the time from New York City. Dynastar had just acquired Lange. I got a job as the import manager based on my experience in logistics in NYC. It was a very fun role. I started skiing in high school and skied through college. I loved it, so I was thrilled to be in the industry. My boyfriend became my husband, we had our first child in 1992, and decided to move to Seattle. I applied for a job with K2 in November. I’ve been there almost 24 years now. Eventually I took on global operations.

What is your favorite part of your job? What I have found is that in our industry every year and every day is different. We’ve been involved in acquisitions and brand expansions, new owners, and more. There’s constant change. I like being part of the solution to effect change in a very positive way.

What are 3 things people don’t know about you?

1. I lived in France for a year back in 1978. I went to school there. Travel has become my passion, and the group of people I lived there with have become my lifelong friends. 2. I was a (Grateful) Dead Head. I used to go to a lot of concerts back in the day. 3. I am a good cook. I can make anything from anything. I am really good at looking at ingredients I have and making a good meal. If you have olive oil, mustard and garlic, you can pretty much make anything. I use a lot of fresh and organic ingredients.

What advice would you give to young women getting their start in the snow sports industry? Have a basic understanding of financial statements. I think in today’s business world, it’s really important for women to understand the impact of finance on a company. As you grow in your career, it will be a critical skill. You need to understand the basics of a financial statement. All of your actions and your decisions impact the bottom line. This is not a hobby or a sport – even though that’s the fun part of what we do. This is a business.

Anything else you want to add?

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It’s important to talk to people – get up from your desk and have a conversation in person; pick up the phone and call someone instead of emailing; and make sure to have fun. Congratulations to the 2016 OIWC-SIA Women to Watch: Stephanie Bennett, K2 Sports; Julia Blumenfeld, Head/Tyrolia; Wendy Carey, Seirus Innovation; Donna Carpenter, Burton; Katie Hawkins, Marmot; Annelise Loevlie, Icelantic Skis; Kirsten Lynch, Vail Resorts; Kathy McGuire, K2 Sports; Amy Ohran, Boreal Ridge Corp.; Linda Rodney, Giro; Claire Smallwood, SheJumps; Kim Walker, Outdoor Divas


AWARD | WINNERS SPOTLIGHT

Retailer of the Year

Each year, SIA honors outstanding retailers in the snow sports industry. These are the industry proponents who rise above and beyond to build relationships, engage customers and support brands, all the while promoting passion and growth in snow sports. Retailers are voted on by suppliers and reps. The Retailers of the Year were recognized Friday night at the Snow Show. Snow Show Daily spoke with some of the winners. North Central Retailer of the Year

Aspen Ski and Board Co. Gil Harris, Owner

Years in business: 17 Locations: Lewis Center, Ohio Favorite thing about the snow sports industry: Helping customers have a great experience on the mountain. I just love getting people involved with skiing and snowboarding. Why you like going to the Show: I can get all of my business done all at one place, and all at one time.

What sets you apart? We’re super customer service-oriented. One prime example of that is every person gets a handwritten thank

you note that buys anything from us. High-quality boot fitting is also a strong suit for us, and the third thing for us is we try to stay uber-competitive with the Internet deals going on and making sure people can afford snow sports here.

What’s the most difficult part about selling snow sports gear in Ohio? The consumer is very driven to season leasing versus buying. Our season-leasing program has gone through the stratosphere for both children and adults, and I’m worried about the long-term commitment to skiing from parents and kids. When you own the equipment, you tend to go a little more, and there’s a little more passion involved.

You guys seem to be pretty digitally inclined. What do you have to say about the importance of that for a shop? It’s always a work in progress, but you absolutely have to be a part of the digital world. With big Internet players

being so involved, too, it’s important that little guys like us get as involved as we can. We’re alwaysBEER working on it. RAINBOW AT GREAT DIVIDE

What’s something you’re excited about at the shop this year?

I’m personally excited about walkable boots. That’s a big answer to a big problem for a lot of our customers. A lot of people simply don’t understand why boots are so heavy and so hard to walk in, so walkable boots are a big deal. I’m also offering some backcountry products. There is a demand for it. We’re also considering delivering products to our customers to battle online competition. —Connor W. Davis This year’s Retailers of the Year: Alpine Ski Shop, Sterling, Va.; Aspen Ski & Board Co., Lewis Center, Ohio; Buchika’s Ski & Board, Salem, N.H.; Cole Sport, Park City, Utah; Colorado Ski Shop, Springfield, Mass.; evo, Seattle, Wash.; Freestyle, Charlottesville, Va.; Neptune Diving & Ski, Nashville, Tenn.


MARKET SPOTLIGHT | OVERVIEW

Nordic Sales Level Off

NORDIC MARKET HIT BY LOWER-THAN-AVERAGE TEMPS IN KEY REGIONS CROSS COUNTRY EQUIPMENT SALES HAVE BEEN A BRIGHT SPOT IN RECENT years in the snow sports market. Last season, however, sales of Nordic equipment at retail were down 5% to $72 million, according to The NPD Group for SIA’s Snow Sports Market Intelligence Report. Sales of Nordic equipment were down 2% in the outdoor channel to $37 million. Sales in snow sports channels were down 26% in dollars sold to $35 million, and down 18% in units sold, but Nordic equipment inventories in snow sports specialty shops grew by 26% in units. This pattern tends to indicate a drop in Nordic wholesale orders, and this year’s Wholesale Orders Study found just that. “Selling last season’s equipment has consequences in margin and snow sports retailers may make less profit next season because of it. That said, consumers who want the latest and greatest Nordic equipment will be able to find it, but there will bargains available as retailers work to move carryover inventory,” according to the Snow Sports Market Intelligence Report. The NPD Group doesn’t offer data by region for total Nordic sales, given that half of Nordic equipment sales are completed in outdoor shops. However, in snow sports channels, Nordic equipment sales were down 13% in dol-

SALES IN THE WEST

(IN DOLLARS)

14%

lars in the Northeast, and 26% in dollars sold in the Midwest. Those drops may be due to lower-than-average temperatures in those regions last year. The West actually saw increased sales, up 14%. One trend noted by SIA Research was the growth in skis and bindings sold as systems in retail and wholesale markets. But while sales stagnated in 2014-15, participation continued to climb, especially among women. The number of females skiing increased by 13% in the season to 1.9 million. That was offset by the number of men cross country skiing falling by 12% to 2.1 million. That said, the gender split in cross country skiing is more even than in any other category of snow sports. Regardless, the core of cross country skiers (1.2 million) skied as much as they ever had last season, despite gender. —Lindsay Konzak

PARTICIPANTS IN 2014-15

MADE ONLINE

Backcountry a Bright Spot SPECIALTY SHOPS GAIN GROUND IN 2014-15 SEASON ABOUT 2 MILLION SKIERS AND SNOWBOARDERS HEAD INTO NON-LIFT-SERVED BACKCOUNTRY EACH season, where there is no groomed snow and plenty of challenge waiting for them. But the market is also seeing an increase in consumers who are using their gear for a simple workout, heading up groomed ski hills to grab first tracks before the ski lifts open. The backcountry equipment market is among the strongest in the snow sports industry right now – down overall 2.5% to $52 million, but primarily due to lower sales of backcountry accessories like shovels, beacons, probes and skins. AT equipment sales were actually up 5% in 2014-15 in both snow sports and outdoor channels to $34.2 million. More than a third of alpine touring and backcountry accessory sales happen online, and outdoor specialty shops still sell twice as much backcountry gear as snow sports specialty shops. But specialty shops are starting to grow sales of AT equipment, while outdoor specialty sales are flat or falling. —L.K.

SKIERS & SNOWBOARDERS WHO HEAD TO NON-LIFT-SERVED BACKCOUNTRY

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SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 3 SIAsnowshow.com

Women’s Market Booms

Women’s sales of AT/Randonee equipment were up a whopping 87% in 2014-15 to $2.2 million, with AT ski sales to women more than tripling and boot sales rising by a third. The market for women’s-specific gear goes beyond the backcountry though. Overall, sales of women’s products were up 5% in 2014-15 to $1.4 billion (31% of overall sales). Outerwear for women was up 13% in dollars, snow boots up 25%, and headwear up 13%. The Nordic channel has benefited from growing female participation (up 13% in 201415), and in snowboarding, 5% more women 18 and over joined in the fun last season. And girls are taking up snowboarding at a quickening pace. It’s worth taking notice. Per SIA, women make 80% and influence 95% of all household spending decisions.

5%

WOMEN’SSPECIFIC PRODUCT SALES

(IN DOLLARS)


High-Tech with a Feminine Touch

▼ i.N.i COOPERATIVE LE PUFF PUFFY

TOP TRENDS | WOMEN'S OUTERWEAR

STRETCH, SOFT-TO-HAND FABRICS, HEAT-HOLDING FEATURES AND FLATtering form are all key design elements in women’s apparel for 2016-17. That recipe isn’t oh-so-simple—and the pressure is on: Last season, women’s outerwear sales rose 13 percent in dollars sold, jumping to $783 million, according to the 2015 SIA Snow Sports Market Intelligence Report. Versatility still drives apparel design, thanks to erratic weather and snow patterns and a minimalist movement toward all-in-one pieces across categories. But crossover isn’t necessarily the goal for each product. Mostly, women’s ski apparel should be functional and flattering, regardless of the product’s purpose. “We are seeing longer lengths and feminine-cut lines, stretchy fabrics and interesting color combinations. Function needs to match their male counterparts, but features and small details can be tweaked to fit female needs,” says Joanna Tomasino, Mammut softgoods category manager.

WOMEN'S

SOLUTION-BASED INNOVATION

Ladies’ bibs have marked a gap in most female lineups, which several brands are out to change. Flylow launches the Foxy Bibs, Mammut adds the Sunridge Pro HS Bib Pants, and Dakine addresses the deficit with the Gore-Tex 3L Beretta bib. “Our hope for anyone who uses our outerwear is that it feels like there was someone looking out for them on the other end of the product,” says Amy Eichner, Dakine product line manager. Forged by Eichner and Dakine’s new lead women’s designer, Brittany Crook, the decision to create the bibs was inspired by the question: “If you could have

28

OUTERWEAR (IN DOLLARS)

13%

SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 3 SIAsnowshow.com

▲ DARE2B ARGENT

Even companies that have featured women’s-specific products for decades are adapting to the category’s growth spurt. “(Women’s apparel) is the fastest-growing segment of the Boulder Gear brand,” says President Adam Garry. “Our women's line is growing faster than the men's,” says Flylow Gear President Dan Abrams. Other brands are making first tracks in women’s outerwear, including i.N.i Cooperative. For the past five years, women have worn the brand’s outerwear but in sized-down men’s styles. i.N.i Cooperative premieres its first women’s collection for 2016-17, decked out with simple, functional silhouettes made with stretch fabrics and vibrant tones. Other priorities include female-centric features—like the new Dare2b Argent Jacket’s removable makeup guard or Mammut’s detachable snow skirt tailored to female hips. “Women typically run a little bit colder than men, so we have used our Bio-Mapped Lining to beef up the warmth of most of the jackets. We also have used some removable acrylic faux fur around the hoods,” says i.N.i Cooperative President Adam Shiffman. To achieve the launch, the brand created initial pieces—two jackets and pants—and issued samples to a few dozen women for a full season of testing. In exchange, the ladies gave critical feedback that altered and refined the designs. Ultimately, stretch proved to be most important. “Women like to be able to move and bend, stretch and do cartwheels, so it was important that we utilized fabrics with four-way stretch,” Shiffman says. Two noteworthy additions include the Le Puff Puffy Jacket and Bibster Bib with three-layer laminate.

▲ DAKINE BERETTA

GROWTH SPURT

▲ MAMMUT SUNRIDGE PRO HS BIB

▲ MARMOT CHEEKY REMOVABLE SHORTS

HOW BRANDS ARE MEETING GROWING DEMAND FOR WOMEN’S-SPECIFIC DESIGNS

exactly what you want in the product line, what would it be?” The duo’s overall goal was to elevate the performance and functionality of the women’s product line—and to release something that the guys in the office would be jealous of, Eichner says. The design priorities for the bib included a drop-seat construction, an affordable price point, and a cohesive fit with full layers—meaning an insulation piece could be worn beneath and on top. The team designed the Gore-Tex Beretta 3L jacket to go with the bibs. “As females, we don’t want to be taking our jackets off in the backcountry to do our business. Even in the lodge, you may need to make a quick pit stop, so the drop-seat construction was a number one priority—the challenge was to not have it look super technical. We wanted it to look streamlined with a more modern, feminine fit,” Eichner says. Also filling a void, Marmot debuts the Gore-Tex Performance three-layer Women’s Cheeky Pant with removable, insulated shorts (mid-thigh length) to help her stay warm on the lift or to use as après-wear. “The designer, Lisa Hadley, lives in Jackson Hole, and her experience on cold ski mornings in the single digits or below zero was that she’d get chilled sitting on the chairlift. (These pants) are a great idea—a true solution borne out of trying to solve a problem,” says Brian LaPlante, Marmot’s category merchandise director. Lengthy boyfriend-style jackets, paired with slimmer pants, are also trending, he notes. Also trending: placement prints—mixing textured fabric with plain and print fabrics—for a playful yet controlled visual. “The mixed media (trend) has been happening in high fashion. It adds more complexity and depth, and creates a richer textual feel without being overt,” LaPlante says. The layering trend is happening in athletic and yoga wear—so ski apparel “is an interpretation of what’s already happening in general market,” he says. But like any apparel innovation, it’s typically driven by a need. Fortunately, there are stellar women on the front line putting those solutions in motion. —Morgan Tilton


Layer Up MIDLAYERS ARE SET FOR PERFORMANCE ON THE SLOPES AND OFF

Strafe's Drifter Jacket is a freeride midlayer with PrimaLoft Silver 60g quilted insulation, a ripstop DWR body and accent shell fabric. "The end result is a high-performance, technical piece that gives off a stylish, street-influenced vibe," said Strafe CEO John Gaston. Strafe doesn’t play favorites when picking ingredient partners, adding new eVent and PrimaLoft partnerships to its freeride line. "It's simply a matter of designing pieces that utilize each in the most effective manner." Eider designed its Aster Hoodie Jacket with American women in mind. Thermostretch side panels add flex and breathability, but its sweater-like outer and "housemade" alpine print add fashion appeal. "Yes – they’re functional," said Maro LaBlance, marketing manager, of Eider’s new midlayers. "But we’re designing them to be more of a fashion piece, too."

The Icepeak NAO looks race-ready on the slopes—or on a motorcycle—and the breathable, four-way ThermoStretch midlayer is brushed soft on the inside.

FABRICS, FIBERS AND FILLS

Stop by the Bergans of Norway booth and give the Strandåtind Air Flake Jacket a squeeze. It's filled with new Air Flake insulation, which the company says rebounds and breathes better than down. The new matte face fabric on the Big Agnes Women's Yarmony Hooded Jacket gives a different look to the wind- and water-resistant puffy, as does the non-traditional quilting pattern. The Botnica Light ML Hooded Jacket is Mammut's high-activity hybrid, with Pontetorto Technostretch across the front and

Manufacturers are adding more performance features to lighter midlayers. These sweaters, fleeces and pullovers will get plenty of exposure off the mountain. Helly Hansen paired its insulation system with different Polartec fabrics to create the women's Odin Flow Jacket, a stopand-go soft shell/fleece. The Enterprise Pullover from La Sportiva is a dynamic layer with four-way stretch and a durable face. It's stink-resistant, too. 686 gave its Tech Fleece a different face and DWR coating to ward off snow. "We have embraced the trend of people wearing these traditional midlayers as their outer layers as part of their daily routine in town," says Brent Sandor, 686's marketing director. With Han Solo back in theaters, it only follows that vests are cool again. SmartWool, Voormi and NuDown offer insulating vests designed for active pursuits or highstyle lounging. —M.T. Elliott

▲ ICEPEAK NAO

STREET SMARTS

STOP AND PULLOVER

SIAsnowshow.com DAY 3 | SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016

▲ UNDER ARMOUR WOMEN'S REACTOR HOODIE

Jacket designers are always in search of ways to improve thermal regulation. This year, brands made technical breakthroughs by assembling existing materials in new ways. Under Armour matched its new vertical-constructed insulation with lining and face fabrics that would allow the widest range of active comfort. The ColdGear Reactor jacket wicks, breathes and vents just enough. Its startand-stop quilt lines are a practical innovation, with added style. "The end result is a jacket that adapts and reacts, but also has an aesthetic that Under Armour can own that is differentiated in mostly a sea of sameness," says Matt Page, the brand's senior director of outdoor performance. Marmot’s Terrawatt jacket takes on traditional hybrids with a composite baffle construction that creates "threedimensional" thermal migration, moving heat across lateral and vertical layers. The secret is in the net baffling, which holds in 800-fill down, yet allows warm air to permeate. Brian La Plante, Marmot outerwear category manager, explains the Terrawatt "uses air flow through the fabric layers to circulate the body heat trapped in the down baffling throughout garment." 686 debuts its Down Thermograph insulation system in the Ether Jacket, a wicking, breathable jacket that saves weight through careful placement of lightweight down in key core spots.

Eider’s new Aster Hoodie Jacket combines fashion appeal and a cozy look with functionality. The brand’s new line of midlayers can be seen in booth #1039.

▲ MARMOT TERRAWATT JACKET

THERMAL REGULATORS

thinner Dryfast elsewhere. For Dare2b, black is the new black. Its weather-resistant Shadow Side Sweater builds off a performance polyester body with stylish knit sleeves, ribbed collar and metal zips. Alp-n-Rock is all about fit and function, says CEO Susanne Reich. This week, Alpn-Rock features the Geneva Parka, made from its Urbanshell nylon wool blend fabric.

PICK OF THE DAY

▲ NUDOWN ECHO LAKE VEST

IN THE APPAREL CATEGORY, CUSTOMERS WILL find the widest range of performance and styling in midlayers. For 2016-17, weatherproofed midlayers continue to get play as outer layers, puffy jackets cram in more warmth at less weight, and light layer options compete for wear-everywhere appeal.

▲ MAMMUT WOMEN'S BOTNICA LIGHT ML HOODED JACKET

▲ BIG AGNES WOMEN'S YARMONY JACKET

MIDLAYERS | TOP TRENDS

29


TOP TRENDS | HIGH-END DESIGN

Cozy and Warm DRAMATIC CUTS, AVANT-GARDE KNITS AND TEXTURES ARE TAKING OVER LUXURY WEAR A SUPERHERO STYLE IS SWEEPING OVER THE FINEST APPAREL FOR 201617. Roomy cuts (like in sleeveless cloaks) deliver comfort and keep away cold with cutting-edge style. Knits and knit textures are also in vogue. Wool continues to dominate, but threads have undergone a handful of innovative processes to make them more resilient and enjoyable to wear. For 2016-17, Krimson Klover introduces luxury wear punctuated by oversized hooded capes, generous ponchos, chunky turtlenecks and boxy sweaters. “The style makes a statement while keeping you cozy and warm,” says Kelly Allen, Krimson Klover product development and technical design manager. The 846 Alchemy is an cape with a generous renaissance-meets-contemporary hood that’s knit out of a boiled Merino and cotton blend. Just as generously cut, the 840 Knotted Up is a 27-inch long Mohair-blend cable poncho with a thickset, luscious turtleneck collar. Jail Jam likewise debuts two knitted ponchos—Cape Cliché and Cape Honey—in the Granadilla collection. The brand also uses a new sublimation print process for knitted fabrics and neoprene, which expands color possibilities while maintaining aesthetic precision. “We are seeing two different currents of trends: a gypsy-chic revival mood, which seems to come straight from the 70s with geometrical patterns and pastel and earth tones. The second trend is opposite: It’s closer to the high-tech culture with reflective fabrics, cool tones and minimalistic shapes,” says Flavia Russo, marketing and communications manager for Jail Jam. “Fashion reflects changes in society. We are living in a transitional phase looking for a balance between a new hyper-technological lifestyle and a more reassuring research of the past.” Pushing fabric limits, Eider announces the backcountry Eider Shaper Jacket with a proprietary bi-density woven fabric called Defender High-Density. The blend weaves heavier threads where more durability is needed next to sections of lighter threads, which allows for seam-free transition, weight reduction and increased durability. The Shaper also features the brand-new exclusive Fix-a-Shape zipper—designed in partnership with YKK—with an ergonomic curve to fit better around the chin and protect the face. Dale of Norway launches the lightweight Ulv (Norwegian for wolf) Sweater, with a new super-soft Merino lamb’s wool that’s air-spun—a technique that adds more space between stitches—and weighs 60 percent less than the brand’s traditional knits. And the

PICK OF THE DAY For perfect and comfy après ski apparel, look no further than Jail Jam’s capes in its Granadilla collection. The cape is reminiscent of what Jail Jam says is today’s “gypsy-chic revival mood,” influenced by the 70s. Stop by Jail Jam’s booth, #1315. hooded Stryn Jacket combines lightweight Knitshell wool fabric with a new breathable WoolShell-fabric that’s water, stain and dirt resistant—for skiing or everyday wear. In ladies’ lifestyles, Bergans of Norway releases the technical yet stylish, mid-thigh length Flora Hybrid Coat. The fabric combo—wool-polyester Pontetorto Tecnowool and a softshell fabric that’s wind and water repellant—barricades the elements and offers a refined look with a slight textural contrast. “Consumers are looking for more sophisticated muted colors, softer fabrics and subtle patterns,” says Keith Patterson, Bergans USA vice president of sales and marketing. “Layering is still important, but Bergans is seeing a growing trend in insulated pieces, especially using softshell outer fabrics, and in the use of synthetic or down-blend mixed insulations.” The 2015 SIA Snow Sports Market Intelligence Report reveals that insulated shell sales increased last season by 15 percent in dollars sold, up to $710 million—whereas regular shells sold $251 million, and soft shells decreased by 7 percent to $91 million. To meet the demand, Bergans adds the Kongsberg—a four-way stretch softshell jacket that’s insulated with PrimaLoft Gold Insulation Active – designed for alpine skiing. And, for ski touring and mountaineering, the new packable, down-style Strandåtind AirFlake Jacket premiers AirFlake insulation: a synthetic fiber manufactured from a polyester yarn. The down alternative doesn’t collapse on itself, which increases product design capabilities with the option of vertical chambers. Outerwear aside, Krimson Klover offers sets of Luxury Long Johns: pairs of quarter-zip tops and bottoms featuring custom-illustrated patterns in a new buttery Merino blend. —Morgan Tilton KRIMSON KLOVER 840 KNOTTED UP SWEATER

▲ BERGANS OF NORWAY FLORA HYBRID COAT▲ EIDER SHAPER JACKET

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SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 3 SIAsnowshow.com

▲ DALE OF NORWAY STYRN JACKET


BASE LAYERS | TOP TRENDS

Dialing In Comfort BRANDS FOCUS ON LIGHTWEIGHT, BREATHABLE UNDERGARMENTS THAT ALSO INSULATE TOUR THE SNOW SHOW FLOOR AND YOU'LL FIND BASE LAYERS IN A variety of weights and constructions designed with different exertion levels in mind. From ultrathin next-to-skin pieces to sweater-like tops, there are plenty of options for every customer. That's good news for retailers who can lend their expertise to guiding customers to the best selections, and that's plural because every wardrobe needs a base layer for every condition. "We’re starting to see consumers understand that it’s the close-to-body surface area that matters most," said Benjamin Fleming, Woolpower product manager. "Customers want lightweight and breathable undergarments that insulate so they don’t have to have bulky outerwear." The future looks bright for base layers. Last season, sales grew 6 percent to $151 million, according to the 2015 SIA Snow Sports Market Intelligence Report. That growth comes in the face of growing market competition from fashion brands offering thin black tights as outerwear.

WINTRY MIX

Put sheep farmers on notice, more wool is on the way. For 2016-17, more brands are responding to consumer demand by incorporating wool into their base layers. Poly-wool stalwart Terramar debuts its Thermawool line of crew, half- and full-zips for men and women. For high-intensity workouts in cold weather, Kari Traa adds wool to wicking DriRelease polyester for its Rett line, which includes a half-zip and pant in modern alpine prints. Aiming for a sweet spot of thermal range, the Woolpower Short Zip LITE is a 200gsm-weight wool layer with synthetic touches for shape and durability.

$151 MILLION SALES

WEIGHT CLASSES

Base layers push into sweater territory in 2016-17. Weighing in at 290g, the 100-percent wool Snøull line from Bergans of Norway is styled with a Jacquard pattern so it can serve as a standalone layer indoors and fits loose enough to allow a sleeker layer below. The Snøull tops and tights are machine-washable. Le Bent brings its blend of bamboo and wool stateside for the first time, with a heavier line that includes the LeBase Definitive 260-Gram 1/2-Zip Mid-Layer. "After a couple of years focused on our 200-gram base layers, the 260-gram half-zip is probably the most popular category of base layer garment," says Josh Fonner, Le Bent North America's managing director. At the other end of the spectrum is the superlight Thermal I basewear from Voormi. This lightweight option is a fit for people who “burn hot” or prioritize wicking over warmth. Helly Hansen's Dry Performance Crew is a breathable, wicking base on the mountain, with a loose fit and comfort touches for everyday wear. Patagonia introduces a waffleknit polyester Speed Waffle Crew with Polygenie odor control. From its trail collection, the piece works as an active top or cold-weather base option.

(IN DOLLARS)

8%

BOLD AND BEAUTIFUL

KRIMSON KLOVER 869 SIGNATURE HANDPAINT

Krimson Klover sets itself apart with its hand-painted 869 Signature quarter-zip tops, with a cushy feel for those in the market for unique sportswear. Patagonia brings new colors and a spacy nature print to its stretchy women's Capilene Daily collection. A strong contender for boldest color blocking, Ortovox's midweight Merino Rock'N'Wool Overalls include a hood and high-rise leg length. —M.T. Elliott

SIAsnowshow.com DAY 3 | SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016

▲ BERGANS OF NORWAY SNØULL HALF-ZIP

▲ TERRAMAR HALF-ZIP

▲ ORTOVOX 185 MERINO ROCK'N'WOOL

▲ KARI TRAA NAVY

31


& AT THE SHOW | WHO WHERE

Find booth numbers and Show layout at SIAsnowshow.com/floorplan. Download the SIA Snow Show App at SIAsnowshow.com/showapp.

Exhibitors

MORE THAN 900 BRANDS ON DISPLAY AT THE SHOW (AS OF 1.14.16; SUBJECT TO CHANGE) Company

Company

Company

Company

Company

Company

686 ............................................... 3365 10th Mountain Division Foundation, Inc.............................16 2XU................................................. 1148 4F.................................................. 530 540 Snowboards.......................... 3378 Abom, Inc....................................1965A ACADEMY Snowboard Co..........2070 Adaptive Spirit...................................19 Advanced Racking Systems........3442 Adventure SnowSports............. 562 Agent Outerwear....................... 435 AION............................................... 3075 Airblaster....................................... 2670 Airhole Facemasks....................... 2071 Aksels............................................. 2551 All Resort Furnishings.................2400 Aloha Products LLC.................. 1270 Alpaca Imports............................. 1330 Alpina Sports Corp....................... 2703 Alp-n-Rock LLC.............................. 1321 Amerex Group................................ 609 American Express OPEN.........3100 American Institute for Avalanche Research and Education (AIARE).................... 3657 anon............................................... 1561 Apex Sports Group LLC...............4311 Arbor.............................................. 1365 Arcade Belt Co.............................. 2371 Arctix.............................................. 2717 Armada.......................................... 4350 Artesania, Inc................................ 2138 ARVA............................................... 3412 AscentCRM.................................... 3305 Ascente Ski Company.............. 4345 Ashbury Eyewear......................... 3176 Astis 2516 Athalon Sportgear, Inc................4114 Atomic USA, Inc................. 3923, 4123 Auclair Sports, Inc........................ 1324 AWSM LLC.................................... 973 Backcountry Access, Inc..............3942 Backcountry Experience............. 3657 BbTALKIN.................................. 4663 Bearpaw Apparel....................... 840 Becker Glove International LLC.....................1273 Belong Designs............................. 1170 Bench............................................. 1042 Bent Metal Binding Works......... 2871 Bergans of Norway........................ 721 Bern Unlimited, Inc...................... 3480 Besso Imports........................... 1507 Big Agnes, Inc................................ 1671 Billabong USA........................... 2361 Black Crows Skis......................1965BC Blackstrap....................................1965B Blanc Noir.................................. 1311 Blizzard.......................................... 3701 Blossom Skis................................. 4345 Blue Acorn..................................... 1076 Board Retailers Association......... 669 Bollé ................................................. 552 Bomber Alpine Snowboard Outfitters.............................. 2115 BONFIRE........................................ 2671 Booster Strap................................ 3411 Boot Doc........................................ 3335 Boulder Gear................................ 2724 Braven........................................ 4561 Brekka............................................ 1051 Bridgedale North America..................... 2448 Briko USA....................................... 4111 Bronto Software, Inc................... 1075 Buff, Inc.......................................... 3148 BULA............................................... 1051 Burton Snowboards.................... 1665 C3.................................................... 3357

C4 Belts.......................................... 1370 CAM Commerce Solutions........... 434 CandyGrind................................... 1569 CAPiTA Snowboarding................3357 Captuer Headwear...................... 3674 Caravan Skis............................. 4445 Carver Skateboards.................1974 Celerant Technology Corporation................................ 434 Celtek............................................. 3370 CenterStone Technologies, Inc.....................1736 CEP Compression Sportswear...4310 Cerevo, Inc................................. 3973 Chaos............................................. 2423 Chapplicator LLC...................... 2937 Choucas Hats.............................. 703 Cirque Mountain Apparel...........2540 COAL Headwear........................... 3357 Coalition Snow.......................... 4469 Colmar........................................... 1317 Colorado Original Outdoor Products................................... 2817 Colorado Ski Country USA..........1739 Colour Wear.................................. 2071 Copper Mountain Resort............2215 Corbeaux................................... 4307 CP Sports North America...........3444 CRAFT @ SIA.................................. 4469 Craghoppers................................. 1124 crazeeHeads, inc.......................... 1123 Crescent Moon Snowshoes.......3117 CTR (Chaos Thermal Regulation)............................... 2423 Dainese USA Inc........................... 2117 DAKINE........................................... 2557 Dalbello Sports LLC..................... 4118 Dale of Norway, Inc....................... 711 Dare2b................................ 1117, 1124 Darn Tough Vermont.................. 2200 Db Equipment........................... 2780 DC Shoes, Inc................................ 1673 DCURVE...................................... 1571 Deeluxe....................................... 1965D Demon United.............................. 1667 Descente North America, Inc.....1711 Deuter USA................................... 2814 Deviation Ski & Snowboard Works........................................ 3621 Dinosaurs Will Die Snowboards............................. 1970 DIOMI............................................... 601 DMOS......................................... 3075 Donek Snowboards................. 2115 Double Diamond Sportswear....2134 DOWP a snowboard group........4469 DPS SKIS........................................ 3509 Dragon Alliance............................ 2565 Drop MFG...................................... 2645 DryGuy........................................... 3138 Dynastar Skis................................ 3708 Eider................................................ 1039 Eisbär Sportmodeu Gmbh....................................... 718 Elan Blanc...................................... 1930 Elan Skis......................................... 2703 Electric............................................ 2957 Elm Company............................ 3971 EMU Australia............................. 741 Endurance Enterprises, Inc........1800 Envy Snow Sports..................... 4448 Erik Sports-WhiteWoods.............3501 Erin Snow...................................... 1527 Eurosock International............... 1145 Everest Designs........................ 2140 Exel Sports.................................... 2916 E-Z UP International, Inc............. 4443 Faction Skis................................... 4145 Fairweather Ski Works............ 4469 Falke USA....................................... 3138

Farm to Feet.................................. 4039 Fast Strap...................................... 3417 Fat-ypus Skis................................. 4245 Fera International Corp.............. 1111 Fischer Skis US.............................. 4411 FITS ............................................... 2416 Fix Binding Co........................... 2476 Flow Sports, Inc............................ 2961 Flux Binding Systems.................. 1475 FlyLow Gear.................................. 3112 Fox River Mills, Inc........................ 2517 Franco SnowShapes.................... 4469 Freezy Freakies......................... 2274 Freyja.Ca.......................................... 733 Friends of Colorado Avalanche Information Center (CAIC)............................ 3657 Full Tilt Boots................................ 3723 G3 Genuine Guide Gear, Inc......3306 Garmin USA.................................. 4362 Geographical Norway............. 1748 Gilson Boards............................... 1369 Giro Sport Design........................ 3649 GloveTacts................................. 2533 GNU ............................................... 2871 GO PUCK....................................... 4563 Goal Zero....................................... 3521 Goggle Grip................................... 2935 GoGlove..................................... 3975 Goldbergh..................................... 1415 Goldwin America, Inc.................... 535 GOODE Ski Technologies........... 3320 GoPro............................................. 4357 Gordini USA, Inc........................... 2645 GoScope........................................ 4361 Grabber, Inc.................................. 3405 Gramicci.................................... 1769 Grassroots California.................. 1073 Grenade, Inc................................. 1473 Hand Out Gloves.......................... 1173 Hatley USA...................................... 833 HEAD Wintersports..................... 2924 Heat Factory USA, Inc.................. 1700 Helly Hansen................................. 1720 HESTRA GLOVES LLC................... 2120 Hey Sport....................................... 4345 High Fives Non-Profit Foundation................................. 872 High Sierra.................................... 3633 Hippie Board............................. 1169 Holden........................................... 3478 Holmenkol.US............................... 4401 Homeschool Outerwear............. 3374 Honey Stinger............................... 1670 Horizon Agency, Inc..................... 2700 Hot Chillys..................................... 3330 Hotfingers Gloves........................ 1703 Hotronic......................................... 3335 Hovland Snowskates............... 3675 HOWL............................................. 2375 Humanity Snow............................ 3472 i.N.i. Cooperative............................ 765 Icelandic Design........................... 2242 Icelantic Skis.................................. 3309 Icepeak........................................... 1034 IFA Prowear..................................... 615 ImedgeBoards LLC................... 4243 Impact Canopies USA.................. 4314 Implus LLC..................................... 3138 Incase......................................... 4661 Indigo Ski USA LLC................... 3414 Industry + Intelligence Live........... 679 International Avalanche Nest-Egg Fund (IAN)................2475 International Skiing History Association (ISHA)........................21 Itasca Footwear by C.O. Lynch Enterprises..................... 737 JAIL JAM.......................................... 1315 JASEBOARDS USA, Inc..............2276 Jonathan Paul Eyewear................. 451 Joshua Tree Skin Care................. 1701 Jupa Sports................................ 1505 K2 Skis............................................ 3949 K2 Snowboarding........................ 3957 Kamik......................................... 1048 Kapan Kent Co, Inc..................... 600 Karakoram.................................... 3068 Karbon........................................... 1730 Kari Traa........................................ 2238 KASK America, Inc........................ 3342 Kastle USA..................................... 4101

KEL52.......................................... 4657 KGB SPORT................................... 3800 Khombu........................................... 715 Killtec NA Inc................................. 2111 Kiss My Face LLC.......................... 1400 Kitten Factory LLC........................ 4237 KJUS North America, Inc............... 403 KneeBinding, Inc.......................... 3511 Kombi Ltd., Inc.............................. 2930 Komperdell................................... 2920 Krimson Klover............................. 1536 Kuhl Clothing................................ 2413 KULKEA.......................................... 2529 KUUsport Mfg. Ltd....................... 4109 Kwik Tek, Inc................................. 3514 La Sportiva N.A., Inc..................... 3630 LACROIX SKIS..........................1965L LandYachtz.................................... 1669 Lange Ski Boots............................ 3708 Laundromat.................................... 524 L-Bow Mittens................................. 727 Le Bent......................................... 457 Learn to Ski and Snowboard Month............................................24 LEKI USA, Inc................................. 3120 Level USA....................................... 2360 Lib Tech.......................................... 2871 Liberty Mountain......................... 2421 Liberty Skis.................................... 3725 Linda Richards, Inc.................. 1122 Line Skis......................................... 3523 Little Blue House by Hatley.......... 833 Loki LLC...................................... 1278 Look Bindings............................... 3708 Lorpen North America, Inc......... 1334 Lost Horizons Imports.................. 725 Lucky Bums, Inc........................... 2710 LUHTA USA Ltd............................. 1034 M. Miller........................................... 818 Mad Bomber Company.............. 1332 Mammut Sports Group NA........3517 Manzella Products....................... 3447 Marhar Snowboards................... 2373 Marker USA........................ 4417, 4420 Marmot Mountain LLC................ 1339 MasterFit Enterprises.................. 3644 MDXONE........................................ 2275 Meier Skis...................................... 3317 Mervin Manufacturing............ 2871 Message Factory, Inc................... 4301 Mitchie’s Matchings....................... 513 Mons Royale USA......................... 3945 Montana Sport North America, Inc............................. 3639 Moon Boot.................................... 3601 Mortali, Inc.................................. 974 MOTOTV Networks.................. 2143 Mountain Collective....................... 565 Mountain Uniforms..................... 1534 MTN Approach............................. 2359 MyPakage...................................... 3375 National Ski & Snowboard Retailers Association (NSSRA)..................................... 4308 National Ski Areas Association (NSAA).......................23 Native Eyewear........................ 2542 NEFF ............................................... 3661 Neve Designs................................ 3718 Never Summer Industries.......... 1359 NeverWet.................................... 641 Newland.................................... 1909 Niche Snowboards...................... 1977 Nidecker North America.......................... 3070, 3167 Nightmare....................................... 971 Nike Vision.................................... 2565 NIKITA............................................ 2671 NILS ............................................... 1742 Nitro Snowboards....................... 1978 Nordbron..................................... 701 Nordic Center............................... 3115 Nordica USA....................... 3603, 3704 Northern Lites Snowshoes.....3622 NPD - Sports and Leisure Trends......................................... 437 NuDown, Inc................................. 2133 Oakley, Inc..................................... 1345 One Way Sport USA..................... 3118 OneBall.......................................... 2876 O’Neill............................................. 1557 Onewheel.................................... 665

Optic Nerve................................... 3347 ORAGE........................................... 1750 Ortovox USA Inc........................... 2814 OSBE Helmets.............................. 4315 Outdoor Designs.......................... 2421 Outdoor Gear, Inc........................ 2724 Outdoor Industries Women's Coalition (OIWC)........................ 548 Outdoor Survival Canada........... 2716 Outdoor Tech............................... 4161 Ovan........................................... 2362 Owner Operator............................ 869 Pajar Canada................................ 1523 Parajumpers................................. 1515 Patagonia, Inc............................... 1857 Pepper’s Polarized Eyewear.......2445 Phunkshun Wear LLC.................... 762 Picture Organic Clothing...........1965P Pinnacle Designs.......................... 2714 PISTIL.............................................. 2229 Pit Viper........................................... 448 Planks Clothing America, Inc............................. 4037 POC ............................................... 3350 point6 LLC..................................... 1530 Point-of-Rental Software............4404 POLARMAX.................................... 2334 PolarPro......................................... 4559 Polartec LLC.............................. 1257 Popticals.................................... 1375 POW Gloves.................................. 3477 Powder Point Sports..................... 740 Pret Inc........................................... 3937 Pretty Great LLC............... 2578, 2671 Protect Our Winters (POW)........2324 PSIA-AASI......................................... 153 Public Snowboards...................... 1478 Pulse................................................. 757 Purnell......................................... 540 Quiksilver, Inc............................... 1678 Radical! Gloves............................. 1271 Rain Retail........................................ 430 Rawik.............................................. 2724 Recco Systems Ltd.........................UL1 Red Bull Racing Eyewear........1269 Redfeather Snowshoes............... 3605 Regina Imports LLC..................... 1511 Remind Insoles............................. 2272 Rental World - Backshop............ 4501 reusch SnowSports..................... 2136 Revision Skis............................. 4469 Revo Sunglasses........................... 2146 Ride Snowboards.............. 3965, 4171 Riot Skis..................................... 4446 Ripclear.......................................... 2650 Roces USA, Inc.......................... 4305 Rocky Mountain Sunscreen.......2554 Rocky Mountain Underground.... 3326 Rodin Ltd....................................... 4469 Rome Snowboard Design Syndicate.................................... 965 Rossignol............................ 3614, 3714 Rossignol Apparel........................ 3818 ROXA Sports.................................. 4107 Roxy ............................................... 1678 Ruffolo Enterprises, Inc............... 2553 Rukka............................................. 1034 Ruroc Ltd..................................... 431 Saga Outerwear............................. 962 Saint Bernard’s........................... 769 Salomon Snowboards................. 2178 Salomon USA..................... 3830, 4130 Sandbox......................................... 2270 SAXX Underwear Co.................... 3377 SCARPA North America, Inc.......3109 Schure Sports U.S.A., Inc............. 1730 Scott Sports........................ 2940, 3147 Screamer, Inc.................................. 730 SeatRack.................................... 4437 Sector 9.......................................... 1062 Sego Skis........................................ 4449 Seirus Innovation......................... 2630 SESSIONS....................................... 2578 SH+................................................ 453 SheJumps........................................ 450 Sherpani...................................... 539 Shred Optics................................. 3961 SIA Sourcing Seminar Area........ S423 SIMS Apparel............................. 1769 Sioeye Inc.................................. 4462 SKEA, LTD...................................... 2411 Skhoop........................................... 1430

Ski and Snowboard Mechanics Workshops............................... 4210 Ski Kare, Inc................................... 3505 Ski Sundries and Supplies..........2124 SkiA Designs.................................. 4405 Skida............................................... 2000 SkiMetrix, Ltd................................ 3411 Slant Skis................................... 4244 Slide On......................................... 3411 SLOKKER SPORTS NORTH AMERICA.................4339 Slope Ropes............................... 2142 Slytech Protection........................ 3961 SmartWool Corporation............... 957 SMITH....................... 2850, 2950, 3048 Smokin’ Snowboards.................. 1175 Sno Skins, Inc.................................. 915 Snoogee Boards.......................... 970 SnoPlanks...................................... 2374 Snow Angel................................... 1939 Snow Dragons.............................. 2724 Snow Gliders LLC...................... 4469 Snow Show Daily............................ 441 Snowboarders and Skiers for Christ..................................... 772 Snowjam Canada, Inc.................. 3378 SnowStoppers.............................. 2938 SOLE........................................... 3939 SOS Outreach....................................22 Soul Poles...................................... 3418 SP United USA, Inc.......................4557 Spacecraft..................................... 2269 Spark R&D..................................... 2470 SplitPea Sound.......................... 4659 Sport Design Sweden................. 622 Sport Obermeyer Ltd.................. 1803 Sportcaster Company, Inc............ 757 Sportlast USA............................ 1331 Sports Accessories America, Inc............................. 2720 Sportswear of Sweden (SOS)... 1508 Sportube........................................ 2701 Spy.................................................. 2651 Spyder Active Sports, Inc.............. 903 Spyderco........................................ 4147 STANCE....................................... 3475 Stepchild Snowboards................1478 Stockli Outdoor Sports................3323 Strafe Outerwear......................... 3215 SubQ Designs............................ 4239 Sun Bum LLC................................ 2477 Sun Valley Ski Tools, Inc..............3944 Suncountry Sales and Distributing LLC..................... 543 Sunice............................................... 744 Sunrise......................................... 616 Superdry...................................... 569 Superfeet Worldwide, Inc...........2520 Swany............................................. 1703 Sweet Protection.......................... 3946 Sweet Turns.................................. 2534 Swix Sport USA, Inc......................3102 SYNC............................................... 2948 Tecnica USA....................... 3601, 3701 Ternua............................................ 1334 Terramar Sports, Inc................... 2644 The Chill Foundation........................25 The Interior Plain Project.......3972 The Sessions @ SIA...................... 4565 The Soze Group (TSG).................4407 ThermaCELL Heated Products................................ 3135 ThirtyTwo...................................... 2265 Thorlo, Inc..................................... 1520 Thule, Inc....................................... 3302 Tiki Toss......................................... 2447 TOBE Outerwear........................ 545 TOKO.............................................. 3102 Transpack...................................... 2935 Trespass USA................................ 1030 Turbine.......................................... 4365 Turtle Fur....................................... 1125 Under Armour................................ 749 Uniform Gallery............................ 4400 Union Binding Company............ 3357 United States of America Snowboard & Freeski Assoc (USASA)...............................20 US Ski and Snowboard Hall of Fame..................................17 USRA - Rep Associations..................18 UVEX Sports, Inc........................... 2910

Be our Sales Representative Grab the opportunity now Colorado

Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky & Illinois

Meet us at booth # 1505

California, Nevada

Texas

Toll Free 1-800-363-1898 • www.jupa.ca

New exhibitors are bolded

32

SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 3 SIAsnowshow.com


Company

Company

Company

Company

Company

Company

Vail Resorts Inc / Epic Pass........... 458 Vans................................................ 2865 Vapur............................................ 662 Vauhti Wax Technologies....... 4343 VEMO Sports LLC......................... 4301 Vigo Imports............................... 621 VillageHouse................................... 639 Volcom........................................... 3665 Volkl ............................................... 4323 VonZipper...................................... 3165 Voormi........................................... 4369 Vuarnet........................................1965V Watson’s Bodywear....................... 837 WAXD Laces.................................. 1174 Whitedot Skis US...................... 4440 WI-ME SNOWBOARDS................ 2478 Wintersteiger, Inc......................... 3335 Wolfie Furs Canada....................... 825 Woolpower................................ 2156 WSI Sports..................................... 1313 X22 Snowboarding................... 1374 XS Helmets.................................... 3647 XSories........................................... 4655 Yaktrax........................................... 3138 YodelTECH................................. 4658 YRC Freight...................................... 619 Yukon Charlies............................. 3514 Zanheadgear................................ 1069 ZANIER Sports Inc......................1965Z Zarges Inc...................................... 3136 ZDAR Boot USA............................ 1503 Zeal Optics.................................... 2161 Zensah......................................... 643 Zion Snowboards..................... 3574

Beijing Huafu Manufacturing Ltd.............. S324 CBF Labels Inc............................... S522 CHANGZHOU GAODA SPORTINGS CO., LTD........... S321 Concept III Textiles International............................ S418 drirelease.................................. S318 DTS, Inc.......................................... S320 DURAFLEX..................................... S415 Erictex Fashion Co Ltd................. S114 Global Merino............................... S414 Guangzhou Hangbao . Group Co Ltd........................... S124 Guangzhou Yijia Optical Technique Co Ltd................. S223 Hebei Joyful I&E Trade Co., Ltd................................... S221 Jiangyin Diamond . Tools Co Ltd........................... S123 Jining Glove and Sewing Product Col Ltd........................ S120 Jining Jianhua Zhongxing Ski Products Co. Ltd............ S121 Maxland Sportswear Industrial Co Ltd...................... S520 Paltex Company Ltd................ S519 Roaly Merchandises Inc.............. S313 Shenzhen Pengyifa Industrial Co Ltd...................... S421 Shenzhen Reanson Products Co. LTD..................... S220 Shifan Racewear, Inc................... S118 Solis Fabric Technology Co Ltd........................................ S115 Suzhou Zhongbo Textile Garment Co. Ltd.................. S218 Sympatex Technologies, Inc...... S420 TEXLAND & NEXKO . CO. LTD................................... S620 Toray International America, Inc............................. S417 Union Line Textile Co Ltd........................... S515 Vertical Source, Inc...................... S422 Welltern Enterprise Co. Ltd....................................... S517 Xiamen Evergreen Industrial Corp..................... S323

YKK (USA), Inc................................ S521 Zhaoqing Bohan Sports Co., LTD........................ S224

BENT METAL Black Crows Black Diamond Equipment Blizzard Skis Bolle Sunglasses & Goggles Boot Doc Burton Snowboards Capita snowboards Caravan Skis Dalbello Ski Boots DC Snowboards/Boots/ . Outerwear Deviation Skis & . Snowboards Dinosaurs Will Die DPS Skis Dragon Dynafit Dynastar Skis Elan Electric Faction Skis First Degree Fischer Skis XC Fisher Ski Fitovers Eyewear Fix Bindings Flow Snowboarding Flux Snowboard Bindings Full Tilt Boots G3 Gilson Boards LLC Giro Goggles Giro Snow Helmets GNU GO PUCK Goode Carbon Ski Products GoPro Cameras Head Winter Sports: Alpine Skis, . Ski Boots, Bindings Hotronic Hovland Snowskates Icelantic Skis Jonathan Paul Eyewear Jones Snowboards Julbo Optics K2 Skis, Boots, Helmets, . Goggles, Poles and Accessories K2 Snowboarding

Kastle Skis La Sportiva Landyachtz Snowboards Lange Ski Boots LIB TECH Liberty Skis LINE Skis Look Bindings Marhar Snowboards Marker Ski Bindings, . Helmets & Goggles Meier Skis MOMENT SKI Morrow Snowboards Native Eyewear Never Summer Snowboards Niche Snowboards Nike Goggles Nitro Snowboards Nordica accessories Nordica Boots Nordica Skis Northern Lites Snowshoes Now Bindings Oakley ON3P Skis Outdoor Technology POC Helmets, . Goggles & Armor Pret Helmets Ride Snowboards Rocky Mountain Underground Rome Snowboards Rossignol Alpine, Nordic, . Snowboard ROXY SNOWBOARDS Salewa Footwear Salomon Alpine Salomon Goggles Salomon Helmets Salomon Nordic Sandbox Helmets Scarpa Scott Boots

Scott Sports-Hardgoods/ . Softgoods Sego Skis Signal Snowboards SIMS Snowboards Skia Slant Skis Slash Snowboards Smith Smokin Snowboards Spy Optic Start Wax and Poles Stepchild Snowboards STOCKLI OUTDOOR SPORTS Superfeet Worldwide Swix Alpine: Ski Tuning . Equipment, Ski Poles Swix Sport USA SWIX Wax, Tuning and . Poles, UT/WY Technine Tecnica Ski Boots Toko Wax, Tuning and . Ski Care Products Triple 8 Tyrolia: Alpine and Alpine . Touring Ski Bindings Union bindings UVEX UVEX Winter/Bike Helmets, . Goggles and Sunglasses Vans Voile Manufacturing Volkl USA Von Zipper Sunglasses . and Goggles Whitedot Skis Wintersteiger Yeah for It! Distribution . (Bataleon, Lobster, Switchback) Yes Snowboards Yukon Charlie's Zeal Optics

3M Thinsulate Insulation.................................. S126 AMATERRACE, Inc........................ S315 Aparso (Fujian) Sportswear Co Ltd........................................ S117

CRAFT

All CRAFT exhibitors can be found at booth #4469 Coalition Snow DOWP a snowboard group Fairweather Ski Works Franco SnowShapes Revision Skis Rodin Ltd Snow Gliders LLC

ON-SNOW DEMO* 32 ThirtyTwo Snowboard . Boots & Outerwear 4FRNT Skis Adidas Snowboarding Alpina Anon Apex Ski Boots Arbor Collective . (Snowboards and Skateboards) Armada Skis Atomic Atomic Nordic Atomic USA Alpine

the #1 RESOURCE for Mountain Professionals around the world!

6 Issues a Year Exclusive In-depth Resort Profiles Annual Top 10 Under 30 Rental Buyer’s Guide Best & Worst in Resort Marketing New Products Mountain Spy New Retail Products & Trends Annual Terrain Park Contest Economic Analysis & Market Trends And much, much more.

WWW.SAMINFO.COM Subscribe online at www.saminfo.com/subscribe RECEIVE 50% OFF: Enter offer code NEW16 Contact us at: sarah@saminfo.com

AUTOMATED RACE EDGE FINISHING · Race ski prepared at competition level · Razor sharp, burr-free polished edges · Angle adjustment in 0.5’ steps, up to 4’ · Programmable for all ski shapes; SL, GS, SG, DH · Electronically controlled pressure curves for precisely defined grinding pressure

PE R FEC SIDE E T DGE R AC E FIN ISH

SAM is also the host of mountain operation events including Cutter’s Camp & Summer Ops Camp MONTANA RACE EDGE

SUBSCRIBE to sam

*In conjunction with the Western Winter Sports Representatives Association (WWSRA) Rocky Mountain Demo, and in partnership with Cross Country Ski Areas Association (CCSAA)

COME AND SEE US AT BOOTH #3639 MONTANA-INTERNATIONAL.COM


SPOTLIGHT | DISTILLERIES

Drink Up

UP FOR SOMETHING DIFFERENT? CRAFT DISTILLERIES ARE THE NEXT BIG THING IN COLORADO, AND – YOU’RE IN LUCK – THERE ARE SOME WITHIN A FEW MILES OF THE SHOW. BY LINDSAY KONZAK Mile High Spirits

MILE HIGH SPIRITS TASTING ROOM

MILES FROM THE SHOW: 1.2

Mile High Spirits in downtown Denver is a full-service distillery and tasting room producing whiskey, tequila, gin, vodka and rum. Sip it straight up or try one of Mile High’s specialty cocktails, such as the Denver Gold Rush (whiskey, honey syrup, lemon juice) or the Colorado Sunset (tequila, OJ, bing cherry juice). The spot also serves up six different Moscow Mules.

Rising Sun Distillery

200 S. Kalamath St.; 303-296-7440; stranahans.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 2.5

This Colorado whiskey mainstay, hot before the latest distillery craze, features an on-site Whiskey Lounge so you can get a taste of Stranahan’s in one of its signature cocktails. Stop by until 8:30 p.m. on Saturday, and Sunday through 5 p.m. If you’re lucky, you may be able to snag a coveted last-minute spot on a tour; check the website for availability.

Breckenridge Distillery

1330 Zuni St., Unit J; 303-534-1788 risingsundistillery.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 1.7

Hit this spot before 9 p.m. on Saturday to grab a taste of its extensive list of cocktails, which feature its own spirits: vodka, gin, eau de vies and brandy. The distillery offers up some unique combos, including the Dill Chili Martini and the Spicy Centennial Sipper, with cucumber, jalapeño, mint, vodka and ginger beer.

“No American skier's autobiography is ever likely to equal Warren Miller's in its wealth of reflection, detailed action, and anecdote. When you personally meet the sport's movers and shakers of the past 75 years in the pages of this book, it's because Warren knew them all through his movie-making and friendships. History is enriched.“ –John Fry

Stranahan’s

1925 Airport Road, Breckenridge; 303-296-7440 breckenridgedistillery.com MILES FROM THE ON-SNOW DEMO: 16

And here’s one for visiting after the On-Snow Demo at Copper Mountain. Just down the road in Breckenridge, stop by this top distillery of bourbon, vodka, rum and its own bitters. Enjoy free tastings and a laid-back tour.

FREEDOM FOUND M Y L I F E S TO RY

WARREN MILLER You know him as skiing’s greatest ambassador and as the godfather of action sports filmmaking. Now, here at last is the rest of Warren Miller’s extraordinary life story--and what happened behind the camera is even more remarkable than what you saw on the big screen.

On-sale date: Sept. 1, 2016, Publisher: Warren Miller Company, Hardcover, $29.95, 512 pages, 100-plus rarely seen photos Promoted in conjunction with the fall 2016 Warren Miller Film Tour, in national ski and outdoor publications, and in other multi-platform media. For ordering and other information, contact Andy Bigford (AndyBigford@gmail.com)

PHOTO COURTESY OF MILE HIGH SPIRITS

2201 Lawrence St.; 303-296-2226 drinkmilehighspirits.com


PRODUCT PICKS | AT THE SHOW

Wish List FEMALE FLOATER

Rossignol Super 7 W, Booth 3614

Now women can enjoy the tech of Rossignol's award-winning Super 7 line with a ski all their own. The new, schmearalicious Super 7 W features a carbon alloy matrix offering more power, edge bite and rebound to its 140/114/30 profile, augmenting its 19-meter turn radius, Powder Turn Rocker and Air Tip Technology (which keeps its weight down to just 1.9 kg). Plus, its purple-tipped colorway adds a feminine touch.

DISASTER-READY PHOTOS BY JULIE ELLISON AND ALTON RICHARDSON

Shred Bumper NOSHOCK, Booth 3961

Shred, the brainchild of Ted Ligety, introduces the Bumper NOSHOCK helmet, which uses two materials to prevent your brain from pain. The company’s very own Slytech NOSHOCK, a minimalistic material originally used in Slytech’s back protectors (Shred’s partner company), is on each side of the head to prevent linear impacts. Its INFINITE RAA material, on the other hand, is made of joystick-like absorption units that help the helmet take hard, non-linear hits.

PERFORMANCE PANTS Powder Point Sports Pants, Booth 740

Made in Denver by a brother-sister team who couldn’t find any ski pants they liked, Powder Point Sports pants are designed to be warm, yet super comfortable and flattering. The waterproof softshell fabric is breathable, stretchy and soft on the inside. Reminiscent of pants worn by bump skiers in the '80s, the men’s line features bold motifs such as flags and smiley faces at the knees. The women get patterned tuxedo stripes. Custom-printed designs are available, too.

WATERPROOF HITS RESET BUTTON

Voormi Fall Line Jacket, Booth 4369

Pagosa Springs, Colo.-based Voormi may be a relative newcomer to the outdoor industry, but it's not shy about introducing revolutionary new spins on wool technology. Most recently, the brand brings us Core Construction, what it claims is the first truly single-layer fabric to contain an integrated weatherproofing membrane. In layman’s terms: No lamination or coating layers. Instead, weather-resistant and other functional cores are woven directly into the fabric. “We’re able to create a whole spectrum and balance of air permeability, weather protection, softness and abrasion resistance,” says Timm Smith, marketing director. “The Core Construction technology, to us, represents an entirely new platform for innovation, a reset button of what’s possible in the world of performance composites.” Find the new tech in the Fall Line Jacket.

SIAsnowshow.com DAY 3 | SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016

35


AT THE SHOW | CALENDAR

Events

#SIA16 WHAT’S HAPPENING AT THE 2016 SIA SNOW SHOW

12-1 PM | I+I Live (Booth 679)

Daily Events Every day, all day | Booth 679 | SIA

I + I Live: Connect, recharge, socialize and push social media updates live with free wi-fi. Seminars throughout Show.

Every day, all day | Booth 3115 | SIA

Nordic Center: Come preview apparel, equipment, accessories and technologies specific to cross country and snowshoe.

Every day, all day | Sourcing Snow | SIA

Sourcing Snow: More than 50 raw material leaders showcase their services. Join seminars on sourcing, production & design.

Every day, all day | Booth 458 | SIA/Vail Resorts

Discounted Epic Pass Sales: SIA and Vail Resorts are partnering to offer attendees an exclusive Epic Pass for $319 per adult. Unlimited/unrestricted skiing benefits start Feb. 1, 2016.

Every day, all day | Booth 548 | OIWC

Women’s Lounge: Check out examples of how to best merchandise women’s hardgoods and softgoods for your store. Or stop by just to relax in a comfortable seating area and network away from the bustling floor.

7-9:30 AM | Room 103

Are Your Customers Listening To You? How to Develop Messaging that Engages Your Customers: Walk through how to clarify your target customers, develop an effective buyer persona profile, and create a profile of your business. This session will then use the profiles to build a concise Positioning Statement and a Messaging Platform for your business. Presented by Dan Smink and Ian Lancaster, C1 Partners

1-1:30 PM | Booth 4657 | KEL52 Raffle Event: Enter our drawing for your chance to win a POWR wireless helmet audio kit. There will be 10 lucky winners. 1:30-2:30 PM | I+I Live (Booth 679) Boom, Bust and B2B: Wholesale eCommerce Is Booming & Brands Holding Out Are Going Bust: This presentation will focus on how brands can use online wholesale solutions to increase sales with current customers, as well as effectively acquire new ones. Presented by Heath Wells, NuORDER 2-3 PM | Backcountry Experience (Booth 3657)

How Retail Employees Can Become Your Brand Advocates Presented by Verde PR

5-6 PM | Show Floor Entrance Passing the Torch Industry Celebration: Celebrate a career in snow that has lasted more than 50 years and toast to the future. Join the industry as David Ingemie passes the torch to new SIA President Nick Sargent. 5-6 PM | Backcountry Experience (Booth 3657) A Backcountry Mental Checklist Presented by Jeremy Jones

Donut Dunking Christian Fellowship: Lively fellowship and discussion in the context of skiing and snowboarding.

Monday, February 1, 2016

9 AM-6 PM | Booth 1148 | 2XU

On-Snow Demo/Ski-Ride Fest & Nordic Demo: Test gear and accessories previewed at the Snow Show.

2XU Compression Sock Challenge: Each day, 2XU will be giving away 100 pairs of Elite Alpine X-Lock compression socks ($60 MSRP) free to anyone who does the sock challenge at its booth. While supplies last each day. Note: 9AM-1PM on Sunday

Saturday, January 30, 2016 7-9 AM | Mile High Ballroom 1

OIWC Keynote & Awards Ceremony: Bacon, Bloody Marys & Inspiration: Join OIWC for bacon and bloody marys, and inspiration at the annual Keynote & Leadership Awards Presentation featuring Mark Satkiewicz, president and GM of SmartWool. Mark will focus on how greater leadership diversity and workplace inclusion played a role in SmartWool’s growth. Also, OIWC will present Kelly Davis, SIA Research director, with the Pioneering Woman Award, and Kerry O’Flaherty, founder and owner of KerryO Sales, with the First Ascent Award. Open to all attendees.

9 AM-4 PM | Copper Mountain Resort

8 PM | Copper Mountain Resort Incline Bar & Grill

Elan’s 70th Anniversary Party: Live music (80s band The Goonies), raffle prizes and signature drinks. The brand will release its Ripstick ski. Glen Plake will announce the winner of the prototype tester video contest. RSVP: email copperparty@elan.si. Or stop by the tent at the Demo to get drink tickets.

Tuesday, February 2, 2016 9 AM-4 PM | Copper Mountain Resort

On-Snow Demo/Ski-Ride Fest & Nordic Demo

Mobile: Should You Really Care?: Too many companies push mobile for the wrong reasons and in the wrong ways. The question you need to ask is how will mobile truly help drive your business? This session will explore trends, both inside the industry and out, and will help you identify your true mobile needs, if they even exist. Presented by Jason King, Accella

9:30-10:30 AM | Rental World/Backshop (Booth 4501)

Power Panel: Rental Industry Roundtable: Bootfitting experts and rental gurus demonstrate the tools, techniques and talk that ensures renters get the best fit possible.

10-11 AM | Backcountry Experience (Booth 3657) Backcountry Magazine - Biff America Book Signing

10 AM | Booth 4123 | Atomic

Doc DesRoches Award: SIA and the U.S. Ski Team recognize an SIA member and Team supplier for its promotion of the Team’s brand and athletes. This year’s winner is Atomic. After the presentation, World Cup alpine ski racer Mikaela Shiffrin will sign autographs.

10:30-11:30 AM | I+I Live (Booth 679) SEO Best Practices for 2016 - Improve Visibility and Stay Protected from Google Penalties: The way Google and other search engines evaluate sites and rank them is the result of more than 200 different factors; it is critical that brands and retailers understand how they can position themselves to be the best option. Presented by Chris Rodgers, Colorado SEO Pros 11 AM-12 PM | Backcountry Experience (Booth 3657) Open Q&A with AIARE: Stop into the booth to learn more about the current and future state of avalanche education in the U.S. and how you can get involved. 12-1 PM | Backcountry Experience (Booth 3657) Reflections on Big Mountain Avalanche Risk and the Benefits of Fear Presented by Greg Hill

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SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 3 SIAsnowshow.com

PHOTOS BY (FROM LEFT) ALTON RICHARDSON; JULIE ELLISON

9-10 AM | I+I Live (Booth 679)


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AT THE SHOW | SHOW NEWS

Avalanches and the Media: Where’s the Line? BACKBONE MEDIA'S ERIC HENDERSON FACILITATES THE PANEL ON FRIDAY

FEW TOPICS ARE AS DELICATE AS AVALANCHES WHEN IT COMES TO SKI AND SNOWBOARD reporting. Fatalities are often involved, and even when they’re not, the subject still requires care. So how do we find a balance between getting the story out on time and conforming to ethical standards along the way? On Friday morning at the Backcountry Experience booth, five panelists gathered to discuss the topic in “Media & Retail Role in Changing Backcountry Culture.” The panelists were Freelance Journalist Gordy Megroz, Powder Magazine Editor Matt Hansen, Backcountry Magazine Associate Editor Lucy Higgins, Freelance Writer and Guide Rob Coppolillo, and Outside Magazine Associate Editor Jakob Schiller. The goal: To discuss how, through proper reporting, the media can help educate readers and potentially prevent these tragedies. Schiller says that, first and foremost, it’s important for a publication to know its place when discussing avalanches, and avalanche-related deaths in particular. Some need to cover the stories right away, while others are keener on waiting with an eye on education. “We don’t report on a ton of avalanches right after they happen,” Schiller says. “So when we do get into specific avalanche coverage, it goes back to the question of, ‘Can we learn something from this?’ We try to be thoughtful about the way we approach a story and create a lesson from it by stepping back a little bit.” Megroz adds that, even for the publications that need to get stories out quickly, timeliness shouldn’t always be the priority when dealing with such a delicate topic. “I think it’s pretty irresponsible to just throw a story out there when you don’t know at least most of the information that has to do with the avalanche. If someone is killed or buried, and you don’t know certain details as to why that might have happened, who was involved, and what the decision-making was, I just feel like that’s click-bait.” Managing already-published avalanche stories is a huge battle in itself, Hansen says, and dealing with conversations on social media in particular has become difficult. “The online comments create this massive public shaming of the people involved (in the avalanche),” he says. “When we report a story, we try to urge people to be respectful of those who are involved. We need to remind people that these are sad accidents.” —Connor W. Davis

Kari Traa on Skydiving, Women’s Design and Bullying

When you launched Kari Traa in Norway 14 years ago, not many brands were focused on women’s-specific designs. Have you seen the gender field in the sport apparel industry level out? Kari Traa: From 2002 to today, there’s been a big change.

Back then, not very many girls were shopping in sports stores. The whole industry was very masculine and had more black than colors. Now, it’s more women in the sports stores than men. It’s also in (vogue) to train and take care of your health. People work a lot and are sitting in front of a computer and need to find time to train and be fit.

38

The brand recently launched a campaign, Troll Fighters, to help empower girls who are being harassed on the Internet. Can you tell us about the initiative? KT: We wanted to make a campaign that gives back to all

of the girls that have posted pictures of themselves and received bad, ugly comments about how they look or threats, for instance, that they are being watched or should be killed. We want to show girls that they are not alone. It’s important to teach younger people that it’s not right: You need to follow the ‘Internet rules,’ behave well, and be nice. We are interested in the problems in the community, and we are a brand that stands up for women and making girls stronger, healthier and happier.

How’s the skydiving? KT: I recently had a training camp with my friends. We are competing in the Nordic Championship for indoor skydiving in April at the Norwegian Extreme Sports Week, and then in the Norwegian Skydiving Nationals in August in Voss—where we are going to be the first female team in Norway to compete in vertical freefall skydiving. You are

SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 3 SIAsnowshow.com

head-diving most of the time, and there are some switches where you ‘sit.’ It’s difficult to learn how to go upside down! —Morgan Tilton PHOTOS BY (FROM TOP) ALTON RICHARDSON; JULIE ELLISON

FOLLOWING A DECADE OF REIGNING OVER freestyle skiing, Olympic medalist Kari Traa didn’t halt her career in the snow sports industry. What began as knitting hats for Bula evolved into Traa launching a ladies’ activewear line—named after hers truly—which launched in the U.S. last fall. This is in addition to Kari’s other full-time jobs: motherhood and competitive skydiving. The Snow Show Daily caught up with Traa to ask about her brand, hobbies and advocacy work.


Jan. 27 Jan. 28 - 31

Industry + Intelligence SIA Snow Show & Sourcing Snow Colorado Convention Center, Denver, CO

Feb. 1 - 2

On-Snow/Nordic Demo Copper Mountain Resort, CO

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AT THE SHOW | SHOW NEWS

WORLD-CLASS SNOWSURFER TARO TAMAI BELIEVES RIDING A BOARD IS about connecting with the mountain under his feet, and his recent collaboration with K2 on a snowsurfing boot, aptly named the K2 x Taro Tamai Snowsurfer Boot, captures that essence. The Snow Show Daily sat down with the rider to hear more about the K2 collab, the difference between Japanese and American riding styles, and the future of snowboarding.

What led you to K2 as a partner in creating this boot? Taro Tamai: I was after a boot that was flexible and could support my style of riding. Mak-

ing a soft boot seems like a simple task, but it was hard to find a company that was ready to take on the challenge. It’s not just an easy, simple modification. K2 had this attitude of being ready to take on the challenge.

Freedom is a key element of snowsurfing. What is the role of the boot in maintaining that freedom? TT: Having stiff boots and a stiff connection between you and the board limits the freedom

of movement and how you connect with nature. Having soft and flexible boots gives you more direct connection with the environment, the slope and the snow.

How is snowboarding culture in Japan different from the culture in the U.S.? TT: In the past few years the Japanese snowboarding scene has been starting to find its own

direction of snowboarding style. It’s not conquering the terrain and mountain, but trying to blend into the slope and fit into the mountains.

Any thoughts on what the next generation of snowboarding will look like? TT: Right now snowboarding is branching out to competitions or going really big and mak-

ing really crazy drops or lines, but things tend to branch out and regroup again. I think the next generation will be a hybrid of all the components, all the different branches. There will be talented riders not just focusing on competition or how many spins you can do or how steep you can go, but combining all the elements together.

What do you hope your legacy will be? TT: Snowboarding is evolving, which is a

good thing. People are pushing the limits and snowboarding is going further and further with new things happening, but what’s most important is not to forget the roots. What I’ve been trying to do with my boards and these boots is keep the essence that started snowboarding and keep it pure and simple, to (prevent) people from forgetting where the sport started. —Courtney Holden

Meet Tamai and see his new boot at K2’s booth (3957) at 4 p.m. today.

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SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 3 SIAsnowshow.com

Disruptive Behaviors TO GET MILLENNIALS’ ATTENTION, BREAK THE STATUS QUO WANT TO BOOST SALES OR BRING MORE GUESTS TO YOUR RESORT? GET disruptive, recommends Chris Faught of business development and strategy firm, Affirm Inc. His seminar, “How to Reduce Sales Friction Among Millennial Snow Sport Consumers,” offered ways to target underserved or ignored segments of the market and draw them—a strategy known in the business world as disruptive innovation. And the target for that disruption? You guessed it: Millennials. As the largest generation today (and in all of U.S. history), this group of 15-35 year-olds has, and will continue to have, serious buying power. Some things to keep in mind when targeting this group: They’re skeptical—thanks in large part to living their formative years during the Great Recession; they’re highly educated—more than half have a college diploma; and because of the cost of that diploma, they’re in debt. More worrisome, Millennials find skiing and snowboarding too expensive, too far away and too extreme. As a result, we need to address—to disrupt—these negative perceptions. Address cost by offering layaway plans for that high-end snowboard or installment payments for a season ski pass. Partner with Uber and Airbnb to minimize the stress of traveling to the resort. And leverage social media—YouTube, Instagram—to show the softer side of snow sports. “Even if you do one bullet point on one of these problems, it is a way to chip away at the industry in a disruptive way that people aren’t doing today,” Faught says. —C.H.

Nonprofit Show Nuggets NOT EVERYONE AT THE SHOW IS ABOUT MAKING A BUCK. IN FACT, NONprofits have gained an increasing presence at SIA, this year numbering a record 37. Following are four to keep your eyes—and checkbooks—open for as your stroll the Show: 10th Mountain Division Foundation: This nonprofit preserves the heritage of the famed 10th Mountain Division, both from World War II and in its current incarnation. “We do a lot of good work,” says board member Flint Whitlock, “from funding scholarships for children and grandchildren of 10th Mountain vets to creating memorials and supporting widows of 10th Mountain members killed in action. Visit the group in Booth 16. Adaptive Spirit: This group provides the U.S. Paralympic Ski & Snowboard Team with 60 percent of its annual budget. Dollars raised helps U.S. Paralympic athletes pursue their goal of being the best in the world. Visit Adaptive Spirit in Booth 19. International Avalanche Nest Egg Fund (IAN): Three years ago after Ian Lamphere died in an avalanche on Colorado’s Loveland Pass, his widow, Elizabeth, and brother, Judd, founded IAN to support the children and families of avalanche victims as well as provide education. “Proceeds go to childcare, college funds, funeral assistance and more,” Judd says. “We also offer emotional support and activities like summer camp—things a kid might normally do with a parent.” See IAN in Booth 2475. The Chill Foundation: Started in 1997 by Jake Burton and Donna Carpenter, this group provides opportunities for underserved youth to build self-esteem and life skills through snowboarding and other outdoor sports. “We give them everything, from goggles and gloves to clothing and boards,” says Denver coordinator Mike Smith, who takes 82 kids per week into the hills. “Each time we focus on a different life skill theme, including respect, patience, persistence, responsibility, courage and pride.” Learn more in Booth 25. —Eugene Buchanan

PHOTOS BY ALTON RICHARDSON

Taro Tamai Rides Free


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Celebrate a career in snow that has lasted more than 50 years and toast to the future. Join the industry as David Ingemie passes the torch to new SIA President, Nick Sargent.


OF AT THE SHOW | QUESTION THE DAY

What’s your most memorable Super Bowl moment? “When I was younger at the ski resort I’m from in Montana, we would all go to the main ski shop on Super Bowl Sundays and get in this huge tire. All of us would get pulled by this truck in it, so we’d just be sledding in this massive tire.”

—Bridget French, Shred Optics, Huntington Beach, Calif.

“I grew up in Minnesota as a Vikings fan for a long time and, of course, had to go through them losing like five Super Bowls. And then I moved to Colorado, and I think Denver lost four or five. Then, they finally won, but it’s been tough being a fan of both Minnesota and Denver. Hopefully this is our year. Go Broncos!”

—Richard Allen, Vintage Ski World, Frisco, Colo.

“My best ‘almost memory’ is beating the Patriots in the AFC championship a couple of years ago. But jumping into the ocean in New York on Super Bowl Sunday was my best ‘real’ Super Bowl memory.”

—Kevin Joyce, K2 Skis, Seattle, Wash.

▲ FROM THE COVER - FRONT ROW: ANNELISE LOEVLIE, CEO, ICELANTIC SKIS; WENDY CAREY, CFO, SEIRUS INNOVATION; KELLY DAVIS, SIA DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH, OIWC PIONEERING WOMAN AWARD; KERRY OFLAHERTY, KERRY O SALES, OIWC FIRST ASCENT AWARD; KATIE HAWKINS, SALES MANAGER, MARMOT. BACK ROW: KIM WALKER, CO-FOUNDER, OUTDOOR DIVAS; DONNA CARPENTER, CO-OWNER, BURTON SNOWBOARDS; JULIA BLUMENFELD, COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER, HEAD/TYROLIA; AND CLAIRE SMALLWOOD, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, SHEJUMPS. THESE WOMEN, AMONG OTHERS, WERE RECOGNIZED BY THE OUTDOOR INDUSTRIES WOMEN'S COALITION AND SIA AS WOMEN TO WATCH IN 2016. READ INTERVIEWS WITH SOME OF THEM IN EACH ISSUE OF SNOW SHOW DAILY THIS WEEK, STARTING ON DAY 1.

HEARD IN THE AISLES

SWIPE RIGHT

“Welcome to SIA 2016, where we read your Tinder profiles out loud.”

—Pit Viper booth, literally reading Show-goers’ Tinder match profiles out loud

THE REASON HE LOVES LEAH AT ELEVATED STRATEGIES

“I'd give a shameless Snow Show Daily plug to the first brand/product/person that can put me on a consistent supply of Red Bull for the rest of the day.”

—Chelsea Hoogenboom, XSories, Carlsbad, Calif.

“Donovan McNabb in 2004, puking in the final two minutes of the game and just blowing it. That’s definitely my favorite Super Bowl story ever.”

—Chris May, Patagonia, Ventura, Calif.

—Snow Snow Daily Publisher Andy Hawk via Facebook (check out www.elevatedstrategies.com)

SOCIAL MEDIA FILES

“Just eating a burrito next to Jeremy Jones. #SIA16”

— snowsAy, @snowsAy

"Dr Porkenheimer made a rare public appearance today at #SIA16 to show some of the new line. #NS25th #protofamily"

—Never Summer Industries, @neversummerind

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SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 3 SIAsnowshow.com

PHOTOS BY ALTON RICHARDSON

“Well, I want my favorite Super Bowl story to come next Sunday. I’ll be in North Carolina for the game, which was not planned, but I’ll be there with a bunch of Carolina fans as the lone Broncos fan, so we better win.”


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SIA Snow Show Day3 2016  

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